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Volume 11, Issue 5, Week of February 10, 2014

Saskatoonʼs REAL Community Newspaper

Estimates vary on the number of wild horses roaming in the RM of Canwood (Photo by Tammy Robert)

Wild horses pose danger in RM Tammy Robert Saskatoon Express

rently plaguing the RM of Canwood and devouring his profits. The Debden-area farmer is on the verge of installing a pricey s the debate over the fate of wild electric fence around a quarter section of horses rages in Alberta, for some his land. Saskatchewan farmers the issue “It’s gotten really bad over the last three hits much closer to home. or four years,” said Boudreault, whose The landscape in the hay bales are particularly RM of Canwood, located “I’ve got half a dozen popular with the horses northeast of Prince Albert, in the field right now, during frigid winter is unforgiving. Frozen but I’ve had up to 40 months. winds howl over fields “I’ve got half a dozen dotted with scrubby clumps in there.” in the field right now, of dense brush. The snow -Luc Boudreault but I’ve had up to 40 in in the area is deep — waist there.” deep in parts. Boudreault’s attempts to mitigate the Moments after crossing the southern damage done by the powerful, starving border of the RM, a herd of wild horses horses with a regular fence have been unis spotted in a field about a kilometre off successful because of high snow drifts and the grid road. They are nosing fervently gates opening, or being opened by human through the icy drifts in search of food. interference. Down the road a second herd is spotted Wild horses in Saskatchewan, while huddled together on a frozen pond. At least romanticized by some, pose a tricky, often four mares are pregnant. dangerous situation for governments and LS908502.B10 Luc Boudreault has had more than residents. Loose legislation binds the Liza of the wild (or feral) horses curenough hands of law enforcement and animal-

A

welfare organizations. Multiple collisions with feral horses have occurred in the RM within the last year. These have resulted in vehicle damage, personal injury and the deaths of the horses involved. While there has not been a Saskatchewan SPCA (SSPCA) investigation into feral horses in the RM, it’s not a new issue for them. “This is certainly not the first time I’ve heard of a situation like this,” said Kaley Pugh, manager of Animal Protection Services for the SSPCA. In fact, the SSPCA has looked into incidents with wild horses all over the province. Because feral horses are not classified as wildlife, they do not fall under the jurisdiction of the Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management (SERM) agency. Feral horses are not tattooed, and up-to-date veterinarian’s records are sparse to non-existent. Colin Hughes, reeve of the RM of Canwood, feels that his municipality has spent too much time and money dealing with roaming horses. He, along with

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numerous local residents interviewed for this story, allege the feral horses originate from the Big River First Nation, which borders the RM. “We’ve went up to Big River First Nation and told their council that it’s a problem,” said Hughes. “We offered to get rid of (the horses), but we were told they’d be looked after. Back in the 1980s, a local resident and the reeve at the time rounded up over 60 wild horses and took them away because people were going to get killed. We can do that again.” Derek Klein, Big River First Nation’s band administrator, said “some of those horses may be owned by band members. They get out or someone lets them out. “We try to round them up every spring and fall,” he said in an interview. “It is a feed issue, absolutely. You get lots of snow and the horses are digging and digging forever, looking for feed. We try and help the farmers out, but they can’t afford to feed them.” (Continued on page 4)

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Page 2 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

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Wild horses could drag Tammy away

T

WO SASKATOON Police Service officers are now on Twitter. I’m guessing it is a coincidence that this happened the same week Express columnist Tammy Robert wrote how police services across Canada handle Twitter. My goodness, we don’t need Tammy thinking she changed the course of the city’s social-media history. The two police officers are great choices. Constable Derek Chesney (@SPSDerekChesney) walks the beat in the central part of the city. He is community minded and admits Twitter is a bit of a new-fangled thing for him. “… Just gettin schooled on twitter by our social media specialist. I’m pretty old school. 10-4 keep in touch.” Editor I didn’t know police officers said “10-4” anymore. Cool. The other officer is Sgt. Patrick Barbar @SPSPatBarbar. He seems right at home. Here are some of his recent tweets. “Me: how much have you had to drink. Driver: nothing, it’s Monday!” “Thx to an alert resident, nabbed a duo breaking into cars in River Heights. The start of my days off will have to wait until reports r done.” “Located a disoriented intox male wandering near Griffith stadium w/ a light jacket on. Just in the nick of time too, windchill is -39°c!” “Great sleep today after night shifts. I’m off for a couple of weeks, “B” platoon will be ensuring ur safety tonight. U R in good hands.” Great stuff. The Saskatoon Fire Department (SFD) is now on Twitter as well. Here’s a note from its account. “Today is the start of social media for SFD. From horse drawn fire wagons to the world wide web. Tweeting from 8am4pm, M-F.” Follow our fire department @SaskatoonFire. 10-4.

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Wouldn’t it be nice if the mannequins at the Artifact Room of Military History could share war stories? (Photos by Sandy Hutchinson) the city. With the lure and romanticism of wild horses, this one seemed too good to pass up. Tammy texted me a few times from the RM of Canwood where the horses were roaming. “Have seen three different herds. Hiked in and got decent closeups of one herd. They weren’t impressed. “I’m not exactly a horsewoman, so I guess when they started snorting, tossing their manes and pawing the ground I should have gathered something was coming.” Tammy then turned and ran. Well as much as a person can run in kneedeep snow. I was hoping for a different ending. I was hoping she would break one of those steeds and ride it all the way home.

of Military History at the Nutana Legion. They are among the 12 volunteers that keep the bountiful basement of archives running smoothly. With the anniversary of Canada joining the First World War approaching, the Legion has some big plans for this year. One is making actors and experts available to speak at schools and other events. The actors will perform the roles of a First World War nurse and soldier on the front line. I have read the scripts Shirley has written, and they are tremendous. Historians will field questions after performances. There are many manA FEW WEEKS AGO nequins in the museum. I REALLY LIKE Tammy’s cover Sandy and I met Shirley They are dressed in varistory. We rarely have worked on news Timpson and Ryleigh ous uniforms from past stories and especially those from outside Carr at the Artifact Room military and peacekeepSASKATOON

EXPRESS

ing missions by Canadians. Walking among them made us wonder if they come alive when the lights go out at night. We could picture these men and women from wars past dancing to the tunes of Vera Lynn and Bing Crosby. What a beautiful thought. Tours can be arranged by phoning the Legion office at 306-374-6303 or emailing the museum at theartifactsroom@yahoo. ca. For a story on the Legion’s anniversary project please go to Page 11.

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The contents of this publication are the property of the Saskatoon Express. Reproduction of any of the contents of this publication, including, but without limiting the generality of the following: photographs, and graphic designs, is strictly prohibited. There shall be no reproduction without the express writ15-2220 Northridge Dr., Saskatoon, SK S7L 6X8 artwork ten consent of the publisher. ads in the Saskatoon Express are published in good faith without verification. The Saskatoon Express Tel. Fax. 306-244-5053 All reserves the right to refuse, classify, revise or censor any ads for any reason in its sole discretion. This paper may include inaccuracies or errors. The Saskatoon Express does not under any circumstances accept responsibility for the accuracy or otherwise of any ads or messages in any of the publication’s editions. Cam Hutchinson – Editor The Saskatoon Express specifically disclaims all and any liability to advertisers and readers of any kind for chutchinson@saskatoonexpress.com loss or damage of any nature what-so-ever and however arising, whether due to inaccuracy, error, omission or any other cause. Advertising: ads@saskatoonexpress.com All users are advised to check ad and message details carefully before entering into any agreement of any kind and before disclosing personal information. www.saskatoonexpress.com

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oger Jolly doesn’t play Jolly’s transformation from the piano. But as a piano an engineer in Great Britain to a technician with global piano technician has been one of credentials he draws the richest wonderment. of tones out of the instrument. He grew up in Plymouth. He He’s made the last-minute joined the Royal Air Force and checks for visiting artists — from took an engineering career with Liberace to Billy Joel to Herbie him to the Atomic Energy AuHancock. He’s worked with thority in Britain. A little disilluCanada’s pure talent, such as Ansioned by the income-tax system gela Cheng, Janina Fialkowska in Britain, he moved to Canada and David Braid. And from his in 1970. He was employed at the 33-year ownership of the Yamaha oil sands in Fort MacMurray, People Piano Centre with his wife, Matook a turn as a system engineer rie, the family has given back to for Hewlett Packard and then in Saskatoon’s music community in stunning Edmonton he began to show an interest in ML42191.B10 ways. piano and organ sales and service. Mary

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That’s where he met Marie Witte. She grew up around Engelfeld, took piano and voice lessons from Sister Mary Herman, attended summer piano classes with Lyell Gustin and after further studies in Regina, sang in an opera chorus in Edmonton. They have been married for 36 years and she has become the perfect musical companion on their first piano adventures in Saskatoon. “I guess the engineering skills within me creeped out,” said Jolly. “I was curious. I got a little fed up that technicians were over-charging me with sub-standard work. I read like crazy. I experimented like crazy. I started to write for the Piano Technicians Journal. I was largely self-taught. I was thorough in print because what you write is

there forever. I chose my words carefully in lectures, prepared in case I was ever challenged.” As people in world piano circles became his audience, he was also attracted to Saskatoon when Baldwin Pianos were looking for dealers in 1980. He bought his current facility on Broadway Avenue from Bill Shulhan, who once operated the Saskatoon Piano House. “When I first came to Saskatoon there were nine piano dealers, and five of them were on Broadway.” Today, at 71, he stands as the sole survivor. His strength in toning, voicing, testing (Continued from page 6)

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Page 4 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

Rounding up horses costly for RM

on rez. They’re big, and at night we can’t see them. People are going to get hurt. “We’ve worked with the RM, told them to pen them up. And they have brought people in to do that, which is fine. If our members aren’t going to look after their horses, and they’re starving, then haul them away. I’m OK with that.” “We keep them for horseback riding Hughes is not OK with that. The and leisure,” Whitefish said. “They can horses must be roped, which involves be broke. It’s just a matter of finding the paid wranglers and tranquilizers to get time to break them and hop on.” them into the trailer. Klein said feral horses pose a serious “We lose money when we impound safety risk. them,” said Hughes. “We keep them for “The biggest issue for us is the horses 14 days, pay the pound keeper to look running around,” he said. “We drive after them, and then haul them to auction around on the roads more than anyone where they sell for a hundred bucks each. else. Someone could be seriously hurt. It’s a five-hundred-dollar bill behind We’ve had two or three in the last year hit every horse.” (Continued from page 1) Lyle Whitefish, Big River band member and principal of the First Nation’s elementary school, said he and his family try to round up as many horses as they can. That includes strays and those belonging to other people, he said.

Hughes estimates that impounding feral horses cost the RM at least $20,000 in 2013. That’s just for the ones they caught. That number doesn’t include what farmers have lost to fields that are trampled or to crops that are consumed. Those costs aren’t covered by insurance. Hughes says the problem has gotten so bad at times that the horses have been rounded up and taken to slaughter. In Alberta, legislated capture regulations for feral horses exist under the provincial Stray Animals Act. The number of capture licences issued is regulated, designates areas and ensures the humane treatment of feral horses. It also limits the number of horses that can be removed from an area. Applicants must provide a plan and proof they’re experienced in

capturing horses. Animal rights activists and WHOAS (Wild Horses of Alberta Society) argue that capture licences should be abolished altogether. In Saskatchewan, Lloydminster MLA Tim McMillan introduced a private member’s bill in 2009 that legislated protection for wild horses that roam the Bronson Forest Recreation Site. Beyond that the laws for dealing with wild horses in Saskatchewan fall between the Animal Protection Act or the Stray Animals Act, both of which are under the jurisdiction of the ministry of agriculture. “Feral horses fall at an intersection of different bits of legislation,” said Pugh. “The Animal Protection Act covers cruelty and neglect. The Stray Animals (Continued on page 5)

Valentine’s Day feast at farmers’ market able,” said Brown. The atmosphere will be low key and amorous. Brown says it will be perfect for any couple, whether celebrating their first ooking for something different on or 50th Valentine’s Day together. Valentine’s Day? The His menu includes options such How about a romantic night out as a wild boar tourtiere, Angus beef and at the Saskatoon Farmers’ Market riverside building? Wild Cuisine chef Thomas a raspberry chocolate torte. Her menu offers scallops, honey bourbon chicken and Brown and the Garlic Guru chef Teresa cherry chocolate fudge. Giesbrech are offering up a three-course Tickets must be purchased in advance. His and Her menu for $45 per ticket. The They are available Tuesday through Friday price includes taxes and a glass of wine. Additional local wine and beer will also be (from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) at Wild Cuisine or the Garlic Guru in the Saskatoon Farmers’ available for purchase. $28,890 Market building. Call 306-384-6262 for “We wanted to do something that was unique while both sumptuous and afford- more information.

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SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014 - Page 5

Some of the horses have been shot, Reeve says

(Continued from page 4)

Act says it is an offence to have animals at large. The problem is that they are ‘loosely-owned’ horses. Nobody really does own them, or they own them when it’s convenient. It makes it challenging for us to deal with them as strayed or when they haven’t been fed. Where we could potentially prosecute, if nobody knows or admits they own the animals it’s difficult.” Exactly how many feral horses there are in the RM of Canwood is a number that varies widely. The Big River First Nation says there are only 15 to 20; others allege the numbers are more like 40, 60 or even 200. In addition to the danger the horses pose to drivers, Hughes is also concerned about how local area residents may be taking the matter into their own hands. “I know they’ve been shot,” said the Canwood reeve. “They usually gut shoot them, so they go into the bush and die. I know that’s not nice, but these guys have cattle to feed. If you get a bunch of horses on a bale, it’s gone over night.” Animals shot in the gut or intestines suffer a prolonged and agonizing death. They often walk off to find a place to lie down and die under dense coverage, which renders the carcass out of sight and out of mind. Sgt. Lyle Korczsak of the Big River RCMP detachment is a 13-year veteran of the force. He seen his fair share of incidents involving wild horses in Saskatchewan, both in the Big River area and his previous post. Sgt. Korczak shares concerns over the safety risk, citing numerous dispatches for vehicular collisions with the animals. “There have been ambulance trips,” he said. “We get a lot of calls on horses going across the grids, but our capac-

Deep snow makes it difficult for the horses to find food (Photo by Tammy Robert)

ity for rounding up horses is minimal at best. Our suggestion has been that if feral horses are on private property they should be rounded up. It would be very unpopular if they’re going around and culling the horses. I know it’s frustrating for the guys that have farmland.” The SSPCA also warns against shooting feral horses. “If someone owns livestock at large, you are not meant to shoot them,” said Pugh. “At the least the animal must be declared a ‘dangerous stray’ under the

Stray Animals Act on a case-by-case basis. Further, horses are valuable property. Never mind that it’s just not very nice. So if someone is deliberately shooting these animals, that’s a concern. If they’re not shooting them in a humane manner, that’s even worse.” Boudreault (who said he has never resorted to using a firearm nor harmed the horses ravaging his crops) and other farmers have seen a spike in feral-horse activity in recent years, in part due to a run of heavy snowfall and long winters. Others

say the issue goes back much farther. “I’ve lived up here 20 years, and they’ve been around for at least that long,” said a local resident who wished to remain anonymous. “I couldn’t even guess how many there are. The other day there were about 30 running in the schoolyard. They go wherever they want.” If you have information about wild horses in Saskatchewan call the SSPCA at 1-877-382-7722. Your personal information will be kept confidential.

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Page 6 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

The good old days weren’t so good

I

sometimes wish it was around with those “Native the old days” is somePride” caps. If you check, thing I’ve heard many those caps were not made times, especially from young by North America’s original aboriginal people. people. The caps were made in Taiwan. I often have to remind them the old days were not I’m not really a cap too kind to First Nations person, but if I knew the people. I wonder if they’re caps were made here, then talking about the reality of maybe I would support the the so-called old days or cause. Instead I picture some the one they’ve seen in a poor soul in Taiwan who is Columnist Hollywood production. Do probably paid a few cents for they picture the romanticized making each cap. That cap version of a lone warrior on a horse will be sold to aboriginal people who chasing down a buffalo? Or the reality will pay over $20 to advertise they are of a struggle to survive? proud to be aboriginal people. Not there’s anything wrong with an I’ve spoken with First Nation elders individual’s pride, but I certainly don’t who have heard stories passed down need a cap or T-shirt to know who I am. from one generation to the next. And I’ve read stories from writers over a cen- Can you imagine the response if a white tury ago who tell stories of a harsh and man walked around with a cap that said dangerous environment. The one thing “White Man Pride?” that remained consistent, either for First If a craft or clothing is being marNations people or European settlers, was keted as Native, it should be made by the day-to-day struggle to survive. an aboriginal person and not some poor I doubt many of today’s youth would Taiwanese or Chinese person. That have made it a week in the old days. Of should be a law. course there are those would survive It’s not too farfetched, because there and succeed, but that is because of a are laws in New Mexico and Arizona strong spirit and knowledge of the world that anything sold as a Native craft has around them. Many of today’s youth to be made by an aboriginal person. couldn’t make it without the Internet and Instead of dreaming of the old their cell phones. It’s still nice to picture days — a distorted dream by the way that lone warrior against a mighty buf— young aboriginal people should be falo. In reality that is not the way it was. taught to see what’s happening today Looking around today I see many and dream of a bright future. Maybe aboriginal people who just don’t unthen they could walk around with a cap derstand what our ancestors must have that says “I come from what’s happenendured. ing right now.” KNOSKYE2012@live.com I see many aboriginal people walking

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(Continued from page 3) frequencies and regulating the sound has earned him master craftsman designation. “I tell those in the technician master classes to listen to the best pianists in the world. That means Vladimir Horowitz and Glenn Gould among the classical players, Oscar Peterson among the jazz players and Billy Joel among the pop players. I tell them to listen, listen and listen until their music produces a mental impact on your mind.” As he became a master of the art, he was recruited by Samick Music Corporation to conduct training programs. He was the vice-president of research and development for the Asian company. He’d go to Korea for three-week sessions four times a year. He was racking up air miles galore. He’s also trained independently in Australia twice, Norway twice, New Zealand, Indonesia, Italy and the Czech Republic. He has philosophies about being a concert technician. “Park your ego at the door. Be content to be the faceless person stage left. Always be prepared to hurry up and then wait. I can be analytical, but prefer a straight conversation where I want to know what the artist really wants. It is really a collaborative situation. He names Cheng as “being right up there” among the best pianists he’s met. “She picked my brain and really made me work hard. She’s special. She was rehearsing Beethoven’s Fifth for the Regina Symphony. She left the rehearsal and went to the Green Room in Regina. I walked in and she was rehearsing Grieg for a concert she had the following Tuesday.” He also hails Braid “for an incredible ear and an awesome style. He went back down east and told everyone that the Saskatoon Jazz club was possibly No. 1 in Canada for the equipment, the service and the way we conduct ourselves.” Braid is booked at The Bassment on March 1. Jolly has played a role in three of Saskatoon’s choice venues.

SW10054.B10 Sheri photo: Mary Anderson

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In November 2012 he donated a Bechstein Concert Grand (valued between $200,000 and $250,000) to the University of Saskatchewan for use in Convocation Hall. “I had bought the piano on a whim and we used it as a rental to artists. I let it slip that Marie and I might donate it someday. My friends at the university never let it me forget the promise. It is available to do an awful lot of good for young people. I want them to play on the finest instrument possible.” About the same time, Jolly and pianist Bonnie Nicholson were chosen to represent TCU Place and the City of Saskatoon on a piano search at the Steinway factory in New York. There they were joined by Saskatoon-born jazz pianist Jon Ballantyne. “We went over a number of Steinways with a fine tooth comb. Bonnie and Jon played them all vigorously, and we chose the best one. There were no financial limitations from TCU Place. “They just wanted the best Steinway they could find.” When the Saskatoon Jazz Society wanted a new piano and was blessed with a grant from the Saskatoon Kinsmen clubs, Jolly found the right Yamaha for them. “It pleases me that the three venues have the really fine pianos. I always say that a pianist can go straight ahead mechanically from A to B. The difference comes from the superstars who know how to colour these musical passages. That’s the sign of a true artist.” Jolly has also been influential in what has happened with the Saskatoon Symphony, Opera Saskatoon, the Saskatoon music festivals, Gustin House, the Sun Dog Faire, the Saskatoon Children’s Choir and the Saskatchewan Registered Music Teachers’ competitions. Sometimes it’s just supplying a piano or a performance room or a practice space. But always giving. “The piano is my passion. I realize that as an engineer I would have been locked up in an office, writing report after report. I’ve been too much of a people-oriented person to do that all my life. And being a piano technician is something I can do for as long as I want.”

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Page 8 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

Council meetings may be coming in bunches

Q

uestion: There is a new plan for we don’t enter into a dialogue. Under the how council will do business. One new model a citizen’s concern is dealt with part of that plan clusters all com- at the committee level. A lot of details still mittee meetings on Mondays, and have to be ironed out, but there they will council meets once a month on a Monday have more opportunities for interaction. afternoon and into the evening. What are One thing that is changing is that you your thoughts on this? won’t be able to speak at council if the item Mayor Atchison: This is about better isn’t on the agenda. If you came to council serving the citizens of Saskatoon and beto talk about whether the city should have coming more efficient in what we do. That a major league sports team – I am using means how we look after snow removal, that as an example – that wouldn’t be the potholes, back alleys, street sweeping, venue. What you would do then is send a sidewalks, your sewer lines, your water letter, and they will find the right commitlines, police, fire, transit and tee for you to address. garbage. This is about doing Question: Is there a reason a better job for the citizens of why manhole covers finish up Saskatoon. like potholes after the roads This change is not trailhave been repaved? They are David Nahachewsky and his horse Mak out for a stroll near Grasswood Esso blazing by any stretch of the about four inches lower in some (Photo by Sandy Hutchinson) imagination. Many other city spots. Can they not be raised councils are doing this already. closer to the level of the paveI think another important part ment? is consistency. All the meetings Mayor Atchison: Actually will happen on Mondays. That there is a product that was patmeans every Monday is city ented here in Saskatoon. It’s a business. re your ready to meet your maker? your personal affairs in order. A series of collar you put on a manhole and Ask the Mayor As monumental a question as that questions are asked. Answering them will I think it is really important the cover sits on it and it raises to understand we are still using is, this isn’t a religion column, and help you organize personal information, the height. We are laying more I’m not talking about Judgment Day. I’m items and intentions in one place. In addi- the same number of hours in a month for and more asphalt now. Manhole covers talking about the time before tion to preparing the binder be- council meetings. We are just putting those started at the same level as the road asphalt, Judgment Day. fore you expire, Harold wisely hours into one day a month. It’s more efbut over a period of time the manhole covficient. Council will start at one o’clock in ers get lower and lower. That’s certainly a When you pass away will emphasizes things like dethe afternoon and go to five o’clock. And your affairs be in order to minicluttering your home, dealing valid comment. mize the natural stress that will with the family cottage now and then break until 6. At six o’clock we have Question: Coun. Zack Jeffries has be triggered with your family? revitalizing your relationships. always held our hearings in the past and started an online petition to try to put will continue to hold hearings in the future. Of course if you’re a grumpy, Just because your kids pressure on the provincial government to Question: Is there a downside to hav- support the proposed Parkway Bridge/Trafstick-in-the-mud kind of a didn’t come with an instruction ing an afternoon meeting in terms of who person, your passing may well manual when they came into fic Bridge project. What are your thoughts can attend and who can watch it on televi- on this? trigger relief. this world doesn’t mean you sion? shouldn’t provide them with Mayor Atchison: It is wonderful to Mayor Atchison: All meetings will be WHAT HAPPENS WHEN one when you leave it. Check talk about the Parkway Bridge and the YOU DIE? out the Saskatoon Community live streamed by the city on our website. Traffic Bridge once again. We have been Finance We are in the process of talking to Shaw Death triggers many events Foundation website for future dealing with this for over a year now. We your family will have to naviJust In Case sessions and other Cable to see if we can get the meetings are certainly looking forward to a positive gate. Immediately there’s the funeral and related events. (www.saskatooncommuni- broadcast on the channel along with SaskTel. I believe those two companies are outcome from PPP Canada. We will have all the related details. Your estate needs tyfoundation.ca) that announcement sometime in the spring. bastions of democracy. They allow every to be settled. One way or another possescitizen the opportunity to see exactly what We hope the province opts in to the project sions will be distributed to family, friends, GOT A WILL? is going on. All meetings are recorded and as well. We have said in council chambers charity and the garbage dump, depending There is one basic question when you that we are moving ahead with the project. archived. on how you left things behind – with or die: What are your intentions for your Question: Coun. Pat Lorje is concerned Question: Do you want to say anything without a will. property and finances? If you die without about the petition itself? fewer people will have access to council The CRA considers that all registered a will, the uncertainty created by your Mayor Atchison: That is for Coun. now that they can’t discuss anything and investments, such as RSPs, RIFs, PRIFs, silence will very likely be a source of conJeffries to comment on. He didn’t discuss it everything at meetings. and LIRAs, are deemed to have been siderable stress among surviving family. with me. I am hopeful the project is going Mayor Atchison: In a lot of ways I sold right before your death resulting in a Don’t do that to them. Don’t die without really think access will increase. When you to go ahead just as we planned. potentially significant tax bill. Likewise, leaving a will. (Have a question for Mayor Atchison? there may be another big tax bill if you Perhaps you’re thinking of writing your come to council now, you get five minutes. And often you will hear the speaker say, “I Send it to editorial@saskatoonexpress.com. have a family cabin that’s increased in own will – something you’ve never done have some questions for you.” At council Please put “mayor” in the subject line.) value over the years. I will look at how to before and will probably never do again. handle these and related issues in future How good were you at riding a twocolumns. wheeled bike the first time you tried? Pay a lawyer to write your will and walk you JUST IN CASE through that process. Have you recorded and organised Your passing could result in a time of your important personal information and unity and bonding for your family and intentions in one location? Things like the extended family. This is especially true if details of your funeral? Your will? This you’ve anticipated and dealt with areas of will determine how your physical and potential financial and relationship conflict financial property will be distributed. Your before death pays you a visit. On the other power of attorney, living will and letter hand, it could result in needless conflict of intent? Safety deposit box location and and damaged relationships if you leave keys? A list of key contacts, such as your things unattended. accountant, financial advisor, lawyer and How are you going to leave things? insurance advisor? Derek Shevkenek is a Saskatoon InvestThis past December I attended an excel- ment Advisor with RBC Dominion Seculent presentation by Harold Empey on the rities Inc. Member CIPF. Inquiries are Just In Case Binder. Ned Powers featured welcome at 956-7803 and at www.dereks. Harold in detail in the Nov. 25, 2013 issue ca. Information is believed to be accuof the Saskatoon Express. It was his 86th rate at the time of writing and is subject presentation in the Saskatoon area, with to change. Past performance may not be 4,000 binders sold so far. There’s a huge repeated. Opinions are provided in good demand for this kind of practical informa- faith, but without legal responsibility. tion. Opinions are the author’s, not that of RBC The binder is a great tool for getting Dominion Securities Inc. LS908534.B10 Liza

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SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014 - Page 9

Saskatoon Heritage Society 38 years of preserving our city’s history Joelle Tomlinson for the Saskatoon Express

W

hen Peggy Sarjeant and her husband moved to Saskatoon in 1972, they were intrigued by a city brimming with heritage. They immediately wanted to figure out “what made it tick.” What they didn’t know is that their interest in the city’s history would lead to the formation of a group that is now celebrating 38 years of existence. “At first it was the CP rail station, which has since been restored by Ken Achs,” said Sarjeant. “At the time there were rumours about what would happen to that station because the passenger railway had moved out of town. It’s one of the nicest buildings in Saskatoon. That’s really what started us looking at the history and heritage of this city. I love that station, but what we were noticing was that more and more buildings were starting to come down.” The final straw was when the Standard Trust Building (at the corner of 22nd Street and Third Avenue) was torn down. It was demolished to make room for the present-day Sturdy Stone building. “This was the catalyst for the formation of the Saskatoon Heritage Society,” said Sarjeant. “People often think of the Capitol Theatre as the catalyst, but we were founded before that. Nowadays one might have been able to incorporate that beautiful old architecture into that site, but at the time it was an either or thing.” Thus the Saskatoon Heritage Society was born. Sarjeant and her husband, Bill, were founding members along with a handful of others concerned about the city’s direction and mentality. Marches, protests and public forums were all part of the society’s approach to educating the public as to the importance of heritage sites. “What my husband and I saw was that people were not recognizing the value of the identity of their city,” said Sarjeant. “They did not recognize that Saskatoon was special. Saskatoon was unique, and remains unique. What makes it different from other places is its architectural heritage and the stories it has to tell.” Member Linda Epstein lives and

JW11332.B10 James

Linda Epstein (left) and Peggy Sarjeant stand on Broadway Avenue, the original commercial centre of Saskatoon (Photo by Joelle Tomlinson) breathes heritage. Her character home nitely changed. The city is revamping and “What we’re doing is educating the emanates history and is reminiscent of the bringing in a new infill policy, and a new public, attempting to change attitudes. You original houses just off Broadway Avenue city-centre plan recognizes four streets never know what impact you have because in the Nutana district. She joined the heri- downtown of specific heritage interest,” you’re trying to change a culture,” said tage group four years ago. The society is a said Sarjeant. “So there’s that interest in Sarjeant. “You’re trying to have an impact perfect fit for her passion to preserving the preserving the identity of the city.” on a culture. And culture changes over stories of Saskatoon. time. What’s important about our society is The policy protects properties and en“Some of the projects we get involved sures historic characteristics of pre-war and it brings a public voice to the importance in are to celebrate the heritage we have, post-war neighbourhoods are maintained. of heritage preservation.” and some of them are to try to make sure Education is now a key focus of the Both Sarjeant and Epstein consider this a that things that are important in Saskatoon win for the society. society. are not pulled down —like the Standard “What’s happening in areas like Rivers“We have big hopes from the city with Trust Building,” said Epstein. “The biggest dale and with business owners on Broadexample I can think of since I joined is the the new policy. We see a changing culture way Avenue is exciting,” said Epstein. “If at City Hall,” said Epstein. “I think there’s Traffic Bridge. The city has made decisions we can raise our voices, put out the infora changing attitude that heritage preservawe don’t agree with about that bridge. Livmation, make ourselves heard and preserve ing in the area I feel strongly about it. And tion is an important part of city planning. our history, then we feel good about that. And certainly I’m hoping with the cityas part of Saskatoon I think it’s vital.” If we can educate those to the important centre plan that the interests in certain Both Sarjeant and Epstein note that of heritage and to what Saskatoon, we are areas in the downtown core translate into with a society such as theirs disappointdoing our job. specific guidelines for those areas.” ment is unavoidable. Examples such as the “It’s no one group or person that Standard Trust Building, the Traffic Bridge, One of the challenges the society faces really saves a building or saves a landscape the Gathercole Building and the original is never truly knowing the impact it has. or streetscape. It’s all of those people who Capitol Theatre were all architectural cor- Membership is purely volunteer. It can nerstones of Saskatoon. But they are both involve attending city hall meetings, soci- care about what this city is all about.” optimistic about the future. The society is always looking for ety meetings, marching to save buildings, “We’re much more involved in planwalking tours (in the past) and planning for members. Visit www.saskatoonheritage.ca ning issues now and the broader picture. the future in conjunction with other groups or email saskatoonheritagesociety@gmail. Since we first came attitudes have deficom for more information. interested in preservation in Saskatoon.

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Page 10 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

Bridal store caters to hard-to-fit women Cam Hutchinson Saskatoon Express

K

imberley Camboia says shopping for a wedding gown should be a memorable experience. That often isn’t the case for hard-to-fit and plus-size brides, she says. When a woman looking for a size 16 or 20 is in the same store as someone trying on sixes and eights, the shopping experience isn’t as pleasant as it should be. Camboia recognized that when she was just 17. “About 13 years ago when I was working in bridal, I said, ‘This city needs a plus-size bridal store; this is ridiculous.’” The city now has that store. Camboia and her sister, Kayla, recently opened W Bridals ~ Curvy Couture on 23rd Street between First and Second avenues. Between the two they’ve worked for 18 years in the bridal business. “It’s a new store, but in no way new to us. It is like coming home; we are back in the element we love. We say our blood runs ivory with platinum accents. In our blood are wedding gowns. It’s something we really really love.” She said plus-size brides weren’t getting the service and selection of gowns they should have. Memories weren’t being made. LS908526.B10 LIZA

“There would be so many brides that would walk in, and we would have nothing for them to try on. People would put more of the focus on the skinnier girls because they have more options (and) they’d spend more money.” She said it is important that women shop with those that are like-minded. “(Imagine going) to a store where they have a full range of sizes and you are standing next to a girl who is a size 10, and she’s ‘Oh my god, I need to lose 20 pounds. There’s no way I can be double digits. This is ridiculous; I am going to be a size six when I get married. This sucks, oh my god!’ (How do you feel) sitting there, and you are a size 20 and you can’t find anything that fits you?” And then there are the “skinny” girls. “You get the girl that is a size four: ‘Oh my god, this wedding shopping is so hard; everything is so big on me; I’m so skinny.’ “It’s like you are standing right beside this person. As a consumer it is not your job to be sensitive to the people around you like that. But as a business owner, I find it my responsibility to make every customer feel comfortable. “By offering something like this, you are shopping with other women who understand what it is like to be hard to fit.”

Kimberley Camboia (above) and her sister Kayla recently opened W Bridals ~ Curvy Couture (Photo by Sandy Hutchinson) Camboia has been around wedding gowns since she was 10. Back then an aunt and her mother, Eddie, opened a store. Eddie works at W Bridals with Kimberley and Kayla. Camboia said she is unaware of another bridal store in Canada with their concept. “There are enough hard-to-fit, plus-size, curvy brides to be able to sustain a location to cater to them.” The companies providing product in W Bridals have sizes from two to 44. Samples at W Bridals start at size 16. She said gowns at her store don’t have sizes marked on the labels. Dresses are named with words such as timeless, unique, ravishing, glamorous, fabulous, sassy and vivacious. “Everything in Vivacious is a size 16 by the company standard, but we don’t label it size 16. When a bride walks in we can tell more or less what

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size she is. So we know to gravitate to a certain section of the store. “But if she wants to know, we just take her measurement and cross reference it with the size chart. ‘OK you are a Unique bride. It means you get to shop in Unique, but dresses can fit differently from company to company. So feel free to shop in Fabulous and Ravishing as well.’ “It doesn’t matter if it is going to be too big or too small. We have the knowledge and the wont to do our best to get them into something. Because we cater to that, there is an extended level of trust. “They get to shop by what they like and dislike rather than what size they can shop in. I think that makes it a lot more enjoyable.” The store also carries accessories such as veils, head pieces, shoes and jewelry. For more information visit www.wbridals.ca.

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SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014 - Page 11

First World War roles re-enacted in Legion project

O

Cam Hutchinson Saskatoon Express

n Aug. 5, 1914 Canada entered the First World War. To mark the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the war, the Nutana Legion is preparing to take the war in much of its graphic detail to schools and community events. The project is expected to begin in March and run until Remembrance Day. There will be few holds barred, although there will be modifications for some age groups. Shirley Timpson, a volunteer at the Artifact Room of Military History, has researched and written biographies of what would have been a typical First World War nurse and soldier. These depict the horrible conditions that our men and women faced on the front lines. The Nurse Alice was a nursing graduate when the war broke out. She and her friends had read of the war effort and the need for care for our wounded soldiers. Off these young women went. They stationed just behind the front in France. The things Alice saw are raw. The conditions horrific. She and other Canadian nurses did all they could to treat and comfort our soldiers. The Soldier He is a farmer from outside Moose Jaw. He could hardly wait for his 18th birthday so he could join the army and go on an adventure to Europe. How that changed in the trenches in France, with the smell of death all around. There was endless rain, a shortage of food and water. And rats. Cigarettes, letters from home and rum helped the soldiers press on. There was a feeling that if it wasn’t for the rum, the war wouldn’t have been won. Drama students will act each role. They will be outfitted in First World War apparel. The museum has a soldier’s uniform in its collection. Men were small then, but fought big. A nurse’s uniform is being made. After productions in schools and the community, historians will answer questions. “When we go to schools we will tone it down a tiny bit so it does run with the curriculum,” said Ryleigh Carr, a volunteer at the museum who has a degree in military history from the University of Regina. “Growing up I would hear stories, but you never heard the nitty gritty. It was all kind of sugar coated. “I don’t want to lie to these kids about the truth. Canada did do some nasty things during the war, but it’s reality. These boys were pretty much lied to when they signed up. They thought it was an adventure and that it would be over in two months and they would be back home with a girl on their arm.” Timpson said she wrote it like it was. “It was not pretty in the trenches. I had a volunteer say, ‘I don’t know if we should say stuff like that.’ But that’s the way it was. I have been going back and forth with the monologue, but I think we will leave it as is.” Carr said the war defines Canada as a nation. “I wholeheartedly believe it was a big turning point. I want more people to understand that. Our heart and soul was because of World War I. It is how we came to be and it wasn’t all about politics; it was all about these boys and these men dying on the fields for us so we can live how we are today. “I find that is what I am more passionate about. They did this because of this. They did things because they had to. To me it is so underappreciated. No one understands the whole meaning behind it.” The museum, one of those hidden gems in our city, is renovating and moving artifacts as it prepares for the anniversary. When the shuffling of exhibits is completed, guests will walk straight into the First World War. The collection is stunning. Among the thousands of ML42210.B10 Mary

Shirley Timpson and Ryleigh Carr are volunteers at the Artifact Room of Military History The history room has one of two known medical field kits in Canada Mannequins display the uniforms from various times in Canadian military history (Photos by Sandy Hutchinson) treasures are a First World War stretcher and a field medical kit. It is believed to be one of only two sets in Canada. It was found at a garage sale in Saskatoon. “People like to look at this one. I think it is a bone saw,” Timpson said pointing to the operating kit. It sends shivers imagining a young soldier needing a limb severed with such a crude tool. Contents of the kit look more like what people in various trades would use. Timpson made a recent discovery that instantly became one of her favourites. It is a little pouch with a bullet resting inside. “It is among the rare and interesting artifacts we have in the collection. Whoever donated it was shot with the bullet. It was taken out and given to him.” Carr made a similar find a couple of months ago. “We went through one of the trunks and pulled out a pristine World War I officer’s uniform. It’s in perfect condition, with his diary in it and everything.” She said she could have spent hours reading it, but other duties

called. Carr and Timpson are two of a core group of 12 volunteers at the museum. Timpson, who has been volunteering at the museum for four years, became interested when she was doing research for a memorabilia project for her father — a veteran. Carr said volunteering at the

museum is a dream job. She found out about the museum through a “little blurb” in a paper about 18 months ago. She didn’t know of the museum’s existence. Neither did her father, a collector of guns used in wars. “Coming down here was overwhelming,” she said. “I couldn’t believe how much stuff there was. I could have cried I was so excited.” Tours can be arranged by phoning the Legion office at 306-374-6303 or emailing the museum at theartifactsroom@yahoo.ca.

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Page 12 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

Is February the best month of the year?

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ver notice how our reaction to the cycle of winter evolves with the season? It all starts in October when the beautiful fall colours are gone and that distinctive icy chill sets in. That’s when we find ourselves on the thin line between love and hate. We love the notion of tall leather boots, cozy sweaters, fat snowflakes and the looming holiday season. We hate that getting around is about to get much more difficult, how outdoor activity is curbed significantly, and we hate the general bone-aching chill Columnist that accompanies those first blustery, wintery days. No matter how long you’ve lived in Saskatchewan, winter still tends to take us a bit by surprise, like we weren’t just slogging through it a mere six or seven months prior (or for some of us, like clockwork, every year of our lives). December flies by in a flurry of parties, family and fattening food. The weather is a constant topic of conversation, but spirits are bright and we’re resolute. After all, what would Christmas in Saskatchewan be without snow and dangerous wind chills?

TAMMY ROBERT

Then January arrives, and the complaining starts full force. It’s cold, and everybody talks about it. Then they snap at each other for talking about it. It’s winter for heaven’s sake! We live in Saskatchewan! Road clearing, ruts, block heaters and snow ploughs are part of the daily lexicon. Winter boots are getting worn out. Our kids are on their fourth pair of mittens, which are getting cheaper every time they lose them. You had your fun in November with fancy, state-of-the-art, expensive brand-name mittens from the trendy outdoor shop. In January, you get the $1.99 mini-gloves. They’re too thin? Wear two pairs. And then there’s February. It’s when proper, grim determination sets in. It could snow 16 feet, and no one would notice. Or care. Another week of minus-40 with windchill? Who cares? They’re all running together. Winter is no longer a novelty, nor a hassle. It just is. The shortest month of the year couldn’t be longer. All seems lost. But then something magical happens. It’s called March. Sure the month of March can be as much of a wintery hell as December and January. But the daylight — there’s so much more of it! And next month is April, which sometimes is kind of like spring. Even if it’s not, the month after April is May, which, even if it snows, contains the long weekend that unofficially kicks off the run up to another spectacular Saskatchewan summer.

Coffee tips that leave no grounds for complaint

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ear Reena, me a couple of tries to get it right, but it Do you know what I can do to works in a pinch if you don’t have gravy prevent my coffee from tasting mix or when you want to use gluten-free bitter morning after morning flour. — Teina after morning? — Dave Cleaning baseball caps in Dear Dave, the house Begin by inviting someone Dear Reena, over with their coffee maker. Putting them in the dishMake your coffee using washer is not a good idea the same water and coffee because the cap fabric will grounds. This will determine trap food particles. My method whether your machine and/ is to put them in the washing or water are the culprits. machine, but not in the dryer. Clean all parts of your coffee I take them from the washing maker. Make sure your coffee machine and firmly stuff the grounds are fresh. Colombian skull part cap with a dry towel. Household coffee tends to taste less bitter Shape the peak to original. Solutions than some others, but experiLeave it to air dry. All shapes ment with a variety of blends. are retained like new. — Erich Add a pinch of salt to coffee grounds Re: Cleaning computer and televibefore brewing coffee. sion screens Dear Reena, I use lens cleaner for cleaning my I was amazed to learn there are differ- television screen. I was spraying my eyeent colours for the days of the week with glasses and got some of the spray on the plastic bread clips. I noticed there was no screen. I wiped it off and was so pleased colour stated for Wednesdays. Is bread not with results I use it all the time. — M. made on that day? — Maureen Fantastic Tips of the Week! Dear Maureen, To clean my iron I use baking soda and Many stores do not have a breadvinegar, and scrub with a clean toothtag colour for Wednesday and Sunday, brush. I own a quilt-design company, so because they do not bake those days. Your my iron always needs to be very clean. best bet for fresh bread is to check the date — Benita on the tag just in case a store changes the Whenever I struggle with hard water colour pattern on you. stains in my bathtub, I use toilet-bowl Feedback from Readers who Care: cleaner to get rid of them. Works great. — Dear Reena, Mary Just read your column regarding keepI never purchase anti-spot agents for ing brown sugar usable and not dry and my dishwasher. I pour vinegar into the hard. I have found the very best solution dispenser and never have spots on my by far is to keep brown sugar in a tight glasses. — Mary container (like Tupperware) and put a Here is a fun way to give cash or a fresh marshmallow in with it. It is absogift card to someone. Take a clean jar and lutely wonderful and the marshmallow place the gift inside the jar in a closed stays good too. Problem solved. — Nadine sealable bag. Pour in Jell-O and let set. Hi Reena, Close with a lid and decorate with a ribHere is another way to make brown bon. If you add more than one colour of gravy the way my Ukrainian grandmother Jell-O, the jar looks even better. — Robyn taught me. Brown 1-2 tbsp flour (or Harness the Power of Words more as needed) in a hot, dry frying pan. “A business absolutely devoted to Be careful not to burn it by continually service will have one worry about profits. sifting it. Once it’s the colour you want, They will be embarrassingly large. — turn down the heat. Start adding your Henry Ford beef or poultry juices or flavouring, and I enjoy your questions and tips; keep hot water. Continue to mix so it doesn’t them coming. Missed a column? Can’t reclump. Season with salt and pepper to member a solution? Need a motivational taste. Sometimes I add a little Oxo and/or speaker for an upcoming event? Check poultry seasoning for more flavour. It took out my website: reena.ca.

It’s as if February is waiting in the departures lounge as our plane fuels up for our trip to Hawaii. With that in mind, you could argue that February is actually the greatest month of the year. Now we can think about everything we still have to look forward to. That’s what I’m telling myself anyway.

So take heart all you winter warriors out there. Rejoice at the passing of every day this month as they bring us ever closer to weather that is more tolerable. Soon we’ll be moaning about the prairie heat — until someone inevitably declares “at least it’s not minus 40!”

Name That Towno

Answers on page 19

ByByBoots JimandStruthers Berniceand Rosella James Kilner

ACROSS 1 Engrossed 5 Suburb, for short 9 Oner 12 Egyptian Queen, for short 13 State 14 Badger, so to speak 15 About stars 17 Place in Newfoundland 19 Island 20 Middays 21 Joiner's cry 23 Korean city 25 Capital or human follower 26 Opaque gemstone 28 Trumpet selection 31 Vinyl recording, for short 32 Untrue 34 Credit rating 35 Aced 38 Eastern leader 39 Real estate listing svce. 40 Place in Nova Scotia 42 Painful infections 44 Ghastly pale 46 Baby carriage 47 Place in Manitoba 49 Hauling 52 Man's given name 53 Swedish furniture maker 55 Resonate 56 RN’s forte? 57 Receptors 58 ____ Contendere DOWN 1 Cdn. military unit 2 Capone and Waxman 3 Minute 4 Body part 5 Bundle

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6 Ultraviolet, for short 7 Rebel, for short 8 Place in Saskatchewan 9 African nation 10 WW2 Normandy battlefield 11 Senses of self 16 Detached 18 Cause to turn tail 21 Venus de _____ 22 Popular sports network, abbr. 23 Place in British Columbia 24 Actress _____ Lancaster 27 Duo

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29 Shroud 30 Spunk 33 Place in Ontario 36 Racial 37 Three, in Hanover 39 Place in Ontario 41 Release 43 Containing oats 44 Assist a wrongdoer 45 Market 46 Pesetas, abbr. 48 Scene of Mohawk uprising 50 Gretzky milieu, for short 51 Sticky stuff 54 Hosp. hot spot

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SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014 - Page 13

For your inflammation, pills don’t help swollen tendons hetis, a gorgeous Greek goddess of the sea, was courted

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by several high-ranking gods, including Zeus, Poseidon and Charlie, son of Bacchus. But due to your basic Greek curse-de-jour she was condemned, like most women, to marry a mere mortal man. Not terribly pleased about this, Thetis made the life of her mortal hubby, poor Peleus, a living Hades. Each time Peleus tried to hold Thetis, she had the irritating ing herself into habit of transforma tree or fire or a tiger, earning her the title of goddess of PMS. Finally the odd couple did manage to have a little bouncing baby demigod they named Achilles. Wanting him to be immortal, Thetis (not exactly the brightest lighthouse on Olympus) held Achilles by the heel and dipped him into the river Doctor Styx, immortalizing all but his heel. Achilles went on to become the hero of the Trojan War against the Sheiks. But eventually archenemy Paris, shooting with the accuracy of a Lord of the Rings elf, landed an arrow smack dab into Achilles’ heel, mortally wounding him and proving the old adage “time wounds all heels.” Achilles’ heel didn’t heal, and as a result he passed into Greek mythological death, ensuring himself a lucrative deal as a constellation, a sports shoe or a tendon. A tendon is that tough sinewy end of a muscle that connects the muscle to a bone. (A ligament connects a bone to a bone.) Painful tendons are commonly caused from overuse. Athletes commonly overuse a tendon until it develops wee cracks and tears and starts to degenerate. Most doctors do not know the difference between a tendonitis and a tendinosis. Fortunately most physiotherapists do. “Itis” refers to inflammation of a particular organ or tissue. Meningitis, appendicitis, bursitis, arthritis, tonsillitis, hepatitis and colitis refer to swollen and inflamed organs. But tendons rarely get inflamed. Tendonitis therefore is as mythical as Thetis, Zeus or Austerity. Instead a sore tendon is commonly a tendinosis, a painful degeneration of the tendon caused by microtrauma, aging or poor blood flow. Anti-inflammatory pills do not help. But I guarantee that 8.7926 doctors out of 10 will recommend anti-inflammatory pills for what they perceive is tendonitis. Treatment should be geared towards both preventing further collagen degeneration in the tendon as well as stimulating collagen synthesis. Treatment includes specific strengthening, deep friction massage, laser, appropriate rest (may take months), surgery and more recently the use of Botox. Five tendons that commonly get into trouble are: ACHILLES TENDON: Achilles tendonitis refers to pain in the calf as a result of overuse (usually in runners). This is the only tendinosis that does not occur where the tendon attaches to the bone, but rather where the tendon connects to the muscle. Hence pain is not at the heel but more toward the lower calf. If allowed to continue to degenerate, this tendon can rupture, with devastating results. PATELLAR TENDON: Just below the kneecap, the patellar tendon can be worn out through extensive jumping, squatting or pooping in the woods. TENNIS ELBOW: Tennis elbow is a tendinosis of the top of the elbow (hold your arm out straight with palm down and press the top of your elbow). It is actually caused by anyone who overuses the wrist, not the elbow. It is so named because it occurs in grunting tennis players who snap their wrist backwards for a backhand shot. ROTATOR CUFF: This occurs in the shoulder of swimmers, pitchers or in older folks who fall on the shoulder. This tendon can easily progress to a tear causing the shoulder to hurt all night. Surgical repair is often necessary. GOLFERS ELBOW: Doctors hate this one. They even hate to see patients with it. The bottom of the elbow is sore, again from overuse of the wrist. It is named for the strain put on the tendon by golfers constantly bending their clubs around the neck of the nearest grunting tennis player.

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This showhome is located at 430 Veltkamp Crescent in Stonebridge (Photos by Peter Wilson)

Montana Homes Front veranda one selling point

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cabinets and ample countertop space. Just here are plenty of reasons to take off the dining nook there is a garden door a tour of the latest showpiece from leading to a future backyard deck. Montana Homes. The main level also has a conveniently Listed at $389,900, the two-storey, located powder room. On the upper level three-bedroom home features hardwood there are three bedrooms and the family floors, custom cabinets and a spacious bathroom. The large main bedroom feakitchen. tures two oversized closets and an en suite With 1,440 square feet of living space with a large shower. on the two levels, the showhome at 430 The basement has roughed-in plumbVeltkamp Crescent in Stonebridge deming. Some of the standard features include onstrates the flexibility of floor plans that a high-efficiency furnace and water heater, comes with Montana Homes. Homes and an air-to-air exchange system. The The front veranda is an important sellhome has a convenient side door providing ing point, as is the large foyer leading into access to the yard or basement. the living room. The kitchen has an island It also has a 22x22 concrete parking pad in the rear. with a breakfast bar, a corner pantry, custom Capella

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Page 14 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

Bat Facts Vampire bats offer health benefits

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Michael Robin U of S News

ough-hewn stone walls and old bricks line the stairwell downward to a traditional public room in the basement of Winston’s English Pub and Grill in Saskatoon. It was the perfect venue for the Interview with the Vampire (Bat) café scientifique event — or rather, an interview with the bats’ spokesperson, Vikram Misra. Misra, a professor of veterinary microbiology at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM), expounded on the virtues, vices and astonishing variety of bats. “There are bats that would fit on my thumbnail, and bats in India with a six-foot wingspan,” he said. Misra explained that bats are the only mammals that evolved true flight, pantomiming with outstretched arms how their taxonomic order got its name. If a human had fingers like a bat, they would stretch to the floor from shoulder height and be joined with thin webs of skin. Hence, bats are Chiroptera, from the Greek words for hand and wing. Chiropterans account for roughly 1,000 of the more than 5,000 species of mammal on the planet. They fill ecological niches virtually everywhere except Antarctica and the high Arctic, performing such valuable services as pollinating fruit plants and eating tonnes of insects. Misra shared the story of what is billed as the world’s largest urban bat colony under the Congress Avenue Bridge in Austin, Texas. Tourists come to watch up to 1.5 million Mexican free-tailed bats swarm to and from their roost every dawn and dusk, searching for insects including a moth whose caterpillars are a major crop pest. “The bats are so numerous that they can be seen on radar,” Misra said. “You can see the cloud of bats and the cloud of moths as they move together. Then they meet, and there is only one cloud — the moths are gone.” On the Prairies, Misra said there are six species of bat, three of which migrate south for the winter and three that hibernate. The little brown bat, which can be seen flitting about on warm summer evenings chasing mosquitoes, is a hibernator with a remarkable ability for torpor, putting itself into suspended animation for the winter. “Their body temperature lowers to the ambient air temperature,” Misra said. “We’ve measured body temperatures of four degrees (Celsius) in hibernating bats.” Unfortunately, the little brown bat as well as other North American bats is under threat by white-nose syndrome. The devastating disease has killed millions of the animals — by some estimates, 94-99 per cent of affected colonies throughout Eastern Canada and the eastern United States. Researchers at the WCVM discovered in 2012 that the bats are likely dying from a fungus recently introduced from Europe, possibly from people visiting caves there and inadvertently bringing back fungal spores. While human activity can be harmful to bats, the reverse is also true, as Misra explained with several dramatic examples. In 2008, a Dutch woman became sick after visiting Python Cave in Uganda, a tourist attraction that features huge snakes on the floor. Misra explains there is a reason for the pythons’ size — a plentiful foodLiza supply right overhead. LS908509.B10

Vikram Misra is professor of veterinary microbiology at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (Photo by Dave Stobbe) “If those tourists put their flashlights up, about a foot above their heads, they would see the roof is covered with bats.” The woman had contracted Marburg virus from the bats. The virulent and deadly hemorrhagic fever ultimately killed her and caused the government of Uganda to close Python Cave. Other examples include Hendra virus, which flares up in Australia and kills horses and sometimes their keepers, although it does not harm the bats that are its host. Likewise, bats harbouring the Nipah virus in Malaysia suffered no ill effects from it, but they ate fruit in orchards near pig farms and the pigs were exposed to the virus. People caught the virus from the pigs and died, prompting the government to

cull the country’s entire pig herd — about a million animals — to contain the disease. Misra said the scenario in the disaster movie Contagion was based on the Nipah case. Closer to home, Misra said SARS also had a bat connection, borne of markets in Asia dealing with live exotic meats. Civet cats picked up the virus from bats, and then infected the people who ate the cats. Modern air travel brought the disease to Canada. Despite their mixed reputation, Misra recommended a measured approach to humans’ relationship with bats. Even the vampire bat, native to Mexico, Central and South America, has its saving graces, although perhaps not its feeding habits. It scuttles along the ground at night and creeps up to cattle (or an occasional sleeping human), makes a small cut with

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its razor-sharp incisors and laps up the blood. Despite their creepy habits, Misra said vampire bats may have great value to human health thanks to a powerful anticoagulant in their saliva. “This substance promises to be a much more effective treatment for people suffering from stroke,” he said. Cafés scientifiques like the one that featured Misra are informal events that bring scientists out into the community for conversations with the public. The movement has roots in the United Kingdom, explained Julia Boughner, an assistant professor from the College of Medicine, who, along with PhD student Isaac Pratt, organizes the monthly events for the U of S.

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Haydn - String Qua Quarte tett in in B mi minor nor, Op Op. p. 33, 33 3, No No. 1 No. Mozart Moz art - Str String ng g Qu Quart artet et No. No. 21 21 in n D Maj Major orr Dvorak Dvo rak ak - St Striing Str ing g Qu Quart artet art ar et No. No. 5 in n F mino ino or Ticcket kets ts $30 adu ad adult d lt, lt $2 $25 se $25 en niior o (6 ors (65+ 5+) +)), $15 15 st stud stu den nts ts On ine Onl ne: ne e: ww www w ww.pe p rse rsepho rs pho one nethea heatre heatr re.o .or org or or org or (3 (306) 6))38 384 4--77 77 72 27 7

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SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014 - Page 15



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he Mississippi Gulf Coast boasts the world’s largest man-made beach — 26 miles in all. Great seafood restaurants and deep-sea fishing enhance the area’s popularity. Biloxi was named the Seafood Capital of the World a century ago because of its abundance of sweet Gulf shrimp, blue crab, superb oysters, spotted sea trout, red drum, Spanish and king mackerel, flounder, snapper, grouper and shark. Mississippi boasts 20 championship golf courses. The best is Fallen Oak, owned by the Beau Rivage, home to the PGA Tour’s Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic. The scenery is second to none with ancient oak trees, huge magnolias and deep contoured bunkers. To play Fallen Oak one has to stay at the Beau Rivage and pay a green fee of $200. That does include a complimentary limousine. A caddy is mandatory and expensive, but mine was worth his weight in gold. He found my ball, wiped it, placed it, selected my club and told me where to aim. That was an experience to cherish. We were fortunate to stay at the Beau Rivage Resort & Casino, recognized as one of the best hotels in the United States. Beau Rivage is French for the beautiful shore. It opened in 1999 with 32 stories and 1,740 luxury rooms. The $750 million invested made it the largest onetime single investment in Mississippi’s history. But cost and size alone is not its significant feature. It provides employment for 4,000 people. On Aug. 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast with a vengeance. The Beau Rivage was shut down for a year and reopened following a $550-million renovation. It is an AAA Four-Diamond hotel with 10 restaurants, four nightclubs and bars, an 85,000-square-foot casino and a 1,550seat theatre. It has an upscale shopping promenade, 50,000 square feet of meeting space and a world-class spa. Also on Beach Boulevard is an old but lovely Southern mansion called Beauvoir. It was the last home of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. After his death, his wife sold it to the United Sons of Confederate Veterans as a home for veterans, their wives, servants and children. For 54 years it served its purpose well, but by 1957 the

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residents had dwindled and the facility was closed. Beauvoir was badly damaged by Hurricane Katrina with its 30-foot waves and 17 hours of hurricane winds. It has since been beautifully restored and shaded by giant live oaks. The sprawling complex includes the Jefferson Davis Presidential Library, a Civil War museum, a gift shop, the Tomb of the Unknown Confederate Soldier, a cemetery and nature trails. This national landmark preserves the legacy of President Davis and the Confederate Soldier. Something new to me was the Biloxi-sponsored Historic Cemetery Tours. Graveside re-enactors bring to life the stories of characters from the past. The cemetery is one of the oldest in the country, with burials dating back to the mid1700s. The oldest surviving headstone belongs to Michael Batet, a native of France who died in 1811. During the tour individuals that changed the city, the country and even the world are featured. Each year 10 new individuals are portrayed. I particularly enjoyed the story of Edward Barq who opened a bottling company in New Orleans in 1890 and another in Biloxi in 1898. He hit on the formula for Barqs Root Beer, selling it at the time for five cents for a 12-ounce bottle. Everyone in the audience was given a bottle of that “famous olde-tyme root beer” by Barq’s great, great grandson. Another enactment was of Archbishop Eugene Marino whose father was a Puerto Rican immigrant and whose mother was an African American maid. He was born in Biloxi in 1934 and educated at a school for black students. In 1988 Eugene became the first black Catholic Archbishop. Another highlight was the Infinity Science Center, NASA’s newest visitor centre. We met astronaut Fred Haise of Apollo 13 (April 11, 1970). He was heading to the moon when an oxygen tank exploded two days after takeoff — 200,000 miles from earth. With their experience and help from Mission Control, the three astronauts landed safely in the South Pacific. Haise is in his 80s now. For four hours he showed us around the site. We were truly honoured to have a space traveller introduce us to the visitor centre. In retrospect, it is no wonder Mississippians say, “We have it all, y’all!” (Doreen Kerby is a Saskatoon freelance writer.)

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Page 16 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

I’m changing for the good

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very day as I awake I am er that I see myself as imperfect so reminded how lucky I am to that they can sell as many products be turning a day older. as they can. Products with names My body reminds me as it aches like Vertical Lift and Radical Difa little here and there ference line the shelves of as I slowly begin to stores, promising women a move around for the more youthful look. day. Looking in the I learned to be skeptical mirror I see my face of products at an early age. is aging and my hair And as Rathbone suggraying. My hair is gested, survived my own coarser than ever. stupidity. Reaching for my I was 17 and going to glasses, I take note the Evan Hardy graduation, of my hands: a little a huge coup in itself for a veinier, arthritic and Holy Cross girl. Wanting Columnist showing dark spots. to present my best I bought Sad? into the ads at the back of Could be. But I’ve always the famous Seventeen magazine. Inbelieved that aging needs to be con- teresting to look back now, thinking sidered as something attractive. that I had to cut the coupon out of Truth is, the freedom that I felt the magazine and mail in the order after the age of 50 was fabulous. with payment, probably a money Not sure why or what it was, but order. I must have wanted those everything seemed that much easier, items badly. and the little things didn’t seem I remember being excited when nearly as important. Perhaps it is all the package came. Who wouldn’t connected to a thought Brian Rath- be, with underarm pads and eyebone wrote: “Wisdom is the reward brow setter waiting? for surviving our own stupidity.” Imagine my horror when I went Whatever the thought behind it, to the washroom at some point that the freeing with the coming of age graduation night only to find my has been one of my life rewards. underarm pads wrinkling and creepThat’s part of why I think I’m lucky! ing across my body, my eyebrows For years advertising has directed looking as though they had heavy many a woman’s thought. Slogans dandruff. that were dominant in my era, such Years ago I stopped dyeing my as “How old do you think I am?” hair, noting that I really had no idea and “Only her hair dresser knows of what it looked like without cofor sure,” plagued woman with hid- lour. Truthfully it was another very ing their age with mystery, deceit freeing experience. and a good dye job. I have decided that I am quite As I grew older new slogans happy to age. came along that reflected the femiSo when someone says to me, nist of the day: “You’re not getting “You crack me up!” I’ll take pride in older, you’re getting better!” That’s the laugh lines I have added to their an adage I have always subscribed face. I’ll see silver, not grey; laugh to as it seemed to have a better lines, not wrinkles. I’m going to buy outcome. myself a medal with the date 1956 Now that I am just past middle emblazoned on it. I’m going to wear age (I’d have to live to be 114 in or- my age with pride. der to claim middle age), old enough Last weekend my daughter-into gather the lines of life and show law asked me to watch over my some character in body and being, I grandchildren while she and my son have arrived at a viewpoint that has get their new home ready. been evolving all of my life. Rather “Sure, I’d love to have them than seeing aging as my own deover.” mise, why not see it as a reward for “Thanks so much,” she respondgetting through it all? I will never ed. “We really appreciate it.” again be as young as I am right now. “No worries; this is one of the That should be celebrated. reasons I wanted to get older!” Advertising agencies would rathLucky me!

Shelly Loeffler

Everything that your advertising should

stack up to be!

An irrigation system sits idle for the winter North of Blackstrap (Photo by Sandy Hutchinson)

New meter system discussed

The city is currently investigating an appropriate Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) for Saskatoon. The AMI technology would allow the city to implement the use of smart meters which can measure and record actual power and water usage by time intervals throughout the day, and transmit that data wirelessly over a secure network to a central data management system. In October 2013 a consultant was hired to determine the feasibility and cost of an AMI system for Saskatoon. Now the city is asking for feedback from residents through a series of public information sessions. The open house events will be held: Feb. 11 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Cliff Wright Branch auditorium at Lakewood Civic Centre (1635 McKercher Drive) Feb. 12 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Mount Royal Collegiate cafeteria (2220 Rusholme Road) The following information will be provided at the open house events:

• • •

How Smart Meters Work Benefits of Smart Meters It’s Your Health (Information on Radio Frequency) – Health Canada • The City’s Meter Exchange Program • Meter Display – Old Versus New • Smart Meter Billing • Tips to Reduce Outdoor Water Use, Indoor Water Use and Electricity Use Residents unable to attend the open house events can also provide their feedback using the city’s new online engagement tool, Shaping Saskatoon, located at www.shapingsaskatoon.ca. To sign up, click on the Shaping Saskatoon link on the city’s homepage, and enter your email address and demographic information. Residents can sign up from a home computer or anywhere that’s convenient on a mobile device. The Smart Meters project will be available for comment on Shaping Saskatoon from now until the end of February.

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SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014 - Page 17



Cam Hutchinson & Friends:

Views of the World

Lorenzen and Stadler well-rounded athletes

• Question: What was the most surprising thing about Vancouver police giving Toronto Mayor Rob Ford a ticket for jaywalking? Answer: That Ford could still walk at that time of night. • TC Chong, on the NHL shutting down during the Winter Olympics: “‘Really? We had no idea,’ said people in Phoenix, Miami and Buffalo.”

• Janice Hough, on airlines being warned about possible terrorist attacks using toothpaste tubes on flights into Sochi: “This means security will be looking carefully at any toothpaste that looks suspicious, especially tubes arriving from England.” • I am such a loser. A two-bite brownie takes me three.

• From Torben Rolfsen: “John Tortorella has returned from his two-week suspension. I’ve heard he spent his time off studying the layouts of North American arenas.”

• From Hough: “In Florida, a middle school teacher who was accused of being drunk in class is blaming it on diabetes. And Toronto Mayor Rob Ford is going, ‘Why didn’t I think of that?’”

• With the large contingent of athletes from our province at the Olympics, you’d think a Saskatchewan sports writer would be on Postmedia’s team. • Bill Littlejohn, on the appearance by a man decked out in 49er gear at the Seahawks victory parade: “He was clearly trying to get on ESPN. It’s more likely he’ll be on the cover of Psychiatric Times.”

• Chong, on many hotels in Sochi having yellow water coming out of their taps: “Staff have instructed guests to not wash their faces with this. Instead, guests have resorted to using vodka.” • I hope I look half as good in underwear as David Beckham when I am 39.

• Littlejohn, on former NFL quarterback Jared Lorenzen now weighing 320 pounds and playing for the Northern Kentucky River Monsters of the Continental Indoor Football League: “Who’s his trainer? JaMarcus Russell?”

• From Torben Rolfsen: “The Sochi Olympics construction sites and security perimeters are huge, but you can’t see them from the International Space Station. The only man-made objects visible from space are the Great Wall Of China and Jared Lorenzen.” • How will we know what time it is in Sochi if Brian Williams isn’t there?

visitors from Washington and Colorado might want to do carry-on.” • From Littlejohn: “There’s a video making the rounds of Justin Bieber playing hockey wearing large gold chains. Just wait until they see his gold ankle bracelets.”

• Joe Biden’s niece has entered rehab for anger issues. She knew she had a problem when she tried to wipe that silly grin off Uncle Joe’s face.

• Chong, on Roger Clemens and Pedro Martinez being voted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame: “Clemens was presented a book — Misremembering for Dummies — and Pedro received a Don Zimmer punching bag.” • A study found 49 per cent of adults sext. The other 51 per cent don’t have smart phones.

Scarlett Johansson and curlers popular in straw poll By RJ Currie

• What do you get if you combine the best sweeper in women’s curling with a Saskatchewan-born folk legend? • Littlejohn, on the Red Hot Chili Brushy Sainte-Marie. Peppers releasing a long statement • Opera star Renée Fleming sang explaining why they didn’t have their the national anthem at the Super Bowl. guitars plugged in for the halftime She’s the first diva to appear in the show: “It could have been explained in championship since Terrell Owens. two words: Milli Vanilli.” • The Olympic village has drawn fire for yellow water, toilets that don’t • Chong, on curvy Kevin Stadler flush properly, Spartan hotel rooms and winning the Waste Management Open unpaved streets. Sochi isn’t a resort; it’s in Phoenix: “Shouldn’t it have been a last resort. named the Waist Mismanagement • A new study says modern humans Open?” have varying levels of Neanderthal • Rolfsen, on CBS announcing plans DNA. This includes up to two per cent to air Thursday Night Football this fall of Europe, three per cent of Asia and 19 The Big Bang Theory said it would per cent of Richie Incognito. have no comment on being moved to • Fox banned a Super Bowl ad feaTuesdays at 2 p.m. until it ran some turing actress Scarlett Johansson doing numbers through their calculators.” provocative things with a soda straw. • From Hough: “The Oakland RaidIt didn’t help the Broncos, who really ers are at 75-1 odds to be next year’s sucked. Super Bowl champions. 75-1? Who • Canadian Olympic ice dancer knew bookmakers in Las Vegas are Tessa Virtue may be lithe and beautiful, optimistic Raiders fans?” but if I met her at a party I wouldn’t give her a second look. In a related • One third of Russians believe the story, my wife is my proofreader. sun revolves around the Earth. The • The Guardian reports a British man other two thirds believe it revolves fell through the skylight of a London around Vladimir Putin. pet shop straight into a large aquarium. • From Chong: “Support for the And people say the Cleveland CavaSeahawks extended into British Colum- JW11304.B10 liers are tanking? bia. Many buildings flew the 12th-man • How about Justin Bieber? Two reJames flag atop their roofs. Given the latest exchange rate, those flags should’ve read 10.8th man.” • From Littlejohn: “The yellow water in Sochi appears to be unsafe for drinking. All is not lost. Tour de France riders plan to use it for their drug tests.” • There are reports that former U.S. president Bill Clinton had a year-long affair with actress Elizabeth Hurley. Both denied the allegation: “I wish I would have had sexual relations with that woman,” said Clinton.

• Pilots on Justin Bieber’s private plane to the Super Bowl wore oxygen masks because there was so much mari• From Hough: “Apparently six per juana smoke in the cabin. This gives cent of Americans take the day off after another meaning to the Mile High Club. the Super Bowl. So the Denver Broncos were just 24 hours ahead of their time.” • Hough, on the Jamaican bobsled team’s luggage being lost on the way to Sochi: “Can’t imagine why Russian authorities might have delayed and/or searched bags from Jamaica. Maybe

Elizabeth Hurley (Wiki Photo)

• Funeral and casket companies are setting up displays in malls. In late April a display will be set up in the Toronto Maple Leafs dressing room.

cent arrests, DUI, paternity suit, tested positive for marijuana, and he scored eight in celebrity basket ball. What’s next, a Knicks contract? • Enough already about Steven Stamkos, his broken shin and not healing in time to play for Canada’s Olympic team. It’s turned into Shakespearean drama: tibia or not tibia? • Groundhog Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow. Just as we feared — six more weeks of hearing about Peyton Manning’s legacy. • How good was Team Canada during round-robin play at the Scotties? They went 11-0 by a combined score of 94-43. Dominant? It was Homan versus ho-hum. • Molly Schuyler, a 5-foot-7, 125-pound Nebraska mother of four, ate a record 363 chicken wings in 30 minutes at Wing Bowl 22. Witnesses say she was poultry in motion. • A brand new Harley-Davidson owned by Pope Francis sold at auction in Paris. It came with a 1,585cc engine, a life-time blessing and prayer bags. • I can’t help wondering if the Islanders’ Michael Grabner takes a lot of holding penalties. • Despite reports to the contrary, the woman who rode a horse into an Auckland supermarket has yet to be arrested. Police say that was a horse of a different collar.

BLADES PROFILE Clayton Kirichenko Height: 6’0’’

Defense

Weight: 188 lbs

DOB: 02/28/1996 Hometown: Sherwood Park, AB 2012-2013 Season: Sherwood Park

League M-AAA: 30 GP • 9 Goals • 13 Assists • 65 PIM

Favorite hockey memory

Eight period game last season

Best part of my game Vision Favorite Pro Athlete Steve Yzerman Any nicknames? Clay, Chenks Blades Home Games This Week:

My last meal would be... Protein Shake

Worst habit Leaving clothes on the floor Biggest pet peeve Negativity Favorite holiday destination Banff and Jasper

No home games this week

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Page 18 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

greymadder.net

From brain tumour to saying what’s on her mind

I

Tammy Robert Saskatoon Express

t was the summer of 2012. Saskatoon woman Alix Hayden was a healthy, busy executive and stepmom. A month later, she was diagnosed with brain cancer. For a period of time prior she had been experiencing loss of motor control on one side of her body, which lasted anywhere from one to three minutes. For the six months it took Hayden to get the MRI which led to her diagnosis, she joked about her brain “tumour.” Today Hayden considers herself a healthy woman living with cancer. And she’s turned to blogging to share her thoughts on her diagnosis, as well as the lifestyle and diet changes she’s made on a quest to heal herself. At only two months old, greymadder.net — a combination of brilliant writing and startlingly frank selfreflection — is already getting noticed by the likes of the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada. “I work for a metabolic research company; every day we look at cancer as a health disorder affected by, even caused by, underlying biochemical factors,” said Hayden. “I knew the depth of research out there that shows that lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise impact health as much as any medical intervention, and they have as much value and right to a place in a treatment regimen as any other modality.” The changes didn’t come immediately. Due to the shock, grieving and anger of the experience, Hayden said her “mental machinery” ground to a halt after her diagnosis. “It wasn’t about going outside of something traditional to look for an alternative. It was just waking back up to what I know and being able to articulate it and apply it to my own situation,” she said. “One of the founders of my company told me I should think about and really internalize how rare it is to be in the position to both work in the abstract, reduce that work to personal practice, and how difficult that really is.” Hayden has turned to a ketogenic, or low carb/high fat diet, as part of her treatment. “There is a large body of research going back to the 1920s that focuses on the concept that one hallmark of cancer cells is that they stop using oxygen as the beginning of energy production, like normal cells do. Instead, they ferment sugar,” she said. “Many people have heard that cancer loves sugar. It is complex, but the underlying principle is that if you remove sugar as an energy source, that really puts tumour cells under stress. You still need an energy source for all your other cells. Normal cells can use something called ketones for energy in the absence of sugar, but cancer cells can’t. Ketones are produced in your liver if you eat high fat and no carbohydrates.” Hayden is eating as much fat and saturated fat as she wants: oils, fatty meats, fish, butter, full-fat dairy and cheese, nuts and avocadoes. “Think of a cup of coffee supplemented with oil, butter and whipping cream (35 per cent fat), all blended up creamy, with a plate of bacon, eggs, fresh avocado and

Alix Hayden considers herself a healthy woman with cancer (Photo taken at Collective Coffee on 20th Street by Sandy Hutchinson)

a dollop of sour cream. That’s the perfect ketogenic meal,” she said. “I eat as much leafy and green veggies as I want. A rule of thumb is that if the veg grows above the ground, it’s good. No breads, pastas, sweets or treats, rice, fries, chips, or starchy sides like potatoes. No root or sweet veggies like beets, which are evolved to be sugar storage machines.” After emerging from the mental fog that initially came with dealing with her diagnosis, Hayden reflected on one thing that did not come with the news when the doctors broke it to her — the word cancer. In fact, the first the word was placed in front of her was via a package she received unexpectedly in the mail from the Cancer Centre. “I was upset. I knew pretty well what I was dealing with,” said Hayden. “I didn’t want it. I was trying to get my equilibrium back, home from work and thinking about making supper. I wasn’t at the doctor’s office and armed for it, so I was nakedly unprepared. I felt it was uninvited, infringing on some kind of boundary system I was trying to build. I didn’t want those blue folders with the kind people pictured on the front to even be in my house.” While her background and education in health led Hayden to ponder the possibility of a neurological condition, the news was still a blow. “I was 37, never a day in the hospital, never sick,” she said. “I honestly never truly believed for a second that I was going to get this news. In retrospect, I can’t believe I was that naïve.” In tandem with oncologists and her neurosurgeon, Hayden is in a “watchful waiting” pattern as long as her seizures can be controlled through medication. Surgical removal, chemotherapy and radiation therapy have all been reserved for a time when the tumour changes or advances. In addition to her dietary changes, Hayden also uses visualization to manage her condition. “One of the things I visualize before I

go for another monitoring MRI is the cover of my book which will be entitled The Girl Who Starved Her Brain Tumour to Death,” she said with a laugh. “If I go for an MRI one day, and they say that thing has shrivelled up, you bet I’m writing that book.” With her blog gaining momentum, a future in writing is a very viable goal. “To take something that is outside someone’s experience and make it experiential for them is every writer’s dream,” said Hayden, who really started blogging as a work-related experiment. “What the attention did first is literally scare the pants off me. You don’t write a blog and have any expectation of privacy. But I wasn’t prepared for actual attention, to be frank. I still don’t think my experience is different or unique. So I just thought it would be one of many. I experienced stage fright; perhaps we can dub it blog panic.” Hayden took a step back and talked it over with her husband, who is her anchor. “I found the panic came down to the continuing struggle to come to terms with how much of my life I want to give over to

this experience,” she explained. “I always thought I’d be the person who would fearlessly read and research and want to know everything in a situation like this. Turns out I’m not. I have to be careful. Reading too much, seeing too much media about related subjects, seeing movies where people are dramatically dying of cancer, it throws off some kind of balance for me, where it’s harder to feel ‘normal’ and not obsess over all of it. So my blog getting some attention felt like something backfired for me that I never even perceived was a risk. “My husband settled it for me. He said, ‘When you write it, do you feel good? Do you enjoy it?’ Yes. ‘Then let that be all you do if it has to be; just write. Worry about everything else as it comes. You don’t have to answer everyone’s questions, find information for them, or even respond to them. Be selfish in this. That’s OK,’ “I think that’s good advice. So I think I’ll keep writing and worry about everything else as it comes.” Read Alix Hayden’s blog at www.greymadder.net.

17th AnnuAl

Thursday, March 13, 2014 • Prairieland Park Tickets only $110 (plus GST) Registration deadline is March 10, 2014 Contact the NSBA office today for more details 306-242-3060

SASKATOON SENIORS CONTINUED LEARNING (courses for persons 55 plus) Spring Session - 7 courses beginning March 17, 2014

Mail-in registration begins February 11, 2014. Information and registration forms online and at all Public Libraries on February 11. In-person registration is February 20th at 1:30 p.m. at the Main Library. A General Meeting will follow at 2:00 pm Courses are $55 each with a $5 membership fee (payment by cheque or exact cash) Deadline for registration is February 28. Classes are 2 hours per week for 8 weeks, and are held at the University. INFORMATION LINE 306-343-6773 www.ccde.usask.ca/seniors

“Supporting Saskatoon’s Business Community” www.nsbasask.com


JW11326.B10 James

SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014 - Page 19

See showtimes at

www.roxysaskatoon.ca

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Chinese Banquet in celebration of the Year of the Horse. 6 p.m. The 10-course supper is a fundraiser for Third Avenue United Church. Tickets are $35 each. They are available from the church office (306-652-6812) and also from Rosanna Parry (306-229-8289).

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FEB. 17

FEB. 15 What: Pianoman Brett Balon is joined by Dave Anderson, Nathan Degenhart, Gent Laird and Arlan Kopp for what is essentially a tribute to the music of Cannonball Adderly. Show time is 8 p.m. Where: The Bassment, 202 4th Avenue North. Tickets: $15 for SJS members, $20 for non-members ***** U of S Amati Quartet at Third Avenue United Church, at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Haydn - String Quartet in B minor, Op. 33, No. 1; Mozart -String Quartet No. 21 in D major; Dvorak - String Quartet No. 5 in F minor. Tickets: $30 adult, $25 seniors (65+), $15 students. Online: www. persephonetheatre.org. In person: Remai Arts Centre, 100 Spadina Crescent East, 384-7727.

FEB. 16 Classical variety night: This is the second concert of the series’ third season. It will feature talented local musicians performing music they love. This event is hosted by the Galliard Foundation. The concert is at Grosvenor Park United Church at 2:30 p.m. Admission is by donation. For more information, visit our website www. galliardfoundation.zzl.org or email us at galliard.foundation@gmail.com. ***** Sing On! Celebrating the Life and Music of Pete Seeger. 7:30 p.m. Unitarian Congregation of Saskatoon (213 Second Street East). An informal community gathering to honour the passing of a great musician and activist by joining our voices in song. Please bring your banjos, ukuleles, guitars, etc. and most important, your voices! All are welcome. Lyrics/chords will be made available, and coffee and tea provided.

Saskatoon Seniors’ Globe Walk is sponsoring one of the many events for Family in motion Day. Time: 1-3 p.m. Location: Saskatoon Forestry Farm Park and Zoo, 1903 Forestry Farm Park Drive (off Attridge Drive). The Saskatoon Seniors Globe Walk is an initiative by the Saskatoon Council on Aging to promote physical fitness and positive aging for older adults. For more information contact SCOA at 306-652-2255 or visit www. scoa.ca/globewalk.

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There’s Hope Beyond Depression Program. Free introductory sessions Feb. 3 or Feb. 10 from 7 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Where: 327 Pinehouse Drive (wheelchair accessible). For more info call Pekka at 306-717-1665 or email saskatoonrecovery@gmail.com.

First Saturday of every month What: The MindFULL Café, part of the international Alzheimer Café movement, is an opportunity to meet in a relaxed social setting for persons with dementia, family, care partners and other interested people. The Café is a two-hour get together with refreshments, entertainment and information. First Saturday of the month from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Sherbrooke Community Centre.

FEB. 18, 25

Every Tuesday

Saskatoon Council on Aging. Mending Seniors Hearts with Art features sessions using creative expression, story, music, reflection and sharing to help participants voice their grief and loss to transform it into new life. Times: 1:30 to 4 p.m. Cost: $20. Limited enrolment. Phone 306- 6522255 or email admin@scoa.ca to register.

Tops #5273 meets at St. Mathews Hall (135-109th Street West). Weigh-in from 5:45 p.m. to 6:15. Meeting from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Experience a healthy weight loss. For more information call 306- 249-2029 or 306-931-3286.

ML42187.B10 Mary

Book your Valentines reservations now for Friday, Feb. 14th The Saskatoon Golf & Country Club is a year round facility that caters to our members’ and guests’ everyday events and special occasions. The clubhouse has several party rooms available by reservation and offers a wide variety of services. From menus to room arrangements, our experienced and professional staff look forward to helping you with every aspect of your function!

Saskatoon Summer Players and The Bassment present Broadway Unplugged: 9 p.m. Pianist Wes Froese and the Saskatoon Summer Players perform your favourite tunes inviting you to sing along. Where: The Bassment. Ticket price: $20 regular and $15 for Bassment members. Tickets are on sale online http://www. showclix.com/event/3803398

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Dr. David Kaplan will speak about his life’s experiences as The Well-Tempered Klezmerer at the Canadian Club of Saskatoon meeting at the Sheraton Cavalier. Registration at 11:30 for noon buffet. Cost $20 for members and $25 for non-members. Call Laura at 931-6790 for tickets.

month

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*****

First Tuesday of every

Saskatoon Ostomy Association meetings. 7:30 p.m. at Mayfair United Church. We meet the first Monday of the month except when there is a holiday. Then it is the second Monday.

month

What:  FROMI - Friends and Relatives of People with Mental Illness. These meetings run from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Where:  W.A. Edwards Family Centre, 333 Fourth Avenue North (wheelchair accessible). If you have a loved one or friend with a mental illness and you need understanding support, contact Carol at 306-2490693, Linda at 306-933-2085, Lois at 306-242-7670 or e-mail fromisk@gmail. com.

First and Third Sunday of each month

Every Wednesday The Saskatoon Mood disorder support group for people with bi-polar, depression and other related mental health problem meets at the Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church at 323 4th Ave. South (south entrance) at 7:30 p.m. For more information call Al at 306-716-0836 or Lindi at 306-491-9398. ***** What: Singles Social Group - “All About Us” for people in their 50s and 60s. Events such as weekly Wednesday restaurant suppers, monthly Sunday brunches, movie nights, dances, pot luck and more. Meet new friends. No membership dues. For more information email allaboutus10@hotmail.com or phone (306) 978-0813. ***** The Off Broadway Farmers’ Market and International Bazaar from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the basement of Emmanuel Anglican Church (607 Dufferin Ave. and 12th Street). A variety of Saskatchewan foods ranging from grass-fed beef, Katadin lamb, free-range eggs, and several varieties of frozen fish. Fresh baking, German pastry, and fresh and frozen Indian food including samosas are other features. Guest vendors may call 306664-2940 for details.

Month

First Monday of every

Full-Plate Living Weightloss Program. Are you Eating Enough to Lose Weight? FEB. 11 Introductory Session from 6 p.m. to 7 What: Saskatoon Seniors Continued p.m. Program Runs Wednesdays from 6 Learning (SSCL) Spring Class Registration p.m. to 7 p.m. for eight weeks. Where: for non-credit academic studies. Classes 327 Pinehouse Drive, main floor boardare 2 hours per week for 8 weeks and room. Contact: 306-717-1665. are held at the University. They begin the week of March 17. Class information and registration forms will be on the FEB. 20 website and at Public Libraries on Feb. Saskatoon Nature Society: Who: Alec 11. Mail-in registration begins on Feb.11, Aitken. What: The Legacy of Glacial and In-Person registration will be held on Lake Agassiz in the Canadian Prairies. Feb. 20 at 1:30 at the Frances Morrison When: Thursday February 20 at 7:30 p.m. Library. A general meeting will follow. Where: Rm 106 Biology Building, U of S Visit www. ccde.usask.ca/sscl. Call 306- Campus. Why:  Alex has a special interest 343-6773 for more information. in the affect Lake Agassiz had and has on

group runs on the first and third Thursday of each month, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. This is open to anyone struggling with depression and family members wanting to support them. Where: 311 – 38th Street East. This is a wheelchair accessible building. For more info call 270-9181.

Third Tuesday of the

FEB. 19

What: Pet Loss Support Group, Support and comfort to people who are struggling FEB. 13, 14, 15 with the loss of a beloved companion aniCountry Farms Market Place: Sweet Card mal due to old age, sickness or other sad & Craft Event with Bridal Swap & Shop. FEB. 22 reasons.  The no-obligation support group Confederation Mall. More information is meets the first and third Sunday of every available http://www.facebook.com/coun- MENSA is an international, non-profit month 2 p.m. at the W.A. Edwards Centre, society for people who score among the tryfarmsmarketplace 333 4th Avenue North, Saskatoon. For top two per cent of the general populamore information or telephone support, tion on a standardized IQ. A supervised IQ call 306-343-5322. testing session is being held Feb. 22 at FEB. 14 2 p.m. The cost is $9 0, or $70 for stuThe Rosebud Burlesque Club Presents: Tuesdays, Thursdays, A Bouquet of Rosebuds. Doors at 7 p.m., dents. Please call Tim at 306-242-7408 or email trf674@campus.usask.ca. performance at 8 p.m. at the Free Flow Saturdays Dance Centre (224 25th Street West). What: Free art drop-in at the SCYAP Art Call: 665-5998 or email burlesque@ MARCH 4 Centre. All ages welcome, all materials sasktel.net to purchase tickets. Tickets: supplied, no registration required. Every $20 advance, $25 at the door. Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper from Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m., Thursday 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Emmanuel Anglican 5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m., and Saturday 1 p.m. Church (formerly St. James), 607 Dufferin – 6 p.m. FEB. 15 Avenue, corner of 12th Street East.  Cost What: Saskatoon Nutana Lions Club Flea is $6 for adults, $3 for children 7 to 12 Market. When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Every Thursday years; no cost for children 6 years and Prairieland Park – Hall D. Admission: under. What: Depression Support Group — free our surroundings. He is a recipient of a Master Teacher award.

R

Every Monday

865 Cartwright Street West • (306) 931-0022 • www.saskatoongcc.com

FEB. 28

EVENTS

Answers

*****

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Saskatoon

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What: JP Cormier of Cape Breton has a 30-year career, highlighted by 13 albums and 12 East Coast Music awards, and has been recognized widely for his guitar work, singing and writing. Show time is 9 p.m. Where: The Bassment, 202 4th Avenue North. Tickets: $17 for SJS members, $23 for non-members.

FEB. 14

MISCELLANEOUS

B

E

MUSIC

Adults $5, children 12 and under $1, preschoolers free. For more information call 306-291-3964.

What: Monthly Drop-In Caregiver Support Group. Who:  Caregivers for adult family members or friends. Cost:  Free (presented by Saskatoon Health Region). To Register: Jeanne (306-655-3426) or Karen (306-655-3427). Third Thursday of the Month The Saskatoon Prostate Cancer Support Group is a local community group of men who have or who have had prostate cancer, and their spouses/partners/caregivers. We meet monthly for sharing, for support, and for information. Location: W.A. Edwards Centre, 333 – 4th Avenue North.

Every Second Wednesday  What: Friendship Force International, Saskatoon and Area Club. We are an organization of more than 360 clubs in more than 50 countries throughout the world. FFI allows you to enjoy economical travel while forging new friendships with club members from around the world. Visit our website at www.thefriendshipforce.org Find out more about us or come join us at our next meeting by contacting Bill Gulka at 306-249-0243 or by email w.gulka@sasktel.net. First and Third Saturdays of Month Lions Clubs Texas Holdem Tournaments: $60 buy in, $40 to the prize pool. 7 p.m. start time. Must be 19. The Coachman Bar Market Mall. Call 306-668-0015 for more info.

Every Tuesday and Thursday Bridge City Senioraction Inc: Classes every Tuesday and Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.  Registration is $20, drop-in fee is $2. For information, call Sheila at 306-931-8053 or Kathy at 306244-0587.

Every Tuesday, Saturday and Sunday Overeaters Anonymous: Is food a problem for you? Do you eat when you’re not hungry? Do you binge, purge or restrict? Is your weight affecting your life? We are a non-profit 12-step group that meets on Tuesdays at noon and 7:30 p.m., Saturdays at 9:30 a.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. For more information including locations visit www.oa.org. Canadian Light Source Tours The synchrotron research facility opens for the public on Thursdays at 1:30 p.m., and the following evenings at 7 p.m.: Feb. 20, March 20 and April 17. Admission is free. Pre-registration is required. Call 306-657-3644 or email outreach@lightsource.ca.  Info at www.lightsource.ca/ education/public_tours.php


Page 20 - SASKATOONEXPRESS - February 10-16, 2014

D

Feeling on the clock has divorcée ticked

ear Lianne, I have been dating a man for six months. We are both established professionals. He has never been married, while I am divorced and have two teenagers. We seem to get along well when we are together, enjoying similar outdoor activities and interests in concert and theatre. Our lives seem to make sense together. What is the problem then? The problem is although he says he wants to be with me, he limits our time together, fre-

LIANNE TREGOBOV

Relationships

quently to only a few hours a week. I also find his inability to respond to subtle communication to be frustrating. When I draw this to his attention he is mortified that I would think he is indifferent. He has a busy demanding career and I have been very accommodating. However, the lack of both time together and progress in the relationship has left me feeling anxious, sad and unlike myself. I feel I am “on the clock” and have but a few

hours weekly to be engaging and interesting. We have talked, and he has said the right things, but this has not resulted in more time together. I made it clear within the first month of dating I was looking for my life partner, not just a casual date. I can’t tell if he is truly clueless about how to be in a meaningful relationship or if he is being dishonest. Should I move on? — Baffled Dear Baffled, It sounds as though you have met a man with great potential but requires guidance and an open line of communication. He has been single all his life and has controlled his

own schedule with regards to his personal life. I would suggest explaining to him what you need and what change you can see that would make the relationship more comfortable and fulfilling for you. He will likely need to ease into the changes and start to make room in his life for a partner. Should he not be prepared to bend, you will need to decide if it will or will not work for you the way it is. (Lianne will be interviewing in Saskatoon from Feb. 25-28. Call 204-888-1529 to reserve an appointment time. Questions for this column can be submitted to camelotintroductions@mymts.net.)

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Retail offers not combinable with any CPA/GPC or Daily Rental incentives, the Commercial Upfit Program or the Commercial Fleet Incentive Program (CFIP). † Until January 31, 2014, receive 0% APR purchase financing on new 2013 Edge (excluding SE) models for up to 48 months, 2013 Fusion, Taurus, Flex and 2014 Taurus and Escape models for up to 60 months, and 2013/2014 Ford Focus (excluding BEV) and Fiesta models for up to 72 months to qualified retail customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest interest rate. Example: $25,000 purchase financed at 0% APR for 48/60/72 months, monthly payment is $520.83/ $416.66/ $347.22, cost of borrowing is $0 or APR of 0% and total to be repaid is $25,000. Down payment on purchase financing offers may be required based on approved credit from Ford Credit. ‡ Until January 31, 2014, receive $500/ $1,000/ $1,500/ $2,000 / $2,250/ $2,500/ $3,000/ $3,250/ $4,000/ $4,500/ $5,500/ $5,750/ $6,500/ $6,750/ $8,500/ $9,000/ $10,000/ $10,500 in Manufacturer Rebates with the purchase or lease of a new 2014 [Escape (excluding 2.0L)]/ 2013 [Focus (excluding BEV), Fiesta], 2014 [Focus BEV, Escape 2.0L, E-Series] / 2013 [Escape S, E-Series], 2014 [Mustang V6 Coupe, Taurus (excluding SE)] / 2013 [Edge AWD (excluding SE), F-150 Regular Cab XL 4x2 Value Leader, F-350 to F-550 Chassis Cabs], 2014 [Edge, Transit Connect (excluding Electric), F-150 Regular Cab XL 4x2 Value Leader, F-350 to F-550 Chassis Cabs]/ 2013 [Taurus SE]/ 2013 [Mustang V6 Coupe]/ 2013 [Edge FWD (excluding SE), Explorer Base], 2014 [Mustang V6 Premium]/ 2013 [C-MAX]/ 2013 [Taurus (excluding SE), Escape 1.6L, Transit Connect (excluding Electric)], 2014 [Mustang GT]/ 2013 [Mustang V6 Premium, Escape 2.0L, Explorer (excluding Base)] / 2013 [Mustang GT]/ 2014 [F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2)] / 2013 [Expedition], 2014 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Gas Engine]/ 2014 [F-150 Super Cab and Super Crew]/ 2013 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Gas Engine], 2014 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) - Diesel Engine]/ 2013 [F-150 Regular Cab (excluding XL 4x2)]/ 2013 [Focus BEV, F-150 Super Cab and Super Crew]/ 2013 [F-250 to F-450 (excluding Chassis Cabs) -Diesel Engine] - all Raptor, GT500, BOSS302, and Medium Truck models excluded. ≠ Until February 28, 2014, eligible purchase financing and lease customers will have the equivalent of their first four bi-weekly payments covered by Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited up to a maximum amount per eligible vehicle (the “Offer”). The Offer applies to the first four bi-weekly payments for customers paying on a bi-weekly basis and the sum of 12 monthly payments divided by 26 and multiplied by 4 for customers paying on a monthly basis (“First 4 Bi-Weekly Payments”). Maximum amounts are $500 on 2013/2014 [Focus S and Fiesta S]; $750 on 2013/2014 [Focus (excluding S), Fiesta (excluding S)] and 2014 [CMAX]; $1,000 on 2013/2014 [Fusion], 2014 [Mustang (excluding Shelby GT500), Escape]; $1,250 on 2013/2014 [Taurus, Edge], 2014 [F-150 Regular Cab, Super Cab, and Super Crew]; $1,500 on 2013/2014 [Flex], 2014 [Explorer]; $1,750 on 2014 [Expedition]. All Mustang Shelby GT500, Transit Connect, E-Series, F-150 Raptor, Super Duty, Medium Truck, Chassis, Stripped Cab and cutaway models excluded. Offer only available on approved credit (O.A.C.) from Ford Credit. If the equivalent of the First 4 Bi-Weekly Payments exceeds the maximum amount, the customer will be responsible for the balance. First 4 Bi-Weekly (or monthly payment equivalent, as applicable) payments are required from customer. Finance customers will receive a cheque for the amount of their First 4 Bi-Weekly Payments from the dealer. For RCL customers, the first month’s payment will be waived and they will receive a cheque for the amount of two bi-weekly payments according to the formula described above - customer will then be responsible for making all of his/her remaining scheduled payments in accordance with their contract. Offer not available to cash purchase customers. Not combinable with CFIP, CPA, GPC, Commercial Upfit Incentive Program or Daily Rental Allowances incentives. * Until February 28, 2014 purchase a new 2013 Ford [F-150 Super Cab XLT 4x4 5.0L/ F-150 Super Crew XLT 4x4 5.0L] / 2014 Ford [Fusion S/Escape S FWD 2.5L] for [$25,999/$28,499]/ [$21,999/$23,249] (after Total Manufacturer Rebate of [$10,000] / [$0/$500] deducted). Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price after total manufacturer rebate has been deducted. Offers exclude freight and air tax [$1,750]/ [$1,700] license, fuel fill charge, insurance, dealer PDI, registration, PPSA, administration fees, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. All prices are based on Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price. ^ Until February 28, 2014, receive [2.99%/2.49%] APR purchase financing on new2014 Ford [Fusion S/Escape S FWD 2.5L] models for up to [84] months to qualified customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest interest rate. Get the above for [$21,999/$23,249] purchase financed at [2.99%/2.49%] APR for [84] months, with [$0] down payment, monthly payment is [$291/$302] after total price adjustments of Delivery Allowances [$0/$500]). (the sum of twelve (12) monthly payments divided by 26 periods gives payee a bi-weekly payment of [$134/$139], interest cost of borrowing is [$2,389/$2,049] or APR of [2.99%/2.49%] and total to be repaid is [$24,388/$25,298]). Down payment may be required based on approved credit from Ford Credit. All purchase finance offers exclude freight and air tax ($1,700) license, fuel fill charge, insurance, dealer PDI, registration, PPSA, administration fees, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. Taxes are payable on the full amount of the purchase price. All prices are based on Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price. Delivery Allowances are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives. ^^ Estimated fuel consumption ratings for the 2013 [F-150 4X4 5.0L-V8 6-Speed Auto] / 2014 [Fusion SE 2.5L – I4/Escape S FWD 1.6L GTDI-I4]. Fuel consumption ratings based on Transport Canada-approved test methods. Actual fuel consumption will vary based on road conditions, vehicle loading and driving habits. **Offer only valid from February 1, 2014 to February 28, 2014 (the “Offer Period”) to resident Canadians with an eligible Costco membership on or before January 31, 2014 who purchase or lease of a new 2013/2014 Ford (excluding Fiesta, Focus, C-Max, Raptor, GT500, Mustang Boss 302, and Medium Truck) vehicle (each an “Eligible Vehicle”). Limit one (1) offer per each Eligible Vehicle purchase or lease, up to a maximum of two (2) separate Eligible Vehicle sales per Costco Membership Number. Offer is transferable to persons domiciled with an eligible Costco member. Applicable taxes calculated before CAD$1,000 offer is deducted. ®: Registered trademark of Price Costco International, Inc. used under license †† Based on R. L. Polk Canada, Inc. Total New Registration data for Full Size Pickups per Ford Segmentation as of YTD September 30, 2013. ± Based on year-end 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 total sales figures for light vehicles in Canada from DesRosiers Automotive Consultants Inc. (and Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association data exchanged by OEMs). ©2014 Sirius Canada Inc. “SiriusXM”, the SiriusXM logo, channel names and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc. and are used under licence. ®: Registered trademark of Price Costco International, Inc. used under license. ©2014 Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. All rights reserved. Available in most new Ford vehicles with 6-month pre-paid subscription


Saskatoon Express, February 10th, 2014