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Design Portfolio

Laudeman, Sara M || Georgia Institute of Technology


M

Architecture is not a static field of study. In education, each semester brings a project that spans four to five months. By nature, such projects are always evolving and never cease to grow, even at the end of the formal project sequence. We are always told to never stop, never give up, and always look back. The first semester of my architectural education, we were warned to never lose sight of the fundamentals of design. It has been my endeavor over the past three years to maintain rigor of process and clarity of design by building upon these fundamentals and adding to my

“toolbox” of architectural and artistic knowledge. Architecture is not an isolated field of study. We cannot take architecture and society as separate, nor can we assume that architecture is disjoint from those that would occupy the spaces that we strive to create. Architecture is meant to be a destination – it should engage the occupants. It should be pleasant to experience. It should be practical. Architecture is both a place and a space, which means that it must meet the needs of its users as well as the aesthetic standards of its designers. architecture iS a journey. it doeS not beGin with a Sketch, and it doeS not end with a review. it iS a way of thinkinG, and the chaLLenGe iS portrayinG that. thiS portfoLio ServeS to ShowcaSe a SeLection of work from my architecture education. they are taken from a SeLection of LeveLS, incLudinG proceSS and Group work aS weLL aS individuaL projectS and finaL productS, inaSmuch aS any project iS ever “finaL."


Sara M. Laudeman mobiLe: 919-698-2160 Sara@Laudeman.com | SLaudeman@Gatech.edu

Education: Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia Master of architecture – May 1, 2020 Member of the American Institute of Architecture Students Member of the Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honors Society Graduate Ambassador for School of Architecture University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina Member of the University Honors Program, Student Ambassador Member of the Sigma Alpha Pi National Leadership Society Bachelor of Arts in Architecture – May 10, 2018 Member of the Arts and Architecture Honors Program Member of the Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honors Society Early Entry Masters Program Bachelor of Science in Mathematics – May 10, 2018 Member of the Pi Mu Epsilon Mathematics Honor Society (Secretary) Department of Mathematics and Statistics Honors Program Early Entry Masters Program Durham Technical Community College, Durham, North Carolina associate in science – may 2014 Member of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Concurrent Enrollment and Graduation with high school

Honors and Awards: recipient of SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE LEADERSHIP, SERVICE & PROFESSIONAL PROMISE AWARD, SprinG 2020 Recipient of architecture founDation of georgia Merit scholarshIP, SprinG 2019 Portman Prize Studio, Third Place Winner, Georgia Institute of Technology, Spring 2019 Recipient of Lynn Hauser Pearce Memorial Merit Scholarship from UNC-Charlotte, Fall 2017 Recipient of a Research Grant through the College of Arts and Architecture, UNC-Charlotte UNC-Charlotte Chancellor’s List Fall 2014, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017 UNC-Charlotte Dean’s List Spring 2015, Fall 2015 Recipient of a Research Grant for Honors Thesis Research through the College of Arts and Architecture Honors Program for “Derivation, Form Finding, and Structural Analysis in Catenary Derivate Shells”


Experience: Graduate Research/Teaching Assistant, January 2019 – Current Georgia Institute of Technology Employment in Georgia Inst. of Technology School of Architecture front office. Focus on front-end website design, development, and implementation in HTML/CSS/JavaScript. Assistance in programming and outreach events. Work with Vernelle Noel on computational design modeling in Kangaroo2, Kiwi3D, and Grasshopper. Additional work in RhinoScript and Python on form remapping and connection development (Konector plugin) to refine and develop script. Program Assistant/Teaching Assistant, May 2019 - July 2019 Georgia Institute of Technology Program/teaching assistantship for the Summer 2019 Barcelona Live-in resident assistant for students in Barcelona, Spain, teaching assistant for two architecture courses: City Literacy and Barcelona Architecture under Prof. Sabir Khan. Responsible for coursework preparation, one-to-one instruction, program event organization, live-in contact for students. Teaching Assistant, August 2017 – May 2018 University of North Carolina - Charlotte Teaching assistantship for two courses in the College of Arts and Architecture, UNC-C. Class instruction, grading, one-to-one instruction, and course management for Structural Systems and Computational Methods. Research: “Derivation, Form Finding, and Structural Analysis in Catenary Derivate Shells” Honors Undergraduate Research Thesis in Mathematics and Architecture through UNC-C Participation in Martian Advanced Renewable Systems (M.A.R.S.) VIP program through GTRI at Georgia Institute of Technology (F18, S19, F19) (team leader, habitats, S19, F19) Skills: Proficient in Computer Skills; AutoCAD; Rhinoceros 3D Modeling, Grasshopper plug-in for Rhinoceros, Karamba3D; Revit (with Dynamo and DesignScript); Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign; Microsoft Word etc; Matlab; coding and logic, C#, PHP, Javascript/CSS/HTML, python. Base proficiency with: Maple Computing Software; LUA coding. Reading Comprehension in Spanish, intermediate to advanced. Verbal Communication in Spanish, intermediate, Kiwi 3D and Kangaroo 3D plug-ins for Grasshopper.


Studio


Work


Operable Panel System

Spaceframe System: 2m x 1m module

Ceiling Cell Assembly: Lighting

Facade Cell Assembly: Power Storage

Floor Cell Assembly: Surface and Cluster

Foundation: Concrete Retaining Wall

Foundation: Structural Steel Supporting Cell Mechanism


Electronic House

An Active and Ballardian Communal Work-Live Experiment

Laudeman, Sara M; Li, Yuhang; McClelland, Marta ARCH 8866 LS || Spring 2020 || Georgia Institute of Technology


Electronic House

An Active and Ballardian Communal Work-Live Experiment Laudeman, Sara M; Li, Yuhang; McClelland, Marta Georgia Institute of Technology Design and Research Studio || Spring 2020 The psychotropic house, as in J.G. Ballard’s “The Thousand Dreams of Stellavista,” serves aS the primarY motivation for thiS proJect. We have SeLected the eLectronic houSe in order to diScuSS the reSponSiveneSS of a houSe and itS inhaBitantS. the eLectronic houSe SuggeStS that the reLationShip BetWeen the inhaBitantS and the architecture iS a game Which then createS SpaceS of interpLaY and internaL tenSion. in order to frame thiS diScuSSion, the proJect uSeS the idea of a Work/

pLaY artiStS commune.

the reSidencY Length iS SeLected BY inhaBitantS and rangeS BetWeen 4 WeekS and one Year. CLuSterS are created from a ceLLuLar grid (architecture) BaSed on agent (inhaBitant) actionS aS WeLL aS the occupancY LeveL. theSe cLuSterS are then tranSformed acroSS the pLaYing fieLd according to a Set of ruLeS. there are ruLeS for the effect that agentS have, ruLeS for the effect that cLuSterS have, and ruLeS for the WaY the houSe itSeLf interactS Within the fieLd. thiS createS SpaceS of conStructive aWkWardneSS and direct tenSion, cauSing the inhaBitantS and the architecture to Work With and againSt one another in turn. practicaLLY, thiS meanS that the houSe iS conStantLY Shifting aS it reSpondS to the haBitS, patternS, and uSeS of itS inhaBitantS. thiS meanS that there might Be feWer iSSueS of LoSt Space, and that the iSSueS of haBit and pLaY (or memorY and fantaSY) are BaLanced againSt one another.

From left to right: Sacripanti’s “Lyrical Theatre”, Frazer’s “An Evolutionary Architecture”, Price’s “Fun Palace”


rotate

mirror

clone

Base Cell

1. Base Cell

2. Mirror +X

3. Mirror +X

1. Base Cell

4. Mirror -X

2. Translate +Y 3. Rotate -90

Rule 1 Clone

5. Translate +Y6

4. Mirror -Y

5. Mirror -Y

Rule 1 - Attachment

Rule 3 - Decay

Rule 4 - Predator/Prey

If two clusters bump, they join into a single cluster.

If a cluster has 6 cells in a row, remove the row.

Clusters of 2 cells or fewer are absorbed by the nearest larger cluster.

Rule 7a - Cluster Movement: “Rook”

Rule 7b - Cluster Movement: “Bishop”

Rule 3 Rotate

Rule 2 Mirror

. Rotate -90

6. Translate +Y7

7. Mirror +X

. Mirror -X8

Agents can cause clusters to copy themselves.

8. Rotate 90

. Translate -X

9. Rotate -90

Agents can cause clusters to mirror themselves.

Rule 7c - Clusters “Line of Sight” and Density Clusters within 5 cells attract, and clusters move towards areas of lower density.

6. Mirror -X


4.1 - 1: Formation

4.1 - 2: Agent Movemement

tluseR :5 - 1.7

tnemevoM retsulC :4 - 1.7

4.1 - 4: Cluster Movement

tnememevoM tnegA :2 - 1.7

4.1 - 5: Result

noitamroF :1 - 1.7

in the formative phaSe of the proJect, different termS are defined aS the architecturaL Brain WorkS to create a LandScape for communaL Living. the ceLLS are the individuaL grid eLementS of the pLaYing fieLd. the entiretY of the architecture iS compoSed BaSed on theSe ceLLS. cLuSterS are highLighted groupS of ceLLS, Which are referred to aS activated in thiS phaSe. cLuSterS are created BaSed on agent, or inhaBitant, actionS and motionS. that iS to SaY that the formation of cLuSterS iS movement given form, BaSed on the BehavioraL patternS of inhaBitantS. each cLuSter then functionS under a Set of Seven maJor ruLeS. cLuSterS can comBine, Break apart if theY Become too Large, and aBSorB SmaLLer “uSeLeSS” cLuSterS BeLoW a certain Size threShoLd. agentS can cauSe cLuSterS to copY themSeLveS, mirror themSeLveS, or perform a hYBrid copY/mirror action. finaLLY, cLuSterS move acroSS the pLaYing fieLd in orthogonaL or diagonaL pathS, Which themSeLveS are viSuaLized through the fieLd reactionS. cLuSterS near one another WiLL then move toWardS each other WhiLe other cLuSterS move toWardS areaS of LoWer denSitY in a pSeudo-fLock interaction.

Above: progression across the rules (previous) of play for the system. Two series are shown here.


4.2 - 1: Formation

4.2 - 2: Agent Movemement

7.2 - 1: Formation

7.2 - 2: Agent Movemement

4.2 - 5: Result 4.3 -1: Formation

7.2 - 5: Result 7.3 -1: Formation

4.3 - 2: Agent Movemement

7.3 - 2: Agent Movemement

4.3 - 5: Result

7.3 - 5: Result

When theSe ruLeS are appLied over a PERIOD OF TIME, theY can Be tracked through the diagrammatic Space of the pLaYing fieLd. in five maJor StepS, cLuSterS and agentS pLaY out the game on a gridded Board. the firSt Step containS originaL cLuSter information, movement path tYpeS, and agent LocationS. Second, agentS move around the fieLd to activate cLuSterS. agent effectS are mapped and appLied. fourth, the movement raiLS are overLaid on the pLaYing fieLd to ShoW the interactionS, SpaceS of overLap, and White Space, Which WiLL Become important ShortLY. finaLLY, the cLuSter movement iS performed, and the reSuLt of the tranSformation iS ShoWn. the Large-ScaLe tranSformationS here are the SLoWer kind, theSe movementS happen over the Span of a Year, Shifting the communaL reSidence over the period that an artiSt might Be in reSidencY.


deveLoping a diagrammatic reLationShip iS onLY haLf of the proceSS. to Bring theSe tWo-dimenSionaL BoardS into architecturaL conceptS, the proJect reLieS on another dichotomY. draWing from the ideaS of urBaniSm, Waddington’S cHreodeS, and gouLd’S intermediate formS, tWo SurfaceS are deveLoped: an urBan form, Which containS the cLuSterS aS theY are conStructed of ceLLS, and a LandScape form, Which createS dramatic hiLLS and vaLLeYS from the Same ceLLS.

s

Development from 2D diagrams to 3D architectural landscapes.


1.

5.

2.

6.

3.

7.

As discussed previously, the landscape of the house changes overlonger time spaces (a one-year cycle) in response to its occupants and the ingrained rules of the house itself.

A further “round� of development

shown in three dimensions helps highlight the interaction of the urban and the landscape forms as they change over the longer timescale.

4.


1.

2.

3.

4.

Tracking relationships between plazas and plateaus over time

(1yr). Progression from left

to right.

5.

6.

1) Tendency: The

7.

space transitions from fewer large plateaus to more small ones.

become more distant from one another, they split into more small boulevards.

2) Interaction: As clusters converge, merge, and split, the diverge, and shift to create areas of different interactions. 3) Characteristic: The lower (more private) spaces have spaces. The boulevards function as connections between As

As movement rails

boulevards, plazas, and plateaus combine,

less exposure than the higher (more public)

the two with direct exposure to the clusters.

the clusters move, they drag the boulevards with them, functioning as transient anchors for

the landscape. Tracking the relationships between plazas and plateaus over one year shows the

agglomeration and decay of spaces in direct response to cluster movement and inhabitant activities.


Clusters and plateaus are predefined features of the landscape and attract groups of individuals. transform in time.

However, they also

Boulevards between

clusters, plateaus, and plazas are full of potential.

Since clusters move extremely

slowly, the boulevards become spaces for spontaneous gatherings and temporary activities.

Fantasy: all registered deviations from the memorized pattern. These fantasies create vertical modification of the landscape. Flat surfaces are interrupted by hills as they emerge. This results in geometric vagueness

of the hills, allowing unexpected scenarios and uses of space. Work spaces become play spaces and vice versa.

From top to bottom: 0% Play, 40% Play, 100% Play

Below: The schematic section illustrates interactions between floor, ceiling, and facade as supported by a spaceframe.


Operable Panel System

Spaceframe System: 2m x 1m module

Ceiling Cell Assembly: Lighting

Facade Cell Assembly: Power Storage

Floor Cell Assembly: Surface and Cluster

Foundation: Concrete Retaining Wall

Foundation: Structural Steel Supporting Cell Mechanism


Threaded Hub Facade Cell Frame

In order to develop a cave-like landscape and prevent interruption with columns, the project utilizes a spaceframe structure with a triple-layer grid composed of 2m x 1m modules. The structural system supports the operable cell mechanisms and the cells themselves. An accessible basement level allows for maintenance, and the façade is composed of rotating panels that capture

Facade Framing System Rotating Facade Panel

Ground Connection Hub

sunlight and store the energy in the façade cells. The

clusters and cells move within this framework, creating variations within the forms discussed above.

Clusters vary

in height to accommodate different uses, while plateaus and plazas shift slightly in

6� increments to allow easy

access. The cells are supported by scissor lifts which can raise and lower the surface. Floor cells have integrated 0m

1234

5m

walls which slide to allow access to the interior of clusters, while overhead cells house lights behind

frosted glass panels.


L2 - Low Cluster

L3 - High Cluster

L1 - Plateau

L -1 - Plaza

L3 - High Cluster

Steps

L2 - Low Cluster

L0 - Boulevard

L1 - Plateau

L -1 - Plaza

Steps

L0 - Boulevard

The Electronic House subverts the expectations of a traditional living situation on many levels. From the communal living aspect to the transient physical states, the House forces its inhabitants to adapt even as it responds to those adaptations and shifts again.This project attempts to connect disparate concepts and shifting expectations from both the inhabitants and the architecture. Through this unconventional approach, the Electronic House challenges the notion of passive architecture. It combines the modernist ideas of adaptable buildings with advanced capabilities of 21st century technologies and it explores solutions for underoccupancy, adaptability, and transformability of the built environment. The project attempts to prove that through interaction, learning, and adapting both architectureand inhabitants - as two equal entities - can create spaces full of unexpected conditions where memories and fantasies coexist.


All rendering post production by Marta McClelland


Back to the Future

Languages of Design from Durand to Today

ARCH 8866 AE || Fall 2019 || Georgia Institute of Technology


Durandian Shape Grammars A Language of Town Halls in the Style of Durand Laudeman, Sara M || Georgia Institute of Technology Design and Research Studio|| Fall 2019 Durand is known to this day for his rigorous descriptions of the proper methods for assembling buildings of many types. The first half of this studio investigation, titled Durandian Shape Grammars, focuses on the typological guidelines set forth in the Precis with regards to Town Halls. For Durand, these buildings are spaces of municipal gatherings and workings. They are designed to accomodate larger gatherings or smaller offices effectively with an eye for circulation as well as accessibility.

Using the principles set forth in all three sections of the Precis, it is the goal of this project to present a functional shape grammar for Durandian Town Halls. The program elements of the Town Hall are broken down both formally and programatically. Durand highlights the need for office rooms, gallerias for access, and a municipal hall in this typology in addition to the typical parts of a building he specifies throughout the Precis. “The size of these buildings varies in accordance with the size of the towns in which they are built. We offer as an example a town hall for a place of modest size, in order to show, as with the preceding design, that, although in architecture, as in everything, magnitude is one of the qualities that strike us the most forcibly, a building in which it must necessarily be absent may still be beautiful, providing that the requirements of fitness are fulfilled as they ought to be.” - Durand, “Precis” p 157

Opposite: Foregrounding of Durand’s Plans from the plates of the Precis according to building part (top) and program (bottom).


ROOM

STAIR

PORTICO

VESTIBULE

OFFICE

ENTRY

GALLERIA

STAIR

HALL

HALL


A deconstructive sequence highlights the wall centerlines of key building parts: in Durand’s language, these are the room, the galleria, the portico, the vestibule, and the stair. Together, the relational lines, common axes, and building organization imply a room symmetry parti as above. This investigation guides the development of the rules of a durandian shape grammar. The following pages detail the basic constructive rules used in this grammar and their applications into parts (like the rooms) and the total ensemble.


Wall Offs

et

Rules

Detail Rules

1

11

2

12

3

13

4

14

5 15 6 16 7 17 8

9

10

18

19


20

27

Clean Up Rules

21

22

28

23

29

30 24

31

32 25 33

26


59

63

a SmaLL SubSet of poSSibLe PartS of varyinG SizeS which

can be aSSembLed from the

71

previouS ruLeSet. theSe partS can be pLaced into a

durandian enSembLe in the manner iLLuStrated in the foLLowinG paGeS.

72

73

74


118

119

120

132

133

134


Starting from the spatial symmetry parti, a series of rules can be applied to locate the part boundaries around the lines of symmetry. These rules are the basic premise of the language. From there, the constructed parts from the previous pages can be applied in various ways based on the perimeter conditions of the parts. In the rules constructed for this project, the Rhinoceros layers are used as “labels” to call out different parts. A series of rules are applied to add offices, gallerias, and vestibules in turn. As a simplification, the entire entry sequence is applied as a single rule. Porticos, stairs, and vestibules are combined into a single condition. The continuation of the language is a series of hall rules. These rules define columns, vaults, engaged columns, and pilasters if there are any. Finally, “cleaner” rules are applied and external stairs are placed on the entry conditions.


1 | Nine Sq uare

2 | Nine Sq uare

3 | Nine Sq uare

4 | Nine Sq uare

5 | Nine Sq uare

6 | Nine Sq uare

7 | Nine Sq uare

8 | Nine Sq uare

9 | Nine Sq uare

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

10 | Nine Sq uare

11 | Nine Sq uare

12 | Nine Sq uare

13 | Nine Sq uare

14 | Nine Sq uare

15 | Nine Sq uare

16 | Nine Sq uare

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

3 interaxes hall 7 interaxes bars

17 | Nested Re c tangles

18 | Nested Re c tangles

19 | Nested Re c tangles

20 | Nested Re c tangles

21 | Nested Re c tangles

22 | Nested Re c tangles

23 | Nested Re c tangles

5 interaxes central hall 3 interaxes bars

9 interaxes central hall 3 interaxes bars

9 interaxes central hall 3 interaxes bars

9 interaxes central hall 3 interaxes bars

9 interaxes central hall 3 interaxes bars

9 interaxes central hall 7 interaxes bars

9 interaxes central hall 7 interaxes bars

24 | El ong ated “H”

25 | El ong ated “H”

26 | El ong ated “H”

27 | El ong ated “H”

28 | El ong ated “H”

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

29 | Double E l ong ated “H”

30 | Double E l ong ated “H”

31 | Double E l ong ated “H”

32 | Double E l ong ated “H”

33 | Double E l ong ated “H”

7 interaxes halls 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes halls 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes halls 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes halls 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes halls 3 interaxes bars

34a | As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

34b | Asymmetri c al Re c tangles

35a | As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

35b | Asymmetri c al Re c tangles

36a | As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

36b | Asymmetri c al Re c tangles

37a | As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

37b | Asymmetri c al Re c tangles

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

9 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

9 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars


38 | Double As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

39 | Double As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

40 | Double As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

41 | Double As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

9 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

42 | Double As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

43 | Double As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

44 | Double As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

45 | Quad As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

46 | Quad As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

47 | Quad As ymmetri c al Re c tangles

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

5 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

48 | “H” with Two Re c tangles

49 | “H” with Two Re c tangles

50 | “H” with Two Re c tangles

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

51 | “I” with Two “8”s

52 | “I” with Two “8”s

53 | “I” with Two “8”s

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars

54 | Three “I” with Two “8”s Joined 7 interaxes hall 3 interaxes bars


55 | Cr oss with Four Halls 7 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

56 | Tiled Cr oss with Four Halls 7 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars


57 | Cr oss with Four Halls 7 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars

58 | Tiled C r oss with Four Halls 7 interaxes hall 5 interaxes bars


A Language of Municipal Office Buildings A Language of Town Halls in the Style of Durand Laudeman, Sara M || Georgia Institute of Technology Design and Research Studio|| Fall 2019 How can the work done in developing a shape grammar of Durandian design be pushed forwards into a modern concept for an office space with municipal functionality? To answer this question, we should return to Durand’s constraints first and foremost. 1. Vestibules and Porches are almost always wider than they are deep. 2. Vestibules lead to staircases. 3. Rooms may be square, round, or semicircular. 4. Rooms may be wider than they are long, or longer than they are wide. 5. The central portion of a room must be wider than its flanking aisles. 6. Courtyards may be square or circular. 7. Courtyards may be wider than they are long, or longer than they are wide. 8. Courtyards may have surrounding porticoes, walls, or both. 9. External stairs are built in straight, single flights. 10. Interior stairs may be straight, spiral, wrap the corner, or switch back onto themselves. 11. All columns must be equally spaced. 12. External walls should pass in a straight line from one corner to the other. 13. Interior (cross) walls should pass in a straight line from one external wall to another. 14. Parts shall be constructed so that the front and back are the same in form. 15. Walls, columns, doors, and windows should be placed on common axes. 16. Rooms should be placed on common axes. 17. Assemblages shall have bilateral symmetry. 18. The central axis of each room will align with the next. 19. Rooms shall be joined corner to corner. 20. Rooms are connected within a sequence (vestibule -> stair, etc.) 21. The construction shall align on a modular grid. Each module is 25cm.


Then the final set of constraints will be: 1. Rooms may be wider than they are long, or longer than they are wide. 2. Courtyards may be wider than they are long, or longer than they are wide. 3. Courtyards may have surrounding porticoes, walls, or both. 4. External walls should pass in a straight line from one corner to the other. 5. Rooms are connected within a sequence (vestibule -> stair, etc.) 6. The construction shall align on a modular grid. Each module is 25cm. 7. The interior face of a room need not align with the underlying grid. 8. The parts need not align specifically on their shared axes, although the individual elements should.

Dur and ’s Town Hall : 1809

Edge

offices

with a centr al

munici pal hall

.

Sulli

van ’s

An office

Gua ra nt y Building 1896

building with edge offices

and a centr al punch to stre et le vel

.

A ci ty

Bos to n Cit y Hall 1968 hall

with open spa ces and an

ar ticul ated cent ra l cut for ac cess

.

Car ro lt on Cit y Hall (Dallas -For t Wor th ) 1986 Edge offices break down to al lo w ac cess ; la rg e , cent ra l au di to rium .

A co llec

Tallinn Town Hall (2009) tion of spa ces with open and

priv ate offices

share co ur ty ards

.

The development of town halls and office buildings throughout the year can be traced through the years since Durand. Consistent across all of these examples are offices, atria or central halls, and shared meeting spaces. The development of the massing scheme for the language of municipal offices that this project proposes is below. A form should, in the Durandian manner, capture the block or site. Following this, the edges of the form should be capture as a rigid office band. Finally, the interface between office and atrium reacts - articulating the common space in the center band of the building.

Massing Devel opment Scheme


4

Rules like these can be combined in a multitude of different ways to create nearly infinite variations. This example is one of many. Additional examples of constructive rules (with variations on the meeting rooms and atrium conditions) can be seen on the following pages. Additional variations based on different envelope forms, office organizations, and atria can be found following the sample set of rules.


1 | Extra Small | 4 Office Modules

5 | Small | 8 Office Modules

2 | Extra Small | 6 Office Modules

6 | Small | 8 Office Modules

3 | Extra Small | 6 Office Modules

7 | Small | 10 Office Modules

9 | Medium | 24 Office Modules

10 | Medium | 20 Office Modules

11 | Medium | 22 Office Modules

12 | Medium | 18 Office Modules

13 | Medium | 22 Office Modules

14 | Medium | 20 Office Modules

4 | Extra Small | 4 Office Modules

8 | Small | 8 Office Modules


15 | Large | 38 Office Modules

16 | Extra Large | 82 Office Modules

17 | Medium [Var] | 24 Office Modules

18 | Medium [Var] | 22 Office Modules


As a proof of concept for this scheme, consider a building constructed of three of these variations. For this, consider a site in Atlanta. The block between Ivan Allen Jr Blvd. and W Peachtree Pl. NW is rectangular and currently a surface parking lot. This space allows a good demonstration of the potential of a this language of municipal offices to capture the site in a sensible manner.

The massing of the four main elements of the language reveals the underlying logic. The office bands capture the envelope condition, creating open spaces for gathering on upper floors and entry conditions on the lower level. The core stacks vertically through, hosting bathrooms, stairs, elevators, and storage. The semi-public meeting spaces and open plan offices work their way between offices and the atrium as an interstitial space between the two, and the atrium is a multifaceted construct that carves its way through the project.

Office Massing

Core Massing

Semi-Public Massing

1:2000

SITE PLAN 1:500 1:1000

Atrium Massing


In combinging three variations on a site, the algorithmic generation is grounded in reality. The upper floors are edited to define the balcony edge of the atrium condition. Here, the core helps to define a public landing with work spaces and open spaces for gathering and public interaction. A

B

C

4

5

2

4

4 1 3

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:125 0

2

4

6

2

3

1. ATRIUM 2. OPEN PLAN WORKSPACE 3. MEETING ROOMS 4. SERVICE | STORAGE 5. CAFE


in Section, the atrium windS itS way throuGh the Space. overhead, LiGht fiLterS down acroSS

the baLconieS aS weLL aS SpiLLinG in from the breakS in the officeS aLonG the perimeter of the buiLdinG.

overhanGinG LeveLS create SheLtered SpaceS beLow which provide open pLan work Space, pubLic deSkS and bencheS, and a cafe on the Ground LeveL.

in perSpective, the faceted nature of the atrium becomeS more cLear. canted GLaSS on the meetinG room interface with the atrium puSh the Space outwardS, ShiftinG throuGhout to refLect IN an aLmoSt cryStaLine form, hiGhLiGhtinG the reaction between pubLic and private within the project.

SECTION A-A 1:125

SECTION B-B

SECTION C-C


Section perspectives showing faceted interiors and atrium conditions with meeting spaces and offices on the perimeter.


Mass Timber in the City Multipurpose Applications for Mass Timber


Mass Timber in the City

Multipurpose Applications for Mass Timber

ARCH 8856 CR || Fall 2019 || Portman Prize Studio || Georgia Institute of Technology


Mass Timber in the City Multipurpose Applications for Mass Timber

Laudeman, Sara M || Georgia Institute of Technology Portman Prize Studio || Spring 2019 || Third Prize This project brings together the public and private realms of Boston, MA. As a primary goal, the open plaza on Foundry Street invites passerby into the market and gallery spaces, encouraging visitors to partake of the spatial experience and cultural programming housed within the mass timber construction.

Combining housing above and community space below, this project pulls 4th Street and Foundry Street together via a set of layers composed of spaces and building volumes. These layers serve to create overlaps and interactions, creating spaces of opportunity, conditions of entry, and locations of friction. Interactions in these spaces between public market and private artists’ residences will bridge the gap between the edge of 4th Street and the boundaries of Foundry Street, blurring the edges of the public realm and creating a focal point for the communities in this South Boston neighborhood.

Program Requirements Urban Marketplace Artist-In-Residence Housing

12,000 nsf

Community Spaces Lecture Hall 2,000 nsf Gallery 2,000 nsf Lobby 500 nsf Storage 500 nsf

5,000 nsf

10,000 nsf

Subtotal Net Areas Grossing Areas

26,000 sf 15,600 sf

Total Area

42,600 sf


This project is about layers, levels, and crossing between them. It’s about what happens on a multi-level site when a set of apparently disparate programs are combined. In the case of this project, these stratifications happen in multiple ways: spatially in parallel with both 4th Street and Foundry Street, vertically with 4th Street serving as a datum reference, and in terms of program. The building logic stitches Foundry and 4th Streets together with an auditorium and entry onto the lobby and plaza on the 4th Street level above, while allowing a view down to the Foundry plaza and the more private gardens that serve the gallery. These connections are meant to encourage interaction from above. Pedestrian entry under the auditorium is compressed before it spills out into a vertical atrium, linking 4th Street and Foundry Street via the plaza that spills outwards. Programatically, the gallery and the market dominate the Foundry Street level. The market is an open plan flexible space that occupies two levels, connected to 4th Street on the second level via an open air crossover. The gallery is directly underneath the 4th Street plaza and serves as a space for the artists in residence to display their work or host receptions. The garden on the west side of the site allows for a more intimate gathering space with large, operable bay doors to create a seamless transition in warm weather. The entire site is framed by the taller residential tower on the north side.

Boston Across the Scales: The city itself sprawls across the waterfront and the central mass of the coastline to the southwest (cover). As the scope zooms into the site at the intersection of 4th Street and Foundry, the city scale gives way to the urban scale Opposite: Program massing diagrams showing spatial interactions. Far Right: Floor plans exploded vertically showing overlap and circulation.


Housing Residential Common Space Auditorium Market Gallery 4th Street Lobby Vertical Atrium

Circulation


Volume of Wood Products Used: 94,979 cubic ft (2,690 cubic meters) U.S. and Canadian forests can grow this much wood in seven minutes Carbon Stored in Wood: 2338 metric tons of CO2 Avoided Greenhouse Gas Emissions: 894 metric tons of CO2 Total Potential Carbon Benefit: 3,233 metric tons of CO2 One of the main goals of the studio has been to evaluate and design for the needs of a world faced with climate change. Using wood to sequester CO2 is one of the many solutions put forth, and the focus of the project topic “Mass Timber in the City.� Above, the U.S. and Canadian WoodWorks council has offered a set of estimates based on the volumes of material provided on the opposite page. This carbon sequestration is equivalent to pulling 683 cars off of the road for a year, or the energy required to operate 341 homes for a year. Below, a Georgia Tech developed tool allows for the assesment of heating, cooling, and energy delivered to the site.


By the Numbers CLT (by volume) NLT (by volume)

49,036 cubic ft 23,942 cubic ft

GluLam (by volume)

19,287 cubic ft

Plywood Sheathing (1/4”) Wood Siding (2”x6” nominal)

18,819 sqft 13,929 sqft


Diagramatic site plan

This

project

engages

the

urban context by capturing

4th Street street at

Foundry different levels,

encouraging

and

the

bridging

between these two levels, and extending the influence of

the

site

northwards

towards Traveler

Street.

The Foundry Street

plaza

pulls the street into the site, allowing for pedestrians to cross down the alley between the two adjacent residential buildings, spill out of the

market, or meander across the park space to the north.

SITE PLAN 0’

24’


Site plan showing a subset of layer gridlines

The

4th

engages

Street

level

pedestrian

and

vehicular traffic alike with the

prominent

display

the

auditorium

where

on it

cantilevers over the street and on the urban plaza that pulls away from the traffic of

4th Street, looking down

onto the garden below and back towards the city center.

From 4th Street, pedestrians might pause to look over the edge to the plaza below on

Foundry, creating a dialogue between

the

methods

of

occupation above and below.

4TH ST PLAN 0’

24’


SECTION A-A

SECTION B-B


In section, the interplay between spaces becomes apparent. Opposite, the sections through the gallery, lobby, and auditorium Above, the section demonstrates the connection between the market and housing. This verticality is displayed again in the vertical atrium beneath the auditorium.

showcase the verticality of the spaces.

Below, a detail section of a residence addresses concerns of access, ventilation, and sunshading.

AIR FLOW

GLAZING LINE

SUMMER WINTER

DETAIL SECTION - RESIDENCE 1/4” = 1’ - 0” 0’

12’

SUN ANGLES


12 11

10 9

1 2 3 4 5 6

Wood Cladding over CLT Wall Assembly Control Joint with 4th St HVAC under Floor System Raised Floor System Frame for Support of Display and Lighting GluLam Structural Beam

8

7 6 5 4 3 2

1

0’

7 8 9 10 11 12

Insulated CLT Slab Built Up Stage Daylighting Window Digital Display Screen Nail-Laminated Timber Roof Built Up Roof Assembly


Top Left: East Elevation Top Right: West Elevation Bottom Left: South Elevation Bottom Right: North Elevation The facade logic in this project calls upon repurposed wood siding (2”x6” nominal) to maximize the wood applications in the project. The light glazing details accent the mass of wood and slate gray paper composite panels that highlight vertical elements of the facade and the prominent auditorium and common space. Glazing on the south face is shaded by extended CLT floor plates. Opposite, the “gatehouse” element is detailed. The auditorium (plan, bottom opposite) juts out over 4th St to capture pedestrians’ attention. A deep entry condition allows for glazing on the south face of the building.


18 17

7

16

15

6

14 13

5

18 WOOD CLADDING SYSTEM 17 EXTERIOR SHEATHING BOARD 16 RIGID INSULATION - 4” 15 GLULAM STRUCTURAL BEAM 14 FLASHING AND DRIP EDGE 13 BLOCKING AND WINDOW MULLION

12

7 GLULAM STRUCTURAL BEAM 6 FLASHING AND DRIP EDGE

11 10

5 BLOCKING AND WINDOW MULLION

4 3 2 12 VERTICAL STRUCTURAL MULLION

1

11 HORIZONTAL MULLION 10 CLT FLOOR ASSEMBLY WITH INTERSTITIAL

9

RAISED FLOOR ASSEMBLY

8 DOUBLE-GLAZED WINDOW ASSEMBLY 7 FLASHING TO GROUND 6 BRICK PAVERS TO MATCH VERNACULAR 5 COVERED DRAIN

9 8 7

4 BRICK PAVER UNDERLAYMENT 3 HVAC UNDER FLOOR 2 RIGID INSULATION - 6” 1 CAST IN PLACE FOUNDATION

6 5

4

3 2 3/4” = 1’ - 0” 0’

1 4’

4 PARAPET TOP AND FLASHING 3 BUILT-UP ROOF AT SLOPE 2 DROP EDGE BLOCKING 1 PARAPET BLOCKING


11.15’ FLOOR TO CEILING

15’ FLOOR TO BOTTOM OF GIRDER

19’ FLOOR TO CEILING

1/4” = 1’ - 0” 0’

12’


Bridging the Gap A sketch proposal for a bridge over North Avenue at the Ponce City Market. In order to be successful, this project calls upon a series of considerations for safety, practicality, and intentionality. By establishing a strong base on both North Ave and the Beltline, this proposal is able to ground itself in the culture of the area and the appeal of the public spaces it serves. Approach | Path Arrival | Departure Road | Bridge Pedestrian | Vehicular By addressing these conditions as dichotomies, this proposal becomes a volumetric bridge that spans vertical and horizontal space in order to build engagement at all levels and all approaches.

ARCH 8856 MC || Fall 2018 || Georgia Institute of Technology


Music Rooms An investigation of spatial and formal relations within a proposal for the Georgia Institute of Technology School of Music. Ten practice rooms Two Large Three Medium Five Small Ten corresponding “gardens�

ARCH 8856 MC || Fall 2018 || Georgia Institute of Technology


A

B

F

F

E

E

D

D

C

C

A

B


SECTION A-A

SECTION B-B


This project is presented across scales. The campus scale becomes the context for the proposal. Relations, using elements that are part of Kevin Lynch’s set, inform design decisions at the larger scales. At the site scale, the buildings surrounding the proposal are located and employed as anchors so that this project can reach into space, sliding against the grain of path and building alike in order to situate itself on campus. It penetrates the

Klaus/Caddell

courtyard at its thinnest, and against the smooth facades, it slips against

Architecture West and the pedestrian path between Clough and the Binary Bridge. FIRSTT FLOOR

SECTION C-C

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

SECTION D-D


in the frame of the buiLdinG, the conSiderationS of

the Site carry throuGh. in Section, orGanization iS defined

by a Set of hexaGonaL GeometrieS that interLock and Stack toGether, Serviced by a centraL circuLation SyStem. the two haLveS interLock without touchinG, creatinG baLance and a

moment of peace in the courtyardS beneath the Structure that towerS overhead.

the detaiL ScaLe payS homaGe to wood conStruction. with cLt StructuraL SyStemS, reinofrced with SteeL BANDS that Serve to counter Shear and rackinG forceS. the facade contraStS the warmth of the naturaL coLorS of the cLtS with a charred wood finiSh. SuSpended from a moduLar SyStem, the facade paneLS can SLide aSide to aLLow acceSS to the roomS beyond.

SECTION E-E

SECTION F-F


CRITICAL DETAIL I - BRIDGE CONDITION


River-walk Connections

Tying the culture and history of Savannah, GA to the public

ARCH 4101 - Mona Azarbayjani || Fall 2017 University of North Carolina at Charlotte


PUBLIC

CASUAL DINING

LOBBY ENTRY

MUSEUM

PRIVATE

FORMAL DINING MIXED

CIRCULATION GALLERY

MARKET STRUCTURAL ZONES

FORM AND FORM SURFACE

PROGRAM

PUBLIC AND PRIVATE

ENVELOPE OPACITY

Located on the historic Savannah, GA river-walk, this project brings together cultural, social, and commercial uses to anchor the river-walk to the city. The program consists of a small museum of the history of Savannah, a market hall that doubles as a community gathering center, and a series of both sit-down and take-away restaurants and dining areas. Top: Development axon diagrams showing spatial relationsBottom: Structural axon illustrating structural zones Opposite: Third floor plan on site and diagrammatic plans showing circulation across all three floors.

STRUCTURAL AXON WITH STRUCTURAL ZONES


DN

UP

UP

DN

UP

SITE PLAN 1/32” = 1’ - 0” 0’

48’

1

CIRCULATION DIAGRAMS - WATER LEVEL

UP

DN

UP

C

CIRCULATION DIAGRAMS - GROUND LEVEL

E

DN

D

D

A

B

1

FIRST LEVEL 1/16” = 1’-0” 0’

CIRCULATION DIAGRAMS - FIRST LEVEL

24’


SECTION B 1/8” = 1’-0” 0’

24’

SECTION A 1/8” = 1’-0” 0’

24’

River-walk Connections aims to create interlocking spaces through a vertical circulation atrium. From the topmost floor, visitors can look down into the museum. From the bottom floor, visitors can look up into the atrium, towards the long gesture of the market hall, or out onto the river from the lounge and cafe area. Spread: Sections rendered with depth against elevation. Rendered section perspective.


SECTION D 1/16” = 1’-0”

0’

24’

SECTION E 1/16” = 1’-0”

0’

24’


UP

UP

DN

1

LOWER LEVEL LOBBY

The facing of the project allows the use of view glass on large northern exposures over the river, while the structural system of massive trusses dominates the south facade in a neo-industrial nod to the history of

Savannah’s riverfront industry.

The double-height lower lobby offers a place to gather and watch the riverfront, or to step outside onto the pedestrian walkway at water level.

DN

1

CIRCULATION 2


DN

1

CIRCULATION 1

The vertical atrium is the organizing principle of the scheme. It offers direct lines of sight throughout the project while partitions and stairs guide the circulation path between water, ground, and air.

Each space

UP

UP

UP

1

GALLERY 2


CIRC ULATION + DATUM WALL

MAIN COLLECTION (FIRST FLOOR) SPECIAL COLLECTION (SECOND FLOOR)

ENTRANCE / LOBBY

MEETING ROOMS (FIRST FLOOR) STAFF OFFICES (SECOND FLOOR)

COURTYARD + OUTSIDE READING AREA

PUBLIC RESTROOMS (FIRST FLOOR) STAFF / SERVICE SPACES (SECOND FLOOR)


Library Explorations

Community Library through Sustainability in South Charlotte

ARCH 3102 - Dale Brentrup || Spring 2017 || University of North Carolina at Charlotte


3

2

1

This project pulls from the first two full years of undergraduate education into a comprehensive design project.

5

The program is a small public library in southern Charlotte, NC. The program is split between axillary spaces to the south and library stack spaces

to the north. This allows large

3

view windows to the north and controlled southern light. The two programs are organized along a datum wall, which shields from eastern sun and

EV 5

0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

SARA LAUDEMAN | FIRST FLOOR PLAN

provides circulation.


6

5

4

1. Special Collection Stack Area 2. Special Collection Reading Area 3. Courtyard 4. Second Floor Circulation Space 5. Parking 6. Library Office 7. Staff Workroom 8. Staff Meeting room 9. Staff Restroom 10. Staff Lounge 11. Mechanical 12. General Collection Stacks 13. General Collection Circulation 14. General Collection Reading Area 15. Exterior Covered Patio 16. Staff Workroom/Book Return 17. First Floor Circulation Desk 18. Lobby Entrance 19. Public Meeting Space 20. Women’s Restroom 21. Men’s Restroom

1

4 3

EV

0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

SARA LAUDEMAN | SECOND FLOOR PLAN


0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

SECTION A - A

0’ 2’ 4’

8’

SECTION B - B

16’


PARAPET CAP SOLAR PANEL SHINGLES RIGID INSULATION COMPOSITE DECK STEEL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

The neighborhood vernacular of brick is pulled into the site by use of a similarlytoned terracotta finish. View glass is accented with glass bricks to allow daylight accents and provide coves for electric lighting. The combination of materials provides the structure

DROP CEILING ASSEMBLY GROUT LINE WITH REINFORCING

GLASS BLOCK

with a textured exterior facade and a series of low-profile articulations on the interior which

accentuate the length of the datum/circulation space and the end-cap walls on each wing. STEEL STUD WALL ASSEMBLY

TERRA COTTA PANEL

INTERIOR WALL FINISH SHEATHING BOARD RIGID INSULATION

AIR SPACE AND CLADDING SPACERS

CONCRETE SILL PLATE

GLAZING

SECTION C - C

Opposite: Sections through the office space (top) and perpendicular to the wings (bottom) Left: Wall section assembly detail showing terracotta cladding over stud assembly. Bottom: Section through reading area and circulation area.


Daylighting plays an enormous role in the design of pleasant space. The primary goals

FIRST FLOOR

in this project were to bring northern light into

8A

the stacks spaces and shield the courtyard side of the wing from harsh summer sun.

Charlotte, NC benefits from the winter sun being allowed to penetrate the building mass. 12P

The primary design schemes are view glass to the north with minimal overhang shading, smaller windows onto the courtyard to the south with deeper overhangs, and the

3P

vertical datum wall to protect from early JULY

SEPT

DEC

morning glare potentials to the east.

The collection wing uses a clerestory to admit winter light and allow ventilation on both floors. The clerestory also allows VENTILATION 0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

winter sun to penetrate to the deepest part of the wing.

On the administrative side, the same schemes (less the clerestory) are applied to accomplish similar results. The bulk of the south wing provides some shading in the courtyard in the summer, but an unfortunately high amount of shading in the courtyard

SUMMER SUN 0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

WINTER SUN 0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

during the winter months.

Top: Radiance and Ladybug simulations of Daylight Glare Potential and illuminance. Bottom: Diagrammatic sections illustrating ventilation and direct sunlight penetration.


“All material in nature, the mountains and the streams and the air and we, are made of Light which has been spent, and this crumpled mass called material casts a shadow, and the shadow belongs to Light.� - Kahn


Elective


Work


Environmental Systems Design

Showcasing Analytical Design through Systems Modeling

Laudeman, Sara M || Brown, Zachary || Cioffi, Jack || Schultz, Madison || Vaivodiss, Robert ARCH 6532 TR || Spring 2020 || Georgia Institute of Technology


Located in Salt Lake City, Utah, this project is a 6 classroom wing of a K-12 school developed to a schematic level to showcase environmental design strategies in daylighting, lighting, HVAC, and water. With a primary focus on iterative design for daylighting and lighting and a conceptual design strategy for HVAC and water, the final design strategies are represented here. Working collaboratively, the group located the project in a developing residential area on the eastern edge of Salt Lake city. The climate is heating dominated with cold, humid winters and warm, dry summers. The primary passive design strategies emphasized are internal heat gain, sun shading, and passive solar gain.


Floor Plan

S ec ti o n

6'

6'

Classrooms are located on the south side to allow access to direct sunlight and low mass thermal gain in the flooring. The administrative spaces, media lab, and circulation spaces are on the north. A deep overhang on all sides helps provide solar shading when combined with louvers and light shelves. Above: Schematic design decisions represented graphically. Right: Daylight availability, annual solar exposure, point in time DGP represented using Climate Studio.

illuminance, and


D a y l i g h t A v a i l a b i li t y

Annua l Sol a r E x posur e

Poi nt i n T i m e Il l um i na nc e

D ec emb er 2 1 , 9 am

D ec emb er 2 1 , 1 2 p m

D ec emb er 2 1 , 3 p m

June 21, 9am

June 21, 12pm

June 21, 3pm

DGP

D i stu rb i n g Gl are f o r 6 . 6 % o f v i ews f o r mo re th an 5 % o f th e y ear

D GP : 0 .2 5 , Imp erc ep ti b l e Gl are D ec emb er 2 1 , 1 2 p m


Electric lighting uses dimmer switches and photocells in the classrooms to control overlighting and save energy during the day. Lighting power densities are shown for the different room types. The goal was to bring mean lux per space into acceptable ranges (200-450 depending on the program use).

Circulation: 310 mean lux, 4.5 w/m2 Media Lab: 267 mean lux, 4.4 w/m2 Bathroom: 298 mean lux, 5.8 w/m2 Lounge: 261 mean lux, 3.8 w/m2 Admin: 465 mean lux, 8.1 w/m2 Classroom: 309 mean lux, 5.9 w/m2


This building strives to redefine “waste” so that water is respected and treated as a valuable resource. This is achieved by implementing a water system that harvests adequate water to meet the needs of the occupants while respecting the natural hydrology of the land and the water needs of the site and building’s ecosystem.  


HVAC design provides two systems to account for different occupancy schedules: classrooms (zones 1-6) and support spaces (zones 7-12). Desiccant Wheels provide humidity control and heat exchange. VAV systems are used for the classrooms, admin space, lounge, and media lab. A CAV System is used for circulation spaces. Radiant Heating in the floor provides a hybrid heating system. There is exhaust-only ventilation in the bathrooms.


The overall schematic axon showcases the integration of the different system and provides a broad overview of the conceptual systems design. While this is a high-level conceptual design project, continuing to apply the knowledge and skills shown here can lead to thoughtfully designed buildings where sustainability and efficiency are considered from the beginning stages of design.


THICK + THIN

Investigations in Inflatible Architecture

Laudeman, Sara M || Pye, Jamieson ARCH 8833 JDO || Spring 2019 || Georgia Institute of Technology


Inflatibles as we have seen them have a certain kind of life that is lent to them. They move within and respond to the environment around them, creating volumes of space enclosed by small, quickly erected shells that can be deconstructed, reinflated, and reused with little adjustment. These structures are relatively unconstrained by typical material logics. Plastic sheeting can be cut in a plethora of ways to create shapes that are rectilinear, curvilinear, and self-intersecting. All structures were constructed from four to six mil plastic sheeting in black and translucent white. These first investigatons explored basic forms, methods for joining the seams, methods of construction, and the limits of the forms. Here, it was discovered that it is in fact possible to construct square structures from plastic sheeting, even when pressurized.


N

S

This led to ine quare, which is a continued investigation into inflatible forms pushed to the opposite end of what is typically imagined from pressurized structures. This project employs rectilinear forms to create inflated cubes, cantilevers, and multi-layered spaces that explore the interplay between light and dark with materiality. The concept of Nine Square is a nine square meter cube, distorted, stretched, and distended by adding and subtracting volume in a cubic meter unit. This leads to an architectural construct that can be occupied from both the inside and the outside. Stripes of darkness wrap the translucent shell, casting shadows and creating different levels of translucency on different faces as they wrap around the mass of the construction.

This project creates an architectural form that can be inflated within 45 minutes, stored in a roll the size of a small tent, and easily transported. The only tools necessary for inflation are anchor ropes, an air blower, and continuous power.

Above: The entire form pictured opposite is composed of the above pieces. Plastic was taped and plastic welded together to ensure a nearly airtight seal.


Above: The structure, when inflated, is self supporting and can be inflated in just under an hour. Opposite: On the interior, the form is spacious, with a larger main space and a secondary “tunnel� that leads to the connected tower.


Construction Technology II

Reconstruction of NMDA’s 9000 Wilshire Project

ARCH 8833 CII || Spring 2019 || Georgia Institute of Technology


3

1, 2

This project reconstructs drawings of NMDA’s 9000 Wilshire project in order 7

to understand construction methods and drawing techniques.

Drawings were done primarily in Revit, with fine detail work modeled in Rhinoceros and imported. The intention of this project is to demonstrate a working understanding of construction assemblies and

Revit.


4, 5


1 Exploded Parapet Axon 1

2 3

4

1. Aluminum Panel System 2. Aluminum Panel Mounts 3. Flashing 4. Rigid Insulation


Parapet Axon 1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1. Aluminum Panel System 2. Stone Rail Top 3. Planter 4. Insulated Drainage 5. CMU Wall Assembly 6. Concrete Structural Beam 7. Steel Stud Framing Assembly


3 Interior Facade Axon

6

4 Parapet Framing Axon 5 Parapet Framing Axon


4

5

6 7

6 8 9

5 4 3

2

3 2

1

6 Glazing Detail

1. Structural Concrete Slab 2. Rigid Drainage and Insulation 3. Raised Floor System 4. Blocking 5. Aluminum Mullion 6. Operable Window

1

7 Green Wall and Raised Patio Detail 1. Aluminum Dacade Panel 2. Earth Filled Planter 3. Eggcrate Green Wall Structure 4. Structural Steel Support 5. Structural Steel Column 6. Structural Steel Flange 7. Channel Cap for Green Wall 8. Aluminum Handrail Top 9. Safety Glass Handrail

Profile for sara-laudeman

Academic Design Portfolio  

The academic design portfolio of Sara Laudeman, completed at UNC-Charlotte (B.A. Architecture, B.S. Mathematics) and Georgia Institute of Te...

Academic Design Portfolio  

The academic design portfolio of Sara Laudeman, completed at UNC-Charlotte (B.A. Architecture, B.S. Mathematics) and Georgia Institute of Te...

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