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NEW MEXICO

2011

VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


NEW MEXICO

2011

VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


NEW MEXICO 2011 VACATION GUIDE WELCOME

Greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 N.M. Tourism Commission Members . . . . . 6 N.M. Tourism Department Contact . . . . . . 6 Using This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

TRAVEL TIPS

Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 City Temperatures Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 New Mexico Facts Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 In-state Mileage Chart &   City Elevations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Planes & Trains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 National Mileage Map/Chart . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Special Needs Travelers Disabled Travelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Senior Travelers & Retirees . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Kid Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 International Visitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Geology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fauna & Flora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Cuisine & Vineyards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

TOP EVENTS

Gathering of Nations, Albuquerque  April 28-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 SRAM Tour of the Gila, Silver City April 27-May 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Roswell Hike It & Spike It May 27-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Pork & Brew BBQ State Championship, Rio Rancho July 1-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Roswell UFO Festival  July 1-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Santa Fe International Folk Art Market July 8-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Traditional & Contemporary Spanish Market, Santa Fe July 30-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

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Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial Aug. 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Santa Fe Indian Market Aug. 20-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Great American Duck Race, Deming Aug. 25-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Hatch Chile Festival  Sept. 3-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 All American Futurity, Ruidoso Sept. 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Clovis Music Festival Sept. 8-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Fiesta de Santa Fe  Sept. 9-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 New Mexico State Fair, Albuquerque Sept. 9-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Whole Enchilada Fiesta, Las Cruces Sept. 23-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta Oct. 1-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Lincoln County Cowboy Symposium, Ruidoso Oct. 7-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Festival of the Cranes, Socorro Nov. 16-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Christmas on the Pecos, Carlsbad  Nov. 26-Dec. 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

THE REGIONS

Central Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itineraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northwest Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itineraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Central Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itineraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northeast Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itineraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30 34 36 38 40 42 44 48 50 54. 56. 58

Southeast Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itineraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Southwest Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Itineraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60 62 64 66 68 70

OUTDOORS

Public Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Aviation & Sport Flying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Ballooning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Biking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Bird Watching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Boating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Camping & Hiking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 State Parks Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Dude Ranches & Horseback Riding . . . . . 76 Fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Geocaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Golfing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Motorcycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Off-Highway Vehicle Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Rafting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Rockhounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Scuba Diving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Skiing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Disability Ski Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 N.M. Ski Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Soaring & Hang Gliding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Tennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Train Riding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Continued on Page 4 Above—Vibrant chile ristras glow at Elizabeth Berry’s ranch near the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico. PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN

Cover—The Scenic Cumbres & Toltec Railroad in Chama offers a nostalgic ride in the Old West. PHOTO BY THEODORE GREER.

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PHOTO: DICK KENT

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2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  3


NEW MEXICO 2011 VACATION GUIDE NATIVE NEW MEXICO

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Native Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Native Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Etiquette on Tribal Lands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Acoma. . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Pojoaque. . . . . . . . 90 Cochiti. . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Sandia. . . . . . . . . . . 91 Isleta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 San Felipe. . . . . . . . 91 Jemez. . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 San Ildefonso. . . . . 91 Jicarilla Apache . . . . 86 Santa Ana. . . . . . . . 92 Laguna. . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Santa Clara. . . . . . . 92 Mescalero Apache. 86 Santo Domingo. . 92 Nambe. . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Taos. . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Navajo. . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Tesuque. . . . . . . . . 93 Ohkay Owingeh . . . 89 Zia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Picuris. . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Zuni. . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Indian Pueblo Cultural Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

ARTS & CULTURE

New Mexico State Museums and Cultural Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 State Monuments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 More Museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Performing Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Visual Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

CASINOS & RACETRACKS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

VISITOR INFORMATION CENTERS AND EMERGENCY NUMBERS IN “NUMBERS TO KNOW” ON PAGE 172

Above—Cholla cactus blooms soak up the sun in the Ojitos Wilderness. PHOTO BY THEODORE GREER.

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CITY LISTINGS

An alphabetical and color-coded guide to New Mexico’s communities, with a listing of notable events to help you plan your visit. Abiquiú . . . . . . . . . Alamogordo . . . . Albuquerque . . . Angel Fire . . . . . . Anthony . . . . . . . . Artesia . . . . . . . . . . Aztec . . . . . . . . . . . Belén . . . . . . . . . . . Bernalillo . . . . . . . Bernardo . . . . . . . Bloomfield . . . . . . Capitán . . . . . . . . . Capulín . . . . . . . . . Carlsbad . . . . . . . . Carrizozo . . . . . . . Cerrillos . . . . . . . . Chama . . . . . . . . . Chimayó . . . . . . . . Chloride . . . . . . . . Cimarrón . . . . . . . Clayton . . . . . . . . Cloudcroft . . . . . . Clovis . . . . . . . . . . . Columbus . . . . . . Corrales . . . . . . . . Crownpoint . . . . . Cuba . . . . . . . . . . . Datil . . . . . . . . . . . . Deming . . . . . . . . Des Moines . . . . . Dexter . . . . . . . . . . Dixon . . . . . . . . . . . Eagle Nest . . . . . . Edgewood . . . . . . Elephant Butte . . Española . . . . . . . .

103 103 104 112 113 113 113 114 115 115 115 116 116 116 117 118 118 119 119 119 120 120 121 122 122 123 123 123 123 124 124 124 125 125 125 125

Eunice . . . . . . . . . . 126 Farmington . . . . . 126 Folsom . . . . . . . . . 127 Fort Sumner . . . . 127 Fort Wingate . . . . 128 Galisteo . . . . . . . . 128 Gallup . . . . . . . . . . 128 Glenwood . . . . . . 129 Grants . . . . . . . . . . 130 Hatch . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Hillsboro . . . . . . . . 130 Hobbs . . . . . . . . . . 130 Jal . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Jémez Springs . . 131 Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Kingston . . . . . . . . 131 Lamy . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Las Cruces . . . . . . 132 Las Trampas . . . . 136 Las Vegas . . . . . . . 136 Lincoln . . . . . . . . . 138 Logan/Ute Lake . 138 Lordsburg . . . . . . 138 Los Alamos . . . . . 139 Los Lunas . . . . . . . 139 Los Ojos . . . . . . . . 140 Los Ranchos de Albuquerque . . . 140 Loving . . . . . . . . . . 140 Lovington . . . . . . 140 Madrid . . . . . . . . . 140 Magdalena . . . . . 141 Manzano . . . . . . . 141 Maxwell . . . . . . . . 141 Melrose . . . . . . . . 141 Mesilla . . . . . . . . . . 141

Milan . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Mogollon . . . . . . . 141 Mora . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Moriarty . . . . . . . . 142 Mountainair . . . . 142 Ojo Caliente . . . . 142 Pecos . . . . . . . . . . 142 Peñasco . . . . . . . . 143 Peralta . . . . . . . . . . 143 Pie Town . . . . . . . . 143 Pinos Altos . . . . . . 143 Placitas . . . . . . . . . 143 Ponderosa . . . . . . 144 Portales . . . . . . . . 144 Quemado . . . . . . . 144 Questa . . . . . . . . . 144 Ramah . . . . . . . . . . 144 Ranchos de Taos . 144 Raton . . . . . . . . . . 145 Red River . . . . . . . 145 Rio Rancho . . . . . 146 Rodeo . . . . . . . . . . 146 Roswell . . . . . . . . . 146 Roy . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Ruidoso/Ruidoso Downs . . . . . . . . . . 147 Santa Cruz . . . . . . 149 Santa Fe . . . . . . . . 149 Santa Rosa . . . . . . 157 Santa Teresa . . . . 158 Shiprock . . . . . . . . 158 Silver City . . . . . . . 158 Sipapu . . . . . . . . . . 159 Socorro . . . . . . . . . 160 Springer . . . . . . . 162 Sunland Park . . . 162 Taos . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Taos Ski Valley . . 164 Tatum . . . . . . . . . . 165 Tierra Amarilla . . 165 Tomé . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Truth or Consequences . . 167 Tucumcari . . . . . . 167 Tularosa . . . . . . . . 168 Wagon Mound . . 168 Whites City . . . . . 168 Winston . . . . . . . . 168

NUMBERS TO KNOW

Chambers of Commerce/Convention   and Visitor Bureaus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Emergency Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Vacation Guide Credits/Contacts . . . . . . 175 Visitor Information Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . 175

INDEX

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176

HIGHLIGHTS

Fiber Arts Trails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 www.newmexico.org


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¡Bienvenidos!

Choose New Mexico for a fantastic vacation!

W

ELCOME TO THE GREAT STATE OF NEW MEXICO. The Land of Enchantment offers all the ingredients for a perfect vacation. The state’s turquoise skies and diverse, rugged Southwestern landscapes enchant people of all ages. You and your family can ski in the mountains, raft on white-water rapids, fly in a hot-air balloon or sled on gypsum, white sands. Or plan a trip where you can relax and unwind at one of the state’s many natural hot springs or upscale luxury spas. Discover the state’s storied past amidst ancient ruins, etched in petroglyphs and along rutted wagon trails. New Mexico’s 25 Scenic Byways invite you to see breathtaking vistas, while enjoying the state’s historical and cultural heritage. Rodeos, fiestas, music festivals, balloon rallies and county fairs all offer a taste of the state’s diverse cultures, as well as our tasty foods from fiery-hot chile to finger-lickin’ barbecue. The state’s 22 tribes welcome you to their traditional villages during special events. Many tribes also offer upscale hotels, casinos, restaurants and golf courses. When the sun sets, take time to savor our wonderful cuisine at a roadside diner or at a top-rated restaurant. Then when it’s time to call it a night, you’ll find diverse offerings such as cozy country inns to luxury resorts. Use this handy vacation guide throughout the year to find other ways to experience the Land of Enchantment at www.newmexico.org. Once you’ve enjoyed the enchantment of New Mexico, we’re sure you’ll keep coming back.

New Mexico Tourism Commission

NM Tourism Commission Members CHAIRMAN

Above—Light and shadow compete over the Río Grande Wild and Scenic Area.

Al Lucero Santa Fe, NM

DISTRICT 1

PHOTO BY EFRAIN M. PADRO.

DISTRICT 2

DISTRICT 3

Ted Garcia Albuquerque, NM

Selena Chino Mescalero, NM

Randy Randall Santa Fe, NM

Deidra Lujan Albuquerque, NM

Bill Hirschfeld Ruidoso, NM

Chris Stagg Taos Ski Valley, NM

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NEW MEXICO TOURISM DEPARTMENT 491 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (505) 827-7400; (800) 545-2070; Fax: (505) 827-7402 enchantment@newmexico.org www.newmexico.org


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2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  9


Using this Guide farmington shiprock

raton (vic)

chama (vic)

64

bloomfield

522

84

north central

taos

491

68

550

northwest gallup (vic)

santa fe (vic)

40

las vegas

bernalillo

Rio Rancho

grants

northeast

los alamos la bajada (vic)

Clayton

25

espaÑola

glenrio (vic) Tucumcari

clines corners

albuquerque

santa rosa

central belén

84 285

54

texico (vic) Portales

socorro

southwest

25

southeast

Carrizozo 380

RUIDOSO

roswell

70

Alamogordo Silver City lordsburg (vic) 10

70

artesia 54

Deming

carlsbad

Hobbs

las cruces

anthony (vic)

We divided the state into six major regions, each easily identifiable by color headings that are used in the community listings. Please refer to the table of contents or the index to locate information quickly and easily. Most of the material in this guide was gathered nearly a year in advance to accommodate our press deadline. We highly recommend that you call ahead or check specifics online where available to verify events and specific destination information. For further travel information or more copies of the 2011 New Mexico Vacation Guide, call the New Mexico Tourism Department at (800) SEE-NEW-MEX (733-6396), (505) 827-7400, or write 491 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, N.M., 87501. E-mail: enchantment@newmexico.org www.newmexico.org Visitor Information Centers (VIC) are indicated on this map. Consult a state map for more detailed information and to locate cities not shown on this map.

Cities by Region CENTRAL

Abó Albuquerque Belén Bernalillo Budaghers Corrales Cuba Edgewood Jémez Springs Los Lunas Los Ranchos de Albuquerque Manzano Moriarty Mountainair Placitas Ponderosa Rio Rancho Tomé

NORTHWEST

Aztec Bloomfield Crownpoint Farmington Fort Wingate Gallup Grants Milan Ramah Shiprock Thoreau

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NORTH CENTRAL

Abiquiú Angel Fire Cerrillos Chama Chimayó Dixon Elizabethtown Española Galisteo Lamy Los Alamos Madrid Ojo Caliente Peñasco Questa Red River Santa Fe Sipapu Taos Ranchos de Taos Village of Taos   Ski Valley Tierra Amarilla Truchas

NORTHEAST

Capulín Cimarrón Clayton Des Moines Eagle Nest Las Vegas Logan Maxwell Mora Pecos Raton Roy Santa Rosa Springer Tucumcari Wagon Mound

SOUTHEAST

Alamogordo Alto Artesia Capitán Carlsbad Carrizozo Cloudcroft Clovis Dexter Eunice Fort Sumner Hobbs Jal Lincoln Loving Lovington Melrose Portales Roswell Ruidoso/Ruidoso Downs Tatum Tularosa Whites City White Oaks

SOUTHWEST

Anthony Bernardo Chloride Columbus Datil Deming Elephant Butte Glenwood Hatch Hillsboro Kelly Las Cruces Lordsburg Magdalena Mesilla Pie Town Quemado Reserve Rodeo Santa Teresa Silver City Socorro Sunland Park Truth or Consequences Winston www.newmexico.org


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Travel Tips

CITY TEMPERATURES Average Highs/Lows (Fahrenheit) CITY JAN

APR

JULY

OCT

Alamogordo 57/28 78/44 95/65 78/46 Albuquerque 46/28 69/42 91/66 71/45 Angel Fire 44/10 55/18 78/45 65/25 Carlsbad 59/29 80/46 96/67 80/49 Chama 33/3 51/20 73/37 57/23 Cimarrón 47/19 63/33 83/55 67/36 Clayton 48/19 66/36 73/48 69/40 Cloudcroft 41/19 57/31 73/48 60/35 Clovis 52/23 72/40 91/63 73/43 Deming 55/26 77/42 95/66 78/46 Snow serenely dusts a vista of Santa Fe Baldy (12,622 feet) from Ravens Ridge Trail in the Santa Fe National Forest. PHOTO BY EFRAIN M. PADRO.

Weather & Temperatures New Mexico averages 256 sunny days a year. Some areas in the southern half of the state sometimes exceed 300 sunny days a year. New Mexico has four distinct seasons. Due to the range in elevation, different areas of the state can vary widely in temperature. Be prepared for strong temperature variations from day to night. The evening air

can be quite brisk— even in the summer— particularly in high altitudes. Visitors unfamiliar with the daily temperature fluctuations should consider dressing in layers. The high-altitude sunshine can be intense. Plan to wear sunscreen, a hat and/or sport sunglasses. Take time to drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration.

New Mexico Fast Facts Population: 2,009,671

Land Area:

121,599 sq. miles, including 234 sq. miles of inland water. New Mexico is the fifth largest state in area (behind Alaska, Texas, California and Montana).

State Capital:

Santa Fe, the oldest government seat in the U.S.

Statehood Day:

Jan. 6, 1912 (47th state in the Union)

Highest Point: Wheeler Peak (13,161 feet)

Lowest Point:

Red Bluff Reservoir, southeast of Carlsbad (2,842 feet)

State Fossil:

Gallup 43/14 63/31 87/53 67/34 Grants 45/11 67/27 87/52 69/29 Hobbs 58/28 78/47 94/67 78/49 Las Cruces 56/25 77/41 94/65 78/44 Las Vegas 46/18 62/31 83/54 66/36 Los Alamos 40/19 58/34 80/56 62/39 Portales 53/21 75/40 93/63 75/43 Raton 43/10 64/30 84/53 69/33 Red River 36/3 53/22 76/40 59/25 Rio Rancho 45/27 67/40 90/65 70/44

State Fish:

Roswell 56/27 73/40 88/66 79/46

Roadrunner

Río Grande Cutthroat Trout

State Animal: Black Bear

Ruidoso 50/17 65/28 82/48 68/31 Santa Fe 42/18 62/33 85/56 65/38

State Insect:

Santa Rosa 55/24 74/40 93/63 76/42

State Motto:

Silver City 49/24 67/37 87/59 70/41

Tarantula Hawk Wasp

State Gem: Turquoise

Crecit Eundo: ”It Grows as it Goes“

State Flower:

State Tie:

Yucca

Bolo Tie

State Tree:

State Question:

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Farmington 43/17 69/34 92/57 71/36

State Bird:

Coelophysis (“see-la-fisis”)

Piñon

Española 45/13 68/43 90/55 72/33

“Red or Green?”

Socorro 52/24 76/41 95/64 76/43 Taos 40/10 64/29 87/50 67/32 T or C 54/27 75/44 92/66 75/47 Tucumcari 52/24 72/42 94/65 75/45 www.newmexico.org


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City Elevations, In-State Mileages

4,250 186 279 297 323 413

59 428 309 374 118 401 386 287 515 303 354 363

44 217 424 132 422

Airline Travel & Train Riding Most visitors fly into New Mexico through the Albuquerque International Sunport (www.cabq.gov/airport). For details on ground transportation visit www.cabq.gov/airport/ ground-transportation. The New Mexico Railrunner offers commuter train service from Albuquerque south to BelÊn and north to Santa Fe. www.nmrailrunner.com 14  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Travelers coming to southern New Mexico generally fly into either El Paso International Airport in Texas (www.elpasointernationalairport.com) or Las Cruces International Airport (www.las-cruces.org/facilities/airport). Many cities have municipal airports. Contact the chambers of commerce for current information.

Amtrak offers passenger rail service through New Mexico with stops in Gallup, Albuquerque, Lamy, Las Vegas and Raton. For information: call (800) USA-RAIL (872-7245) or visit www.amtrak.com. For recreational train travel, see information on Page 81. www.newmexico.org


Distances To Albuquerque

CITY

MILES

KM

Atlanta

1,404

2,246

Boston

2,220

3,552

Chicago

1127

1814

Cincinnati

1,377

2,203

Dallas/Fort Worth

644

1,030

Denver

437

699

El Paso

266

425

Houston

853

1,364

Kansas City

777

1,243

Las Vegas

586

937

Los Angeles

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811

1,297

Miami

1,970

3,152

Minneapolis/St. Paul

1,219

1,950

New York

1,997

3,195

Oklahoma City

542

867

Phoenix

458

732

St. Louis

1,042

1,667

Salt Lake City

604

966

San Francisco

1,109

1,774

Seattle

1,453

2,324

Tucson

432

691

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  15


Special Needs Travelers

Hikers enjoy the geological wonders at Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument. PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

DISABLED TRAVELERS Despite New Mexico’s reputation for untamed terrain, numerous dining, lodging and public facilities are available for travelers with physical disabilities so they may enjoy many of our natural and cultural wonders. For free disability-related information and referrals contact The Information Center for New Mexicans with Disabilities via Baby Net and traditional phone (800) 552-8195, (505) 272-8549. In addition, contact the Governor’s Commission on Disabilities. (505) 827-6465, fax: (505) 827-6328. gcd.state.nm.us America the Beautiful/National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass/Access Pass/Free. National Park Service, Intermountain Region Support Office, 1100 Old Santa Fe Trail, P.O. Box 728, Santa Fe, 87504-0728. (505) 988-6888. (Passport: Free lifetime pass for U.S. citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities. Must be obtained in person at any national park or monument. Documentation required.) See website for details. www.nps.gov./fees_passes.htm SENIOR TRAVELERS & RETIREES Senior travelers rejoice in New Mexico’s mild climate, reasonable prices and numerous cultural 16  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

activities. New Mexico is retirement-friendly and welcomes older visitors and newcomers. Here is a list of valuable resources for senior travelers and retirees moving to New Mexico: Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce, Carlsbad Area Retirement Endeavor. P.O. Box 910, Carlsbad, 88221. (575) 887-6516. www.carlsbadchamber.com America the Beautiful/National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass/ Senior Pass. National Park Service, Intermountain Region Support Office, 1100 Old Santa Fe Trail, P.O. Box 728, Santa Fe, 87504-0728. (505) 988-6888. (Passport: 62 years or older, $10 lifetime, allows free entrance to any federal recreation area, 50 percent discount parking. Must be obtained in person at any national park or monument.) www.nps.gov./fees_passes.htm T or C Chamber of Commerce. 400 W. 4th St., P.O. Drawer 31, T or C, 87901. (575) 894-3536. www.truthorconsequenceschamberofcommerce.com. Retirement New Mexico by James Burbank published by New Mexico Magazine is a good source of information for prospective retirees and relocation in general. (800) 711-9525. www.nmmagazine.com

INTERNATIONAL VISITORS International travelers seek out New Mexico’s distinct blend of cultural diversity, rich history and exquisite scenic beauty. To travel in the United States, international visitors need a passport or visa, obtainable at any U.S. embassy or consulate. Here is a list of consulates based in New Mexico as well as other information for international visitors: Japanese Honorary Consulate. Davis & Ikuko Begay. Albuquerque. (505) 293-2322, fax: 293-0171. www.jpnconsulalbuq.org Mexican Consulate. Gustavo de Unanue. 1610 4th NW, Albuquerque. (505) 247-2147, fax: 842-9490. Spanish Honorary Consulate. Robert O. Moore. P.O. Box 91388, Albuquerque, 87199. (505) 280-1455. Other useful contacts for foreign visitors. Council on International Relations. Patti Poitras, executive director. 1210 Luisa, Suite 6, Santa Fe, 87505. (505) 982-4931, fax: 982-3953. www.sfcir.org INTERNATIONAL CURRENCY EXCHANGE Very few banks can exchange foreign currency in New Mexico. It is best to carry a universally recognized credit card. You might consider exchanging money when first landing in the United States in major airports in such cities as New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Dallas. Most businesses do not accept foreign currency. Los Alamos National Bank can exchange cash (not coins) at its branches in Los Alamos and Santa Fe. For information either send e-mail to lanb@lanb.com or call (505) 954-5400 and ask for international assistance.

KID SPOTS We’ve highlighted destinations and activities throughout this guide that will offer enjoyable experiences for your entire family. For our recommendations, look for the ✰ next to listings in each community. These certainly aren’t the only destinations your children will enjoy but are some of the best bets! www.newmexico.org


NEW MEXICO ACCOMMODATIONS DIRECTORY

www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  17


Know Before You Go History Prehistoric Times During prehistoric times, towering dinosaurs roamed in a tropical environment. An ice age engulfed the area after the giant reptiles vanished, and the sea, which once covered most of the state, receded. Glaciers from this ensuing cold period later melted and carved out high mountains. New Mexico’s First Residents About 10,000 B.C., the Clovis-Paleo Indians lived in the eastern plains. The ancestors of today’s Native Americans left behind bountiful archaeological evidence of their lifestyles. These ancient Indians dwelled in pit houses, cliffside caves and impressive stone structures. The Ancestral Pueblo people of Chaco Canyon in the northwest and the Mogollon of the southwest established peaceful agrarian-based societies by A.D. 1,000. Their descendents built most of the multistoried adobe pueblos found today. The nomadic Apache and Navajo tribes were the last Native Americans to arrive here about the same time as the first Spanish explorers. Spanish Exploration Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Estebanico the Moor and their companions are believed to be the first Europeans to see New Mexico. They arrived here a hundred years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock. Although Indians held them captive, they escaped in 1534 and returned to Mexico with stories of the lands they traveled. After hearing Estebanico’s stories of gold, Spanish explorer Francisco Vázquez de Coronado led the first group of Europeans to comprehensively explore the state in 1540. The Spanish conquistadors never found the fabled Seven Cities of Cíbola. Coronado, however, was successful in charting much of New Mexico. Juan de Oñate established the first official European colony in 1598, San Ga18  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Elizabethtown, a ghost town in northeastern New Mexico, was once a lively mining community. The state has many historic mining towns. PHOTO BY THEODORE GREER.

briel de Yungé, near the confluence of the Río Grande and Río Chama. His persistent colonists introduced many of the cultural traditions that flourish today. After Oñate was relieved of his command due to atrocities against Native Americans, Pedro de Peralta established Santa Fe as the new capital in 1607. Today Santa Fe reigns as the oldest U.S. capital. Catholic missionaries began fervently converting Indians to Christianity. Pueblo people resented relinquishing their beliefs and being forced to labor for the colonists. The Pueblo people of northern New Mexico united under Po’pay and launched the Pueblo Revolt in 1680. Scores of

Spanish settlers were killed; survivors fled south to Isleta Pueblo with many Christianized Indians and mestizos (persons of mixed blood). Under the leadership of Diego de Vargas, the Spanish reconquered the area between 1692 and 1695. The Spanish colonists survived on limited resources with crucial help from their Pueblo neighbors. The period of Spanish colonization gave way to a period of Mexican control when the country gained independence from Spain in 1821. The newly established Mexican government opened trade with the fledgling United States. Americans began trading with New Mexicans via the Santa Fe Trail. www.newmexico.org


ADVERTISEMENT

TOUR OPERATORS Boarding point: 303 Romero St., NW Albuquerque, NM 87104 Contact Person: Michael Silva or Jesse Herron 505-240-8000 info@abqtrolley.com www.abqtrolley.com The best first thing to do in Albuquerque. Hop on board an openair trolley for our 76-minute “Best of ABQ” city tour. Tour departs from Old Town Plaza. Rated #1 Attraction in Albuquerque on TripAdvisor.com. As seen on HGTV’s Frontdoor.com and NBC TODAY Show.

A WELL-BORN GUIDE/ HAVE PH.D., WILL TRAVEL

PO Box 1601 Santa Fe, NM 87504 Stefanie Beninato 505-988-8022 E-mail: info@swguides.com www.swguides.com Want a unique, entertaining experience with a local, professional historian? Try our regularly scheduled walks, hikes or step-on tours. Custom tours/tour management services.

GUIDED SCENIC TOURS

www.guidedscenictours.com 505-974-9704 Guided Scenic Tours offers the perfect tour which is designed to show you a natural, “less commercial” aspect of Albuquerque! Light walks and hikes are combined with a sight-seeing vehicle tour. Step out into nature, relax and enjoy while we do all of the driving!

NEW MEXICO HORSE ADVENTURES

PO Box 2328 Corrales, NM 87048 505-301-0917 Contact: Steve Simmons NewMexicoHorseAdventures.com This is an all-purpose vacation opportunity for horse lovers. We can do guided riding tours (bring your own horse, or use one of ours), photo opportunities with domestic and wild horses, horse-drawn carriage service and more.

NM GUIDES ORGANIZATION, LLC

PO Box 1601 Santa Fe, NM 87504 Stefanie Beninato 505-988-8022 E-mail: info@nmgo.com www.nmgo.com Want your own New Mexico/northern NM/Santa Fe experience? Excellent destination managers and expert, experienced tour guides for activities and events throughout the state and region.

NEW WAVE RAFTING CO/ FAR FLUNG ADVENTURES

www.NewWaveRafting.com 800-984-1444 www.FarFlung.com 800-359-2627 New Mexico’s top two rafting outfitters, offering the best multi-day, full-day, and half-day trips available. 50 years of experience on the Río Grande and Río Chama rivers of northern New Mexico.

PRIVATE BALLOON FLIGHTS

www.privateballoonflights.com 505-550-2677 888-550-2677 Private Balloon Flights specializes in personal flights of only you and your party with no other guests! Don’t get stuffed 8 to 12 elsewhere! All souvenirs and photos included! Accident-free balloon operator. Year-round flights! Adventure awaits! Call now!

SANTA FE MOUNTAIN ADVENTURES

310 Read Street Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-988-4000, Fax 505-988-4010 E-mail: info@sfmadv.com www.santafemountainadventures.com Exhilarating adventures for groups, families and adults. Hiking, rafting, biking, geocaching, Bandelier and Tent Rocks tours, cooking classes, plus other outdoor and cultural offerings.

SANTA FE RAFTING CO.

1000 Cerrillos Rd. Santa Fe, NM 505-988-4914 Toll-free 888-988-4914 We at Santa Fe Rafting Co. Inc, provide quality river rafting experiences for both the novice person who wants a float trip to experienced thrill seekers. Individuals and families alike have enjoyed Santa Fe Rafting river experiences for twenty-three years. For reservations, go to www.santaferafting.com or call our helpful reservation staff and we will be more than happy to assist you. Trips meet at 1000 Cerrillos Rd. in downtown Santa Fe.

SANTA FE TOUR GUIDES

PO Box 31655 Santa Fe, NM 87549 Pat Kuhlhoff 505-466-4877 E-mail: pglk@cybermesa.com www.santafetourguides.org Santa Fe Tour Guides is an organization of independent guides and destination managers available to assist you in all aspects of travel and touring in New Mexico.

SOUTHWEST SAFARIS

PO Box 945 Santa Fe, NM 87504 Bruce or Anna Adams 505-988-4246/800-842-4246 Fax: 505-983-6061 E-mail: swsafaris@qwest.net www.southwestsafaris.com Scenic airventures explore NM, CO, UT, AZ. Discover Santa Fe/local backcountry, Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, Canyon de Chelly, Mesa Verde, Arches. Geology – Archaeology – History – Bushflying – Jeeping – Photography. Depart/Return Santa Fe.

PHOTO: THEODORE GREER

ABQ TROLLEY CO.


The Territory of New Mexico Without firing a shot, U.S. Gen. Stephen Watts Kearny occupied Santa Fe in 1846, declaring New Mexico a U.S. territory. Once the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the Mexican-American War in 1848, New Mexico’s territorial status became official. During the Civil War, the Confederate Army occupied Santa Fe for several weeks until the battle of Apache Canyon in Glorieta. Another Civil War battle was fought at Valverde. During and after the Civil War, Chiricahua Apaches led by Cochise, Mangas Coloradas, Victorio and Geronimo roamed throughout Mexico, Arizona and New Mexico. Geronimo and his band of Chiricahua warriors refused to live in forced U.S. settlements and eluded the U.S. and Mexican armies for years. Geronimo surrendered in 1886, hoping for peace. Many U.S. Army enlistees in New Mexico at this time were known as Buffalo Soldiers, African-Americans who joined the service after the Civil War. When the railroad arrived in the 1880s, the southeastern plains became cattle kingdoms. Rivaling barons sparked the Lincoln County War, which transformed cowpuncher Billy the Kid into one of the world’s most famous outlaws. For more than 60 years, many factors prevented statehood for New Mexico after it was declared a U.S. territory. After many

attempts, New Mexico became the 47th state on Jan. 6, 1912. Statehood Shortly after statehood, filmmakers and artists flocked to the state. New Mexico has been a popular film backdrop since Thomas A. Edison shot the silent film Isleta Day School here in 1898. Filmmaking remains an important business. The state’s wide-open vistas inspired artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe and continues to attract artists. Since statehood, New Mexicans have served in the military. Notable among these valiant soldiers are the Navajo Code Talkers, who used their native language during World War II to transmit military secrets. While the thunder of war reverberated across the ocean, J. Robert Oppenheimer led the top-secret Manhattan Project in Los Alamos. The result was the development of the atomic bomb, which was tested at Trinity Site in central New Mexico on July 16, 1945. Today you can explore New Mexico by driving along the historic Route 66, the first continuous highway that, beginning in 1926, connected Illinois to California. Although Interstate 40 replaced much of the highway in the mid-1960s, many stretches of the two-lane road remain for nostalgia seekers and those who want to explore the Land of Enchantment.

Geology New Mexico’s diverse geologic landscape ranges from plains less than 3,000 feet in elevation to mountain peaks higher than 13,000 feet. Part of this landscape formed after the Cenozoic period when the prehistoric sea covering New Mexico receded and the Earth’s tectonic plates shifted, creating the Rocky Mountains. White Sands National Monument, the largest gypsum dune field in the world, is a glistening souvenir of this movement. The wave-like crests of sand cover 275 square miles. Other aspects of the state’s terrain developed from volcanic explosions. Geologists sometimes call New Mexico the “volcano state” in recognition of the abundance and diversity of volcanoes in the state. For example, the Valles Caldera is one of the youngest calderas (a collapsed area of land caused by a volcanic eruption) in the world. Formations such as Ship Rock and Little Black Peak remain as evidence of the state’s volcanic past. Some of the most intriguing geologic formations are found below ground. Circulating underground water deposited salt, gypsum and limestone, which shaped the maze of subterranean caves at Carlsbad Caverns National Park—one of the largest cave systems in the world. 20  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


Fauna & Flora Soaptree yuccas bloom in the desert at White Sands National Monument. PHOTO BY GAIL DIANE YOVANOVICH.

Celebrate the Centennial New Mexico is gearing up for the state centennial in 2012. Many communities such as Las Cruces, Raton and Santa Fe will have special activities beginning in the fall of 2011. Many of the festivities were not confirmed by press time. It’s best to contact the area chambers of commerce for details. For information on the centennial

visit www.nmcentennial.org. To learn more about the state’s history visit www.newmexicohistory.org. Check out the New Mexico Humanities Council’s fascinating online atlas of historic maps at atlas.nmhum.org. Also, find out about exhibitions at the New Mexico History Museum by logging on to www.nmhistorymuseum.org.

New Mexico has one of the most extraordinary collections of eco-regions in the United States. This is partly because of the wide range of elevations, from 3,000 to 13,000 feet, and the extremely varied rain and snowfall the state receives. Present vegetation types include tundra, forest, woodland, grassland, scrubland and riparian. Alpine tundra is found on the highest peaks in the state usually above 11,000 feet. Plants consist of very short grasses, sedges and dwarf cushion plants. Bighorn sheep, pikas and marmots make their home here. In the forested regions, aspen, spruce, fir and ponderosa pine dominate. Here an observant hiker may find black bear, mountain lion and elk and many species of wildflowers. The lower elevation savanna woodlands are covered by piñon pines and junipers. Scrub oak, mountain mahogany and apache plume thrive here. Mule deer, Coues’ white-tailed deer and many songbirds are abundant in the savannas. Grasslands and scrublands cover much of New Mexico, especially in the eastern and southern part of the state. Many species of grass grow within the state, along with mesquite, creosote bush, rabbit bush and various species of cold-tolerant succulents like yucca, prickly pear and cholla cactus. Dominant animals include pronghorn antelope, javelina (a wild pig-like mammal), mountain lion, deer, quail and rabbits. Riparian habitats are found alongside most streams and natural lakes. Here one finds huge cottonwood trees alongside an assortment of other native and exotic plants, such as Russian olive and salt cedar. Songbirds are everywhere in the tree canopies. www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  21


Cuisine & Vineyards

Posole and tortillas.

PHOTO BY LOIS ELLEN FRANK.

22  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

A Singular Regional Cuisine and a World of Flavors New Mexico has some of today’s best restaurants and chefs, a claim reinforced with James Beard awards and Food Network attention. New Mexicans still revere tradition yet they also embrace innovation and international flavors. Enjoy our regional cuisine, created over centuries from the early blend of Native and Spanish cultures and the later Anglo influences that first arrived via the Santa Fe Trail. Local chefs proudly serve a variety of food products from New Mexico’s farms, orchards and ranches. Savor dishes such as enchiladas, burritos, tamales, posole (hominy dish), sopaipillas, frybread, fiery carne adovada and stuffed pockets of cornmeal dough called gorditas. Even if you have had versions of these dishes elsewhere in the Southwest or Mexico, you will be delighted with the differences. Don’t overlook our newer fun food traditions too, like red chile-drenched Frito pies

and green chile cheeseburgers. Travel the New Mexico Green Chile Cheeseburger Trail (www.newmexico.org/greenchilecheeseburger) to sample the best. Check out your many culinary options at www.newmexico.org/cuisine. Wine Trails New Mexico is the oldest wine-producing region in the United States. Spanish missionaries planted grapevines throughout the region in the 1600s. Today, Chardonnay, Merlot and Zinfandel grapes, among others, still flourish under warm days and cool nights in New Mexico’s high deserts. The state is home to more than 40 vineyards and dozens of places to sample wine. The New Mexico Wine Growers Association has designated New Mexico Wine Trails. For information on tasting rooms, festivals and tours in New Mexico, go to www.nmwine.com or call (866) 494-6366. Get other details by logging on to www.newmexico.org/cuisine/wineries.

www.newmexico.org


Dining Out SANTA FE

THE PLAZA CAFE IN THE HEART of Santa Fe’s historic Plaza. Since 1905 the Plaza has served New Mexican, American and Greek food. Come enjoy our casual and friendly atmosphere. Whether in the mood for huevos rancheros or moussaka the Plaza is the place. Open daily from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. at 54 Lincoln Ave. (505) 982-1664

CAFE

&

BAKERY

OUR NATIVE FUSION CUISINE is inspired by the traditions and ingredients cultivated by our ancestors. We bring 25 years of experience to the table, and we are enthusiastic about crafting delicious food that will bring diners back to us again and again! Pueblo Harvest Café and Bakery, 2401 12th St. NW (505) 724-3510, www.indianpueblo.com

TAOS MESILLA

FAMOUS STEAKHOUSE offering house-aged steaks, fresh seafood, as well as award-winning margaritas and an award-winning wine list. Dine in a National Historic Register adobe home filled with turn-of-the-century antiques, art and Baccarat chandeliers. Adjoining Peppers Café offers New Mexican cuisine and the World’s Largest Green Chile Cheeseburger at 20 ounces of select beef on a 12-inch yeast bun. Located on the Plaza in Historic Old Mesilla. (575) 523-6700, www.double-eagle-mesilla.com

CELEBRATING 70 YEARS! Still everyone’s favorite stop on the old Butterfield Stagecoach Line, La Posta continues to offer its traditional hospitality, award-winning Mexican food and steaks, and the southwest’s finest margaritas to all who visit. National historic landmark. Tropical birds and fish. Gift shops. Located on the plaza in historic Old Mesilla. (575) 524-3524

www.newmexico.org

THE RENOWNED RANCHO DE CHIMAYÓ RESTAURANTE has been serving traditional native New Mexican cuisine derived from treasured family recipes in an exceptional setting since 1965. Open 7 days a week, May through October, 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and 6 days a week (closed Mondays) November through April, 11:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Breakfast served on weekends from 8:30 a.m. Call for reservations. (505) 984-2100. Online store is now open. www.ranchodechimayo.com

ESPAÑOLA

DOC MARTIN’S RESTAURANT is located in the historic Taos Inn. Chef “Zippy” White creates innovative contemporary American cuisine using the freshest local ingredients. Elegant fine dining in a casual, historic setting. Winner of Wine Spectator’s “Best of” Award of Excellence for 22 consecutive years. Delectable desserts. Kitchen garden on site. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, Sunday brunch. Reservations recommended. 125 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, (575) 758-1977, docmartinsrestaurant.com

FINE DINING BEGINS WITH EXQUISITE culinary artistry matched with impeccable service and an elegant setting at the Black Mesa Steakhouse, located at the Santa Claran Hotel • Casino. Savor the finest of prime aged steaks, chops and seafood selections. Complement the perfect evening with a lovely selection of wines and decadent desserts. Open Wednesday through Saturday, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Black Mesa Steakhouse, 460 N. Riverside Drive, Española, NM 87532. Reservations: (505) 367-4547.

WINE SPECTATOR AWARD OF EXCELLENCE. Experience honest, creative, not fussy food at the “Best of Taos” award winner for overall restaurant, ambiance, outstanding chef and customer service. Award winning wines and beer complement every memorable meal. Enjoy breakfast, lunch or dinner inside or on our outdoor patio while perusing Chef Lesley’s cookbook, “Straight from the Heart.” www.open-table.com, (575) 751-1350 106 Paseo del Pueblo Norte

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  23

www.nmmagazine.com | MAY 2010 1


Top Events Mark your calendars! APRIL 28-30

NC NW

NE C

SW

SE

APRIL 27-MAY 1

GATHERING OF NATIONS POWWOW (Albuquerque)

SRAM TOUR OF THE GILA (Silver City)

www.gatheringofnations.com (505) 836-2810

www.tourofthegila.com, (575) 388-3222

Delight in the Gathering of Nations Powwow at the University of New Mexico Arena, The Pit, in Albuquerque. More than 3,000 dancers compete, representing more than 500 tribes from Canada, the United States and Mexico. About 800 visitors will participate in the Indian Traders Market that weekend. The public is invited to experience Native culture. Photo by Derek Mathews, courtesy of Gathering of Nations Limited.

MAY 27-29

ROSWELL HIKE IT AND SPIKE IT www.roswellgridiron.com (575) 623-5695 ext. 120, (877) 849-7679 ext.120 With male, female and coed divisions based on age and experience, the Hike It and Spike It is truly fun for the whole family. This 4-on-4 flag football tourney features Character Counts and Down and Out Bowl awards for every division. The Show Me the Money division competes for $15,000 in cash prizes. Photo Courtesy of Roswell Chamber of Commerce. 24  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Cycle Grant County roads and view top professionals in this major USA Cycling event, described by Lance Armstrong as an American Classic. The tour’s five stages include the Mogollon and Inner Loop road races, the Tyrone individual time trial, the Downtown Criterium and the Gila Monster Road Race, which is considered one of the best days of racing in the country. Spectators may especially enjoy Saturday’s criterium and citizens’ race. Photo by Dan Monahan.

JULY 1-3

PORK & BREW BBQ STATE CHAMPIONSHIP AND JULY 4TH CELEBRATION (Rio Rancho) www.RioRanchoNM.org/PorkandBrew (505) 891-7258, (888) 746-7262 This is a family–friendly event you won’t want to miss and the perfect way to spend the Fourth of July weekend. Competitors from across the country vie for tastiest barbecue. Continuous live entertainment, fireworks, fun jumps, pig races and, of course, food galore. Photo courtesy of the Santa Ana Star Center. www.newmexico.org


www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  25


JULY 1-3

JULY 8-10

ROSWELL UFO FESTIVAL

SANTA FE INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET

www.roswellufofestival.com (888) ROS-FEST

www.folkartmarket.org (505) 476-1200

Discover the mystery of the 1947 Roswell Incident with presentations and lectures at the Roswell UFO Festival. The weekend of events includes an alien costume competition, an evening parade along Main Street, a street dance and musical concerts. A motorcycle rally, an air show and the Alien Chase (a walk/run that encourages participants to wear alien costumes) top off the celebration. Photo by Julien McRoberts.

Visit the largest international folk art market in the world, designed to have a positive impact on the communities represented by more than 170 participating artists. With wares from more than 50 countries, the Folk Art Market features a huge variety of artistic styles and media. Enjoy ethnic cuisine, music and dance performances. (Milner Plaza on Museum Hill, next to the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe.) Shuttle bus from downtown. Photo by Charles Mann.

JULY 30-31

TRADITIONAL & CONTEMPORARY SPANISH MARKET (Santa Fe) Traditional: www.spanishmarket.org (505) 982-2226 Contemporary: www.elmuseocultural.org (505) 992-0591 The Museum of Spanish Colonial Arts presents the Traditional Spanish Market. More than 250 artists compete for prizes and sell their work on the Santa Fe Plaza. El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe also presents the Contemporary Spanish Market (just off the Plaza on Lincoln Avenue). Photo by Charles Mann. 26  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

AUGUST 10-14

GALLUP INTER-TRIBAL INDIAN CEREMONIAL www.theceremonial.com (505) 863-3896 The All-Indian Invitational Rodeo, street parades, ceremonial dances, arts and crafts, food booths and queen’s pageant draw thousands to Gallup and the beautiful Red Rock Park (the center of most activities) for the Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial. Photo by Theodore Greer.

www.newmexico.org


AUGUST 20-21

SANTA FE INDIAN MARKET www.swaia.org (505) 983-5220 About 1,200 Indian artists compete for prizes and sell their work from more than 600 booths lining the Santa Fe Plaza and surrounding streets during the market, sponsored by the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts. Free entertainment on the Plaza adds to the festive atmosphere, as well as traditional foods sold at nearby booths. Photo by Julien McRoberts.

SEPTEMBER 3-5

HATCH CHILE FESTIVAL www.hatchchilefest.com (575) 522-1232 Tempt your taste buds with New Mexico’s most famous crop. Food booths, arts and crafts, chile-eating contests, live entertainment, a horseshoe tournament, a carnival and a parade add to the festivities of this annual event, which has been featured on the Food Network. Fresh and roasted Hatch chile abounds. Photo courtesy of Tom McConnell.

www.newmexico.org

AUGUST 25-28

GREAT AMERICAN DUCK RACE (Deming) www.demingduckrace.com (575) 544-0469 This family funfest features feisty waterfowl fighting feathery foes in speedy duck races throughout the day. Other favorite activities include a tortilla toss, the Great American Outhouse Race, food booths, craft vendors and nonstop entertainment. Photo by Dan Monahan.

SEPTEMBER 5

ALL AMERICAN FUTURITY (Ruidoso) www.RaceRuidoso.com (575) 378-4431 The world’s richest quarter-horse race caps off the racing season on Labor Day Weekend at beautiful Ruidoso Downs, nestled in the Sacramento Mountains outside Ruidoso. Photo by Gay Harris.

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  27


SEPTEMBER 8-11

SEPTEMBER 9-11

CLOVIS MUSIC FESTIVAL

FIESTA DE SANTA FE

www.clovismusicfestival.net (575) 763-3435

www.santafefiesta.org (505) 204-1598

A celebration of Clovis’ rich music history, and the “Clovis Sound” made popular by such timeless greats as Buddy Holly and Roy Orbison. Other events include tours of the Norman Petty Studios and the Norman and Vi Petty Rock and Roll Museum, a symposium by the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame, a “Kids Rock” Rock and Roll Assembly, a Rockin’ Motorcycle Rally, the Annual Desert Cruzers Run to Hillcrest Car Show, Fanfare and to finish off the weekend festivities, a Rockin’ Gospel Sing-a-long on Sunday morning. Photo Courtesy of Clovis/Curry County Chamber of Commerce.

Fiesta de Santa Fe commemorates the resettlement of Santa Fe in 1692 by Gen. Don Diego de Vargas. The event begins with a Mass and features mariachi music, an arts and crafts fair, a children’s parade, the Hysterical/Historical Parade, continuous entertainment on the Santa Fe Plaza and food booths. It concludes with a candlelight procession to the Cross of the Martyrs. The Kiwanis Club sponsors the burning of Zozobra, a separate event, on Sep. 8. For information on Zozobra call (505) 988-1234 or check www.zozobra.com on the web. Photo Courtesy of Santa Fe Fiesta, Inc.

SEPTEMBER 9-25

SEPTEMBER 23-25

NEW MEXICO STATE FAIR (Albuquerque)

WHOLE ENCHILADA FIESTA (Las Cruces)

www.exponm.com (505) 222-9700

www.enchiladafiesta.com (575) 526-1938

Featuring PRCA-sanctioned rodeos, premier country and rock entertainers, cultural villages representing New Mexico’s rich diversity, the largest carnival in the state, juried art shows in a broad variety of media and categories, traditional fair food and local cuisine and a heavy emphasis on New Mexico’s agricultural and cutting-edge industries—literally something for everyone. Photo by Theodore Greer.

Come, see and sample a world-record breaking enchilada so huge it requires 75 gallons of red chile sauce, 175 pounds of shredded cheese and 750 pounds of ground corn. Enjoy live music and entertainment on two stages, a fiesta parade, a carnival, a 4x4 truck and car show, a horseshoe and huacha tournament, a 5k-run and a fun run. Courtesy Photo, by David Carillo.

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OCTOBER 1-9

ALBUQUERQUE INTERNATIONAL BALLOON FIESTA® www.balloonfiesta.com (888) 422-7277 Experience the world’s largest ballooning event. See about 700 balloons launch throughout the fiesta, with large mass ascensions beginning at dawn at Balloon Fiesta Park. Special events include the evening balloon glows, the Special Shapes Rodeo and balloon races. Photo by Charles Mann.

NOVEMBER 16-21

OCTOBER 7-9

LINCOLN COUNTY COWBOY SYMPOSIUM (Ruidoso) www.cowboysymposium.org (575) 378-4431 Poets, musicians, cooks, Western artists and crafstmen converge at Ruidoso Downs for a three-day celebration of all things Western. Cowboys and cowgirls of all ages will enjoy the concerts and dances (with all-day entertainment on five stages), vendor expo, trail rides, Craig Cameron horsemanship demonstrations, Kid’s Rodeo, Extreme Cowboy Racing and a Chuck-wagon Cookoff. Photo by Charles Mann.

NOVEMBER 26-DECEMBER 31

FESTIVAL OF THE CRANES (Socorro)

CHRISTMAS ON THE PECOS (Carlsbad)

www.festivalofthecranes.com (575) 835-1828, (575) 835-8927

www.christmasonthepecos.com (575) 628-0952

Observe the return of cranes and numerous other birds to the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. The festival features tours, lectures and exhibits. Photo by Gail Diane Yovanovich.

A leisurely riverboat tour featuring more than 100 homes decorated in holiday lights along the banks of the Pecos River. Board a pontoon and experience the holiday magic during this 45-minute excursion. Tours depart nightly (except on Christmas Eve). Photo Courtesy of Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce.

www.newmexico.org

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Central C

San Ysidro 25

40

Edgewood

Clines Corners 41

6

47

SOME REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS: Albuquerque Museum of Art and History PAGE 105. Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum PAGE 37. Albuquerque Aquarium PAGE 104. ¡Explora! PAGE 37. Indian Pueblo Cultural Center PAGE 105. Jémez State Monument PAGE 36. Luna Mansion PAGE 139. N.M. Museum of Natural History and Science PAGE 36. National Hispanic Cultural Center PAGE 108. Petroglyph National Monument PAGE 36. Río Grande Zoological Park PAGE 104. Sandía Peak Aerial Tramway PAGE 37. Unser Racing Museum PAGE 108.

Opposite—Scenic waterfalls on the Guadalupe River, about 12 miles northwest of Jemez Pueblo. Inset—The State Fair midway at Expo New Mexico. PHOTOS BY THEODORE GREER.

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entral New Mexico offers an abundance of bright, colorful landscapes, coupled with urban vitality. Witness the sky unfolding its endless blue horizons while you ride the world’s longest aerial tramway to Sandía Crest. Look down on Albuquerque, the state’s largest city, from an elevation of more than 10,000 feet as sunset turns the mountains a dusky shade of pink. Imagine looking up at hundreds of lazily drifting hot-air balloons of every shape and color. The tempting aroma of kettle corn permeates the air, while the glow of a rising balloon’s burner eases the pre-dawn chill. Spectators and balloonists from all over the world flock to Albuquerque every October for the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta®. Drive along Albuquerque’s old Route 66, now Central Avenue, to visit the shops in Nob Hill and the museums of nearby Old Town Plaza. From there you’re only minutes from the Albuquerque Biological Park, which features an aquarium, zoo and botanic garden. For those traveling without a car, the New Mexico Rail Runner Express commuter train whisks visitors through the cental corridor of the region and beyond to Santa Fe. Albuquerque provides a great base for a variety of day trips in the region. Thousands of intricate rock carvings at the Petroglyph National Monument open a window on the Río Grande Valley’s many past inhabitants. Centuries-old pueblos in this region include Jemez, Zia, Santa Ana, Sandia, Isleta, Santo Domingo, San Felipe and Cochiti.


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Scenic Drives Explore New Mexico’s Scenic Byways

The panoramic Valles Caldera National Preserve, in northern New Mexico.

PHOTO BY MIKE BUTTERFIELD.

The Heart of New Mexico CENTRAL ITINERARIES Day 1: Albuquerque. Places to Go: Old Town Plaza, numerous museums, Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, Central Avenue (Nob Hill and Route 66 districts), National Hispanic Cultural Center. Day 2: Albuquerque. Places to Go: Albuquerque Biological Park (zoo, aquarium, botanical park), Sandia Peak Tramway.

Coronado State Monument

Jemez Pueblo Zia Pueblo Santa Ana Pueblo

Day 3: Albuquerque, Rio Rancho. Places to Go: Petroglyph National Monument, specialty museums and sporting events at the University of New Mexico, and J&R Vintage Auto Museum. Day 4: Corrales, Bernalillo, Jémez Mountain Trail Scenic Byway. Places to Go: Casa San Ysidro, Coronado State Monument, Zia Pueblo, Santa Ana Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Jémez Hot Springs. Day 5: Belén, Los Lunas, El Camino Real Scenic Byway, Mountainair. Places to Go: Harvey House Museum in Belén, Tomé, Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument.

Abo at Salinas Pueblo Missions Nat’l Monument

PLEASE REFER TO A STATE MAP FOR MORE DETAIL. For spectacular drives around the state, travel on one of 25 Scenic Byways. To find out about the Scenic Byways in New Mexico, log on to www.newmexico.org/explore/scenic_byways/index.php, call (800) 545-2070 or e-mail: enchantment@newmexico.org.

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Top Attractions Central

PETROGLYPH NATIONAL MONUMENT

NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENCE

(Albuquerque)

(Albuquerque)

www.nps.gov/petr (505) 899-0205

www.nmnaturalhistory.org (505) 841-2800

Take a look at the estimated 20,000 carved images, including complex carvings and incised images of animals, people and crosses. Also behold the area’s natural wonders, including a variety of wildlife and remnants of volcanic activity. The monument on the western outskirts of Albuquerque features several hiking trails and is open year-round. The visitor center, open daily, offers park maps and travel tips. Photo by Laurence Parent.

The ancient past comes to life at this interactive, high-tech museum, which features an “active” walk-through volcano exhibit, Ice Age cave, hands-on discovery center and dinosaurs galore. View films on a five-story giant screen in the Lockheed Martin DynaTheater. Take a journey through our solar system and beyond at the planetarium. Photo courtesy New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

OLD TOWN ALBUQUERQUE

JÉMEZ STATE MONUMENT

www.albuquerqueoldtown.com (505) 842-8102

www.nmmonuments.org (575) 829-3530

Stroll through the city’s first neighborhood and the hub of village life since 1706. Brick walkways invite travelers to survey galleries, shop in boutiques and visit artists’ studios, while rustic patios tempt travelers to people-watch from shady havens. The historic San Felipe de Neri Church and the plaza’s central gazebo are also must-see attractions. Photo by Charles Mann.

Visit the stone ruins of Giusewa, an Indian village built 500 years ago by the Jemez Pueblo people’s ancestors. The Towa name, Giusewa, refers to nearby hot springs. See the ruins of San José de los Jémez Mission, built using Pueblo labor around the time the Pilgrims landed on Plymouth Rock. The site is 43 miles north of Bernalillo. Photo by Charles Mann.

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ANDERSON-ABRUZZO ALBUQUERQUE INTERNATIONAL BALLOON MUSEUM www.cabq.gov/balloon (505) 768-6020 The Balloon Museum is a world-class facility whose collections and programs highlight the history, culture, science, art and sport of lighter-than-air flight. From the earliest flights in the 1700s to Graf Zeppelin, Strato-Lab and beyond, the museum provides a entertaining and educational experience for all ages, and an unmatched view of the hundreds of hot-air balloons during the annual Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta®. Photo courtesy of Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum.

ALBUQUERQUE BIOLOGICAL PARK www.cabq.gov/biopark (505) 768-2000 Roam the ABQ BioPark Aquarium, Botanic Garden, Zoo and Tingley Beach for adventurous and educational experiences. The ABQ BioPark offers narrow-gauge train rides through the zoo and between the four attractions, located between Old Town and the Río Grande Bosque. Highlights include Mexican wolves and mountain lions at the zoo and a butterfly pavilion at the Botanic Garden. Photo by Charles Mann.

SANDIA PEAK TRAMWAY

¡EXPLORA!

(Albuquerque)

(Albuquerque)

www.sandiapeak.com (505) 856-7325

www.explora.us (505) 224-8300 (505) 224-8323 Español

A trip on the world’s longest aerial tramway transports you above deep canyons along the rugged rock escarpment of the Sandía Mountains in the Cíbola National Forest. See nature’s beauty unfold as you travel 2.7 miles to an elevation of 10,378 feet where you can enjoy an 11,000-square-mile panoramic view of the Land of Enchantment. Photo by Julien McRoberts. www.newmexico.org

Explora is a new kind of learning place, providing real experiences that put peoples’ learning into their own hands. Explora is a place where families can learn together through 250 experiential exhibit activities in science, technology and art for all ages. Photo by Mark Kane. 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  37


Northwest K

nown as Indian Country, the northwest showcases a mixture of living tradition, ancient history and fascinating geology. The national parks, monuments and museums embody the region’s warm embrace of a treasured past. Come celebrate at the InterTribal Indian Ceremonial in Gallup or enjoy one of the city’s daily summer dances. About three-quarters of New Mexico’s Native population make their home here, including residents of the Jicarilla Apache Nation, the Laguna and Zuni pueblos and the Navajo Nation. Visit the Aztec Ruins National Monument or the Salmon Ruins Museum to see faithful re-creations of daily ancient life. Chaco Culture National Historical Park contains the site of a massive stone ruin, formerly the home of Ancestral Pueblo people who cultivated an amazingly advanced civilization for their time. The adventurous visitor in search of hiking and camping can explore the extinct volcanoes of El Malpais National Monument, the dusty trails and ruins of El Morro National Monument or the underground ice deposits of Bandera Crater. Descend into a simulated uranium mine at the New Mexico Mining Museum in Grants. Outdoorsmen can partake in guided big-game hunting on Indian lands. World-class fishing attracts anglers to Farmington’s Quality Waters of the San Juan River, offering some of the best rainbow trout fishing in the nation.

491

Nageezi

Whitehorse

9

Crownpoint

40

SOME REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS: Aztec Ruins National Monument PAGE 43. Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness Areas PAGE 115. Chaco Culture National Historical Park PAGE 42. Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction PAGE 123. El Malpais National Monument PAGE 42. El Morro National Monument PAGE 43. Gallup Cultural Center PAGE 128. New Mexico Mining Museum PAGE 130 . Salmon Ruins Museum PAGE 115 . Ship Rock PAGE 158. Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary PAGE 144 .

Opposite—Ship Rock, a prominent natural landmark on Navajo Nation land, rises 1,600 feet above the desert floor to an altitude of 7,177 feet above sea level. PHOTO BY ADAM SCHALLAU.

Inset—An inquisitive resident of Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary in Ramah. PHOTO BY JULIEN MCROBERTS.

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Scenic Drives Explore New Mexico’s Scenic Byways

Eroded pinnacles and badlands take in last light in the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness, south of Farmington.

PHOTO BY LAURENCE PARENT.

Indian Country U.S.A. NORTHWEST ITINERARIES Day 1: Acoma Pueblo, Grants. Places to Go: Acoma Pueblo (Sky City), sections near I-40 are original Route 66, El Malpais National Monument, Bandera Volcano and Ice Caves. Day 2: Gallup, Zuni Pueblo. Places to Go: Historic Route 66 sites, downtown shops, trading posts, museums, El Morro National Monument, Zuni Pueblo.

Aztec Ruins Nat’l Monument

FARMINGTON Ship Rock Peak

PLEASE REFER TO A STATE MAP FOR MORE DETAIL.

JICARILLA Bloomfield

NAVAJO

APACHE NATION

NATION

Nageezi

Cuba

Chaco Culture Nat’l Historical Park

Day 3: Chaco Culture National Historical Park, Ship Rock Peak, Farmington. Places to Go: Chaco Culture National Historical Park, Ship Rock Peak, Four Corners Monument, Gateway Park and Museum, Piñon Hills Golf Course. Day 4: Bloomfield, Aztec, Dulce. Places to Go: Salmon Ruins/Heritage Park, Aztec Ruins National Monument, alleged Aztec UFO Crash Site, Navajo Lake State Park and Quality Waters of San Juan River, Jicarilla Apache Nation.

Salmon Ruins

Chama

Navajo Lake State Park

Aztec

White Horse

GALLUP

Casamero Pueblo Ruins

Thoreau

Zuni Pueblo

Prewitt

El Malpais Nat’l Monument El Morro Nat’l Monument

GRANTS ALBUQUERQUE Acoma Pueblo

For spectacular drives around the state, travel on one of 25 Scenic Byways. To find out more about the Scenic Byways in New Mexico, log on to www.newmexico.org/explore/scenic_byways/index.php, call (800) 545-2070 or e-mail: enchantment@newmexico.org.

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Top Attractions Northwest

CHACO CULTURE NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK

EL MALPAIS NATIONAL MONUMENT

(Crownpoint)

(Grants)

www.nps.gov/chcu (505) 786-7014

www.nps.gov/elma (505) 783-4774

Named a World Heritage Site, archaeologists have dated these impressive Ancestral Puebloan ruins from A.D. 850 to 1250. The park features 13 major ruins and 49 campsites. It is 74 miles south of Farmington and 69 miles north of Cuba, off U.S. 550. You can find restaurants and accommodations in Farmington, Gallup and Cuba. The entrance road can get muddy during rainstorms. Photo by Adam Schallau.

Prepare for exciting adventures in this rugged terrain between Grants and Gallup. Hiking, primitive camping and diverse wildlife await those who venture into El Malpais (badlands in Spanish). Evidence of volcanic activity abounds. Visitors can see cinder cones, lava tubes and pressure ridges. Take scenic drives to see prehistoric ruins and unusual rock formations. Photo by Brian Leddy.

It all begins September 2011 www.nmcentennial.org (505) 984-2012 42  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

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EL MORRO NATIONAL MONUMENT

AZTEC RUINS NATIONAL MONUMENT

(Gallup)

(Aztec)

www.nps.gov/elmo/ (505) 783-4226

www.nps.gov/azru/ (505) 334-6174

Follow Inscription Trail to a sandstone bluff where more than 2,000 signatures and messages were written by early Pueblo people, Spanish explorers and American travelers. The top of the bluff offers wide-open vistas and Ancestral Puebloan ruins. The monument lies west of Grants and southeast of Gallup. The visitor center features interpetive programs, a bookstore and more. Photo by Theodore Greer.

Take a self-guided tour of the 12th- and 13th-century Ancestral Puebloan ruins and a reconstructed great kiva, considered to be the oldest and largest building of its kind. See ancient artifacts in the visitor center. The monument in the city of Aztec offers craft demonstrations, lectures and interpretive walks. Photo by Mark Kane.

www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  43


North Central Costilla

Dulce

84

Chama

522

285

64

64

110

Lindrith

38

64 Taos Ski

Valley

111

Ranchos de Taos

El Rito Abiquiu

Red River Angel Fire

Tierra Amarilla 537

Questa

Ojo Caliente

68

285

150

TAOS

518

75

~ Dixon Penasco ~ ESPANOLA 76 Chimayo Los Alamos 502

SANTA FE

25

Lamy

14 Cerrillos

Madrid

285

SOME REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS: Bandelier National Monument PAGE 50. Bradbury Science Museum PAGE 52.

F

rom the picturesque Santa Fe Plaza, to the celebrated World Heritage Site of Taos Pueblo and the scientific community of Los Alamos, this region quietly mingles the past, present and future. The Sangre de Cristo Mountains (blood of Christ in Spanish) are visible from almost any point in the area. Named for their red hue at sunset, these rolling peaks and valleys are the hub for a variety of outdoor pursuits. In Chama, experience the splendor of the Rocky Mountains on an unhurried ride on the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad. Nestled in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristos is Taos Pueblo, continuously inhabited for more than 1,000 years. The nearby town of Taos has garnered national renown for its vibrant art scene. Taos is also one of six destinations on the Enchanted Circle, an 86-mile loop through mountainous terrain featuring some of New Mexico’s finest ski resorts, fishing, golf, river rafting and horseback riding. Santa Fe, the state capital, has a wealth of museums, galleries and markets. With almost daily concerts throughout the summer months, the Santa Fe Plaza offers a lively place for shopping as well as experiencing the much-loved traditions and culture. An easy daytrip away from Santa Fe, Bandelier National Monument features paths to ruins of ancient cliff dwellings waiting to be explored and hiking trails overlooking gorgeous waterfalls. Head into Los Alamos and visit the Bradbury Science Museum, where you can learn about the development, use and consequences of nuclear technology.

Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad PAGE 50. Enchanted Circle PAGE 50. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum PAGE 151. Museum Hill PAGE 52. New Mexico Museum of Art PAGE 152. New Mexico Museum of History/Palace of the Governors PAGE 151. Oñate Monument and Visitors Center PAGE 126. Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park PAGE 112.

Opposite—A statue of St. Francis of Assisi stands sentry outside San Francisco de Asis Church, built circa 1815, in Ranchos de Taos, PHOTO BY EFRAIN M. PADRO.

Inset—The Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park, in Angel Fire, features a Vietnam-era Huey helicopter. PHOTO BY ADAM SCHALLAU.

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Scenic Drives Explore New Mexico’s Scenic Byways

Río Grande Gorge Bridge, northwest of Taos, spans the Río Grande.

PHOTO BY TERRY THOMPSON.

Rocky Mountains Historical Treasure NORTH CENTRAL ITINERARIES Day 1: La Cienega, Turquoise Trail. Places to Go: El Rancho de Las Golondrinas Living History Museum, Cerrillos, Madrid, Golden, numerous historic mining curiosities along the way. Day 2: Española, Chimayó, Taos, Ojo Caliente. Places to Go: Oñate Visitor Center, Santa Clara Pueblo, Embudo Station, Pilar, Santuario de Chimayó, Rancho de Chimayó, High Road to Taos, Truchas, Sipapu Ski and Summer Resort, Ranchos de Taos Church, Taos Plaza, Taos Ski Valley, Río Grande Gorge Bridge, Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs. Day 3: Enchanted Circle. Places to Go: Questa, Red River, Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park, Wild Rivers Recreation Area, Cabrestro Lake, Red River State Trout Hatchery, historical and recreational attractions in Angel Fire and Eagle Nest. Day 4: Abiquiú, Chama. Places to Go: Ohkay Owingeh, Georgia O’Keeffe house, Abiquiú Lake, Echo Amphitheater, Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad.

Chama

Cumbres &Toltec Scenic Railroad Wild Rivers Questa

Tierra Amarilla

Ghost Ranch

Río Grande Gorge Bridge

Red River Enchanted Circle Taos Ski Valley Eagle Nest Taos Pueblo

TAOS Abiquiú

Angel Fire Ski Area Angel Fire

Pilar Ohkay Owingeh

ESPAÑOLA Santa Clara Pueblo

Los Alamos

San Ildefonso Pueblo Nambe Pueblo

Bandelier Nat’l Monument La Cienega

Santa Fe National Historic Trail

Chimayó

SANTA FE

Mora

LAS VEGAS

Madrid Turquoise Trail

Day 5: Los Alamos, Jémez Mountains. Places to Go: San Ildefonso Pueblo, Tsankawi Ruins, Fuller Lodge, Bradbury Science Museum, Bandelier National Monument, Valles Caldera National Preserve. Day 6: Santa Fe. Places to Go: Museum of New Mexico facilities and other private museums, Canyon Road art galleries, Santa Fe National Forest, Plaza and historic downtown area, Santa Fe Opera, Marty Sanchez Links de Santa Fe Golf Course, numerous other points of interest. PLEASE REFER TO A STATE MAP FOR MORE DETAIL. For spectacular drives around the state, travel on one of 25 Scenic Byways. To find out more about the Scenic Byways in New Mexico, log on to www.newmexico.org/explore/scenic_byways/index.php, call (800) 545-2070 or e-mail: enchantment@newmexico.org.

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Top Attractions North Central

TURQUOISE TRAIL NATIONAL SCENIC BYWAY

BANDELIER NATIONAL MONUMENT

(Cerrillos, Madrid)

(Los Alamos)

www.turquoisetrail.org (505) 438-8711

www.nps.gov/band (505) 672-3861 ext. 517

Use all your senses to tour the back roads. Experience 15,000 square miles of old mining towns, natural wonders, quaint galleries and gift shops. The area’s turquoise and lead deposits were used in jewelry and pottery made by prehistoric Indians, while Spain’s crown jewels also contain turquoise mined here. The byway stretches from Tijeras past San Marcos and Lone Butte. Photo by Gail Diane Yovanovich.

Walk the 1.2-mile loop, ascend the wooden ladders and climb the stone stairs to view petroglyphs and Ancestral Pueblo dwellings in Frijoles Canyon. The park has a visitor center and campgrounds for families and for groups. Visitors may also hike the trail up to the mesa top in the Tsankawi section or explore the 72 miles of backcountry trails in the Bandelier Wilderness. Photo by Theodore Greer.

CUMBRES & TOLTEC SCENIC RAILROAD

ENCHANTED CIRCLE

(Chama)

(Angel Fire, Eagle Nest, Taos)

www.cumbrestoltec.com (888) 286-2737

www.enchantedcircle.org (877) 885-3885

Depart from Chama on America’s longest and highest steam-operated train. The outing combines history with scenery and machinery, since this narrow-gauge steam locomotive, built in 1880, is preserved and esteemed as a living history museum running between Colorado and New Mexico. Passengers may choose to ride in the elegant parlor car, tourist or coach class seating. Take in spectacular views from the open-air platform. Photo by Charles Mann.

Circle an area rich in exhilarating activities and refreshing settings. Explore the top of 13,161-foot Wheeler Peak down to the fish hatcheries and trout-laden lakes below. Visitors traveling along the Enchanted Circle may see rocks dating back 2 billion years, view art, kick back in saloons and enjoy winter sports at premier mountain resorts. Photo by Mike Butterfield.

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BRADBURY SCIENCE MUSEUM

MUSEUM HILL

(Los Alamos)

(Santa Fe)

www.lanl.gov/museum (505) 667-4444

www.museumhill.org (505) 476-1411

Research the history and purpose of Los Alamos National Laboratory through interactive exhibits, feature videos and science demonstrations. The Museum, in downtown Los Alamos, bridges the laboratory and the community by interpreting past and current research and informing the public of the lab’s role in national security. Photo by Charles Mann.

Explore four world-class museums in piñon-studded foothills along Camino Lejo, on Santa Fe’s east side. Take time to tour the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of International Folk Art and Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. Then savor a meal at Museum Hill Café and relax on a scenic bus ride to the Santa Fe Plaza. Photo by Julien McRoberts.

ESPAÑOLA VALLEY

TAOS PUEBLO WORLD HERITAGE SITE

www.espanolanmchamber.com www.espanolaonline.com (505) 753-2831

www.taospueblo.com (575) 758-1028

Take an excursion to Española Valley, the “Jewel of northern New Mexico,” which stretches from the Jémez Mountains to Truchas Peaks in the northern Río Grande Valley. Española, New Mexico’s first capital, is now known as the Lowrider Capital of the World. The valley is near beautiful destinations, such as the Puye Cliffs and historic Chimayó, and adventure opportunities, such as skiing, hiking and fishing. Photo by Charles Mann. 52  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Visit the best-preserved northern pueblo, where the structures provide evidence of both past and present Pueblo Indian culture. On the central plaza, visitors may see the San Geronimo Chapel and two large structures called Hlauuma (North House) and Hlaukwima (South House) that function as living quarters. Guided walking tours are available. Check fees and rules on the website. The pueblo will be closed for 6-8 weeks in February and March. Photo by Efraín M. Padró. www.newmexico.org


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North Central Costilla

Dulce

84

Chama

522

285

64

64

110

Lindrith

38

64 Taos Ski

Valley

111

Ranchos de Taos

El Rito Abiquiu

Red River Angel Fire

Tierra Amarilla 537

Questa

Ojo Caliente

68

285

150

TAOS

518

75

~ Dixon Penasco ~ ESPANOLA 76 Chimayo Los Alamos 502

SANTA FE

25

Lamy

14 Cerrillos

Madrid

285

SOME REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS: Bandelier National Monument PAGE 50. Bradbury Science Museum PAGE 52.

F

rom the picturesque Santa Fe Plaza, to the celebrated World Heritage Site of Taos Pueblo and the scientific community of Los Alamos, this region quietly mingles the past, present and future. The Sangre de Cristo Mountains (blood of Christ in Spanish) are visible from almost any point in the area. Named for their red hue at sunset, these rolling peaks and valleys are the hub for a variety of outdoor pursuits. In Chama, experience the splendor of the Rocky Mountains on an unhurried ride on the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad. Nestled in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristos is Taos Pueblo, continuously inhabited for more than 1,000 years. The nearby town of Taos has garnered national renown for its vibrant art scene. Taos is also one of six destinations on the Enchanted Circle, an 86-mile loop through mountainous terrain featuring some of New Mexico’s finest ski resorts, fishing, golf, river rafting and horseback riding. Santa Fe, the state capital, has a wealth of museums, galleries and markets. With almost daily concerts throughout the summer months, the Santa Fe Plaza offers a lively place for shopping as well as experiencing the much-loved traditions and culture. An easy daytrip away from Santa Fe, Bandelier National Monument features paths to ruins of ancient cliff dwellings waiting to be explored and hiking trails overlooking gorgeous waterfalls. Head into Los Alamos and visit the Bradbury Science Museum, where you can learn about the development, use and consequences of nuclear technology.

Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad PAGE 50. Enchanted Circle PAGE 50. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum PAGE 151. Museum Hill PAGE 52. New Mexico Museum of Art PAGE 152. New Mexico Museum of History/Palace of the Governors PAGE 151. Oñate Monument and Visitors Center PAGE 126. Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park PAGE 112.

Opposite—A statue of St. Francis of Assisi stands sentry outside San Francisco de Asis Church, built circa 1815, in Ranchos de Taos, PHOTO BY EFRAIN M. PADRO.

Inset—The Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park, in Angel Fire, features a Vietnam-era Huey helicopter. PHOTO BY ADAM SCHALLAU.

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Scenic Drives Explore New Mexico’s Scenic Byways

Río Grande Gorge Bridge, northwest of Taos, spans the Río Grande.

PHOTO BY TERRY THOMPSON.

Rocky Mountains Historical Treasure NORTH CENTRAL ITINERARIES Day 1: La Cienega, Turquoise Trail. Places to Go: El Rancho de Las Golondrinas Living History Museum, Cerrillos, Madrid, Golden, numerous historic mining curiosities along the way. Day 2: Española, Chimayó, Taos, Ojo Caliente. Places to Go: Oñate Visitor Center, Santa Clara Pueblo, Embudo Station, Pilar, Santuario de Chimayó, Rancho de Chimayó, High Road to Taos, Truchas, Sipapu Ski and Summer Resort, Ranchos de Taos Church, Taos Plaza, Taos Ski Valley, Río Grande Gorge Bridge, Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs. Day 3: Enchanted Circle. Places to Go: Questa, Red River, Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park, Wild Rivers Recreation Area, Cabrestro Lake, Red River State Trout Hatchery, historical and recreational attractions in Angel Fire and Eagle Nest. Day 4: Abiquiú, Chama. Places to Go: Ohkay Owingeh, Georgia O’Keeffe house, Abiquiú Lake, Echo Amphitheater, Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad.

Chama

Cumbres &Toltec Scenic Railroad Wild Rivers Questa

Tierra Amarilla

Ghost Ranch

Río Grande Gorge Bridge

Red River Enchanted Circle Taos Ski Valley Eagle Nest Taos Pueblo

TAOS Abiquiú

Angel Fire Ski Area Angel Fire

Pilar Ohkay Owingeh

ESPAÑOLA Santa Clara Pueblo

Los Alamos

San Ildefonso Pueblo Nambe Pueblo

Bandelier Nat’l Monument La Cienega

Santa Fe National Historic Trail

Chimayó

SANTA FE

Mora

LAS VEGAS

Madrid Turquoise Trail

Day 5: Los Alamos, Jémez Mountains. Places to Go: San Ildefonso Pueblo, Tsankawi Ruins, Fuller Lodge, Bradbury Science Museum, Bandelier National Monument, Valles Caldera National Preserve. Day 6: Santa Fe. Places to Go: Museum of New Mexico facilities and other private museums, Canyon Road art galleries, Santa Fe National Forest, Plaza and historic downtown area, Santa Fe Opera, Marty Sanchez Links de Santa Fe Golf Course, numerous other points of interest. PLEASE REFER TO A STATE MAP FOR MORE DETAIL. For spectacular drives around the state, travel on one of 25 Scenic Byways. To find out more about the Scenic Byways in New Mexico, log on to www.newmexico.org/explore/scenic_byways/index.php, call (800) 545-2070 or e-mail: enchantment@newmexico.org.

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Top Attractions North Central

TURQUOISE TRAIL NATIONAL SCENIC BYWAY

BANDELIER NATIONAL MONUMENT

(Cerrillos, Madrid)

(Los Alamos)

www.turquoisetrail.org (505) 438-8711

www.nps.gov/band (505) 672-3861 ext. 517

Use all your senses to tour the back roads. Experience 15,000 square miles of old mining towns, natural wonders, quaint galleries and gift shops. The area’s turquoise and lead deposits were used in jewelry and pottery made by prehistoric Indians, while Spain’s crown jewels also contain turquoise mined here. The byway stretches from Tijeras past San Marcos and Lone Butte. Photo by Gail Diane Yovanovich.

Walk the 1.2-mile loop, ascend the wooden ladders and climb the stone stairs to view petroglyphs and Ancestral Pueblo dwellings in Frijoles Canyon. The park has a visitor center and campgrounds for families and for groups. Visitors may also hike the trail up to the mesa top in the Tsankawi section or explore the 72 miles of backcountry trails in the Bandelier Wilderness. Photo by Theodore Greer.

CUMBRES & TOLTEC SCENIC RAILROAD

ENCHANTED CIRCLE

(Chama)

(Angel Fire, Eagle Nest, Taos)

www.cumbrestoltec.com (888) 286-2737

www.enchantedcircle.org (877) 885-3885

Depart from Chama on America’s longest and highest steam-operated train. The outing combines history with scenery and machinery, since this narrow-gauge steam locomotive, built in 1880, is preserved and esteemed as a living history museum running between Colorado and New Mexico. Passengers may choose to ride in the elegant parlor car, tourist or coach class seating. Take in spectacular views from the open-air platform. Photo by Charles Mann.

Circle an area rich in exhilarating activities and refreshing settings. Explore the top of 13,161-foot Wheeler Peak down to the fish hatcheries and trout-laden lakes below. Visitors traveling along the Enchanted Circle may see rocks dating back 2 billion years, view art, kick back in saloons and enjoy winter sports at premier mountain resorts. Photo by Mike Butterfield.

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BRADBURY SCIENCE MUSEUM

MUSEUM HILL

(Los Alamos)

(Santa Fe)

www.lanl.gov/museum (505) 667-4444

www.museumhill.org (505) 476-1411

Research the history and purpose of Los Alamos National Laboratory through interactive exhibits, feature videos and science demonstrations. The Museum, in downtown Los Alamos, bridges the laboratory and the community by interpreting past and current research and informing the public of the lab’s role in national security. Photo by Charles Mann.

Explore four world-class museums in piñon-studded foothills along Camino Lejo, on Santa Fe’s east side. Take time to tour the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of International Folk Art and Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. Then savor a meal at Museum Hill Café and relax on a scenic bus ride to the Santa Fe Plaza. Photo by Julien McRoberts.

ESPAÑOLA VALLEY

TAOS PUEBLO WORLD HERITAGE SITE

www.espanolanmchamber.com www.espanolaonline.com (505) 753-2831

www.taospueblo.com (575) 758-1028

Take an excursion to Española Valley, the “Jewel of northern New Mexico,” which stretches from the Jémez Mountains to Truchas Peaks in the northern Río Grande Valley. Española, New Mexico’s first capital, is now known as the Lowrider Capital of the World. The valley is near beautiful destinations, such as the Puye Cliffs and historic Chimayó, and adventure opportunities, such as skiing, hiking and fishing. Photo by Charles Mann. 52  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Visit the best-preserved northern pueblo, where the structures provide evidence of both past and present Pueblo Indian culture. On the central plaza, visitors may see the San Geronimo Chapel and two large structures called Hlauuma (North House) and Hlaukwima (South House) that function as living quarters. Guided walking tours are available. Check fees and rules on the website. The pueblo will be closed for 6-8 weeks in February and March. Photo by Efraín M. Padró. www.newmexico.org


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Northeast S

456

72

Raton

Des Moines 64

Eagle Nest Cimarron Angel Fire

64 87

Maxwell 58

Clayton

Springer

21

56 412

434

402

Wagon Mound

Mora

120

Roy

25

518

102 419

63

Pecos

LAS VEGAS

39

54

104

Logan 104

3

Tucumcari 84

Santa Rosa

40

San Jon

SOME REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS: Blue Hole PAGE 59. Capulín Volcano National Monument PAGE 58. Clayton Lake State Park PAGE 120.

haped by the Western expansion of the 1800s, this region was much traversed by cowboys, soldiers, miners, homesteaders, outlaws– and many years before them all–Spanish conquistadors looking for gold. Though the mythical Seven Cities of Cíbola eluded the Spanish, they did discover many Puebloan ruins, including those near Pecos National Historical Park, which once soared five stories high. On the outskirts of Clayton, take a bigger step back in time by viewing ancient dinosaur tracks, and learn more about these vanished giants at the the Mesalands Community College’s Dinosaur Museum in Tucumcari. A former U.S. Army outpost in the 1800s, Fort Union National Monument housed soldiers tasked with protecting travelers from the many bandits and raiders on the Santa Fe Trail. Visiting nearby Las Vegas, where beautiful Territorial- and Victorian-style homes are still a common sight, yields insight into New Mexico’s varied architectural styles. Head outdoors and survey four states from the lofty rim of a dormant volcano at Capulín Volcano National Monument. Skip a boat along the waves of one of Santa Rosa’s many lakes or plunge into the mild waters of the Blue Hole, an 81-foot-deep natural pool that draws scuba divers from all over the world. The local fishing offers a variety of catches including pike, bass, catfish and trout. Pay a visit to the St. James Hotel in Cimarrón, a hotel that has also quartered such Old West legends as Billy the Kid, Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill Cody.

Cleveland Roller Mill Museum PAGE 142. Fort Union National Monument PAGE 58. Folsom Museum PAGE 127. Mesalands Community College’s Dinosaur Museum PAGE 167. Pecos National Historical Park PAGE 59. Route 66 Auto Museum PAGE 157. Raton Historical District PAGE 145.

Opposite—Water flows at the restored Cleveland Roller Mill during the Millfest on Labor Day weekend. PHOTO BY LAURENCE PARENT.

Inset—Santa Rosa is home to the Route 66 Auto Museum, where visitors can view a variety of classic automobiles and Route 66 memorabilia. PHOTO BY GAIL DIANE YOVANOVICH.

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Scenic Drives Explore New Mexico’s Scenic Byways

The Spanish-style Amtrak train station in Las Vegas, was originally built in 1878 by Santa Fe Railway.

PHOTO BY JULIEN MCROBERTS.

Where the Great Plains Meet the Rocky Mountains NORTHEAST ITINERARIES Day 1: Santa Fe to Las Vegas. Places to Go: Pecos National Historical Park, downtown Las Vegas (plethora of Victorian and Territorial architecture, Wild West history), Montezuma Castle and hot springs.

Cimarrón Springer Santa Fe National Historic Trail (Mountain Branch)

Clayton

Angel Fire

Mora

SANTA FE

Day 4: Clayton. Places to Go: Downtown Clayton, Herztein Museum, Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands, Clayton Lake State Park. Day 5: Tucumcari, Santa Rosa. Places to Go: Ute and Conchas lakes state parks, Mesalands Community College’s Dinosaur Museum, Blue Hole, Santa Rosa Lake.

Santa Fe National Historic Trail (Cimarrón Cutoff)

Cimarrón Canyon State Park Eagle Nest

Day 2: Fort Union National Monument, Angel Fire, Eagle Nest, Cimarrón. Places to Go: Fort Union, Mora-area mills, Enchanted Circle motor tour to Angel Fire, Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park, Elizabethtown and Eagle Nest Lake State Park, Cimarrón Canyon State Park, St. James Hotel in Cimarrón. Day 3: Raton. Places to Go: NRA Whittington Center, Raton historical walking tour, Shuler Theater, Capulín Volcano National Monument, Folsom Museum.

Raton Capulín Volcano Nat’l Monument Capulín

Pecos Nat’l Historic Park

Kiowa and Rita Blanca Nat’l Grasslands Headquarters

Wagon Mound

Roy

Fort Union Nat’l Monument

LAS VEGAS Las Vegas Nat’l Wildlife Refuge

Conchas Lake State Park Ute Lake State Park

Logan

Tucumcari

ALBUQUERQUE

San Jon Santa Rosa

Blue Hole

PLEASE REFER TO A STATE MAP FOR MORE DETAIL. For spectacular drives around the state, travel on one of 25 Scenic Byways. To find out more about the Scenic Byways in New Mexico, log on to www.newmexico.org/explore/scenic_byways/index.php, call (800) 545-2070 or e-mail: enchantment@newmexico.org.

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2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  57


Top Attractions Northeast

CAPULÍN VOLCANO NATIONAL MONUMENT

FORT UNION NATIONAL MONUMENT

www.nps.gov/cavo (505) 278-2201

(Las Vegas)

Hike a one-mile trail along the rim of the Capulín Volcano crater to enjoy spectacular 360-degree views of the region. Another short trail leads visitors to the bottom of the crater. The visitor center offers exhibits about the area’s geology and history. Guided tours are available. Photo by Laurence Parent.

www.nps.gov/foun (505) 425-8025 Retrace the footsteps of the guardians of the Santa Fe Trail. Established in 1851, Fort Union was an important military supply post. Visitors can see the largest visible network of Santa Fe Trail ruts here. In the summer, talks and tours are offered on a regular basis. There are also two short self-guided interpretive trails. Photo by Efraín M. Padró.

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58  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

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PECOS NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK

BLUE HOLE

www.nps.gov/peco (505) 757-7241

(Santa Rosa)

Step back into time at this important cultural crossroads. The park is two miles south of Pecos, and preserves 12,000 years of history, including the ancient pueblo of Pecos, Colonial missions, Santa Fe Trail sites, a 20th-century ranch and the site of a Civil War battle. Tour schedules and events vary by season. Photo by Adam Schallau. SR 09-347 NMVG 10

9/23/09

3:54 PM

Page 1

www.santarosanm.org/scubadiving.htm (575) 472-3763 Dive into a natural 80-foot-deep, bell-shaped pool. The Blue Hole has made Santa Rosa a scuba-diving mecca. The water’s clarity and the constant 64-degree temperature draw divers year-round. Check the website for information on diving permits and equipment rentals. Photo by Laurence Parent.

NEXT EXIT

PHOTOS: LAURENCE PARENT

Santa Rosa Surprises

Scuba diving in the desert. Authentic Route 66 culture. Spring-fed natural lakes for recreation and relaxation. A newly renovated historic district. Just a few of the surprises you’ll find when you exit the interstate and take time to explore Santa Rosa. 575.472.3763 SantaRosaNM.org

www.newmexico.org

The City of Natural Lakes On I-40, Highways 54 & 84, and Historic Route 66

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  59


Southeast S

84

60

Melrose

Fort Summer 20

Texico CLOVIS

PORTALES

54

206

285

Carrizozo

Capitan ROSWELL Lincoln

Mescalero Tularosa

Ruidoso Cloudcroft

380

Dexter 13

ALAMOGORDO

Tatum 2

82

Lovington

ARTESIA

82 529

70

HOBBS Eunice

CARLSBAD 54

Whites City

Loving

18

128

Jal

285

SOME REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS: Blackwater Draw Archaeological Site PAGE 144. Carlsbad Caverns National Park PAGE 64.

outheastern New Mexico is awash with legends both old and new. This region’s colorful history offers a wildly mixed bag of outlaws and aliens, bottomless caverns and nuclear explosions. Allegedly the site of a UFO crash in 1947, Roswell takes a simultaneously festive yet genuinely inquisitive approach to its mysterious past with an annual celebration and a museum dedicated to the study of UFOs. Those looking to learn about human space travel can swing by the New Mexico Museum of Space History in Alamogordo. Billy the Kid came to prominence and eventual notoriety in Lincoln and the region. His grave can be viewed on the old Fort Sumner Museum grounds, where he is buried with two of his cohorts. Just down the road is Fort Sumner State Monument and the Bosque Redondo Memorial, where Natives were confined in the 1860s. Natural beauty abounds in the gently rolling dunes of White Sands National Monument and the crystalline formations of Carlsbad Caverns National Park. Both offer robust hiking and spectacular otherworldly scenery. The nearby Capitán Mountains feature the birthplace and gravesite of Smokey Bear, a black bear cub who survived a forest fire. Play a relaxing round of golf after escaping to Ruidoso or Cloudcroft in the Sacramento Mountains. Spend some more leisure time at one of the casinos, or catch a horse race at Ruidoso Downs, home of the world’s richest quarter-horse race.

Fort Sumner State Monument PAGE 127. Hubbard Museum of the American West PAGE 148. International UFO Museum PAGE 64. Lincoln State Monument PAGE 64. Roswell Museum/Art Center PAGE 147. National Solar Observatory PAGE 120. N.M. Museum of Space History PAGE 103. Three Rivers Petroglyph National Recreational Site PAGE 168. Valley of Fires Recreation Area PAGE 118. White Sands National Monument PAGE 64. Opposite—The National Solar Observatory, in Sunspot, includes a new visitors center, added in 1997, and the Apache Point Observatory next door, which houses the latest digital telescopes. Sunspot is a short drive from Cloudcroft in the Sacramento Mountains. PHOTO BY KEN STINNETT.

Inset—The Roswell Museum and Art Center, in Roswell, preserves and exhibits the art and history of the American Southwest. PHOTO BY JULIEN MCROBERTS.

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Scenic Drives Explore New Mexico’s Scenic Byways

Billy the Kid National Scenic Byway, in Ruidoso.

PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

Billy the Kid’s Stomping Grounds SOUTHEAST ITINERARIES

Vaughn

Day 1: Alamogordo, Cloudcroft. Places to Go: White Sands National Monument, N.M. Museum of Space History, pistachio groves, National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak, The Lodge in Cloudcroft. Day 2: Carrizozo, Lincoln. Places to Go: Valley of Fires Recreation Area, Smokey Bear’s gravesite and historical museum, Lincoln State Monument. Day 3: Ruidoso, Ruidoso Downs. Places to Go: Ruidoso Downs Racetrack and Billy the Kid Casino, Hubbard Museum of the American West, Spencer Theater, Inn of the Mountain Gods.

Clovis Fort Sumner

Fort Sumner State Monument/Billy the Kid Gravesite

Portales

SOCORRO

Carrizozo

Smokey Bear Hist. Park

Capitán Elephant Butte Lake State Park

Day 4: Hondo Valley, San Patricio, Roswell. Places to Go: Beautiful Hondo Valley, Hurd La Rinconada Gallery, International UFO Museum and Research Center, Bottomless Lakes State Park, Roswell Museum and Art Center.

Ruidoso

Alamogordo White Sands Nat’l Monument

Day 5: Carlsbad, Whites City. Places to Go: Living Desert Zoo and Gardens State Park, Pecos River Walk, Carlsbad Caverns National Park. LAS CRUCES Day 6: Portales, Clovis, Fort Sumner. Places to Go: Dalley Windmill Collection, Blackwater Draw Archaeological Site & Museum, Norman Petty Studios, Clovis Depot Model Train Museum, Billy the Kid’s grave, Fort Sumner State Monument.

Blackwater Draw Museum

Roswell

Ruidoso Downs Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation Cloudcroft

Bottomless Lakes State Park

Artesia

N.M. Museum of Space History

Hobbs Living Desert State Park

Carlsbad Caverns Nat’l Park

Carlsbad Whites City

EL PASO

PLEASE REFER TO A STATE MAP FOR MORE DETAIL. For spectacular drives around the state, travel on one of 25 Scenic Byways. To find out more about the Scenic Byways in New Mexico, log on to www.newmexico.org/explore/scenic_byways/index.php, call (800) 545-2070 or e-mail: enchantment@newmexico.org.

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Top Attractions Southeast

CARLSBAD CAVERNS NATIONAL PARK

INTERNATIONAL UFO MUSEUM

www.nps.gov/cave (575) 785-2232

(Roswell)

Walk a paved trail in the 8.2-acre Big Room, 750 feet below the surface, or crawl through Spider Cave’s narrow passages in caves formed when sulfuric acid dissolved the surrounding limestone. Above and below ground, the park has much to offer. Visitors may hike, take photos, attend ranger programs and view wildlife. Rubber-soled shoes and a light jacket are recommended for cave tours. Guided cave tour reservations at (877) 444-6777. Photo by Laurence Parent.

www.roswellufomuseum.com (800) 822-3545 Examine the mystery of the 1947 Roswell Incident yourself. Peruse the evidence and read accounts of the incident. The museum’s gallery of UFO, space and extraterrestrial-related art invites visitors to scrutinize photos of sightings and decide whether the incident was a genuine phenomenon or a hoax. Photo by Charles Mann.

WHITE SANDS NATIONAL MONUMENT

LINCOLN STATE MONUMENT

(Alamogordo)

www.nmmonuments.org (575) 653-4372

www.nps.gov/whsa/index.htm (575) 679-2599 Sled in July or take a moonlit walk over and around gypsum dunes. Dazzling sand covers 275 square miles in the Tularosa Basin, where visitors can drive or use one of the five hiking trails through the world’s largest gypsum dune field. Park officials recommend that visitors bring compasses and drinking water, especially if hiking. Photo by Adam Schallau. 64  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Travel back in time to a community frozen in the 1870s and 1880s. Most of the monument’s 17 structures and outbuildings are characteristic of the Territorial style of adobe architecture. Four buildings are open year-round, and two are seasonally open as museums, where visitors can learn about the community’s involvement in the Lincoln County War. Photo by Charles Mann.

www.newmexico.org


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New Mexico Village Ted F. Remington • 28" x 20" $35 unframed (NMP374)

Order online at www.nmmagazine.com Order by phone at 1-800-711-9525 shipping & handling extra VG11

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Southwest 36

60

Bernardo

Quemado

Magdalena

Datil 32

SOCORRO

12

380

107

San Antonio

Reserve 180

25

159

Gila Cliff Glenwood Dwellings

Elephant Butte Truth or Consequences

Hillsboro

Silver City

152

Hatch 90

185

70

26

180

Lordsburg

Deming

LAS CRUCES 10 11

Columbus

Rodeo

Mesilla Anthony Santa Teresa Sunland Park

SOME REGIONAL HIGHLIGHTS:

A

s the fiery heart of New Mexican cuisine, chile (not to be confused with chili) has inspired two major events in the southwest region, the Hatch Chile Festival and the Whole Enchilada Fiesta. Known as the Chile Capital of the World, Hatch has more than 30,000 acres, solely dedicated to growing the red and green cash crop. Las Cruces, home of New Mexico State University and the state’s second largest city, offers numerous museums, beautiful golf courses, regional wineries and even a nearby spaceport. Spend the afternoon browsing Mesilla Plaza’s boutiques and galleries, then catch an evening performance by the city’s bustling theater community. Bird watching doesn’t get any better than at the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, where thousands of Arctic snow geese, dabbler ducks and sandhill cranes stop during their spring and fall migrations. Many more natural splendors abound in the Gila National Forest. Admire the ancient dwellings set amongst the looming cliffs. Hike in the mountains and fish in the many rivers and streams. Cool off by going for a dip or doing some water skiing at Elephant Butte Lake, a reservoir gathered from the waters of the Río Grande and a popular fishing spot as well. Warm back up in a mineral spring bath or luxuriate in a steam sauna at the historic bathhouses in nearby Truth or Consequences. Art aficionados will find much to satisfy their aesthetic senses in the vibrant art scenes of Silver City, Deming and Truth or Consequences.

Bosque del Apache PAGE 160. Deming Luna Mimbres Museum PAGE 123. El Camino Real International Heritage Center PAGE 160. Elephant Butte Lake State Park PAGE 70. Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument PAGE 70. Mesilla Plaza PAGE 70. N.M. Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum PAGE 133. Pancho Villa State Park PAGE 122. Shakespeare Ghost Town PAGE 138. Silver City Museum PAGE 159. Spaceport America PAGE 167. Truth or Consequences’ Historic Hot Mineral Springs, Baths and Spas PAGE 167. Opposite—Discover the rich and diverse cultural heritage of southwestern New Mexico at the Silver City Museum. PHOTO BY LAURENCE PARENT.

Inset—One of many popular red- and green-chile stands dotting the Hatch area. PHOTO BY DIANNE STROMBERG.

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Scenic Drives Explore New Mexico’s Scenic Byways

Sunrise at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, south of Socorro.

PHOTO BY TERRY THOMPSON.

Old West Country SOUTHWEST ITINERARIES Day 1: Socorro, Magdalena. Places to Go: Historic Tomé, El Camino Real International Heritage Center, San Miguel Mission, historic plaza, Very Large Array radio telescope complex, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge.

Magdalena

SOCORRO

Very Large Array (VLA)

Bosque del Apache Nat’l Wildlife Refuge

Day 2: Truth or Consequences, Las Cruces, La Mesilla. Places to Go: Elephant Butte Lake State Park, Geronimo Springs Museum, Hatch: Chile Capital of the World, N.M. Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, historic Mesilla Plaza area.

The Catwalk Glenwood

Day 3: Deming, Lordsburg. Places to Go: Pancho Villa State Park, Rockhound State Park, ghost towns of Shakespeare and Steins. Day 4: Silver City, Glenwood. Places to Go: Silver City Museum, gravesite of Billy the Kid’s mother, Gila Wilderness, Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, Whitewater Canyon and “The Catwalk.”

Datil

Datil Well Nat’l Rec Site

Elephant Butte Lake State Park

Gila Cliff Dwellings Nat’l Monument

Truth or Consequences Caballo Lake State Park Alamogordo

Silver City

Steins (Ghost Town)

City of Rocks State Park Lordsburg

Shakespeare (Ghost Town)

White Sands Nat’l Monument

Hatch Fort Selden State Monument

Deming

LAS CRUCES Rockhound State Park

Mesilla

PLEASE REFER TO A STATE MAP FOR MORE DETAIL.

EL PASO For spectacular drives around the state, travel on one of 25 Scenic Byways. To find out more about the Scenic Byways in New Mexico, log on to www.newmexico.org/explore/scenic_byways/index.php, call (800) 545-2070 or e-mail: enchantment@newmexico.org.

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Top Attractions Southwest

ELEPHANT BUTTE LAKE STATE PARK

GILA CLIFF DWELLINGS NATIONAL MONUMENT

www.emnrd.state.nm.us/PRD/elephant.htm (575) 744-5923

(Silver City)

Plunge into New Mexico’s largest and most popular lake and enjoy your favorite water sport. A dam built nearly a century ago for irrigation and flood control created the 40-mile-long Elephant Butte Reservoir. The lake’s prominent, elephant-shaped island, the eroded core of a volcano, inspired its name. Photo by Ken Stinnett.

www.nps.gov/gicl (575) 536-9461 Peek into the homes of the Mogollon people and discover how they lived here more than 700 years ago. Take a guided tour or explore the trail and dwellings on your own. Continue your exploration by taking the Trail to the Past, a quarter-mile walk to a Mogollon alcove dwelling and pictograph panel. Please inquire at the visitor center for other special tours and events. Photo by Gail Diane Yovanovich.

MESILLA PLAZA

VERY LARGE ARRAY (VLA)

www.oldmesilla.org (575) 524-3262 ext. 117

(Magdalena)

Get lost among the adobe structures of Mesilla Plaza. This community was at the center of many historic turning points, including the Gadsden Purchase, the Civil War and Billy the Kid’s trial. The Plaza now features galleries, shops and restaurants. Many cultural events add to the festive atmosphere. Photo by Julien McRoberts.

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www.vla.nrao.edu (575) 835-7000 Marvel at New Mexico’s astronomical radio observatory. Twenty-seven radio antennas, each 82 feet in diameter, on the Plains of San Agustín generate data used to study astronomical topics such as quasars, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts. Learn more about radio astronomy in VLA exhibits, and enjoy a close-up look from the self-guided walking tour. Photo by Adam Schallau. www.newmexico.org


Outdoors

A member of the Active Knowledge mountain biking team hits the 24 Hours in the Enchanted Forest competition in the Zuni Mountains of northwestern New Mexico. PHOTO BY BRIAN LEDDY.

Adventure awaits outdoor enthusiasts. The Rocky Mountains offer skiing in the winter and exhilerating hiking in warmer months. Lakes and rivers offer some of the best fishing and rafting in the nation. Hunters, bird watchers and photographers alike rejoice in the state’s abundant wildlife. Clear blue skies, dramatic mountain vistas and spectacular sunsets conribute to the allure of the Land of Enchantment. Much of the terrain is accessible to the public. A variety of governmental agencies administer our public lands, and each has its own rules and regulations. Be sure to contact the agency with jurisdiction over your planned destination and activity.

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The National Park Service offers special discounts that allow admission for occupants of vehicles into all national parks and national monuments in New Mexico, as well as the 390 sites nationwide. For more information call (888) ASK-USGS, ext. 1 or visit www.nps.gov. Contact phone numbers and addresses for agencies administering public lands in New Mexico follow. PUBLIC AGENCIES Bureau of Land Management (BLM). P.O. Box 27115, Santa Fe, 87502-0115 or 1474 Rodeo Rd., Santa Fe, 87505. (505) 438-7400. The BLM manages some 13 million acres of public land, including Three Rivers Petroglyph National Recreation Site, Wild Rivers Recreation

Area, Orilla Verde National Recreation Area, Santa Cruz Lake Recreation Area, Fort Stanton Recreation Area, Datil Well Recreation Area, Organ Mountains Recreation sites, El Malpais National Conservation Area, Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument and Valley of Fires Recreation Area. The BLM also oversees boaters on the Río Grande and the Río Chama. www.publiclands.org or www.blm.gov BLM, Carlsbad Field Office. 620 E. Green St., Carlsbad, 88220. (575) 234-5972. BLM, Taos Field Office. 226 Cruz Alta Rd., Taos, 87571. (575) 758-8851. National Park Service Intermountain Region Santa Fe Office. 100 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, 87501. (505) 988-6888. www.nps.gov 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  71


N.M. Department of Game and Fish. P.O. Box 25112, Santa Fe, 87504 or 1 Wildlife Way, Santa Fe, 87507. (505) 476-8000, (800) 862-9310. www.wildlife.state.nm.us Public Lands Information Center. 301 Dinosaur Tr., Santa Fe, 87508. (877) 276-9404, (505) 954-2002. www.publiclands.org State Parks Division. P.O. Box 1147, Santa Fe, 87504-1147. (888) 667-2757, (505) 476-3355. www.nmparks.com Southwest Regional Office of the Forest Service. 333 Broadway Blvd. SE, Albuquerque, 87102. (505) 842-3292, fax: (505) 842-3258. Inquire about specific national forests, including Carson, Cíbola, Gila, Lincoln and Santa Fe. www.fs.fed.us/r3 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Alb. District. 4101 Jefferson Plaza NE, Albuquerque, 87109-3435. (505) 342-3100. USAC oversees a number of reservoirs, including Santa Rosa, Conchas, Cochití and Abiquiú lakes. www.spa.usace.army.mil U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Office. 500 Gold Ave. SW, Albuquerque, 87102. Mail: P.O. Box 130, Albuquerque, 87103-1206. Recreational information about six national wildlife refuges in New Mexico: Bitter Lake, Bosque del Apache, Las Vegas, Maxwell, San Andres and Sevilleta; plus national fish hatchery and technical centers in Dexter and Mora. www.fws.gov/southwest/newmex.html U.S. Geological Survey Information Services. P.O. Box 25046, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colo., 80225. (888) 275-8747. www.usgs.gov

AVIATION & SPORT FLYING New Mexico is known for its seemingly endless blue skies. To take in the wild blue yonder, contact: N.M. Dept. of Transportation, Aviation Division. P.O. Box 9830, Albuquerque, 87119. (505) 244-1788. nmshtd.state.nm.us/main.asp?secid=10871 Hacienda Sur Luna Airpark & 1st Aero Squadron Estate. Columbus, 88029-0750. (575) 531-2771. Tours by air: Southwest Wing Safaris. P.O. Box 945, Santa Fe, 87504-0945. (505) 988-4246. www.southwestsafaris.com Sundance Aviation, Inc. Glider rides, flight instruction. P.O. Box 2066, Moriarty, 87035. (505) 832-2222. www.soarsundance.com BALLOONING Balloonists flock to New Mexico to enjoy the mild weather and vast skies. Year-round hot-air balloon events occur in cities statewide, including Gallup, Farmington, Taos, Angel Fire and White Sands National Monument near Alamogordo. The granddaddy of them all, the 2011 Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, occurs October 1-9. For more information on the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta: (505) 256-2042, (888) 422-7277. www.balloonfiesta.com The following are some of the companies that charter private hot-air balloon flights:

Above & Beyond Affordable Balloon Rides. (505) 293-0000, (800) 725-2477. www.aboveandbeyondballoonrides.com Above It All Balloon Rides. 30 Garcia Rd., Belén, 87002; (800) 955-3715, (505) 861-3386. www.balloonridesnewmexico.com Aliens Aloft Balloon Rides. (866) 437-4525, (505) 864-8871. www.aliensaloft.com Braden’s Beautiful Balloons Co. 3321 Princeton Dr. NE., Albuquerque, 87107. (800) 367-6625, (505) 261-8249. www.beautifulballoonsco.com Discover Balloons. 205 B San Felipe NW, Albuquerque, 87104. (888) 842-1118, (505) 842-1111. www.discoverballoons.com Enchanted Winds Hot Air Balloon Co. (505) 843-6888, (800) 725-2477. www.enchantedwinds.com Eske’s Paradise Balloons. Taos. (575) 751-6098. www.taosballooning.com Hoot’s Hot Aire Balloon Adventures. 3501 Vista Alameda NE., Albuquerque, 87113. (505) 681-1155. www.nmballoonrides.com Private Balloon Flights. 8311 Golf Course NW, Albuquerque, 87120. (888) 550-2677, (505) 550-2677. www.privateballoonflights.com Pueblo Balloon Co. Taos. (575) 751-9877. www.puebloballoon.com Rainbow Ryders Inc. 5601 Eagle Rock Ave. NE, Albuquerque, 87113; (800) 725-2477, (505) 823-1111. www.rainbowryders.com Santa Fe Balloons. (505) 699-7555. www.santafeballoons.com Skyspan Adventures. Meeting location: 6390 Coors Blvd. NW., Albuquerque, 87120; (505) 293-6800. www.skyspanadventures.com World Balloon. 6026 2nd St. NW, Albuquerque, 87107. (505) 293-6800. www.worldballoon.com BIKING New Mexico’s diverse landscapes and scenic roadways make it ideal for exploring on two wheels. From Red River to Silver City, many communities throughout the state sponsor challenging races and leisurely rides. Log on to www.newmexico.org for recommendations on

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specific routes. The following groups provide trips and information for cyclists of any level: Active Knowledge Bicycling. Cultural and educational tours. (505) 694-2177. www.activeknow.com The Bike Coop Ltd. Coaching and tours. 3407 Central Ave. NE, Albuquerque, 87106. (505) 265-5170. www.bikecoop.com Cottam’s Mountain Biking. 207A Paseo del Pueblo Sur, Taos, 87571. (800) 322-8267, (505) 758-2822. www.cottamsoutdoor.com Duke City BMX. 1903 Avenida Cesar Chávez SE, Albuquerque, 87106. (505) 890-1269. www.dukecitybmx.org New Mexico Cycling. Check website for cycling events. www.nmcycling.org N.M. Touring Society. P.O. Box 1261, Albuquerque, 87103. (505) 237-9700. www.nmts.org Sandía Peak Mountain Biking. Memorial Day through Labor Day. (505) 242-9052. www.sandiapeak.com Santa Fe Mountain Adventures. (800) 965-4010, (505) 988-4000. www.santafemountainadventures.com BIRD WATCHING New Mexico hosts diverse and abundant bird species. For information, contact the communities and groups listed below. Angel Fire Chamber of Commerce. Call for birding schedule. (800) 446-8117, (575) 377-6661. www.angelfirechamber.org. Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge. 4065 Bitter Lake Rd., Roswell, 88201. (575) 622-6755. www.fws.gov/southwest/ refuges/newmex/bitterlake/index.html Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. P.O. Box 340, San Antonio, 87832. (575) 835-1828. www.friendsofthebosque.org Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce. (575) 887-6516. www.carlsbadchamber.com City of Albuquerque Open Space Visitor Center. 6500 Coors Blvd. NW, 87120. (505) 897-8831. www.cabq.gov/openspace Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge. Rt. 1, Box 399, Las Vegas, 87701. (505) 425-3581. www.fws.gov/southwest/ refuges/newmex/lasvegas/index.html 74  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge. P.O. Box 276, Maxwell, 87728. (575) 375-2331. www.fws.gov/southwest/REFUGES/newmex/ maxwell National Audubon Society, Randall Davey Audubon Center. 1800 Upper Canyon Rd., Santa Fe, 87501. (505) 983-4609. nm.audubon.org Santa Fe Botanical Garden. P.O. Box 23343, Santa Fe, 87502. Bird walks and bird counts at the Ortiz Mountains Educational Preserve or Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve in spring, summer and fall. (505) 471-9103. www.santafebotanicalgarden.org WingsWest Birding Tours. 2599 Camino Chueco, Santa Fe, 87505. (505) 473-2780. www.home.earthlink.net/~wingswestnm BOATING New Mexico is home to several lakes wellsuited for boating. These include: Elephant Butte, Bluewater, Ute, Conchas, Cochití, Heron and El Vado. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Alb. District. 4101 Jefferson Plaza NE, Albuquerque, 87109-3435. (505) 342-3100. USAC oversees a number of reservoirs, including Santa Rosa, Conchas and Abiquiú lakes. www.spa.usace.army.mil Also refer to the State Parks chart on Page 75 for information on other lakes for boating. CAMPING & HIKING To embrace New Mexico’s diverse landscape, take a day hike or camp overnight at one of the numerous sites throughout the state. An abundance of public hiking trails and campgrounds are easily accessible. Federal and state lands, as well as several Indian reservations, permit camping, hiking, hunting and fishing. Camping and hiking regulations, including fees, differ from one agency or tribe to another. Campsite reservations are accepted at some state parks and U.S. Forest Service lands. The U.S. Forest Service and BLM land holdings are extensive in New Mexico and offer opportunities for isolated camping. Hiking and camping in the backcountry are

generally free but require permits. Be sure your campsite is more than one-quarter mile from shores, streambeds, trails or roads. Also comply with the appropriate agencies’ rules. If you have a passion for the backcountry, take on a portion of the Continental Divide Trail, one of three designated National Scenic Trails in the United States. Be sure to check for fire restrictions within each region before your excursion. Information about New Mexico’s privately owned campgrounds can be obtained from local chambers of commerce listed on Page 172. RV facilities are limited on federally managed public lands, but nearly all of New Mexico’s state parks can accommodate them. For detailed information on recreational opportunities in the state, contact the Public Lands Information Center or the following agencies. www.newmexicorvparksandcampgrounds.org Bureau of Land Management. P.O. Box 27115, Santa Fe, 87502-0115 or 1474 Rodeo Rd., Santa Fe, 87505. (505) 438-7400. The BLM manages some 13 million acres of public land, including the Three Rivers Petroglyph National Recreation Site, the Wild Rivers Recreation Area, Orilla Verde National Recreation Area, Santa Cruz Lake Recreation Area, Fort Stanton Recreation Area, Datil Well Recreation Area, Organ Mountains Recreation sites, El Malpais National Conservation Area, the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument and the Valley of Fires Recreation Area. It also oversees boaters on the Río Grande and the Río Chama. www.publiclands.org or www.blm.gov Continental Divide Trail Alliance. P.O. Box 628, Pine, Colo., 80470. (888) 909-CDTA, (303) 838-3760. www.cdtrail.org Intermountain Region Support Office of the National Park Service. 2968 Rodeo Park Dr. W., Santa Fe, 87505. (505) 988-6888. www.nps.gov Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department. N.M. 264, Bldg. 36A, Window Rock, AZ., 86515. (928) 871-6647. www.navajonationparks.org or the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife. (928) 871-6451, (928) 871-6452. www.newmexico.org


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N.M. Department of Game and Fish. C P.O. Box 25112, Santa Fe, 87504 or 1 Wildlife Way, SW SE Santa Fe, 87507. (505) 476-8000, (800) 862-9310. www.wildlife.state.nm.us Public Lands Information Center. 301 Dinosaur Tr., Santa Fe, 87508. (877) 276-9404, (505) 954-2002. Southwest Regional Office of the Forest Service. 333 Broadway SE, Albuquerque, 87102. (505) 842-3292. Inquire about specific national forests, including Carson, Cíbola, Gila, Lincoln and Santa Fe. www.fs.fed.us/r3 State Parks Division. P.O. Box 1147, Santa Fe, 87504-1147. (888) 667-2757, (505) 476-3355. www.nmparks.com U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Alb. District. 4101 Jefferson Plaza NE, Albuquerque, 87109-3435. (505) 342-3100. USAC oversees a number of reservoirs, including Santa Rosa, Conchas, Cochití and Abiquiú lakes. www.spa.usace.army.mil NC

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (505) 248-6911. www.fws.gov U.S. Geological Survey Information Services. P.O. Box 25046, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colo. 80225. (888) 275-8747. www.usgs.gov DUDE RANCHES & HORSEBACK RIDING Reign in New Mexico’s wilderness on horseback or transport yourself to the days of the Wild West at any of the following: Central Cedar Crest Country Cottage & Stables. (505) 281-5197. www.cedarcreststables.com Romero’s Thunder Inc. Horseback Riding. 311 San Clemente, Bernalillo, 87004. (505) 469-5015. www.romerosthunder.com The Stables at Tamaya. 1300 Tuyuna Tr., Santa Ana Pueblo, 87004. (505) 867-1234, (505) 771-6037 for reservations. www.tamaya.hyatt.com North Central Bishop’s Lodge Ranch & Riding. 1297 Bishop’s Lodge Rd., Santa Fe, 87504. (505) 983-6377. www.bishopslodge.com Bobcat Pass Wilderness Adventures. 1670 Hwy. 38, Red River, 87558. (575) 754-2769. www.bobcatpass.com Broken Saddle Riding Co. P.O. Box 286, Cerrillos, 87010. (505) 424-7774. www.brokensaddle.com Galarosa Stables. Galisteo. (505) 466-4654. www.galarosastables.com Linda Vista Stables. Galisteo. (505) 466-8930. Río Grande Stables. Taos Ski Valley. (888) 259-8267. www.riograndestables.com Roadrunner Tours. P.O. Box 274, Angel Fire, 87710. (575) 377-6416. www.rtours.com Santa Fe Mountain Adventures. (800) 965-4010, (505) 988-4000. www.santafemountainadventures.com Northeast Los Pinos Guest Ranch. Cowles. Route 3 Box 8, Terrero, 87573. (505) 757-6213. www.lospinosranch.com Surprise Valley Guest Ranch. HC 68, P.O. Box 28, Sapello, 87745. (505) 425-8028.

Tererro General Store/Riding Stables. 14 miles north of Pecos via N.M. 63. (505) 757-6193. www.pecoswilderness.com Vermejo Park Ranch. Box E, Raton, 87740. (575) 445-3097. www.vermejoparkranch.com Southeast Burnt Well Guest Ranch. 399 Chesser Rd., Roswell, 88203. (866) 729-0974, (575) 347-2668. www.burntwellguestranch.com Camp of the Tall Pines. 105 Camp Tall Pines Rd., Mayhill, 88339. (575) 687-4171. www.camptallpine.com Runyan Ranch. 4839 Río Peñasco Rd., Mahill, 88339. (575) 687-3330. www.runyanranch.com Southwest Double E Ranch. 67 Double E Ranch Rd., Gila, 88038. (575) 535-2048. www.doubleeranch.com Geronimo Trail Guest Ranch. 1 Wall Lake Rd., Winston, 87943. (575) 772-5157. www.geronimoranch.com N Bar Ranch. P.O. Box 409, Reserve, 87830. (575) 533-6253. www.nbarranch.com FISHING New Mexico boasts a year-round fishing season in waters ranging from large warm-water reservoirs to small, cold-water mountain streams. Within the state’s waters, there are six species of trout, five species of bass, three species of catfish, pike, tiger muskie, walleye, salmon and panfish. Most waters have standard bag and possession limits. However, a few lakes and parts of some streams are designated “Special Trout Waters” where only artificial flies and lures with a single, barbless hook can be used, and where the bag limit is strictly enforced. The license year starts April 1 and runs through March 31. There are a variety of license types ranging from one day to full season. In addition, to fish anywhere in New Mexico, a Habitat Management and Access Validation is required. To fish on U.S. Forest Service or BLM lands, a Habitat Improvement Stamp is required. Licenses may be obtained at sporting goods stores, at any of the five department offices located throughout the state, or online at www.wildlife.state.nm.us. www.newmexico.org


For statewide information, please contact the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, which annually produces the Fishing Rules and Information booklet. The booklet may be obtained by writing to P.O. Box 25112, Santa Fe, 87504. You may visit the department headquarters’ office at 1 Wildlife Way in Santa Fe, (505) 476-8000, or you may view the department’s website: www.wildlife.state.nm.us. Fishing on Native American Land Some Native American pueblos and reservations offer public fishing. A state fishing license is not required to fish on tribal lands, but you must purchase a tribal permit. Contact individual tribes listed in the “Native New Mexico” section on Page 83 of this guide for more information. Other Fishing Contacts Los Pescadores Fly Fishing Club— Gateway to NM Outdoors. Fly fishing, clinics and classes, bird and game hunting, horseback riding, wilderness adventures. North Central and North East regions. 223 N. Guadalupe Street, #159, Santa Fe, 87501. (505) 699-0919. www.lospescadoresflyfishingclub.com For hunting information see Page 79. GEOCACHING Santa Fe Mountain Adventures. (800) 965-4010, (505) 988-4000. www.santafemountainadventures.com GOLFING Golfers rejoice in New Mexico’s mild yearround temperatures, abundant sunshine, scenic surroundings and variety of courses. There are several nationally ranked courses around the state. The state’s courses host a variety of tournaments, some traditional and some more rugged. For example, in the single-hole Elfego Baca Golf Shoot in Socorro, players tee off from “M” mountain and play to a hole on the New Mexico Tech Campus—2,550 feet down and three miles away. For tours, check out Golf West Tours, which offers customized golf packages. Contact them at: (866) 485-3661, (505) 342-1563 or www. golfnewmexico.com. For more golf packages, see Golf on the Santa Fe Trail and New Mexico Golf Destinations, both found in the central region. www.newmexico.org

Central Albuquerque Golf Training Center at Balloon Fiesta Park. Driving range, grass putting course, lessons. (505) 857-8437. www.cabq.gov/golf Arroyo del Oso Golf Course. 27 holes, public. 7001 Osuna Rd. NE, Albuquerque, 87109. (505) 884-7505. www.cabq.gov/golf/arroyo.html Desert Greens Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 10035 Country Club Ln. NW, Albuquerque, 87114. (505) 898-7001. Four Hills Country Club. 18 holes, private. 911 Four Hills Rd. SE, Albuquerque, 87123. (505) 296-1122. www.fourhillscc.com Golf on the Santa Fe Trail. Customized golf packages, top-rated golf trail. 110 Roehl Rd. NW, Albuquerque. (505) 922-1323. www.golfonthesantafetrail.com Isleta Eagle Golf Club. 27 holes, public. 4001 Hwy. 47 SE, Albuquerque, 87105. (866) ISL-ETA2, (505) 848-1900. www.isletaeagle.com

Ladera Golf Course. 27 holes, 9-hole executive, public. 3401 Ladera Dr. NW, Albuquerque, 87120. (505) 836-4449. www.cabq.gov/golf Los Altos Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 9717 Copper Ave. NE, Albuquerque, 87123. (505) 298-1897. N.M. Golf Destinations. N.M. golf info, tee times, media and packages. P.O. Box 6697, Albuquerque, . (505) 620-1953. www.newmexicogolfdestinations.com Paa-Ko Ridge Golf Club. 27 holes, public. 1 Club House Dr., Sandía Park, 87047. (505) 281-6000. www.paakoridge.com Puerto del Sol Golf Course. 9 holes, public. 1800 Girard Blvd. SE, Albuquerque, 87106. (505) 265-5636. www.cabq.gov/golf Sandia Golf Club. 18 holes, resort. 30 Rainbow Rd., Sandia Pueblo, 87113. (505) 798-3990. www.sandiagolf.com Santa Ana Golf Club. 27 holes, public. 288 Prairie Star Rd., Santa Ana Pueblo, 87004. (505) 867-9464, (505) 867-3000. www.mynewmexicogolf.com

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Tierra Del Sol Golf Course. 18 holes, public. C 1000 Golf Course Rd., Belén, 87002. SW SE (505) 864-1000. www. tierradelsol.com/golf/ Twin Warriors Golf Club. 18 holes, resort. 1301 Tuyuna Tr., Santa Ana Pueblo, 87004. (505) 771-6155. www.mynewmexicogolf.com UNM Championship Course. 18 holes, public. 3601 University Blvd. SE, Albuquerque, 87106. (505) 277-4546. www.unmgolf.com UNM, North Course. 9 holes, public. 2201 Tucker Rd. NE, Albuquerque, 87106. (505) 277-4146. www.unmgolf.com North Central Angel Fire Resort. 18 holes, semiprivate. (800) 633-7463, (575) 377-3055. www.angelfireresort.com Black Mesa Golf Club. 18 holes, public. 115 N.M. 399, Española, 87532. (505) 747-8946. www.blackmesagolfclub.com NC

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Los Alamos Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 4250 Diamond Dr., Los Alamos, 87544. (505) 662-8139. www.losalamosgolf.org Marty Sanchez Links de Santa Fe. 18-hole championship course, 9 holes (par 3), public. 205 Caja del Río, Santa Fe, 87501. (505) 955-4400. www.linksdesantafe.com Pueblo de Cochiti Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 5200 Cochití Hwy., Cochití Lake, 87083. (505) 465-22399. www.golfcochititoday.com Santa Fe Country Club. 18 holes, public. 1000 Airport Rd., Santa Fe, 87505. (505) 471-2626. www.santafecountryclub.com Taos Country Club. 18 holes, open to public. 54 Golf Course Dr., Ranchos de Taos, 87557. (575) 758-7300. www.taoscountryclub.com Towa Golf at Buffalo Thunder Resort. 27 holes, public. U.S. 84/285, exit 177, 47 Towa Golf Rd., Pojoaque Pueblo. (505) 455-9000, (877) 455-7775. www.towagolf.com Valle Escondido Golf. 9 holes, public. 28 Lodge Rd., Taos, 87571. (575) 758-3475. www.eveha.com

Northeast Clayton Municipal Golf Course. 9 holes. Water St. (575) 374-9253. N.M. Highlands University Golf Course. 9 holes, public. E. Mills Ave., Las Vegas, 87701. (505) 425-7711. Pendaries Golf Course and Lodge. 18 holes. On N.M. 105, 23 miles northwest of Las Vegas. (505) 425-9890. www.pendaries.net Raton Country Club & Municipal Golf Course. 9 holes, public. 510 Country Club Rd., Raton, 87740. (575) 445-8113. www.ratongolf.com. Santa Rosa Golf Course and Country Club. 9 holes, public. Chuck-n-Dale Rd. (575) 472-4653, (575) 781-0256. Tucumcari Municipal Golf Course. 9 holes, public. P.O. Box 1188, 4465 Rt. 66, Tucumcari, 88401. (575) 461-1849. Twelve Shores Golf Resort. 9 holes, public. Jack Nicklaus design. (877) 224-5071. www.12shores.com

A visitor chips onto the green at the Inn of the Mountain Gods golf course on the Mescalero Apache Reservation.

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www.newmexico.org


Southeast Apache Mesa Golf Course. 9 holes, private / military. Bldg. 761, Holloman Air Force Base, 151 W. Gate Ave. (575) 572-3574. www.hollomanfss.com Artesia Country Club. 18 holes, semiprivate. 26th St. & Richey Ave., Artesia, 88211. (575) 746-6732. Chaparral Country Club. 18 holes, semiprivate. 1300 Colonial Pkwy., Clovis, 88101. (575) 762-4775. www.chaparralcountryclub.com Clovis Municipal Golf Course. 9 holes, par-3, public. 1200 N. Norris St., Clovis, 88101. (575) 769-7871. Cree Meadows Country Club. 18 holes, public. 301 Country Club Dr., Ruidoso, 88345. (575) 257-5815. www.playcreemeadows.com Desert Lakes Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 2351 Hamilton Rd., Alamogordo, 88310. (575) 437-0290. www.desertlakesgolf.com Eunice Municipal Golf Course. 5 miles west of Eunice. (575) 394-2881. Inn of the Mountain Gods. 18 holes, public. Carrizo Canyon Rd., Mescalero, 88340. (800) 545-9001, (575) 464-7941. www.innofthemountaingods.com Innsbrook Village Country Club & Resort. 9 holes, par 3. 146 Geneva, Ruidoso, 88345. (575) 258-5441. www.innsbrookcondos.com Jal Country Club. 9 holes, semiprivate. 1001 N. 3rd St., Jal, 88252. (575) 395-2330. Lake Carlsbad Golf Course. 27 holes, championship, public. 901 N. Muscatel, Carlsbad, 88220. (575) 885-5444. www.lakecarlsbadgolfcourse.com Links at Sierra Blanca. 18 holes, public. P.O. Box 2295, Ruidoso, 88355. (800) 854-6571, (575) 258-5330. www.thelinksatsierrablanca.com Lodge Golf Course. 9 holes, public. 601 Corona Pl., Cloudcroft, 88317. (800) 395-6343, (575) 682-2566. www.thelodgeresort.com N.M. Military Institute Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 201 W. 19th St., Roswell, 88201. (575) 622-6033 . www.nmmi.edu/golf/ Ocotillo Park Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 5001 Jack Gomez Blvd., Hobbs, 88241. (575) 397-9297. www.ocotillogolfcourse.com www.newmexico.org

Portales Country Club. 9 holes, semiprivate. 523-B S. Roosevelt Rd. U, Portales, 88130. (575) 356-8943. Riverside Country Club. 18 holes, semiprivate. 1700 W. Orchard Ln., Carlsbad, 88220. (575) 885-4253. www.riversidenm.com Spring River Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 1612 W. 8th St., Roswell, 88201. (575) 622-9506. Whispering Winds Golf Course. 18 holes, semiprivate. 105 Forrest Dr., Cannon AFB, Clovis, 88103. (575) 784-2800. Southwest Dos Lagos Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 1150 Duffer Ln., Anthony, 88021. (575) 882-2830. www.doslagos.com NMSU Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 3000 Herb Wimberly Dr.,Las Cruces, 88003. (575) 646-3219. www.nmsugolf.com N.M. Tech Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 801 LeRoy Pl., Socorro, 87801. (575) 835-5335. externalweb.nmt.edu/nmtgolf Performance Golf Schools. 3205 Arrowhead Rd., Las Cruces, 88011. (575) 521-1725. www.performancegolfschools.com Río Mimbres Country Club. 18 holes, semiprivate. 2500 E. Pine St., Deming, 88030. (575) 546-9481. www.deminggolf.com Santa Teresa Country Club. 36 holes, semiprivate. Country Club at McNutt Rd., Santa Teresa, 88008. (575) 589-3466. Sierra del Rio Golf Course. 18 holes, championship. (575) 744-4653. www.sierradelriogolf.com Silver City Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 9 Golf Course Rd., Silver City, 88061. (575) 538-5041. www.silvercitygolfcourse.com Sonoma Ranch Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 1274 Golf Club Rd., Las Cruces, 88011. (575) 521-1818. www.sonomaranchgolf.com T or C Municipal Golf Course. 9 holes, public. 685 Marie St., Truth or Consequences, 87901. (575) 894-2603. White Sands Golf Club. 11 holes, public. White Sands Missile Range, Bldg. 1330, White Sands, 88002. (575) 678-1759. www.wsmrmwr.com/golf/.

Northwest Civitan Golf Course. 9 holes, par 3, public. 2200 N. Dustin Ave., Farmington, 87401. (505) 599-1184. Coyote del Malpais Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 2001 George Hanosh Blvd., Grants, 87020. (505) 285-5544. www.coyotedelmalpaisgolfcourse.com Gallup Municipal Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 1109 Susan Ave., Gallup, 87301. (505) 863-9224. Hidden Valley Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 29 County Rd. 3025, Aztec, 87410. (505) 334-3248. Piñon Hills Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 2101 Sunrise Pkwy., Farmington, 87402. (505) 326-6066. www.fmtn.org/pinonhills Riverview Golf Course. 18 holes, public. 64 County Rd. 6520, Kirtland, 87417. (505) 598-0140. HUNTING New Mexico is home to a great variety of native big game, including elk, deer, bear, pronghorn, bighorn sheep, javelina and turkey. Exotic species also have found a home here, and they include oryx, ibex and Barbary sheep. There are good populations of small game, including dove, quail, pheasant, grouse, ducks, geese and sandhill cranes. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish produces two publications for hunters, including the Big Game and Trapper Rules and Small Game Rules and Information Booklet and the Upland Game/Migratory Bird Rules and Information Booklet. These publications provide specific information just for hunters. The New Mexico license year is April 1 to March 31, although most hunts occur in the fall and winter. Licenses may be obtained in person at sporting goods vendors throughout the state or at any of five department offices. Some are available online at www.wildlife.state.nm.us. In addition, to hunt or trap anywhere in New Mexico, a Habitat Management and Access Validation is required. To hunt or trap on U.S. Forest Service or BLM lands, a Habitat Improvement Stamp is required. Hunters may contact the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish at 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  79


(505) 476-8000. The department also provides very useful hunting information through its website: www.wildlife.state.nm.us. Hunting Guides and Outfitters: State law requires that all hunting guides and outfitters operating in New Mexico register with the N.M. Department of Game and Fish and sign contracts with clients for all services. Lists of registered outfitters are available from any department office. In addition, the New Mexico Council of Outfitters and Guides has a list available of active members. Contact them via their website: www.nmoutfitters.com. MOTORCYCLING New Mexico’s back roads are ideal to explore by motorcycle. From Farmington to Ruidoso, nearly every corner of the state hosts motorcycle rallies. Look for individual events under the community listings.

SF Rafting.1-6H

VG 06

9/15/05

Champion Motorsports. Special motorcycle events. 2801 W. 2nd St., Roswell, 88201. (575) 624-0151. www.championroswell.com Thunderbird Harley Davidson, motorcycle rentals. 5000 Alameda Dr. NE, Albuquerque, 87113. (888) 784-2423, (505) 856-1600. www.thunderbirdhd.com OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLE PROGRAM For information on four-wheeling through New Mexico’s backcountry contact: Off-Highway Vehicle Program. OHV users should know the law before riding. New Mexico now has new requirements for off-highway motor vehicles (OHVs) designed to protect the safety of all OHV users and ensure responsible and sensitive use. The law requires all OHV users to register or acquire a permit for their OHV if it is used on any public land. Furthermore, New Mexico requires anyone under age 18 to obtain a safety permit prior to operating an OHV on public land. To learn more about the law and

12:20 PM

Page 1

SANTA FE RAFTING CO. COME WITH US AND RIDE THE RAPIDS! 1-888-988-4914 P.O. Box 23525 Santa Fe, NM 87502-3525

• (505) 988-4914 • www.santaferafting.com 80  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

the program, visit www.B4uRide.com or call the OHV program at (505) 476-8140. New Mexico Jeep Tours. 9950 Florence Ave. NE, Albuquerque, 87121. (505) 252-0112. www.nmjeeptours.com New Mexico Jeep & ATV Tours. (800) 840-9449, (505) 864-9400. www.newmexicoatvtours.com RAFTING Experienced rafting enthusiasts should seek out the Río Grande, west of Taos, for the state’s most exhilarating river thrills, while those seeking a gentler ride should seek out the dam-controlled Río Chama. Apart from these two premier runs, which are regulated by the BLM, an assortment of smaller rivers can be navigated during the short spring-runoff season, which typically begins in April and extends through June. Portions of other dam-controlled rivers, including the Río Grande from south of Santa Fe to the Texas border, can be floated yearround when enough water is released. For a list of qualified outfitters, check out the information below or contact the Bureau of Land Management, 226 Cruz Alta Rd., Taos, 87571; (575) 758-8851. A river information recording is available by calling (888) 882-6188. www.nm.blm.gov Big River Raft Trips. Rafting, rock climbing, llama trekking, guided tours. Junction of N.M. 68 & 570, Pilar, 87531. (800) 748-3746, (575) 758-9711. www.bigriverrafts.com Cottam’s Rio Grande River Trips. Whitewater race course, scenic lower gorge, 207A Paseo del Pueblo, Taos, 87571. (800) 322-8267, (575) 758-2822. www.cottamsoutdoor.com. Far Flung Adventures. P.O. Box 707, El Prado, 87529. (800) 359-2627, (575) 758-2628. www.farflung.com Known World Guide Service. Taos Box, Río Grande race course, Río Chama. P.O. Box 428, Velarde, 87582. (800) 983-7756. www.knownworldguides.com Kokopelli Rafting Adventures. 551 Cordova Rd. #540, Santa Fe, 87505. (800) 879-9035, (505) 983-3734. www.kokopelliraft.com www.newmexico.org


Los Ríos River Runners. P.O. Box 2734, Taos, 87571. (800) 544-1181, (575) 776-8854. www.losriosriverrunners.com Native Sons Adventure Company. 1203 King Dr., Suite A, Taos, 87571. (800) 753-7559, (575) 758-9342. www.nativesonsadventures.com New Wave Rafting Co. P.O. Box 70, 2110 N.M. 68., Embudo, 87531. (505) 579-0075. www.newwaverafting.com N.M. Adventure Co. 220 E. Main St., Red River, 87558. (575) 754-2721. www.bighornsports.us Quiet Waters Paddling Adventures, 105-D Pleasant View Dr., Bernalillo. (505) 771-1234. www.quietwaterspaddling.com Santa Fe Mountain Adventures (800) 965-4010, (505) 988-4000. www.santafemountainadventures.com Santa Fe Rafting Co. 1000 Cerrillos Rd., Santa Fe, 87502. (888) 988-4914, (505) 988-4914. www.santaferafting.com ROCKHOUNDING For information on collecting pieces of New Mexico’s geological history contact: N.M. Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources. N.M. Tech, 801 Leroy Pl., Socorro, 87801-4796. (575) 835-5420. www.geoinfo.nmt.edu Rockhound State Park. P.O. Box 1064, Deming, 88030. (575) 546-6182. www.emnrd.state.nm.us/prd/rockhound.htm SCUBA DIVING New Mexico boasts a world-class scuba-diving destination: the Blue Hole near Santa Rosa. Blue Hole, Perch Lake. Popular scuba certification sites. P.O. Box 429, Santa Rosa, 88435. (575) 472-3763, (575) 472-3370. www.santarosanm.org/scubadiving.htm Scuba Shop LLC. 4808 N. Michigan, Roswell, 88203. (575) 626-9504. SKIING Reference the Ski Chart on Page 82 and community listings for more information on skiing opportunities around the state. www.newmexico.org

Rock climbing is a popular pastime at Las Conchas Campground in the Jémez Mountains. PHOTO BY MARK KANE.

SKI PROGRAMS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES The following is a list of ski organizations that provide services and programs to skiers with disabilities. Adaptive Ski Program. 1595 Camino la Canada, Santa Fe, 87501. (505) 995-9858. www.adaptiveski.org Challenge New Mexico. 74 Caja del Río Rd., Santa Fe, 87507. (505) 988-7621. www.challengenewmexico.com Ski Apache: Disabled Skiers Association. P.O. Box 2138, Ruidoso, 88355. SOARING & HANG GLIDING The state is home to some of the best soaring and gliding conditions in the country. Soaring Society of America. P.O. Box 2100, Hobbs, 88241. (575) 392-1177. www.ssa.org Sundance Aviation, Inc. Glider flights and instruction. 50 George Applebay Way, Moriarty, 87035. (505) 832-2222. www.soarsundance.com

TENNIS For information about where to hold your next match, contact: USTA Southwest Section. 7010 E. Acoma Drive, Suite 201, Scottsdale, AZ., 85254. (480) 289-2351, (888) 918-3647. www.southwest.usta.com TRAIN RIDING The railroad played an important role in New Mexico’s development. You can still experience bits of this history around the state today. Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad. Depot at 500 Terrace, Chama, 87520. (888) 286-2737, (575) 756-2151. www.cumbrestoltec.com N.M. Railrunner Express. Belén to Santa Fe. Office: 809 Copper Ave NW, Albuquerque, 87102. (866) 795-RAIL (7245), (505) 247-0757. www.nmrailrunner.com Santa Fe Southern Railway. 410 S. Guadalupe, Santa Fe, 87501. (888) 989-8600, (505) 989-8600. www.sfsr.com, www.thetraininsantafe.com

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  81


800-331-7669

enchantedforestxc.com

Accommodations 800-633-7463

angelfireresort.com

8,600 feet

10,677 feet

2,077 feet

210 inches

Internet Address

Base Elevation

Peak Elevation

Vertical Drop

Average Annual Snowfall

82  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

25%

No

N/A

24%

50%

26%

Yes: 52% trails 85% beginner terrain

Q-2: High-speed detachable D-3; S-2

Yes

$64

Teen $54 Junior 7-12 $44 6-under 70+ free

70+ free

$48 1-4 pm

Junior $44 Teen $54

Yes

Number of Runs

Expert

Intermediate

Beginner

Snowmaking

Lifts: D=Double; T=Triple; Q=Quad; S=Surface

Tubing

Adult All-day Lift Ticket/ Trail Pass

Child All-day Lift Ticket/ Trail Pass

Senior Lift Ticket/ Trail Pass

Adult Half-day Lift Ticket

Child Half-day Lift Ticket

Snowboarding

No - 3.5 miles

Yes

9 am - 4 pm

12/16/10 3/27/11

Day Care

Hours of Lift/ Trail Operations

‘10-’11 Scheduled Season

11/19/10 3/27/11

9 am - 4:30 pm

6 person YURT

On-slope Yes Accommodations

N/A

11/24/10 3/23/11

9 am - 4 pm

Yes

Yes

Yes

December April

9 am - 4 pm Fri, Sat, Sun & Fed. Holidays

No

No

Yes

Child $25 Teen $31

Teen 13-19 $43 Junior 4-12 $35

Afternoon $12 12-under $6

$39

$46

Afternoon $12

Child 7-12 $33

Junior 4-12 $48

65-74 $41 75+ free

Teen 13-17 $44

Teen 13-19 $57

60-69 full $48 half-day $35

$55

No

Q-1; T-1 S-2; D-3

No

20%

50%

30%

40

280

125 inches

1,410 feet

10,441 feet

9,031 feet

skipajarito.com

800-444-0707

888-662-5725

505-662-5725

Pajarito Mtn. Ski Area*

$63

Yes

D-2 T-3 S-2

Yes: 85% of trails

32%

38%

30%

57

290

214 inches

1,600 feet

10,350 feet

8,750 feet

redriverskiarea.com

800-331-7669

800-331-7669

575-754-2223

Red River*

$12 70+ free

Teen $12 12-under $6 6-under 70+ free

$15 single day

N/A

50%

25%

35 kilometers

50 kilometers

560

74

Skiable Acreage

240 inches

400 feet

10,040 feet

9,850 feet

505-754-2374

800-633-7463

Snow Phone

575-754-6112 575-754-2374

800-633-7463

Enchanted Forest (XC)*

Area Phone

Angel Fire*

1/5/10 3/20/11

9 am - 4 pm Daily 12/18-1/2 Wed-Sun, Holiday

No

In Albuquerque - 15 miles

Yes

Teen 13-20 $30 Child under-12 $30

$35

62-71 $40 full day $40 half day $30 72+ free

Teen 13-20 $40 Child under 12 $40; Kids under 46” in ski boots free

$50

No

D-4 S-1 Aerial Tram

Yes: 15% of trails

35%

55%

10%

30

200

125 inches

1,700 feet

10,378 feet

8,678 feet

sandiapeak.com

800-473-1000

505-857-8977

505-242-9052

Sandia Peak Ski & Tramway*

Yes

No

November-April

9 am - 4 pm

9 am - 4 pm

11/25/10 4/3/11

By prior arrangement

Thanksgiving April

9 am - 4 pm

No - 16 miles

In Ruidoso - 12 miles

Yes

Yes Yes 11/20-4/10

$25

$36

62+ $47/$220 season

Teen 13-20 $26 Child 7-12 $22

$29

60-69 $29 70+ free Early $15-19/ Spring $10

Teen 13-20 $34 12-under $34 Early $15-19/Spring $25 Child 7-12 $29 under 6-free Early $10-15/Spring $10

$20-25 Early season $54 11/20 - 12/19, $25 None Spring 3/25 - 4/12

D-1; T-5 Q-2; S-1 Gondola 4-person

Yes: 40% of trails new snow making top to bottom

20%

40%

40%

55/terrain park

750

183 inches

1,900 feet

11,500 feet

9,600 feet

skiapache.com

800-253-2255

575-464-1234

575-464-3600

Ski Apache

T-2 S-3

Yes: 70% of trails

20%

40%

40%

41 runs 2 terrain parks

200

185 inches

1,055 feet

9,255 feet

8,200 feet

SipapuNM.com

800-587-2240

800-587-2240

800-587-2240

Sipapu Ski & Summer Resort*

Yes

In Santa Fe - 16 miles

Yes

N/A

$45

62-71 $40 72+ free

Teen 13-20 $45 12-under $40 Kids under 46" in ski boots free

$60

No

D-2; T-2 Q-1; S-2

Yes: 50% of trails

20%

40%

40%

73

660

225 inches

1,725 feet

12,075 feet

10,350 feet

skisantafe.com

877-737-7366

505-983-9155

505-982-4429

Ski Santa Fe*

650 feet

2,612/3,274 feet

1,200

11/25/10 4/3/11

9 am - 4 pm

Yes

Yes

Yes

Teen 13-17 $43 Child 7-12 $32

$54

Value period $38

65-79 $60

Teen 13-17 $60 Value period $38 7-12 $42 Value period $31

$71 Value period 11/25-12/17

Yes

D-5; T-1 Q-4; S-3

Yes: 100% of trails beginner/inter.

24%

25%

51%

113/terrain park

12/15/10 3/15/11

9 am - 4 pm

No - 2 miles

No - 2 miles

Yes

$20

$28

70+ free

$25

$35

D-1 S-2

Yes: beginner area/tubing run

33%

33%

33%

21

68

140 inches

9,000 feet

11,819/12,481 feet 305 inches

8,350 feet

skicloudcroft.net

800-333-7542

575-682-2333

575-682-7543 575-682-2333

Ski Cloudcroft

9,207 feet

skitaos.org

866-250-7313

575-776-2916

866-968-7386 575-776-2291

Taos Ski Valley*

12/18/10 3/27/11

9 am - 4 pm

No

No

N/A

N/A

N/A

62+ $8

Child 6-16 $5

$10

N/A

N/A

No

20%

65%

15%

35 kilometers

35 kilometers

350 feet

8,850 feet

8,500 feet

vallescaldera.gov

N/A

505-216-2690

800-382-5537

Valles Caldera XC*

12/14/10 4/15/11

9 am - 4 pm

N/A

No

30%

50%

20%

30 kilometers

175 inches

1,000 feet

9,000 feet

8,000 feet

visitchama.com

800-477-0149

866-222-4700

800-477-0149

Chama Sargents’

New Mexico Ski Area Information

*MEMBERS OF SKI NEW MEXICO • (800) 755-7669 • (505) 858-2422 • www.skinewmexico.com • e-mail info@skinewmexico.com Please note: Season may vary due to snow conditions. Call ski areas for the latest conditions.

www.newmexico.org


Native New Mexico

Young women wear colorful attire at the Taos Pueblo Pow Wow.

N

ative Americans celebrate the land and their cultural traditions with stories told in indigenous languages, dynamic dances, and colorful arts and crafts. Archaeologists theorize that New Mexico Native American groups began evolving from 12,000 to 30,000 years ago. Native spiritual leaders often dispute those theories about their evolution and origin. Tribal elders teach the Native American youth that their people evolved from the earth itself and are as unique to their homeland as the trees and terrain. The descendants of these early people belong to 22 distinct American Indian tribes. Each maintains a separate, sovereign government. Pueblo Indian language is classified into three linguistic groups: Zuni, Keres and Tanoan. www.newmexico.org

PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

Only Zuni people speak Zuni; the Keres speaking pueblos include Acoma, Cochiti, Laguna, San Felipe, Santa Ana, Santo Domingo and Zia. The Tanoan liguistic group is divided into three subgroups: Tewa, Tiwa and Towa. Tewa-speaking pueblos include Nambe, Pojoaque, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Ohkay Owingeh (formerly San Juan) and Tesuque. Tiwa-speaking pueblos are Isleta, Picuris, Sandia and Taos. The only Towa-speaking pueblo is Jemez. (Please note that while many of the Pueblo names are derived from Spanish words, the Pueblo people are no longer using accents.) The historically nomadic Apache and Navajo people in the state are categorized into the Athapascan group. Many members of the Navajo Nation, however, do not agree

with this scientific classification and, just as the Pueblo people, teach the tribal version of beliefs about their origin. The Apaches and Navajos each migrated to the area in the mid-1500s, about the same time as Spanish explorers arrived. The Pueblo Indians united under Po’Pay of Ohkay Owingeh to rebel against religious oppression and forced servitude by the Spanish in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Many Spanish settlers fled, enabling the Ute and Comanche tribes to raid the Pueblo people in their absence. When the Spanish returned a dozen years later, the Pueblo people allied with the colonistas against the nomadic raiders. The Spanish offered land grants to people of mixed heritage (mestizos or genizaros) to establish isolated settlements as 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  83


The cultural center also offers packaged tours to three pueblos: “Into the Sunset Western Pueblo Tours” to Acoma and Zuni pueblos and “A Place Between Earth” and “Sky Northern Pueblo Tours to Santa Clara’s Puye Cliffs.” These one-day tours provide transportation; guided tours of each site’s museum, cultural center, mission and village; and traditional meals. Contact the IPCC to make a reservation. The IPCC is located at 2401 12th St. NW, Albuquerque, 87104; call (866) 855-7902 or (505) 843-7270. www.indianpueblo.org

ACOMA PUEBLO

8

380

RUIDOSO

ROSWELL 70

ALAMOGORDO 70

buffers against hostile raiders between the frontier and more populated areas. By the 1800s, the United States territorial government also battled raiding warriors. The U.S. government’s efforts to expand west also resulted in many battles with Native peoples. The government relocated Navajo and Apache people several times, including a forced march of 8,500 people to the Bosque Redondo Indian Reservation in the 1860s. American Indians didn’t achieve U.S. citizenship and the right to vote nationally until 1924. They were granted suffrage in New Mexico elections in 1948 and guaranteed religious freedom by federal law in 1978. Native Americans have served in every U.S. military conflict since World War I. The Navajo Code Talkers, who communicated secret strategy in the complex Navajo language, were vital to the United States’ World War II victory. Today, tribes have established business enterprises such as casinos, resorts and sporting venues to improve life for their people. 84  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

INDIAN PUEBLO CULTURAL CENTER

The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (IPCC) in Albuquerque is the official interpretive center for the state’s 19 Indian Pueblo tribes and educates visitors about the culture, art and history of these still flourishing tribes. The center, which resembles the ancient Chacoan structure Pueblo Bonito, houses a museum, exhibition galleries, gift shop and the Pueblo Harvest Café & Bakery, which features “Native Fusion” cuisine. The cultural center presents traditional Indian dances every weekend in addition to other family-oriented activities. The 2011 calendar includes the following exhibits: Celebrating Native Legacies: Works in Clay by Kathleen Wall, Gathering the Clouds Many Art Forms One Story, and IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas, a traveling exhibit by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.

With the distinction of being the oldest continuously inhabited community in North America, Acoma Pueblo is an icon of endurance and survival. Acoma Pueblo and the massive San Esteban del Rey Mission, completed in 1640, are identified as National Historical Landmarks, and Acoma is the only Native American community designated as a National Historic Trust Site by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. For centuries, Acoma Pueblo people have maintained ancestral homes atop the 370-foot sandstone mesa, although currently, fewer than 50 tribal members live year-round in the earthen homes. The majority of tribal members live in the neighboring villages of Acomita, McCarty and Anzac. Potters still craft Acoma’s distinctive and highly sought thin-walled pottery. A visitor’s cultural experience begins at the Sky City Cultural Center, where guided tours of the Pueblo are booked. While waiting for the tour to begin, one can walk through Haak’u Museum’s two galleries for a glimpse of Acoma’ Pueblo’s art and history. In the Y’aak’a Café, native Acoma and New Mexico cuisine satisfies the most voracious appetite. Please call (800) 747-0181 for current hours of operation or to make group reservations. Make your visit a weekend getaway. Play at Sky City Casino and refuel at Huwak’a Restaurant or the Sky City Travel Center. To reserve a room at Sky City Casino, call (888) 759-2489. There is a state-of-the-art RV park off I-40, exit 102, alongside historic Route 66. It caters to the class ‘A’ RVs. All of the 52 oversized spaces are designed to accommodate large motor homes towing other vehicles. Call (888) 759-2489.

www.newmexico.org


Acoma Pueblo is 65 miles (96 km.) west of Albuquerque, on I-40, exit 102, and 15 miles (19 km.) south on Indian Route 23, exit 108. Photography permits, tours and guides are available at the Sky City Cultural Center and Haak’u Museum. For more information about tours, please call (800) 747-0181 or log on to www.acomaskycity.org

COCHITI PUEBLO

Cochiti Pueblo, northernmost of the Keres-speaking pueblos, is home to about 1,500 people. One of its renowned members was the late Helen Cordero, who revived the popular storyteller figurine in 1964. Cochiti is also well known for its deep-toned ceremonial drums, which can be heard on July 14, the pueblo’s St. Bonaventure Feast Day. The pueblo leases land to the flourishing community of Cochití Lake. Many golfers enjoy the top-rated 18-hole Cochiti golf course.(505) 465-2239, (505) 465-2230 (for tee times). Visit nearby Cochití Lake, which features numerous recreational water activities and a generous shoreline with campgrounds. The camping facilities and fishing at Cochití Lake are operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, (505) 465-0307. Hike at the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, (505) 269-7455. The pueblo is 22 miles (35 km.) south of Santa Fe on I-25 and another 14 miles (23 km.) north on N.M. 16 (between Albuquerque and Santa Fe). Photography, sketching and recording are prohibited. For more information: P.O. Box 70, Cochiti, 87072; (505) 465-2244, www.pueblodecochiti.org

ISLETA PUEBLO

Founded in the 1300s, Isleta Pueblo is 15 miles south of Albuquerque along the banks of the Río Grande. The more than 3,800 members speak the Tiwa language and still practice traditional ceremonies passed from generation to generation. Isleta Pueblo has survived and flourishes despite its troubled history. When the Pueblo Revolt began in 1680, many of its people fled to Hopi settlements in Arizona. Others had accompanied the Spanish in their retreat to El Paso del Norte. Today, the pueblo has two small communities, Oraibi and Chicale and the main www.newmexico.org

pueblo of Isleta. Agriculture is the principal occupation of the Isleta Pueblo people. Additional revenue comes from the land leased to local businesses and the federal government. The pueblo has experienced a revival of pottery and jewelry making. Isleta is also known for its excellent bread. St. Augustine Mission Church was established in 1613 under the original name of St. Anthony. It is one of the oldest mission churches in the United States. It is the only location where photography is allowed at the pueblo. Some modern enterprises include the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Albuquerque, which is the first and only Hard Rock branded casino in the state of New Mexico. The property boasts more than 200 guest rooms, a lavish casino, an indoor/ outdoor pool, full service spa, abundant convention space and many other features. Call (505) 724-3800 for more information or visit www.hardrockcasinoabq.com. The Isleta Fun Connection, adjacent to the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Albuquerque, offers 24 state-of-the-art bowling lanes, billiards, lazer tag and big-screen TVs. To book an event call (505) 724-3866. The tribe runs the Isleta Eagle Golf Course, featuring a beautifully manicured 27-hole course. To schedule a tee time call (505) 848-1900. Enjoy the natural beauty of the Southwest at the Isleta Lakes & RV Campgrounds. Spend a day fishing in one of two beautiful, fully stocked lakes. The many full-service RV sites are equipped with all the necessities, including water, electricity and sewer hook ups. To make a reservation inquiry call (505) 244-8102. Isleta Pueblo lives up to the meaning of its name (Spanish for “little island”) just 13 miles south of Albuquerque and five minutes away from 1-25 on exit 215. For more information call (505) 869-3111, P.O. Box 1270, Isleta Pueblo, 87022. www.isletapueblo.com

JEMEZ PUEBLO

Jemez Pueblo is the only remaining village of the Towa-speaking Pueblo people in New Mexico. Surrounded by colorful red sandstone mesas, the 90,000 acres of Jemez lands serve as the gateway to the Cañón de San Diego and the Jemez Mountain Trail National Scenic Byway. More than 2,300 residents live in the pueblo.

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Walatowa, the main village, opens to the public only during feast days. Visitors are always welcome to browse the Walatowa Visitor Center, 7413 N.M. 4, which features the Pueblo of Jemez Museum of History and Culture, a reconstructed traditional Jemez field house, a gift shop, a nature walk and an interpretive program. The Jemez Red Rocks Recreation Area is also open to visitors year-round. You can enjoy authentic Indian foods, arts and crafts there. You may also visit the pueblo’s ancestral village of Giusewa at Jémez State Monument on N.M. 4. Landscape photography is permitted at the nearby Red Rocks area. No photography, sketching or recording of the people or the pueblo are allowed. For a fee, the tribe offers the Jemez Outdoor Experience: Red Rock Canyon tour and Ed-Venture Tour Program. Jemez Pueblo is 27 miles (43 km.) northwest of Bernalillo on U.S. 550 and N.M. 4. Please check the website for directions and information about artists. For more information: P.O. Box 280, Jemez Pueblo, 87024; (575) 834-7235. www.jemezpueblo.com

For details on events, call the Walatowa Visitor Center at (575) 834-7235 or e-mail tourism@jemezpueblo.com.

JICARILLA APACHE NATION

The scenic northern mountains and mesas are the homeland of the Jicarilla Apache Nation. Itinerant in nature until just before they encountered Europeans, the Jicarilla Apaches established trade with the Pueblo people centuries ago. They ventured as far east as Kansas until they settled deep in the Tusas Mountains in the mid-1720s. Jicarilla means “little basket” and refers to their distinctive basketmaking skills. The Jicarilla Arts and Crafts Shop and Museum displays beadwork, baskets, paintings and ribbon shirts. Dulce, the tribal capital, offers accommodations at the Jicarilla Inn. The Jicarilla Apache tribe owns and operates two casinos. Apache Nugget Casino is 15 miles north of Cuba off of U.S. 550 and N.M. 537. Contact: Apache Nugget Casino, P.O. Box 219, Cuba, 87013; (575) 289-2486. The other casino, The Wild Horse, is in Dulce at the Best Western Jicarilla Inn at U.S. 64 & Hawks Dr. Contact Jicarilla Inn and Casino, P.O. Box 650, Dulce, 87528; (575) 759-3663. www.bestwesternnewmexico. com/hotels/best-westernjicarilla-inn-and-casino/ Jicarilla Apache Nation lands are popular with outdoor enthusiasts seeking hunting, fishing, camping, boating and hiking opportunities. The tribe maintains the 14,500-acre Horse Lake Mesa Game Park, the largest single elk enclosure in the country. Five beautiful mountain lakes (La Jara, Horse, Stone, Mundo and Enbom) harbor numerous fish and waterfowl. Tent and RV camping are free with a valid fishing permit. Stone Lake has electricity and sewer hook-ups for RVs and trailers, but no potable water. For information on camping, hunting and fishing, or These hand-painted rattles are from dried gourds.

related fees, contact the Jicarilla Apache Department of Game & Fish at P.O. Box 313, Dulce, 87528; (575) 759-3255. www.jicarillahunt.com The Jicarilla Apache Nation includes more than 3,700 tribal members. Most live in Dulce, which is 25 miles (40.2 km.) west of Chama on U.S. 64. Photography, sketching and recording are generally allowed except during ceremonial rituals. Visitors should review the “protocols” section of the tribe’s website. For information: P.O. Box 507, Dulce, 87528; (575) 759-3242. www.jicarillaonline.com

LAGUNA PUEBLO

Largest among the Keresan-speaking pueblos, Laguna Pueblo is home to more than 8,000 members. The tribe is known for its pottery, featuring colorful geometric designs, and other traditional crafts. The Dancing Eagle Casino and Travel Center, off I-40, exit 108, offers virtual table games and more than 500 slot machines. Casino: (505) 552-7777; Travel Center: (505) 552-7477. www.dancingeaglecasino.com The tribe offers RV camping; call (505) 552-7730. For information on fishing, call (505) 552-6654 or (505) 552-0500. Call (505) 552-7512 for hunting information. Step back in time at Route 66 Hotel, I-40, exit 140, and enjoy Route 66-era décor, more than 1,700 slots, bingo hall, poker room, table games, international buffet, nightclub and lounge. (505) 352-7866. www.rt66casino.com Laguna is 45 miles (71 km.) west of Albuquerque off I-40 and 31 miles (50 km.) east of Grants. Photography, sketching and recording are generally prohibited. Inquire at the governor’s office for special permits. For information: P.O. Box 194, Laguna Pueblo, 87026; (505) 552-6654. www.lagunapueblo.org

MESCALERO APACHE RESERVATION

Once nomadic hunters and gatherers drifting throughout the Southwest, the Mescalero people now reside near the Sacramento Mountains. The Mescalero Apache Reservation is in southern New Mexico near the city of Ruidoso off U.S. 70. The tribe’s mountainous lands present exciting opportunities for outdoor adventurers.

PHOTO BY JULIEN MCROBERTS.

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www.newmexico.org


Native New Mexico Visitor Information

Gas/Convenience Store

Golf Course

Visitor Center

Tribal Tours

Casino

Filming w/Permit

Illustrations w/Permit

Photography w/Permit

Hunting

Fishing

RV Camping

Tent Camping

Lodging

PHOTO COURTESY OF NEW MEXICO STATE PARKS

INFORMATION SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CALL TO CONFIRM.

Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (866) 855-7902 • www.indianpueblo.org Acoma Pueblo (800) 747-0181 • www.skycity.com Cochiti Pueblo (505) 465-2244 • www.pueblodecochiti.org Isleta Pueblo (505) 869-3111 • www.isletapueblo.com Pueblo of Jemez (575) 834-7235 • www.jemezpueblo.com Jicarilla Apache Nation (575) 759-4218 • www.jicarillaonline.com Laguna Pueblo (505) 552-6654 • www.lagunaonline.org Mescalero Apache Tribe (575)464-4494 ext. 233 • www.innofthemountaingods.com Nambe Pueblo (505) 455-2036 • www.nambefalls.com Navajo Nation (928) 871-6436 • www.discovernavajo.com Ohkay Owingeh (505) 747-5613 • www.ohkay.com Picuris Pueblo (575) 587-2519 • www.picurispueblo.com Pojoaque Pueblo (505) 455-2278 • www.citiesofgold.com Sandia Pueblo (505) 867-3317 • www.sandiapueblo.nsn.us Pueblo of San Felipe (505) 867-3381 • www.sanfelipecasino.com Pueblo de San Ildefonso (505) 455-3549 Santa Ana Pueblo (505) 867-3301 • www.santaana.org Santa Clara Pueblo/Puye Cliffs (505) 753-7326 • www.santaclaradevcorp.com Santo Domingo Pueblo (505) 465-2214 Taos Pueblo (575) 758-1028 • www.taospueblo.com Tesuque Pueblo (505) 983-2667 • www.camelrockcasino.com Zia Pueblo (505) 867-3304 ext. 220 Zuni Pueblo (575) 782-7238 • www.ashiwi.org • www.zunitourism.com

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During the winter, ski or snowboard down the slopes of Ski Apache. P.O. Box 220, Ruidoso, 88355; (575) 464-3600, snow phone (575) 464-1234. www.skiapache.com The Mescalero Apache tribe operates the Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort with a nationally ranked golf course (P.O. Box 269, Mescalero, 88340; 575-464-7945), luxurious accommodations, fine dining and a casino. (575) 464-7777, (877) 277-5677. The tribe also operates the Casino Apache Travel Center (convenience store, restaurant, smoke shop, gas station and truck stop) on U.S. 70 about a mile west of Ruidoso. The capital is Mescalero, where you’ll find a small museum and shopping center. For information on tent and RV camping, call (575) 464-2244. Call (575) 464-9770 for information on a hunting package. The more than 4,600 tribal members maintain traditions such as the Apache maidens’ “Coming of Age” ceremony celebrated during the Fourth of July. Please abide by photography regulations during ceremonies and at historical sites. For information: P.O. Box 227, Mescalero, 88340; (575) 464-4494, ext. 233. www.innofthemountaingods.com

NAMBE PUEBLO

Nambe Pueblo nestles in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Its 1,700 residents are reviving the traditional arts of weaving and pottery. Several artist studios that display and sell Nambe Pueblo pottery and silver jewelry welcome visitors. The scenic rock formations have been featured in some movies. Nambe Falls Recreation Area, (505) 455-2304, located above the pueblo, offers swimming, lake fishing, a stunning double-drop waterfall and camping for a fee. Some camping sites have water/electrical hookups. Also visit the Avanyu Children’s Park and Fishing Pond. Avanyu features a picnic area, shelters, a wading pool and a playground. The pueblo offers dances and ceremonies at the falls on the July 4 feast day. The pueblo honors St. Francis of Assisi, also the patron saint, on Oct. 4. Nambe Pueblo is about 18 miles (29 km.) north of Santa Fe off U.S. 84/285 and N.M. 503. Photography, sketching and recording are 88  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Tribal members drum at Ohkay Owingeh pueblo.

permitted with a fee. For information: Nambe Pueblo, Rt. 1 Box 117-BB, Santa Fe, 87506; (505) 455-2036. www.nambefalls.com

NAVAJO NATION

The traditional Navajo people refer to themselves as Diné in their language, meaning “The People.” Some suggest that Spanish explorers coined the term Navajo. The Navajo people have endured much suffering throughout the centuries, including the infamous Long Walk in 1864, when the U.S. Army forcibly marched more than 8,000 Navajos to Bosque Redondo near Fort Sumner. They were incarcerated there for four years before being allowed to return to their homeland. The Treaty of 1868 brought peace between the Navajos and the U.S. government. Today the Navajo Nation is the largest U.S. Indian tribe, consisting of more than 298,000 members, about 70,000 of whom live in New Mexico. The reservation includes approximately 27,000 square miles. Three smaller bands of Navajos are also located away from the main reservation boundaries at Alamo, To’hajiilee and Ramah. The Navajo Nation is rich in natural and cultural resources. View the Chuska Mountains and Church Rock (visible from Red Rock Park near Gallup). Chaco Culture National Historical Park (505-786-7014, www.nps.gov/chcu), the Bisti Badlands and Ship Rock also offer interesting sites to visit.

PHOTO BY JULIEN MCROBERTS.

Camping, hiking, hunting and fishing are allowed in various areas with a permit. For camping information, call the Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department at (928) 871-6647. For details on fishing and hunting call the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife at (928) 871-6451. www.nndfw.org Key cities in the Navajo Nation include Crownpoint, Shiprock and the capital, Window Rock, Ariz., about 25 miles northwest of Gallup. Handwoven rugs are sold at monthly auctions in Crownpoint and elsewhere, (505) 786-7386, 786-5302. www.crownpointrugauction.com Navajo rugs and other crafts are available throughout the reservation and at the tribally owned Navajo Arts and Crafts Enterprise stores, (928) 871-4090. Visit the Four Corners Navajo Tribal Park, which has a visitor center. P.O. Box 2520, Window Rock, Ariz. 86515; (928) 871-6647. www.navajonationparks.org Shiprock hosts the annual Northern Navajo Fair and Nightway Chant (Yei-Be-Chei Healing Ceremony) in first week of October. No recordings or photos are allowed. The Navajo Nation Fair, billed as the world’s largest American Indian fair, is presented the first Wednesday following Labor Day in Window Rock, Ariz. Contact the Navajo Nation Fair Office at (928) 871-6478. www.navajonationfair.com Some private photography is allowed on the reservation. Call (928) 871-6436 for information and commercial requests. www.newmexico.org


Request a free Discover Navajo Visitor Guide. For information: P.O. Box 663, Window Rock, Ariz. 86515; (928) 871-6436. www.DiscoverNavajo.com

OHKAY OWINGEH

The Tewa-speaking Ohkay Owingeh (ohkay meaning “strong people,” owingeh meaning “village”) people were once considered so powerful that only they could declare war for the Pueblo Indians. They changed the pueblo’s name from San Juan to better reflect their heritage. Po’pay, one of the primary 1680 Pueblo Revolt leaders, was from Ohkay Owingeh. Of the tribe’s 6,700 members, Ohkay Owingeh artists are renowned for and sell their natural red pottery, painting and weaving. The Ohkay Owingeh Arts Cooperative showcases their work. The tribe operates the Ohkay Casino & Resort, which features thrilling gaming and affordable lodging; (877) 829-2865, (505) 747-1668. Stop at the pueblo’s travel center and adjacent restaurant; (505) 753-5452. The Ohkay Sporting Clays Club is a must for any shooting or hunting enthusiast. Ohkay Owingeh Trout Lakes provide year-round fishing

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(with a permit) and cash tournaments; (505) 753-5067. The Ohkay Owingeh Airport accommodates Type II design aircraft. The airport features navigational aids, self-service fuel and shuttle service. Ohkay Owingeh lies 25 miles (40 km.) north of Santa Fe via U.S. 84/285 and one mile (1.6 km.) north of Española on N.M. 68. Photography, sketching and recording are permitted for a fee. For information: P.O. Box 1099, Ohkay Owingeh, 87566; (505) 852-4400. www.ohkay.com

August includes dances, pole climbing and a morning footrace. Picuris Pueblo is also the majority owner of the Hotel Santa Fe, in downtown Santa Fe at 1501 Paseo de Peralta; (800) 825-9876. www.hotelsantafe.com The pueblo is located 24 miles (38 km.) southeast of Taos in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains via N.M. 68, 518 and 75. Photography permits are available. For information: Picuris Pueblo, P.O. Box 127, Peñasco, 87553; (575) 587-2519. www.picurispueblo.net

PICURIS PUEBLO

POJOAQUE PUEBLO

Spanish colonizer Juan de Oñate originally named the pueblo Gran Pueblo de Picuris, but it was called Pikura (meaning “those who paint”) by its Pueblo neighbors. The ancestral home of the Picuris people, Pot Creek Pueblo, is located near today’s community of about 1,800 inhabitants. Tribal members restored the 200-year-old adobe church, San Lorenzo de Picuris, by hand. Tour excavated structures with a visitor permit or fish in the Tutah Lake for a fee. The Picuris Pueblo Museum displays and sells beadwork, weaving and pottery by local artists. The pueblo’s annual San Lorenzo Feast Day in

Pojoaque Pueblo can trace inhabitants in the area to A.D. 500. In the native Tewa language, the pueblo is called P’o Suwae Geh, or “drinking water place.” Today the Poeh Cultural Center and Museum preserves the traditional culture of the Tewa-speaking pueblos of the northern Río Grande Valley and also displays contemporary Pueblo art. Guided/self-guided tours and artist demonstrations are offered; (505) 455-3334. www.poehcenter.com Buffalo Thunder Resort includes a 390-room hotel (The Hilton Santa Fe North), a luxury spa and fitness facility, world-class dining areas,

entertainment venues, 66,000 square feet in meeting space and a new Las Vegas-style casino with 1,200 slot machines, 18 table games and an eight-table poker room. The nearby Cities of Gold Casino, (505) 455-3313, (800) 455-3313, with a smoke-free section, features slots and nightly bingo. Complimentary shuttle service is provided daily from area hotels, and transportation for disabled visitors is available. Call (505) 455-4253. www.citiesofgold.com For lodging nearby, stay at the Cities of Gold Hotel, which offers passes to the Pueblo of Pojoaque Wellness Center; (877) 455-0515, (505) 455-0515. The Healing Art Center, (505) 455-0320, offers spa treatments. The Sports Bar Race Book and Casino televises all major college and professional sporting events. This is an off-track facility with simulcasts of horse racing and dog racing. Ninety-three LCD screens guarantee you’ll be able to catch a variety of sporting events. There are also slot machines, a full-service bar and a snack bar; (505) 455-3984. Towa Golf Course offers a challenging game with 27 of the 36 holes designed by Hale Irwin and William Phillips. The clubhouse features a full-service restaurant and bar, meeting facilities

Etiquette on Tribal Lands Guests are usually welcome on Native American lands for recreation and celebrations. It is important to know that each pueblo and tribal reservation is a sovereign nation with a distinct culture, language and set of laws. ■

Tribal communities do not use the clock to determine when it is time to conduct activities. Acts of nature, as well as the sequence of events that must take place (some not for public viewing), usually determine start and finish times for ceremonies. ■

Respect people’s needs for privacy and do not push for answers to questions since they might address a sensitive issue or event. In most situations, look to people around you for examples of appropriate behavior. ■

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The following guidelines are helpful:

It is recommended that you call ahead to confirm event dates, as well as access to tribal lands. There are times when tribal leaders need to restrict access because of private ceremonies or other reasons, such as a fire on their land.

Each tribe has its own government and visitor policy. The tribes value common sense, continuity and respect. Please obey all laws when visiting Indian lands. Since many people walk on tribal roads, speed limits are strictly enforced. ■

Tribes value traditions, customs and religion. Some actions and/or questions could be offensive, so refrain from pressing for answers. Tribal dances are religious ceremonies, not public performances. It is a privilege to witness a ceremony. Remain quiet, don’t applaud, and do not touch the dancers. ■

Photography is a sensitive issue. Follow the guidelines regarding fees and restrictions at each pueblo and/or activity. Please refrain from bringing a cell phone onto tribal lands. Tribal officials could confiscate cell phones if they feel they might be used for photography or recording. Also, the ringtones as well as personal conversations can easily disrupt other visitors’ experiences, as well as daily tribal life. Certain areas of tribal communities are off-limits to visitors and might not be posted. They include cemeteries, ceremonial buildings (kivas) and private homes. Do not climb walls or other structures. Do not wander into homes without invitation. ■

Do not remove artifacts, pottery shards or other tempting items. ■

Do not bring alcohol or drugs onto tribal lands. www.newmexico.org


SANDIA PUEBLO

Inspired by the magenta hue of the nearby mountains at sunset, Francisco Vázquez de Coronado named the pueblo sandía (Spanish for watermelon) in the 1500s. The native name is Tuf Shur Tia, meaning “green reed place,” referring to the nearby Río Grande. The pueblo’s boundaries stretch from the river to the mountain’s foothills, spanning more than 22,877 acres. The pueblo was deserted in 1680 when residents fled to Hopi Pueblo during the Pueblo Revolt. The Sandia Pueblo people did not return until the mid-1700s. More than 400 members now live on Sandia Pueblo lands. The pueblo operates the Sandia Resort and Casino on the east side of I-25 off Tramway Boulevard on the outskirts of Albuquerque; (800) 526-9366, (505) 796-7500. www.sandiacasino.com. The resort features a hotel, gaming, dining, golfing and a spa, all with a view of the majestic Sandía Mountains. The resort also presents national entertainers. The tribe maintains a buffalo preserve across from the casino; the buffalo are visible from Tramway Boulevard. The Bien Mur Indian Market Center, (505) 821-5400, is one of the largest Native American-owned and -operated stores in the Southwest. Fishermen can take advantage of three stocked lakes at the tribally run Sandia Lakes, a 70-acre recreation area with picnic sites and a natural trail along the Río Grande bosque; (505) 771-5190. Sandia Pueblo is on the northern outskirts of Albuquerque off I-25 at exit 235 or Tramway Boulevard. For more information: 481 Sandia Loop, Bernalillo, 87004; (505) 867-3317. www.sandiapueblo.nsn.us www.newmexico.org

SAN FELIPE PUEBLO

TH I S I S I ND I A N CO UNTR Y

San Felipe Pueblo, considered the most culturally conservative of the Keresan villages, is protective of its traditions. The pueblo residents, who number almost 3,200, allow visitors only during ceremonies, when food and crafts booths spring up near San Felipe Church at the foot of Black Mesa. The pueblo is well known for its Corn Dances on St. Phillip’s Feast Day. A modern-day attraction is the tribal-owned Casino Hollywood, (505) 867-6700, (877) 529-2946, visible from I-25. www.sanfelipecasino.com San Felipe Pueblo is 25 miles north of Albuquerque off I-25. All visitors should stop at the pueblo governor’s office before entering tribal land. Photography, sketching and video recording are prohibited. For information: P.O. Box 4339, San Felipe Pueblo, 87001; (505) 867-3381.

A

country where the stark

becomes one with the

colorful mixture of tribal ceremonies. It is the country of the Navajo, Zuni, Acoma, Apache and Ute. Visit a timeless land for a vacation that will last a lifetime.

SAN ILDEFONSO PUEBLO

Historians believe the San Ildefonso Pueblo people abandoned their original villages at Mesa Verde and Bandelier due to drastic environmental changes. It was on top of nearby Black Mesa, across the Río Grande from San Ildefonso, that the pueblo held off Spanish soldiers during their reconquest of New Mexico in 1694. The San Ildefonso pueblo is a flourishing art community with about 1,500 residents. It is the home of the late Maria Martinez, who along with her husband, Julian, developed the world-renowned black-on-black pottery with black matte designs. Many artists’ homes throughout the pueblo are open for shopping. The San Ildefonso Pueblo Museum, (505) 455-3549, also displays traditional crafts. With an average of 20,000 visitors each year, San Ildefonso is one of the most visited pueblos. The pueblo is 23 miles (37 km.) north of Santa Fe via U.S. 84/285 and west off N.M. 502. For fishing information, call (505) 670-7128 or (505) 570-0152. Noncommercial photography, sketching and recording are prohibited. Commercial photo requests must go to the pueblo governor’s office. For information: 02 Tunyo Po, Santa Fe, 87506; (505) 455-2273.

imagery of the land

Gallup Intertribal Indian Ceremonial. Courtesy of the City of Gallup.

and a golf shop. For tee times and rates call (877) 465-3489, (505) 455-9000. Homewood Suites by Hilton, located next to the golf course, offers extended-stay suites and several amenities including a wedding chapel and honeymoon suite casitas. Take U.S. 84/285 12 miles north from Santa Fe, Buffalo Thunder exit 177; (505) 455-9100. Pojoaque Pueblo is located about 15 miles (25 km.) north of Santa Fe on U.S. 84/285. For information: Pojoaque Pueblo, Camino del Rincón, Ste. 6, Santa Fe, 87506; (505) 455-2278. www.citiesofgold.com

For more information, call (800) 448-1240 or visit www.IndianCountryNM.org

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The Santa Claran Hotel is adjacent to the casino, www.santaclaran.com The hotel, casino and bowling center are in the Big Rock Shopping Center in downtown Española. The Dreamcatcher Cinema, (505) 753-0087, is nearby off of South U.S. 285 in Española. The Santa Clara Travel Center, on N.M. 30, offers gasoline, convenience items and a full-service grill. The Puye Cliff Dwellings have recently re-opened. Call (505) 753-7326 for more information. Santa Clara Pueblo is off of N.M. 30, which links Española and Los Alamos. For more information, visitors may inquire at the governor’s office, (505) 753-7326, found at the Santa Clara Pueblo Neighborhood Facility.

SANTO DOMINGO PUEBLO

Taos Pueblo is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site.

SANTA ANA PUEBLO

The Santa Ana Pueblo lands cover 79,000 acres east and west of the Río Grande, and are home to about 700 residents. Tamaya, referred to by community residents as the “old village,” is sometimes closed to the public but is open on feast days and other holidays, such as Easter and Christmas. The pueblo provides modern recreational activities. The Santa Ana Star Casino offers gambling, a 36-lane bowling center, an indoor event center, and banquet and conference facilities; (505) 867-0000. www.santaanastar.com Santa Ana Golf Club features three nine-hole golf courses—Tamaya, Cheena and Star—that weave through the high desert hills. The club hosts PGA championships and invites you to eat at the Prairie Star Restaurant. (505) 867-9464, www.santaanagolf.com The pueblo also owns the upscale 18-hole Twin Warriors Golf Course, (505) 771-6155, www.twinwarriorsgolf.com, which caters to the champion golfer as well as the resort-style player. The Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort & Spa, (505) 867-1234, www.tamaya.hyatt.com, offers visitors a relaxing spa and diverse cultural activities, such as Native American bread baking and traditional dances. Other enterprises include the Ta-Ma-Ya Cooperative Association, which sells crafts (open Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday, 92  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

PHOTO BY JULIEN MCROBERTS.

10 a.m.-4 p.m.), and Santa Ana Agricultural Enterprises (SAAE), which grow blue corn for domestic and international food and cosmetic markets. SAAE owns Santa Ana Native Plant and Tree Nursery and Santa Ana Garden Center; (505) 867-1322. www.santaana.org/garden. htm. The Lovelace New Mexico Soccer Tournament Complex (20 fields and two championship fields) is also on tribal land. To order ingredients for native cuisine or specialty items, visit www.cookingpost.com or call (888) 867-5198. Santa Ana Pueblo is two miles north of Bernalillo on N.M. 313. Tamaya, “the old village” is approximately nine miles west of Bernalillo on N.M. 550. Photography, sketching and video recording are prohibited. For information: 2 Dove Rd., Santa Ana, 87004; (505) 867-3301. www.santaana.org

SANTA CLARA PUEBLO

Santa Clara Pueblo is known for its many galleries in the homes and shops of Santa Clara Pueblo artists, which are open daily to visitors . The Black Mesa Golf Club, (505) 747-8946, www.blackmesagolfclub.com, is at 115 N.M. 399, just south of Española. Big Rock Casino, (866) BIG-ROCK, and Big Rock Bowl offer casino gambling and several restaurant options, including Española’s only steakhouse.

Santo Domingo Pueblo is near the ancient Cerrillos turquoise mines, and its people have mastered the art of making fine jewelry and heishi out of the colorful stones. The Santo Domingo people historically are great traders of their crafts. This Keresan pueblo presents a large ceremonial dance on Aug. 4 that honors the pueblo’s patron saint, St. Dominic. While visitors are welcome to the pueblo, the Santo Domingo people are adamant about preserving their traditional way of life. A cultural center and small museum provide opportunities to learn more about the pueblo, which is home to more than 3,100 people. There is no admission fee, but donations are appreciated. Artists sell jewelry, pottery and silverwork at roadside stands. Look for these special items and others during the Santo Domingo Arts and Crafts Market presented every Labor Day weekend. The pueblo also has a small museum and a gas station off the Santo Domingo exit on I-25 between Santa Fe and Albuquerque. The pueblo is located 25 miles (40 km.) south of Santa Fe. For information: P.O. Box 99, Santo Domingo, 87052; (505) 465-2214.

TAOS PUEBLO

Taos Pueblo, also known as “Home of the Red Willow People,” sits at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The village, one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities in North America, was designated a World Heritage Site and a National Historic Site in 1992.

www.newmexico.org


The adobe, multistoried homes of Taos Pueblo have captivated painters and photographers since the 1920s, when an artist colony formed in nearby Taos. The Taos people are also skilled in leatherwork, evident in the drums and moccasins they make. The pueblo operates Taos Mountain Casino; (575) 737-0777, (888) 946-8267. www.taosmountaincasino.com The pueblo is home to nearly 4,500 people who value their privacy and insist visitors do the same. Signs mark houses around the plaza that sell arts and crafts. Respect the off-limits signs and don’t climb the ladders. The pueblo is 2.6 miles (4.2 km.) north of the town of Taos. It is open to visitors most of the year but closes every spring for eight weeks and late August for ceremonial purposes, so please call ahead. The pueblo levies admission, parking, photography and videography fees. Any sketching, painting or commercial photography requires written approval with fees paid in advance. Photography and video recording are prohibited during feast days/religious ceremonies. For information: P.O. Box 1846, Taos Pueblo, 87571; (575) 758-1028, www.taospueblo.com. E-mail: tourism@taospueblo.com

TESUQUE PUEBLO

Situated in the soft red-brown foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Tesuque Pueblo has stood on its present location since A.D. 1200 Prior to this date, evidence indicates that the ancestors of the Tesuque Pueblo people lived in what is now known as Santa Fe. The Tesuque Pueblo people then moved from the Santa Fe area to the present reservation and established several satellite villages. The present site is on the National Register of Historic Places. The name Tesuque is a Spanish variation of the Tewa name, Tay Tsu Geh Oweengeh, meaning the “village of the narrow place of the cottonwood trees.” The pueblo has about 475 residents. The reservation encompasses more than 17,000 acres, including 636 acres of forest land known as the Aspen Ranch and Vigil Land Grant in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Many Tesuque Pueblo artists are well known for their pottery, painting, sculpture, silverwork and traditional tailoring. Tesuque Pueblo operates the Camel Rock Casino, (800) 462-2635, (505) 984-8414, www.newmexico.org

www.camelrockcasino.com, outside Santa Fe. The popular Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market, (505) 670-2599, adjacent to the Santa Fe Opera, is 8 miles north of Santa Fe, off U.S. 84-285. The flea market is open from March to December. Tesuque Pueblo is about 10 miles (16 km) north of Santa Fe off U.S. 84-285. It is sometimes closed to the public, so call before visiting. Photography is allowed on certain occasions, with permission. For information: Rt. 42, Box 360-T, Santa Fe, 87506; (505) 955-7732.

ZIA PUEBLO

Zia Pueblo is the birthplace of the ancient Zia sun symbol, which features stylized rays radiating in each of the traditional four directions from a central sun and is now emblazoned on the New Mexico state flag. The Keres-speaking pueblo, near the Jémez River, is home to approximately 870 members. Behind the pueblo lie the Nacimiento Mountains and the Pajarito and Jémez plateaus. Potters from Zia Pueblo are known for geometric designs, which they use on pottery, as well as plant and animal motifs depicted against white backgrounds. The Zia Pueblo women are skilled at making thin-walled pottery customarily decorated with bird symbols. The Zia Cultural Center sells posters, postcards, T-shirts and caps. Zia Pueblo artwork is available from individuals who sell from their homes; please check with the governor’s office before making home visits. The pueblo offers bass, catfish and trout fishing with a purchased permit at Zia Lake. Please contact the Pueblo of Zia Natural Resource Office for information at (505) 867-3304 ext. 230 or 231, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Zia Pueblo is 17 miles (27 km.) northwest of Bernalillo along U.S. 550 and is open daily during daylight hours. Photography, sketching and recording are not permitted. Filming requires a permit. Contact the governor’s office at 135 Capitol Square Drive, Zia Pueblo, 87053-6013 or call (505) 867-3304 ext. 220.

ZUNI PUEBLO

Spanish explorers first encountered Zuni Pueblo in 1540 during their search for the legendary Seven Golden Cities of Cíbola. Instead of gold, however, an abundance of of precious turquoise and silver arts can be found at the pueblo. Today there are more than 11,000 Zuni Pueblo tribal members living throughout the state with 10,000 living in Zuni Pueblo itself, making it the state’s most populous pueblo. The Zuni people are famous for many traditional art styles, including inlay mosaic and needlepoint jewelry, pottery and stone carvings. Visitors can stop by any of the five active trading posts to experience the full range of the Zuni arts. Learn about Zuni heritage at the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center. (505) 782-4403. The Our Lady of Guadalupe (Old Zuni) Mission, dating from 1630, can be explored via daily tours from the visitor center. Zuni Pueblo is 35 miles (56 km) south of Gallup on N.M. 53. For fishing and hunting information call the Zuni Game and Fish Department at (505) 782-2750. Permits for photography, sketching and video recording are available at the Visitor and Arts Center located along U.S. 53. For information: Zuni Tourism, P.O. Box 339, Zuni Pueblo, 87327; (505) 782-7238, www.zunitourism.com or Tribal Administration (505) 782-7000.

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  93


Native Calendar ◆ April 24. Corn & Basket Dances. Easter Sunday.

Call individual pueblos to confirm if open to the public.. ◆ April 24-27. Easter Festivals. Santo Domingo.

Corn dances. (505) 465-2214. Zia. (505) 867-3304

◆ May 1. St. Philip’s Feast Day/Annual Feast Day &

Corn Dance. San Felipe. (505) 867-3381, (505) 843-7270. ◆ May 3. Santa Cruz Feast Day. Taos. Traditional

footrace. Corn Dance by young adults. (575) 758-1028. ◆ May 6-7. Mother’s Day & Graduation Arts Market.

Zuni. (505) 782-7238.

◆May 28-29. Ancient Ways Arts Festival Market

(from Gallup, Zuni to Grants). Zuni (505) 782-7238. ◆ May 29. Memorial Day. Star Feather Pow Wow

at Jemez Red Rocks. (575) 834-7235.

◆ May 29-31. Memorial Day Weekend Annual Red

Rocks Arts & Crafts Show. Jemez. Sponsored by the Towa Arts & Crafts Committee. (575) 834-7235. ◆ May 30-June 5. Navajo Treaty Day Celebration.

Navajo Nation fairgrounds, Window Rock, AZ. (928) 871-6647. www.navajonationfair.org

◆ June TBA. Corn Dance. Tesuque. (505) 955-7732. ◆ June TBA. Deshkiwi/Fasting. All business closed

during that time at Zuni. (505) 782-7238.

◆ June TBA. Eastern Navajo Nation Arts & Crafts

Festival. Navajo Nation. In Torreon, 26 miles southwest of Cuba on N.M. 197. (505) 731-2422, www.jumpingsun.com ◆ June TBA. Summer Art Show. Jemez. Artists /

vendors at Jemez Red Rocks.

◆ June-Sept. Nightly Indian Dances. Gallup Cultural These youngsters have fun at the Totah Festival in Farmington.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FARMINGTON

CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU.

◆ Jan.-Dec. Crownpoint Rug Auction.

Held monthly every second Friday. (505) 786-5302. www.crownpoinrugauction.com ◆ Jan. 1. Dance. Ohkay Owingeh. (505) 852-4400.

◆ Jan. 23. San Ildefonso Feast Day/Annual

Feast Day. San Ildefonso. (505) 455-2273.

◆ Jan. 25. St. Paul’s Feast Day Dance. Picuris.

(575) 587-1099

◆ Jan. 1. Matachine Dances. Jemez. Subject to change.

◆ Feb. 2. Candelaria Feast Day. Picuris. (575) 587-1099.

◆ Jan. 1. Transfer of Canes Ceremonial Dance.

◆ 1st or 2nd weekend in Feb. Governor’s Feast Day.

◆ Jan. 1. New Year’s Day Corn Dance. Santo Domingo.

◆ 2nd weekend in Feb. Deer Dance. Ohkay Owingeh.

◆ Jan. 1. Transfer of Canes Celebration. Many other

◆ 1st weekend after Feb. 10. Jicarilla Day Powwow.

(575) 834-7235.

Picuris. (575) 587-1099. (505) 465-2214.

pueblos have dances. Call the individual pueblos to confirm if these are open to the public. ◆ Jan. 1. Turtle Dances. Taos. (575) 758-1028.

San Felipe. (505) 867-3381. Acoma. (800) 747-0181. (505) 852-4400.

Jicarilla Apache. (575) 769-1343.

◆ Feb. 11-12. Valentine’s Arts Market. Zuni.

(505) 782-7238.

◆ Jan. 6. Deer or Buffalo Dance. Taos. (575) 758-1028.

◆ March 19. St. Joseph’s Feast Day. Laguna. Harvest

◆ Jan. 6. Kings Day Celebration. Ohkay Owingeh.

◆ April-Oct. Tribal food vendors at Jemez Red Rocks.

Pojoaque (505) 455-2278.

(505) 852-4400. Picuris. (575) 587-1099. Pojoaque (505) 455-2278. Sandia (505) 867-3317. Santo Domingo (505) 465-2214.Tesuque. (505) 955-7732. Zia (505) 867-3304. Call pueblos to confirm dances and access.

94  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

and various dances at Laguna Village. (505) 552-6654.

Generally, most weekends and some weekdays, weather permitting. (575) 834-7235. ◆ April 5. Raymond and Ramona Feast Day. Santa

Domingo. Open to the public. No dances. (505) 465-2214.

Center. Navajo Nation. (800) 242-4282.

◆ June 13. St. Anthony’s Feast Day. Ohkay Owingeh.

Green Corn Dance. (505) 852-4400. Picuris. Corn dance. (575) 587-1099. Taos. (575) 758-1028. Sandia. (505) 867-3317, (505) 843-7270. Santo Domingo. No dances. (505) 465-2214. ◆ June 23-24. Ohkay Owingeh Feast Day. Ohkay

Owingeh. Comanche, Winter and Summer Buffalo dances. (505) 852-4400. ◆ June 24. San Juan Day Corn Dance. Taos. (575) 758-1028. ◆ June 24. St. John’s Feast Day. Santo Domingo. Open

to the public. (505) 465-2214.

◆ June 24. St. John the Baptist Feast Day. Cochiti.

(505) 465-2244.

◆ June 28-July 4. Kayenta Fourth of July Rodeo.

Navajo Nation. Kayenta, AZ. (602) 284-2164. www.kayentarodeo.com.

◆ June 29. St. Pedro’s Feast Day. Santo Domingo. Open

to the public. (505) 465-2214.

◆ July TBA. Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Arts and

Crafts Show. Ohkay Owingeh. (505) 747-1593.

◆ July TBA (usually July 4.). Nambe Falls Ceremonial.

Subject to change. Nambe. (505) 455-2036.

www.newmexico.org


◆ 2nd weekend of July. Taos Pueblo Pow Wow.

Intertribal dancers from all over the country come to dance for entertainment and competition. (575) 758-1028. Taos. www.taospueblopowwow.com ◆ July 4. Apache Maidens Coming of Age Ceremony.

◆ Sept. 2. San Esteban Feast Day. Old Acoma Pueblo

◆ Dec. 12. Our Lady of Guadalupe. Jemez. Matachine

◆ Sept. 3-5 (Labor Day weekend). Santo Domingo

◆ Dec. 12. Our Lady of Guadalupe Feast Day.

at Sky City. Annual feast day with harvest dances. (505) 552-6604.

Mescalero Apache. (575) 464-4494.

Annual Arts & Crafts Market. Santo Domingo. (505) 465-0406, (505) 465-2214.

◆ July 14. St. Bonaventure’s Day. Santo Domingo.

◆ Sept. 3-4. Totah Festival Indian Market, Rug

No dances. Open to the public. (505) 465-2214.

◆ July 14. St. Bonaventure Feast Day. Cochiti.

Corn Dances in the plaza. (505) 465-2244.

◆ July 17-18. Little Beaver Celebration. Jicarilla

Apache Nation. Pro-Indian Rodeo, powwow, Pony Express race. (575) 759-4375.

◆ July 25. St. James Feast Day. Santo Domingo. Open to

the public. (505) 465-2214.

◆ July 25. Santiago Day Corn Dance. Taos. (575) 758-1028. ◆ July 26. Santa Ana Corn Dance. Taos. (575) 758-1028. ◆ July 26. Santa Ana Feast Day. Santo Domingo.

No dances. Open to the public. (505) 465-2214.

Auction & Powwow. Juried art festival, more than 100 artists. Authentic handmade Native American arts & crafts, Navajo rug auction and powwow. Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington. (800) 448-1240. www.farmingtonnm.org ◆ Sept. 4. St. Augustine Feast Day. Isleta. Harvest

dance in the plaza. (505) 869-3111.

◆ 2nd week in Sept. Harvest Dance. Ohkay Owingeh.

(505) 852-4400.

◆ Sept. 7-11. Navajo Nation Fair. Navajo Nation.

Window Rock, Ariz. (928) 871-6647. www.navajonationfair.com.

◆ Sept. 8. The Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s

Dances. Subject to change. (575) 834-7235. E-mail: tourism@jemezpueblo.com for details. Pojoaque. (505) 455-2278.

◆ Dec. 24. Christmas Eve Mass at Midnight. Preceded

by traditional dancing. Santo Domingo. (505) 465-2214.

◆ Dec. 24. Christmas Eve. Taos. Vespers and procession of

the Virgin Mary with dancers and bonfires. (575) 758-1028. ◆ Dec. 24. Torchlight Procession of the Virgin

Vespers and Matachine Dance. Ohkay Owingeh. (505) 852-4400. ◆ Dec. 24-25. Dances After Midnight Mass and

Christmas Dances. Many other pueblos will have dances. Call individual pueblos to confirm access. ◆ Dec. 25. Christmas Dances. Santo Domingo.

(505) 465-2214.

◆ Dec. 25. Matachine Dance. Ohkay Owingeh.

(505) 852-4400.

◆ July 26. St. Anne’s Feast Day/Annual Feast Day.

◆ Dec. 25. Matachine Dance. Picuris. (575) 587-1099.

Santa Ana. (505) 867-3301.

Feast Day. Laguna. Harvest and various dances at Encinal Village. (505) 552-6654.

◆ July 26. St. Ann’s Feast Day. Laguna. Harvest and

◆ Sept. 15. Go-Jii-Yah Feast. Jicarilla Apache Nation.

Taos . (575) 758-1028.

various dances at Seama village. (505) 552-6654.

◆ Aug. TBA. Zuni McKinley County Tribal Fair and

Rodeo. Zuni. (505) 782-7238.

◆ Aug. 2. St. Persingula Feast Day. Jemez. Corn Dances.

(575) 834-7235.

◆ Aug. 4. St. Dominic’s Feast Day/Annual Feast Day.

Santo Domingo. Corn Dances, carnival and vending. (505) 465-2214.

◆ Aug. 9-10. San Lorenzo Feast Day. Sunset dance, pole

climbing, and arts and crafts. Picuris. (575) 587-1099.

◆ Aug. 10. Historic Pueblo Revolt Anniversary Date.

Taos. (575) 758-1028.

◆ Aug. 10. St. Lorenzo’s Feast Day. Santo Domingo.

No dances. Open to the public. (505) 465-2214.

◆ Aug. 10-14. Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial.

Red Rock Park and Gallup. www.theceremonial.com (505) 863-3896. ◆ Aug. 12. Santa Clara Feast Day/Annual Feast Day.

Santa Clara. Buffalo, harvest or Corn Dance. (505) 753-7326.

◆ Aug. 13-14. Zuni Cultural Arts Expo. Zuni.

(505) 782-7238.

◆ Aug. 15. The Assumption of Our Blessed Mother’s

Feast Day. Laguna. Harvest and various dances at Mesita village. (505) 552-6654.

Foot races, powwow, country rodeo. Held at Stone Lake. (575) 759-1343.

◆ Dec. 25-28. Christmas Celebration. Zia.

◆ Sept. 19. St. Joseph’s Feast Day. Laguna. Buffalo,

◆ Dec. 26. Turtle Dance. Ohkay Owingeh.

Eagle and various dances at Laguna Village. (505) 552-6654.

◆ Sept. 25. St. Elizabeth’s Feast Day. Laguna. Harvest

and various dances at Paguate village. (505) 552-6654. ◆ Sept. 29-30. San Geronimo Feast Day. Evening

Vespers, dance, Arts & Crafts Fair, traditional footrace and pole climb. Taos. (575) 758-1028. ◆ Oct. TBA. Northern Navajo Nation Fair. Navajo

Nation. Shiprock Fairgrounds, Shiprock. (505) 368-3727. ◆ 2nd weekend of Oct. Open Air Market. Jemez. At the

Walatowa Visitor Center. Traditional dances and a bread-baking demonstration, as well as both Native and non-Native artists selling arts and crafts. (575) 834-7235. ◆ Oct. 4. St. Francis of Assisi Feast Day. Nambe.

Annual Feast Day with Buffalo & Deer Dances. (505) 455-2036.

◆ Oct. 8. Zuni Fall Arts Festival. Zuni. (505) 782-7238. ◆ Oct. 17. St. Margaret’s Feast Day. Laguna. Harvest

and various dances at Paraje village. (505) 552-6654. ◆ Nov. 1. PUEBLO CLOSED, All Souls’ Day.

Santa Domingo.

◆ Nov. 1-2. PUEBLO CLOSED, All Souls’ Day. Taos.

◆ Aug. 15. Our Lady of the Assumption Feast Day.

◆ Nov. 12. San Diego Feast Day. Jemez. Corn Dances.

Zia. (505) 867-3304.

(575) 834-7235. Tesuque. (505) 955-7732.

◆ Aug. 20-21. Santa Fe Indian Market.

◆ Nov. 24. Zuni Christmas Lights Parade. Zuni.

(505) 983-5220. www.swaia.org

(505) 782-7238.

◆ Aug. 28. St. Augustine, Annual Feast Day. Isleta.

◆ Dec. TBA. Deskwi/Fasting. All businesses closed

Mass in the morning and a procession follows. Traditional dances in the plaza in the afternoon. (505) 869-3111.

in Zuni. Call (505) 782-7238 for dates.

◆ Sept. 1-5. Zuni McKinley County Fair. Zuni.

◆ Dec. TBA (near Christmas). Various Dances.

(505) 782-7238.

www.newmexico.org

◆ Dec. 25. Taos Pueblo Deer or Matachine Dance.

◆ Dec. TBA. Holiday Arts Market. Zuni. (505) 782-7238.

San Ildefonso. Subject to change. (505) 455-3549.

(505) 867-3304. (505) 852-4400.

◆ Dec. 26-28. Christmas Celebration. Santo Domingo.

Corn Dances. (505) 465-2214.

◆ Dec. 25-27. Holiday Dances. Laguna. Christmas

Harvest Dance follows after 10 a.m. Mass at Laguna Village. (505) 552-6654.

◆ Dec. 28. Holy Innocents’ Day. Picuris. Children’s Dance.

(575) 587-1099.

NATIVE EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Please note that not all events are listed for the tribes. Either the tribe did not wish to list the event or we were unable to confirm an activity. Some tribes are not listing events because of the limited capacity at their pueblo or reservation. Generally, the Pueblo Indians have dances on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day, New Year’s Day and Jan. 6, Kings’ Day. Often the dances are not determined until days before the event. It’s a good idea to phone ahead a few days before to confirm activities. For general information on Native tourism, contact the New Mexico Department of Tourism: (800) 545-2070, (505) 827-7400 or e-mail enchantment@newmexico.org. 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  95


Arts & Culture New Mexico celebrates its culture through a wealth of historic, visual and performing arts venues. The following list highlights some museums and cultural destinations operated by the state. See an overview of other museums on Page 100.

State Museums and Cultural Centers MUSEUM OF NEW MEXICO www.museumofnewmexico.org Founded in 1909, the Museum of New Mexico preserves and shares the Land of Enchantment through four Santa Fe museums and six historical monuments across the state. See “State Monuments” on Page 98. The following section includes an alphabetical listing of all state-operated museums and cultural centers. For information on other museums see an overview on Page 100 and also check the “Museums and Historic Sites” section for each community listed later in this guide. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS AND CULTURE/LABORATORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY Camino Lejo on Museum Hill, off Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, (505) 476-1269. www.indianartsandculture.org The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture shares Milner Plaza with the Museum of International Folk Art. Here, Now and Always, a major ongoing exhibition, combines the voices of living Native Americans with ancient and contemporary artifacts and interactive multimedia to tell the complex stories of the Southwest. The Buchsbaum Gallery displays works from the region’s pueblos.

Five changing galleries present exhibits on subjects ranging from archaeological excavations to contemporary art. The museum has about 75,000 individually cataloged pieces and, in the archaeological research collections, there are an additional 5- to 10-million individual pieces. A year-round outdoor sculpture garden offers rotating exhibits of works by Native American sculptors. MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART Camino Lejo on Museum Hill, off Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, (505) 476-1200. www.internationalfolkart.org The Museum of International Folk Art, on scenic Milner Plaza in eastside Santa Fe, has documented, collected, preserved and interpreted the work of traditional artists from cultures throughout the world for more than 50 years. With a collection of more than 130,000 objects, including textiles and costumes, ceramics, furniture, toys and miniatures, religious objects, ephemera, drawings and paintings, it is the largest museum of its kind in the world. The museum is composed of the Girard Wing with the permanent exhibition Multiple Visions: A Common Bond, representing work

from more than 100 countries and designed by collector and donor Alexander Girard; the Gallery of Conscience, with changing exhibitions on pressing issues in folk art; the Hispanic Heritage Wing, concentrating on the art of Hispanic cultures; and the Neutrogena Wing, devoted to textiles and the museum’s largest collection. NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER 1701 Fourth St. SW, Albuquerque, (505) 246-2261. www.nhccnm.org Two-dozen flags of Hispanic countries fly outside the National Hispanic Cultural Center as symbols of its mission—to create a greater understanding and cross-cultural appreciation of Hispanic art and culture. The center commemorates and demonstrates Hispanic tradition and achievement through language, literature, music, theater, dance and cuisine. A variety of art exhibitions, as well as educational activities for children and adults, are just some of the center’s extensive cultural offerings. Plays, concerts, films, lectures and dance performances are presented throughout the year. Visitors can dine in the center’s restaurant and shop in the gift store.

A reproduction of an early New Mexico mercantile store is on display at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Museum in Las Cruces. PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

96  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART 107 W. Palace Ave., Santa Fe, (505) 476-5072. www.nmartmuseum.org The New Mexico Museum of Art has been a center for New Mexico’s art community since it opened in 1917. The Pueblo Revival-style building, which combines Native American and Spanish Colonial sensibilities, is an architectural jewel itself. Inside, exhibitions present the wide range of artistic expressions found in the state. From the romantic landscapes and Native American subjects of the early Taos and Santa Fe art colonies to world-class photography and the newest generation of contemporary artists, there’s something for everyone. The museum brings the art of New Mexico to the world and the art of the world to New Mexico. The museum is free on Friday nights and becomes part of Santa Fe’s traditional “gallery night,” with locals and visitors enjoying dozens of art openings. Engage in conversation with artists, musicians or other creative spirits in Santa Fe’s popular casual style. www.newmexico.org

NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENCE 1801 Mountain Rd. NW, near Old Town Plaza Albuquerque, (505) 841-2800. www.nmnaturalhistory.org The ancient past comes to life at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. This interactive, high-tech museum features a simulated active volcano, Ice Age cave and dinosaurs galore, including an enormous T. rex and Seismosaurus. The exhibition, Space Frontiers, features a full-scale model of the Mars rover with working cameras, an amazing state-of-the-art computer interactive display that interprets the Sun Dagger of Chaco Canyon, the storytelling of New Mexico astronauts, and a variety of artifacts that showcase New Mexico’s history and contributions to how we see and travel beyond our planet Earth. The Planetarium and Lockheed Martin DynaTheater are exciting detours on your journey. Spend an hour or a day, stop for lunch at the M Café, and find unique gifts at the Natureworks store.

To discover central New Mexico is to explore scenic byways like the historic Turquoise and Jemez Mountain trails. Enjoy breathtaking beauty as you take a magical journey dotted with quaint towns, shops and ancient Indian ruins.

For more information call, 1-800-284-2282 or log on to www.heartnm.com. 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  97

Rick Johnson & Co. 266-1100 Prod Dept. SPECS: 4/C JOB#: HONM 511

Visitors are treated to a close-up of Tyrannosaurus Rex at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque. PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

The Soul of The SouThweST lieS in The hearT of new Mexico

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NEW MEXICO FARM AND RANCH HERITAGE MUSEUM 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., Las Cruces, (575) 522-4100. www.frhm.org The interactive museum boasts 47 acres of exhibits and demonstrations of rural life, including an ever-growing livestock collection, and milking, farming and blacksmithing demonstrations. In the main gallery, the Generations exhibit uses the biographies of 33 people to tell the 3,000-year history of agriculture in New Mexico. In Adventure Corral, children can milk a Fiberglas cow, see a windmill and touch wool samples. The Bruce King Building contains more than 24,000 square feet of changing and permanent exhibits, the Eagle Ranch Mercantile and Snack Bar, and a theater.


Since 1931, New Mexico’s monument system has preserved and interpreted important sites in the state’s history. The archaeological and historical sites represent New Mexico’s past from the late prehistoric period to statehood. A visit to any one of the sites offers an educational experience for the entire family. CORONADO STATE MONUMENT In Bernalillo, off U.S. 550 (N.M. 44) one mile west of I-25, exit 242, (505) 867-5351. www.nmmonuments.org The Anscestral Puebloan people first settled on the fertile banks of the Río Grande in A.D. 1300. During a 1930s excavation, WPA workers uncovered evidence of these inhabitants, including a square kiva with many layers of mural paintings considered to be some of the finest examples of pre-Columbian art in North America. The kiva is open for viewing. The visitor center contains prehistoric and historical Indian and Spanish Colonial artifacts. An ornately carved cross stands sentry at the main exhibit at El Camino Real International Heritage Center, southwest of Socorro. PHOTO BY EFRAIN M. PADRO.

NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF SPACE HISTORY Top of N.M. 2001, Alamogordo, (575) 437-2840. www.nmspacemuseum.org Visit the world of space exploration at the New Mexico Museum of Space History. The museum overlooks the Tularosa Basin, the birthplace of our nation’s space program. The New Mexico Museum of Space History tells the stories of the technological wonders that made space travel a reality. Catch a glimpse of life in space through a model of the Skylab Space Station. Outside, the John P. Stapp Air and Space Park displays items such as the Sonic Wind I, the actual rocket sled ridden by Stapp, “the fastest man alive,” in 1954. The museum’s Tombaugh IMAX® Dome Theater is New Mexico’s only theater of its kind. The museum is home to the New Mexico Space Academy, which offers educational programs throughout the year and an internationally known summer camp for children in kindergarten through 12th grade. NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM / PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 113 Lincoln Ave., Santa Fe, (505) 476-5200. www.nmhistorymuseum.org www.palaceofthegovernors.org 98  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

More than 400 years of the stories that made the American West are told in the state’s newest museum, the New Mexico History Museum, an addition to the nation’s oldest government building, the Palace of the Governors. From early Native Americans to Spanish colonists, Mexican settlers, Santa Fe Trail riders, railroad workers, artists, scientists, hippies and more, history was made here in New Mexico and is told in photographs, artifacts, films and computer interactives. The museum, on downtown Santa Fe’s Plaza, still features Native American artisans who sell handcrafted items beneath the Palace Portal under a program that ensures their authenticity. Kick off your exploration into New Mexico with a place that ties it all together.

State Monuments NEW MEXICO STATE MONUMENTS www.nmmonuments.org www.museumofnewmexico.org

EL CAMINO REAL INTERNATIONAL HERITAGE CENTER I-25, exit 115, Socorro, (575) 854-3600. www.caminorealheritage.org www.nmmonuments.org The heritage center, one of the state’s newest monuments, presents the 400-year history of El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (the Royal Road of the Interior Lands), a 1,500mile trade route that carried people, ideas and products from Mexico City in New Spain to pueblos and settlements in the northern frontier—New Mexico. It commemorates the commerce and culture along the oldest public thoroughfare in the United States. Stop in the visitor center to view state-ofthe-art interpretive exhibits, period artifacts and traveling exhibitions. Short hiking trails meander through traditional Mexican- and Indian-style herb gardens. The monument is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. FORT SELDEN STATE MONUMENT I-25, exit 19 at Radium Springs, 13 miles north of Las Cruces, (575) 526-8911. www.nmmonuments.org Native American farmers, known as the Mogollon, prospered at this site long before it was a fort. After the mid-1800s, territorial expansion encroached on the traditional www.newmexico.org


homelands of the Apache Indians. The U.S. government established Fort Selden in April 1865 to protect settlers from desperadoes and Apache Indians, whom they considered hostile. Buffalo Soldiers were among those serving at the fort. It was the boyhood home of Gen. Douglas MacArthur when his father was post commander. Abandoned in 1891, it offers a view of army life on the frontier. FORT SUMNER STATE MONUMENT/ BOSQUE REDONDO MEMORIAL Three miles east on U.S. 60, then three miles south of Fort Sumner on Billy the Kid Road, (575) 355-2573. www.nmmonuments.org The U.S. Army established Fort Sumner in an area called Bosque Redondo in 1862 as the nation expanded westward into the homelands of Navajo and Mescalero Apache Indians. During this tragic period of American history, 9,000 Navajos and Mescalero Apaches were starved into submission and then forced to march hundreds of miles to Bosque Redondo. Navajos call this arduous journey the Long Walk. Between 1862 and 1868 an estimated 25 to 30 percent died en route or during their incarceration at Bosque Redondo. The Mescalero Apaches—450 strong— fled in 1865. The Navajo prisoners were held for three more years before the U.S. government negotiated a new treaty and allowed them to return to their original homeland in the Four Corners region. In recent years, a museum was designed by Navajo architect David Sloan to echo the shape of a hogan and teepee as part of the Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner State Monument. The museum provides information and exhibits. There is also an interpretive trail and picnic area. Fort Sumner was abandoned in 1869. The monument also marks the site where Pat Garrett killed Billy the Kid on July 14, 1881. JÉMEZ STATE MONUMENT In Jémez Springs, on N.M. 4, 43 miles north of Bernalillo, (575) 829-3530. www.nmmonuments.org In arguably one of the most beautiful prehistoric and historical sites in the Southwest stand the stone ruins of a 500-year-old Indian village, built by ancestors of the present-day people of Jemez Pueblo. The monument is also www.newmexico.org

the site of the massive San José de los Jémez Church, a Catholic mission built in the 17th century. Exhibits in the heritage center tell the story of the site through the words of the Jemez people, and an interpretive trail winds through the site ruins. LINCOLN STATE MONUMENT In Lincoln, 12 miles east of Capitán on U.S. 380, (575) 653-4372. www.nmmonuments.org One of the most violent periods in New

Mexico history, the Lincoln County War from 1878 to 1881, made the now quiet town of Lincoln famous. The events of 1878 come alive through exhibitions in the courthouse, which also was used as a store, residence, Masonic Lodge and jail. Old Lincoln Days in August feature living-history demonstrations, including the re-enactment of the last escape of Billy the Kid. Four to six museums are open, depending on the season. Check the website for details.

G e o r g i a O ’ K e e f f e , P e d e r n a l , 1 9 4 1. O i l o n c a n v a s , 1 9 x 3 0 ¼ i n c h e s . G i f t , T h e G e o r g i a O ’ K e e f f e F o u n d a t i o n .

WELCOME TO O’KEEFFE COUNTRY Dedicated to perpetuating the legacy of artist Georgia O’Keeffe (18871986), the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum presents compelling changing exhibitions, which define the artist’s vision, provide insights into her life, and relate her work to that of other American modernist artists.

217 JOHNSON STREET • SANTA FE, NM • WWW.OKEEFFEMUSEUM.ORG 505.946.1000 • OPEN DAILY 10 AM – 5 PM & 5 – 8 PM FRIDAY EVENINGS

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A bronze sculpture by Santa Clara artist Michael Naranjo graces the Sculpture Garden at the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History. PHOTO BY MARK KANE.

Other Museums Statewide

There are a multitude of other museums throughout the state with impressive collections. Even the smaller communities pay homage to their area’s history with exhibitions and local artifacts—often in authentic historical locations. Check the “Museums and Historic Sites” section for each community listed later in this guide. The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe (217 Johnson St.) perpetuates the artistic legacy of Georgia O’Keeffe and the study and interpretation of American modernism. The largest single repository of O’Keeffe’s work in the world, the museum’s collection includes nearly 1,200 O’Keeffe paintings, drawings and sculptures. Open daily, except for New Year’s, Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas. The nearby research center offers periodic behind-thescenes tours of O’Keeffe’s artifacts. For more information, call (505) 946-1000 or see www.okeeffemuseum.org. Also in Santa Fe, discover Southwest Indian arts and crafts at the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, and art spanning four centuries and five continents at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. Both are on Museum Hill, east of the Plaza. See www.museumhill.org for more information. 100  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

In Taos, the Harwood Museum of Art of the University of New Mexico highlights Taos artists with its collection of more than 1,700 works of art. The Agnes Martin Gallery, an octagonal-shaped gallery, permanently exhibits a series of seven paintings (1993-94) donated to the Harwood by the internationally acclaimed artist Agnes Martin (1912-2004). The Millicent Rogers Museum has a large collection of pottery by renowned San Ildefonso artist Maria Martinez and her family members. The museum also features magnificent examples of Southwestern textiles and traditional Spanish arts and crafts, as well as the late Millicent Rogers’ extensive Southwestern jewelry collection. La Hacienda de los Martínez in Taos offers a glimpse of Spanish Colonial life in an authentic reconstructed adobe hacienda from the Colonial Period. The Roswell Museum and Art Center displays paintings by famed artist Peter Hurd and works by his wife, Henriette Wyeth, and other Wyeth family members. There is also a museum dedicated to UFOs, aliens and other unexplainable phenomena in the city. Many cultural centers offer an opportunity to learn about Hispanic and Indian traditions that developed along the Río Grande. Visit El Rancho de las Golondrinas Living History Museum just south of Santa Fe, where Spanish life in the 17th and 18th centuries is reenacted. The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque depicts Pueblo culture from

prehistoric times through today and presents demonstrations and traditional dances. For other views of prehistory, tour the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology in Albuquerque, Blackwater Draw near Portales or the Folsom Museum near Raton. Deming’s Luna Mimbres Museum protects remnants of the Gila Cliff Dwellings. In Tucumcari, the Mesalands Community College’s Dinosaur Museum offers life-size bronze replicas of the many varieties of reptilian giants that once thrived in New Mexico’s prehistoric tropical climate. The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History reflects on 400 years of Middle Río Grande Valley history with one of the largest Spanish Colonial art collections in the nation. The museum also exhibits contemporary Southwest art and photography and often presents touring exhibitions from around the world. The flora and fauna of the Río Grande Valley and beyond are displayed at the Albuquerque Biological Park, which includes the Rio Grande Botanical Gardens, the Rio Grande Zoo and Albuquerque Aquarium. There are also many fun and unusual museums in the Duke City, which exhibit rattlesnakes, turquoise, skateboards and dolls. Mogollon and Shakespeare once boomed with mining activity but went bust when the ore played out. Now a mother lode of tourists frequent these ghost town haunts, just as they do Madrid, a Western town on the Turquoise Trail near Santa Fe that celebrates its mining heritage. The Silver City Museum explores 200 years of mining history, and the Grants Mining Museum takes visitors into a simulated uranium mine. Downstate, visit an intact general store—complete with furnishings, merchandise and business records—in Chloride, a ghost town that has remained unchanged since the 1880s. Finally, The Hubbard Museum of the American West in Ruidoso Downs and the Lea County Cowboy Hall of Fame in Hobbs celebrate authentic cowboy life. The city listings in the back of this guide feature other museums throughout the state. A listing of small museums can be found on the web at www.museumdevelopment.org.

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After a busy day of sightseeing, visitors can treat themselves to top-rate entertainment at venues across the state. There’s a rich tapestry of performing arts to suit a variety of tastes. Traveling Broadway shows to intimate community theater productions fill the bill for theater lovers. Classic music aficionados will discover world-class opera, symphony concerts and chamber music performances. Pop music fans can sample a smorgasbord of rock, blues, bluegrass and country music. Many big-name acts perform at the Hard Rock Pavilion, a giant outdoor amphitheater on the outskirts of Albuquerque. Other venues in the Duke City include the Rodey Theater on the University of New Mexico campus, the historic KiMo Theatre and the Roy Disney Performing Arts Center in the National Hispanic Cultural Center. Nightlife bustles in downtown Albuquerque and Nob Hill. Top country acts often share the bill with an evening of rodeo at the New Mexico State Fair at Expo New Mexico. The Santa Ana Star Center in Rio Rancho features national touring acts. Other amphitheaters and nightclubs on Indian lands offer a myriad of entertainment. See more details in the Native New Mexico section. In Albuquerque, guests of the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra enjoy concerts in Popejoy Hall on the University of New Mexico campus or under the stars at the Río Grande Zoo. Santa Fe, Roswell, Hobbs and Farmington also offer their own community-based symphonies. Opera enthusiasts can hear internationally acclaimed singers perform every summer at the Santa Fe Opera. In downtown Santa Fe, the Lensic Performing Arts Center hosts dance, music, drama, movies and other entertainment. Lovers of theater will find a wide range of performances around the state. Actors take the

stage at the London Frontier Theater Company in Magdalena, the Pinos Altos Melodrama Theater in Silver City, the Brass Rail at Alpine Lodge in Red River, the Angel Fire Mountain Theater in Angel Fire, the Santa Fe Playhouse in Santa Fe and the Shuler Theater in Raton, to name a few. Clovis also boasts a restored vaudeville theater, the Lyceum Theater. In Las Cruces, check out the No Strings Theater Company at the Black Box Theatre and other groups on and off the New Mexico State University campus. Also in the south, the Spencer Theater for the Performing Arts in Alto, near Ruidoso, and the Flickinger Center in Alamogordo stage performances. Many music festivals attract a national audience such as Albuquerque’s Globalquerque, Santa Fe’s Thirsty Ear Festival and the Silver City Blues Festival. For further details, check out the “Performing Arts” section under the community listings, which begin on Page 103. Performance schedules are usually available via websites.

Visual Arts

The crystalline quality of light as well as the state’s rich cultural heritage have long stirred the imaginations of artists, authors and filmmakers. New Mexico has earned its reputation as a world-class destination for artists and collectors. Stroll along Canyon Road in Santa Fe, visit artists’ studios in Taos or join Albuquerque’s weekly Arts Crawl to sample a variety of work. Get off the major highways to visit blossoming art communities such as Silver City, Ruidoso, Truth or Consequences and Madrid. To find out about art openings, craft fairs and other cultural events check out the community calendar listings beginning on Page 103.

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NEW MEXICO FIBER ARTS TRAILS SUPPORT CREATIVITY AT ITS SOURCE!

NEW MEXICO

f ii b e f er r ARTS TRAILS

Your guide to 250 fiber artists and their creations at more than 60 rural destinations along the Trails. TRAVEL AND EXPLORE galleries

artist studios

training programs trading posts museums farms mills

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cottage enterprises 

Visit www.nmfiberarts.org to download the New Mexico Fiber Arts Trails 64-page guide or brochure. Or call: 1-505-827-6490 In New Mexico: 1-800-879-4278 to request a copy by mail.

Since 1915, Raton’s historic downtown Shuler Theater has brought cultural riches to the region, including this recent touring production of Cabaret. PHOTO BY TIM KELLER.

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Background © Shiprock Trading Company

Performing Arts

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Casinos & Racetracks Ruidoso Downs Racetrack is home to richest quarter-horse race in the world.

There are a variety of racetracks and casinos located throughout the state for those who like to partake in Las Vegas-style gaming. The following list is a quick reference for the major gaming establishments. Central Region Dancing Eagle Casino. I-40, exit 108, Casa Blanca, 87007. (505) 552-7777. www.dancingeaglecasino.com Downs at Albuquerque Racetrack & Casino. Expo New Mexico (state fairgrounds), 201 California St. NE, Albuquerque, 87108. (505) 266-5555. www.abqdowns.com Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Albuquerque. 11000 Broadway SE, Albuquerque, 87105. (877) 747-5382, (505) 724-3800. www.hardrockcasinoabq.com Palace West Casino. Palace West State Road 45 #2, 87105. At the Y intersection of Coors & Isleta Road, Albuquerque. (505) 869-4102 Route 66 Casino. I-40 at exit 140, 18 miles west from Albuquerque. 14500 Central Ave. SW, Albuquerque, 87121. (866) 352-7866. www.Rt66Casino.com San Felipe’s Casino Hollywood. I-25 exit 252, 17 miles north of Albuquerque. 25 Hagan Rd., San Felipe Pueblo, 87001. (877) 529-2946, (505) 867-6700. www.sanfelipecasino.com Sandia Resort & Casino. 30 Rainbow Rd. NE (I-25 & Tramway Blvd.), Albuquerque, 87113. (800) 526-9366, (505) 796-7500. www.sandiacasino.com 102  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

PHOTO BY MARK KANE.

Santa Ana Star Casino. 54 Jémez Canyon Dam Rd., Santa Ana Pueblo, 87004. (505) 867-0000. www.santaanastar.com Northwest Region Apache Nugget Casino. U.S. 550/N.M. 537. P.O. Box 650, Dulce, 87528. (575) 289-2486. www.apachenugget.com Best Western Jicarilla Inn & Casino. 1303 U.S. 64, Dulce, 87528. (575) 759-3663. www.bestwesternnewmexico.com/hotels Sky City Casino Hotel. I-40, exit 102. P.O. Box 310, Acoma, 87034. (888) 759-2489, (505) 552-6017. www.skycitycasino.com SunRay Park & Casino. #39 Rd. 5568, Farmington, 87401. (505) 566-1200. www.sunraygaming.com North Central Region Santa Claran Hotel Casino. 460-A N. Riverside Dr., Española, 87532. (866) 244-7625, (505) 747-0059. www.santaclaran.com Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino. 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, Santa Fe, 87506. (505) 455-5555. www.buffalothunderresort.com Camel Rock Casino. 17486-A U.S. 84/285, Tesuque Pueblo, Santa Fe, 87506. (800) 462-2635, (505) 984-8414. www.camelrockcasino.com

Cities of Gold. 10-B Cities of Gold Rd., Santa Fe, 87506. (800) 455-3313, (505) 455-3313. www.citiesofgold.com Ohkay Casino Resort Hotel. N.M. 68, 1 mile north of Española. P.O. Box 1270, Ohkay Owingeh, 87566. (877) 829-2865, (505) 747-1668. www.ohkay.com Taos Mountain Casino. 700 Veterans Hwy., P.O. Box 1865, Taos, 87571. (888) 946-8267, (575) 737-0777. www.taosmountaincasino.com Southeast Region Billy the Kid Casino at Ruidoso Downs Racetrack. P.O. Box 449, 26225 U.S. 70. Ruidoso Downs, 88346. (575) 378-4431. www.raceruidoso.com Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort & Casino Apache Travel Center. 287 Carrizo Canyon Rd., Mescalero, 88340. (877) 277-5677, (575) 464-7777, reservations: (800) 545-9011. www.innofthemountaingods.com Zia Park at Black Gold Casino. 3901 W. Millen Dr., Hobbs, 88240. (888) 942-7275, (575) 492-7000. www.blackgoldcasino.net Southwest Region Sunland Park Racetrack & Casino. 1200 Futurity Dr., Sunland Park, 88063. (575) 874-5200. www.sunland-park.com

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Arts & Culture New Mexico celebrates its culture through a wealth of historic, visual and performing arts venues. The following list highlights some museums and cultural destinations operated by the state. See an overview of other museums on Page 100.

State Museums and Cultural Centers MUSEUM OF NEW MEXICO www.museumofnewmexico.org Founded in 1909, the Museum of New Mexico preserves and shares the Land of Enchantment through four Santa Fe museums and six historical monuments across the state. See “State Monuments” on Page 98. The following section includes an alphabetical listing of all state-operated museums and cultural centers. For information on other museums see an overview on Page 100 and also check the “Museums and Historic Sites” section for each community listed later in this guide. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS AND CULTURE/LABORATORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY Camino Lejo on Museum Hill, off Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, (505) 476-1269. www.indianartsandculture.org The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture shares Milner Plaza with the Museum of International Folk Art. Here, Now and Always, a major ongoing exhibition, combines the voices of living Native Americans with ancient and contemporary artifacts and interactive multimedia to tell the complex stories of the Southwest. The Buchsbaum Gallery displays works from the region’s pueblos.

Five changing galleries present exhibits on subjects ranging from archaeological excavations to contemporary art. The museum has about 75,000 individually cataloged pieces and, in the archaeological research collections, there are an additional 5- to 10-million individual pieces. A year-round outdoor sculpture garden offers rotating exhibits of works by Native American sculptors. MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART Camino Lejo on Museum Hill, off Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, (505) 476-1200. www.internationalfolkart.org The Museum of International Folk Art, on scenic Milner Plaza in eastside Santa Fe, has documented, collected, preserved and interpreted the work of traditional artists from cultures throughout the world for more than 50 years. With a collection of more than 130,000 objects, including textiles and costumes, ceramics, furniture, toys and miniatures, religious objects, ephemera, drawings and paintings, it is the largest museum of its kind in the world. The museum is composed of the Girard Wing with the permanent exhibition Multiple Visions: A Common Bond, representing work

from more than 100 countries and designed by collector and donor Alexander Girard; the Gallery of Conscience, with changing exhibitions on pressing issues in folk art; the Hispanic Heritage Wing, concentrating on the art of Hispanic cultures; and the Neutrogena Wing, devoted to textiles and the museum’s largest collection. NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER 1701 Fourth St. SW, Albuquerque, (505) 246-2261. www.nhccnm.org Two-dozen flags of Hispanic countries fly outside the National Hispanic Cultural Center as symbols of its mission—to create a greater understanding and cross-cultural appreciation of Hispanic art and culture. The center commemorates and demonstrates Hispanic tradition and achievement through language, literature, music, theater, dance and cuisine. A variety of art exhibitions, as well as educational activities for children and adults, are just some of the center’s extensive cultural offerings. Plays, concerts, films, lectures and dance performances are presented throughout the year. Visitors can dine in the center’s restaurant and shop in the gift store.

A reproduction of an early New Mexico mercantile store is on display at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Museum in Las Cruces. PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

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NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART 107 W. Palace Ave., Santa Fe, (505) 476-5072. www.nmartmuseum.org The New Mexico Museum of Art has been a center for New Mexico’s art community since it opened in 1917. The Pueblo Revival-style building, which combines Native American and Spanish Colonial sensibilities, is an architectural jewel itself. Inside, exhibitions present the wide range of artistic expressions found in the state. From the romantic landscapes and Native American subjects of the early Taos and Santa Fe art colonies to world-class photography and the newest generation of contemporary artists, there’s something for everyone. The museum brings the art of New Mexico to the world and the art of the world to New Mexico. The museum is free on Friday nights and becomes part of Santa Fe’s traditional “gallery night,” with locals and visitors enjoying dozens of art openings. Engage in conversation with artists, musicians or other creative spirits in Santa Fe’s popular casual style. www.newmexico.org

NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENCE 1801 Mountain Rd. NW, near Old Town Plaza Albuquerque, (505) 841-2800. www.nmnaturalhistory.org The ancient past comes to life at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. This interactive, high-tech museum features a simulated active volcano, Ice Age cave and dinosaurs galore, including an enormous T. rex and Seismosaurus. The exhibition, Space Frontiers, features a full-scale model of the Mars rover with working cameras, an amazing state-of-the-art computer interactive display that interprets the Sun Dagger of Chaco Canyon, the storytelling of New Mexico astronauts, and a variety of artifacts that showcase New Mexico’s history and contributions to how we see and travel beyond our planet Earth. The Planetarium and Lockheed Martin DynaTheater are exciting detours on your journey. Spend an hour or a day, stop for lunch at the M Café, and find unique gifts at the Natureworks store.

To discover central New Mexico is to explore scenic byways like the historic Turquoise and Jemez Mountain trails. Enjoy breathtaking beauty as you take a magical journey dotted with quaint towns, shops and ancient Indian ruins.

For more information call, 1-800-284-2282 or log on to www.heartnm.com. 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  97

Rick Johnson & Co. 266-1100 Prod Dept. SPECS: 4/C JOB#: HONM 511

Visitors are treated to a close-up of Tyrannosaurus Rex at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque. PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

The Soul of The SouThweST lieS in The hearT of new Mexico

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NEW MEXICO FARM AND RANCH HERITAGE MUSEUM 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., Las Cruces, (575) 522-4100. www.frhm.org The interactive museum boasts 47 acres of exhibits and demonstrations of rural life, including an ever-growing livestock collection, and milking, farming and blacksmithing demonstrations. In the main gallery, the Generations exhibit uses the biographies of 33 people to tell the 3,000-year history of agriculture in New Mexico. In Adventure Corral, children can milk a Fiberglas cow, see a windmill and touch wool samples. The Bruce King Building contains more than 24,000 square feet of changing and permanent exhibits, the Eagle Ranch Mercantile and Snack Bar, and a theater.


Since 1931, New Mexico’s monument system has preserved and interpreted important sites in the state’s history. The archaeological and historical sites represent New Mexico’s past from the late prehistoric period to statehood. A visit to any one of the sites offers an educational experience for the entire family. CORONADO STATE MONUMENT In Bernalillo, off U.S. 550 (N.M. 44) one mile west of I-25, exit 242, (505) 867-5351. www.nmmonuments.org The Anscestral Puebloan people first settled on the fertile banks of the Río Grande in A.D. 1300. During a 1930s excavation, WPA workers uncovered evidence of these inhabitants, including a square kiva with many layers of mural paintings considered to be some of the finest examples of pre-Columbian art in North America. The kiva is open for viewing. The visitor center contains prehistoric and historical Indian and Spanish Colonial artifacts. An ornately carved cross stands sentry at the main exhibit at El Camino Real International Heritage Center, southwest of Socorro. PHOTO BY EFRAIN M. PADRO.

NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF SPACE HISTORY Top of N.M. 2001, Alamogordo, (575) 437-2840. www.nmspacemuseum.org Visit the world of space exploration at the New Mexico Museum of Space History. The museum overlooks the Tularosa Basin, the birthplace of our nation’s space program. The New Mexico Museum of Space History tells the stories of the technological wonders that made space travel a reality. Catch a glimpse of life in space through a model of the Skylab Space Station. Outside, the John P. Stapp Air and Space Park displays items such as the Sonic Wind I, the actual rocket sled ridden by Stapp, “the fastest man alive,” in 1954. The museum’s Tombaugh IMAX® Dome Theater is New Mexico’s only theater of its kind. The museum is home to the New Mexico Space Academy, which offers educational programs throughout the year and an internationally known summer camp for children in kindergarten through 12th grade. NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM / PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 113 Lincoln Ave., Santa Fe, (505) 476-5200. www.nmhistorymuseum.org www.palaceofthegovernors.org 98  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

More than 400 years of the stories that made the American West are told in the state’s newest museum, the New Mexico History Museum, an addition to the nation’s oldest government building, the Palace of the Governors. From early Native Americans to Spanish colonists, Mexican settlers, Santa Fe Trail riders, railroad workers, artists, scientists, hippies and more, history was made here in New Mexico and is told in photographs, artifacts, films and computer interactives. The museum, on downtown Santa Fe’s Plaza, still features Native American artisans who sell handcrafted items beneath the Palace Portal under a program that ensures their authenticity. Kick off your exploration into New Mexico with a place that ties it all together.

State Monuments NEW MEXICO STATE MONUMENTS www.nmmonuments.org www.museumofnewmexico.org

EL CAMINO REAL INTERNATIONAL HERITAGE CENTER I-25, exit 115, Socorro, (575) 854-3600. www.caminorealheritage.org www.nmmonuments.org The heritage center, one of the state’s newest monuments, presents the 400-year history of El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (the Royal Road of the Interior Lands), a 1,500mile trade route that carried people, ideas and products from Mexico City in New Spain to pueblos and settlements in the northern frontier—New Mexico. It commemorates the commerce and culture along the oldest public thoroughfare in the United States. Stop in the visitor center to view state-ofthe-art interpretive exhibits, period artifacts and traveling exhibitions. Short hiking trails meander through traditional Mexican- and Indian-style herb gardens. The monument is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. FORT SELDEN STATE MONUMENT I-25, exit 19 at Radium Springs, 13 miles north of Las Cruces, (575) 526-8911. www.nmmonuments.org Native American farmers, known as the Mogollon, prospered at this site long before it was a fort. After the mid-1800s, territorial expansion encroached on the traditional www.newmexico.org


homelands of the Apache Indians. The U.S. government established Fort Selden in April 1865 to protect settlers from desperadoes and Apache Indians, whom they considered hostile. Buffalo Soldiers were among those serving at the fort. It was the boyhood home of Gen. Douglas MacArthur when his father was post commander. Abandoned in 1891, it offers a view of army life on the frontier. FORT SUMNER STATE MONUMENT/ BOSQUE REDONDO MEMORIAL Three miles east on U.S. 60, then three miles south of Fort Sumner on Billy the Kid Road, (575) 355-2573. www.nmmonuments.org The U.S. Army established Fort Sumner in an area called Bosque Redondo in 1862 as the nation expanded westward into the homelands of Navajo and Mescalero Apache Indians. During this tragic period of American history, 9,000 Navajos and Mescalero Apaches were starved into submission and then forced to march hundreds of miles to Bosque Redondo. Navajos call this arduous journey the Long Walk. Between 1862 and 1868 an estimated 25 to 30 percent died en route or during their incarceration at Bosque Redondo. The Mescalero Apaches—450 strong— fled in 1865. The Navajo prisoners were held for three more years before the U.S. government negotiated a new treaty and allowed them to return to their original homeland in the Four Corners region. In recent years, a museum was designed by Navajo architect David Sloan to echo the shape of a hogan and teepee as part of the Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner State Monument. The museum provides information and exhibits. There is also an interpretive trail and picnic area. Fort Sumner was abandoned in 1869. The monument also marks the site where Pat Garrett killed Billy the Kid on July 14, 1881. JÉMEZ STATE MONUMENT In Jémez Springs, on N.M. 4, 43 miles north of Bernalillo, (575) 829-3530. www.nmmonuments.org In arguably one of the most beautiful prehistoric and historical sites in the Southwest stand the stone ruins of a 500-year-old Indian village, built by ancestors of the present-day people of Jemez Pueblo. The monument is also www.newmexico.org

the site of the massive San José de los Jémez Church, a Catholic mission built in the 17th century. Exhibits in the heritage center tell the story of the site through the words of the Jemez people, and an interpretive trail winds through the site ruins. LINCOLN STATE MONUMENT In Lincoln, 12 miles east of Capitán on U.S. 380, (575) 653-4372. www.nmmonuments.org One of the most violent periods in New

Mexico history, the Lincoln County War from 1878 to 1881, made the now quiet town of Lincoln famous. The events of 1878 come alive through exhibitions in the courthouse, which also was used as a store, residence, Masonic Lodge and jail. Old Lincoln Days in August feature living-history demonstrations, including the re-enactment of the last escape of Billy the Kid. Four to six museums are open, depending on the season. Check the website for details.

G e o r g i a O ’ K e e f f e , P e d e r n a l , 1 9 4 1. O i l o n c a n v a s , 1 9 x 3 0 ¼ i n c h e s . G i f t , T h e G e o r g i a O ’ K e e f f e F o u n d a t i o n .

WELCOME TO O’KEEFFE COUNTRY Dedicated to perpetuating the legacy of artist Georgia O’Keeffe (18871986), the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum presents compelling changing exhibitions, which define the artist’s vision, provide insights into her life, and relate her work to that of other American modernist artists.

217 JOHNSON STREET • SANTA FE, NM • WWW.OKEEFFEMUSEUM.ORG 505.946.1000 • OPEN DAILY 10 AM – 5 PM & 5 – 8 PM FRIDAY EVENINGS

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  99


A bronze sculpture by Santa Clara artist Michael Naranjo graces the Sculpture Garden at the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History. PHOTO BY MARK KANE.

Other Museums Statewide

There are a multitude of other museums throughout the state with impressive collections. Even the smaller communities pay homage to their area’s history with exhibitions and local artifacts—often in authentic historical locations. Check the “Museums and Historic Sites” section for each community listed later in this guide. The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe (217 Johnson St.) perpetuates the artistic legacy of Georgia O’Keeffe and the study and interpretation of American modernism. The largest single repository of O’Keeffe’s work in the world, the museum’s collection includes nearly 1,200 O’Keeffe paintings, drawings and sculptures. Open daily, except for New Year’s, Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas. The nearby research center offers periodic behind-thescenes tours of O’Keeffe’s artifacts. For more information, call (505) 946-1000 or see www.okeeffemuseum.org. Also in Santa Fe, discover Southwest Indian arts and crafts at the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, and art spanning four centuries and five continents at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. Both are on Museum Hill, east of the Plaza. See www.museumhill.org for more information. 100  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

In Taos, the Harwood Museum of Art of the University of New Mexico highlights Taos artists with its collection of more than 1,700 works of art. The Agnes Martin Gallery, an octagonal-shaped gallery, permanently exhibits a series of seven paintings (1993-94) donated to the Harwood by the internationally acclaimed artist Agnes Martin (1912-2004). The Millicent Rogers Museum has a large collection of pottery by renowned San Ildefonso artist Maria Martinez and her family members. The museum also features magnificent examples of Southwestern textiles and traditional Spanish arts and crafts, as well as the late Millicent Rogers’ extensive Southwestern jewelry collection. La Hacienda de los Martínez in Taos offers a glimpse of Spanish Colonial life in an authentic reconstructed adobe hacienda from the Colonial Period. The Roswell Museum and Art Center displays paintings by famed artist Peter Hurd and works by his wife, Henriette Wyeth, and other Wyeth family members. There is also a museum dedicated to UFOs, aliens and other unexplainable phenomena in the city. Many cultural centers offer an opportunity to learn about Hispanic and Indian traditions that developed along the Río Grande. Visit El Rancho de las Golondrinas Living History Museum just south of Santa Fe, where Spanish life in the 17th and 18th centuries is reenacted. The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque depicts Pueblo culture from

prehistoric times through today and presents demonstrations and traditional dances. For other views of prehistory, tour the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology in Albuquerque, Blackwater Draw near Portales or the Folsom Museum near Raton. Deming’s Luna Mimbres Museum protects remnants of the Gila Cliff Dwellings. In Tucumcari, the Mesalands Community College’s Dinosaur Museum offers life-size bronze replicas of the many varieties of reptilian giants that once thrived in New Mexico’s prehistoric tropical climate. The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History reflects on 400 years of Middle Río Grande Valley history with one of the largest Spanish Colonial art collections in the nation. The museum also exhibits contemporary Southwest art and photography and often presents touring exhibitions from around the world. The flora and fauna of the Río Grande Valley and beyond are displayed at the Albuquerque Biological Park, which includes the Rio Grande Botanical Gardens, the Rio Grande Zoo and Albuquerque Aquarium. There are also many fun and unusual museums in the Duke City, which exhibit rattlesnakes, turquoise, skateboards and dolls. Mogollon and Shakespeare once boomed with mining activity but went bust when the ore played out. Now a mother lode of tourists frequent these ghost town haunts, just as they do Madrid, a Western town on the Turquoise Trail near Santa Fe that celebrates its mining heritage. The Silver City Museum explores 200 years of mining history, and the Grants Mining Museum takes visitors into a simulated uranium mine. Downstate, visit an intact general store—complete with furnishings, merchandise and business records—in Chloride, a ghost town that has remained unchanged since the 1880s. Finally, The Hubbard Museum of the American West in Ruidoso Downs and the Lea County Cowboy Hall of Fame in Hobbs celebrate authentic cowboy life. The city listings in the back of this guide feature other museums throughout the state. A listing of small museums can be found on the web at www.museumdevelopment.org.

www.newmexico.org


nmvisitorguide

After a busy day of sightseeing, visitors can treat themselves to top-rate entertainment at venues across the state. There’s a rich tapestry of performing arts to suit a variety of tastes. Traveling Broadway shows to intimate community theater productions fill the bill for theater lovers. Classic music aficionados will discover world-class opera, symphony concerts and chamber music performances. Pop music fans can sample a smorgasbord of rock, blues, bluegrass and country music. Many big-name acts perform at the Hard Rock Pavilion, a giant outdoor amphitheater on the outskirts of Albuquerque. Other venues in the Duke City include the Rodey Theater on the University of New Mexico campus, the historic KiMo Theatre and the Roy Disney Performing Arts Center in the National Hispanic Cultural Center. Nightlife bustles in downtown Albuquerque and Nob Hill. Top country acts often share the bill with an evening of rodeo at the New Mexico State Fair at Expo New Mexico. The Santa Ana Star Center in Rio Rancho features national touring acts. Other amphitheaters and nightclubs on Indian lands offer a myriad of entertainment. See more details in the Native New Mexico section. In Albuquerque, guests of the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra enjoy concerts in Popejoy Hall on the University of New Mexico campus or under the stars at the Río Grande Zoo. Santa Fe, Roswell, Hobbs and Farmington also offer their own community-based symphonies. Opera enthusiasts can hear internationally acclaimed singers perform every summer at the Santa Fe Opera. In downtown Santa Fe, the Lensic Performing Arts Center hosts dance, music, drama, movies and other entertainment. Lovers of theater will find a wide range of performances around the state. Actors take the

stage at the London Frontier Theater Company in Magdalena, the Pinos Altos Melodrama Theater in Silver City, the Brass Rail at Alpine Lodge in Red River, the Angel Fire Mountain Theater in Angel Fire, the Santa Fe Playhouse in Santa Fe and the Shuler Theater in Raton, to name a few. Clovis also boasts a restored vaudeville theater, the Lyceum Theater. In Las Cruces, check out the No Strings Theater Company at the Black Box Theatre and other groups on and off the New Mexico State University campus. Also in the south, the Spencer Theater for the Performing Arts in Alto, near Ruidoso, and the Flickinger Center in Alamogordo stage performances. Many music festivals attract a national audience such as Albuquerque’s Globalquerque, Santa Fe’s Thirsty Ear Festival and the Silver City Blues Festival. For further details, check out the “Performing Arts” section under the community listings, which begin on Page 103. Performance schedules are usually available via websites.

Visual Arts

The crystalline quality of light as well as the state’s rich cultural heritage have long stirred the imaginations of artists, authors and filmmakers. New Mexico has earned its reputation as a world-class destination for artists and collectors. Stroll along Canyon Road in Santa Fe, visit artists’ studios in Taos or join Albuquerque’s weekly Arts Crawl to sample a variety of work. Get off the major highways to visit blossoming art communities such as Silver City, Ruidoso, Truth or Consequences and Madrid. To find out about art openings, craft fairs and other cultural events check out the community calendar listings beginning on Page 103.

11:23 AM

NEW MEXICO FIBER ARTS TRAILS SUPPORT CREATIVITY AT ITS SOURCE!

NEW MEXICO

f ii b e f er r ARTS TRAILS

Your guide to 250 fiber artists and their creations at more than 60 rural destinations along the Trails. TRAVEL AND EXPLORE galleries

artist studios

training programs trading posts museums farms mills

cooperatives suppliers

fiber arts centers

cottage enterprises 

Visit www.nmfiberarts.org to download the New Mexico Fiber Arts Trails 64-page guide or brochure. Or call: 1-505-827-6490 In New Mexico: 1-800-879-4278 to request a copy by mail.

Since 1915, Raton’s historic downtown Shuler Theater has brought cultural riches to the region, including this recent touring production of Cabaret. PHOTO BY TIM KELLER.

www.newmexico.org

Background © Shiprock Trading Company

Performing Arts

6/26/08

www.nmfiberarts.org 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  101

Page 1


Casinos & Racetracks Ruidoso Downs Racetrack is home to richest quarter-horse race in the world.

There are a variety of racetracks and casinos located throughout the state for those who like to partake in Las Vegas-style gaming. The following list is a quick reference for the major gaming establishments. Central Region Dancing Eagle Casino. I-40, exit 108, Casa Blanca, 87007. (505) 552-7777. www.dancingeaglecasino.com Downs at Albuquerque Racetrack & Casino. Expo New Mexico (state fairgrounds), 201 California St. NE, Albuquerque, 87108. (505) 266-5555. www.abqdowns.com Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Albuquerque. 11000 Broadway SE, Albuquerque, 87105. (877) 747-5382, (505) 724-3800. www.hardrockcasinoabq.com Palace West Casino. Palace West State Road 45 #2, 87105. At the Y intersection of Coors & Isleta Road, Albuquerque. (505) 869-4102 Route 66 Casino. I-40 at exit 140, 18 miles west from Albuquerque. 14500 Central Ave. SW, Albuquerque, 87121. (866) 352-7866. www.Rt66Casino.com San Felipe’s Casino Hollywood. I-25 exit 252, 17 miles north of Albuquerque. 25 Hagan Rd., San Felipe Pueblo, 87001. (877) 529-2946, (505) 867-6700. www.sanfelipecasino.com Sandia Resort & Casino. 30 Rainbow Rd. NE (I-25 & Tramway Blvd.), Albuquerque, 87113. (800) 526-9366, (505) 796-7500. www.sandiacasino.com 102  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

PHOTO BY MARK KANE.

Santa Ana Star Casino. 54 Jémez Canyon Dam Rd., Santa Ana Pueblo, 87004. (505) 867-0000. www.santaanastar.com Northwest Region Apache Nugget Casino. U.S. 550/N.M. 537. P.O. Box 650, Dulce, 87528. (575) 289-2486. www.apachenugget.com Best Western Jicarilla Inn & Casino. 1303 U.S. 64, Dulce, 87528. (575) 759-3663. www.bestwesternnewmexico.com/hotels Sky City Casino Hotel. I-40, exit 102. P.O. Box 310, Acoma, 87034. (888) 759-2489, (505) 552-6017. www.skycitycasino.com SunRay Park & Casino. #39 Rd. 5568, Farmington, 87401. (505) 566-1200. www.sunraygaming.com North Central Region Santa Claran Hotel Casino. 460-A N. Riverside Dr., Española, 87532. (866) 244-7625, (505) 747-0059. www.santaclaran.com Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino. 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, Santa Fe, 87506. (505) 455-5555. www.buffalothunderresort.com Camel Rock Casino. 17486-A U.S. 84/285, Tesuque Pueblo, Santa Fe, 87506. (800) 462-2635, (505) 984-8414. www.camelrockcasino.com

Cities of Gold. 10-B Cities of Gold Rd., Santa Fe, 87506. (800) 455-3313, (505) 455-3313. www.citiesofgold.com Ohkay Casino Resort Hotel. N.M. 68, 1 mile north of Española. P.O. Box 1270, Ohkay Owingeh, 87566. (877) 829-2865, (505) 747-1668. www.ohkay.com Taos Mountain Casino. 700 Veterans Hwy., P.O. Box 1865, Taos, 87571. (888) 946-8267, (575) 737-0777. www.taosmountaincasino.com Southeast Region Billy the Kid Casino at Ruidoso Downs Racetrack. P.O. Box 449, 26225 U.S. 70. Ruidoso Downs, 88346. (575) 378-4431. www.raceruidoso.com Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort & Casino Apache Travel Center. 287 Carrizo Canyon Rd., Mescalero, 88340. (877) 277-5677, (575) 464-7777, reservations: (800) 545-9011. www.innofthemountaingods.com Zia Park at Black Gold Casino. 3901 W. Millen Dr., Hobbs, 88240. (888) 942-7275, (575) 492-7000. www.blackgoldcasino.net Southwest Region Sunland Park Racetrack & Casino. 1200 Futurity Dr., Sunland Park, 88063. (575) 874-5200. www.sunland-park.com

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City Listings ALAMOGORDO SE

NC NW

NE C

SW

www.alamogordo.com ci.alamogordo.nm.us

n Oliver Lee Memorial State Park. Rare desert

flora, visitor center, 6-mile hiking trail, campsites, history exhibits. Tours of ranch house every Sat., Sun., 3 p.m. 12 miles south of Alamogordo via U.S. 54, at 409 Dog Canyon Rd. (575) 437-8284. www.nmparks.com

Attractions

SE

✰ Alameda Park Zoo. Oldest zoo in Southwest, established in 1898. 40-plus displays, exotic and indigenous animals. Closed Christmas and New Year’s Day. 1021 N. White Sands Blvd. (575) 439-4290. ci.alamogordo.nm.us/coa/communityservices/zoo/

ABIQUIÚ NC

www.digitalabiquiu.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Christ-in-the-Desert Monastery. A secluded

Benedictine settlement on the banks of the Chama River. The monastery is noted for its architecture, reminiscent of the religious architecture of early New Mexico. F.R. 151, 13 miles west of U.S. 84. www.christdesert.org ■ Florence Hawley Ellis Museum of Anthropology. Native American anthropology, Spanish history. Ghost Ranch Conference Center of Presbyterian Church. 12 miles north of Abiquiú on U.S. 84 and 2 miles east on dirt road. (505) 685-4333. www.ghostranch.org ■ Ghost Ranch Piedra Lumbre Education and Visitor Center. Permanent exhibits, northern N.M. culture, environmental education. Open Tues.-Sun., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. On U.S. 84, 14 miles north of Abiquiú. (505) 685-4312. www.ghostranch.org ■ Poshouinge Ruins. Half-mile ruin trail, 2 vista areas, interpretive signs; overlooks Chama River Valley. South of Abiquiú on U.S. 84. ■ Ruth Hall Museum of Paleontology. Area fossils. In same location as Florence Hawley Ellis Museum of Anthropology. (505) 685-4333. www.ghostranch.org

Outdoor Getaways ✰ Abiquiú Lake. Fishing, camping, swimming, picnicking, boating, windsurfing. Restrooms, shower facilities, grills, elec./water hookups. 7 miles north off U.S. 84. (505) 685-4371. www.spa.usace.army.mil/recreation ✰ Echo Amphitheater. Natural sandstone theater. Campsites, picnicking. 17.5 miles northwest of Abiquiú via U.S. 84.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Oct. 8-10 Abiquiú Studio Tour. (505) 685-4454.

www.abiquiustudiotour.org

www.newmexico.org

✰ Toy Train Depot. Model RR track, model/toy trains, 2.5-mile minitrain ride through Alameda Park. 1991 N. White Sands Blvd. Closed Mon.-Tues. (575) 437-2855. n Trinity Site. Site of first atomic explosion on July 16, 1945. Only open first Sat. of April and first Sat. Oct. 60 miles northwest of Alamogordo via U.S. 70 on White Sands Missile Range. Caravan, individual travel available. (575) 678-1134, (575) 678-1700. www.wsmr.army.mil

Museums and Historic Sites n Alamogordo Airborne Monument Park. Honors

airborne veterans. 10th St. and White Sands Blvd. n Alamogordo Founders Park. Bronze busts of city founders, bas-reliefs, historical mural. 10th St. and White Sands Blvd. ✰ N.M. Museum of Space History. International Space Hall of Fame and designated repository for Spaceport America. Clyde W. Tombaugh IMAX Dome Theater/Planetarium, John P. Stapp Air/Space Park, Astronaut Memorial Garden, Shuttle Camp Program. Outdoor display of restored Daisy Track, once used to test human body’s tolerance to g-forces. Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas days. Top of N.M. 2001. (east from Scenic Dr.). (877) 333-6589, (575) 437-2840. www.nmspacemuseum.org n Tularosa Basin Historical Society Museum. Local history exhibits, Native American artifacts. Open 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Mon.-Fri.; 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat.; 1-3 p.m., Sun. 1301 N. White Sands Blvd. (575) 434-4438.

Natural Wonders ✰ White Sands National Monument. World’s largest deposit of gypsum sand. 17 miles southwest of Alamogordo via U.S. 70. Closed Christmas Day. (575) 679-2599. www.nps.gov/whsa

Outdoor Getaways n Lincoln National Forest Supervisor’s Office.

3463 Las Palomas Rd. (575) 434-7200.

Performing Arts/Galleries n Flickinger Center. Performing arts. Season:

Sept.-May. Tailgate outdoor summer series June-Aug. 1110 New York Ave. (575) 437-2202. www.flickingercenter.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ March TBA. Dog Canyon Experiences. Oliver Lee

Memorial State Park. (575) 437-1134. ◆ April 2. Trinity Site Tour. Chartered bus to site. Reservations required. (575) 437-6120. Free showing of Trinity: The Atomic Bomb Movie at the Clyde W. Tombaugh IMAX Dome Theater. N.M. Museum of Space History. (575) 437-2840, (877) 333-6589. www.nmspacemuseum.org ◆ May 14-15. Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament (575) 439-4142. ◆ June-Aug. Spotlight on Tailgate. Music series every other Saturday night. International Space Hall of Fame. (575) 437-2202. ◆ June-Oct. Lake Lucero Tour. White Sands National Monument. Reservations required. (575) 679-2599 ext. 236. ◆ June 4. Summer in the City. A day at the zoo, featuring food, vendors, entertainment. (575) 437-6120. ◆ June 6. N.M. Space Academy Camp. Week-long summer learning experience for kids K-12. (505) 437-2840, (877) 333-6589. www.nmspacemuseum.org ◆ June TBA. The Stealth Classic. (575) 439-4142. ◆ July 4. Fireworks Extravaganza. (575) 437-2840, (877) 333-6589. www.nmspacemuseum.org ◆ Aug. 11-14. Otero County Fair. Rodeos, livestock judging, food, rides and games. (575) 437-6120. ◆ Sept. 3-5. Cottonwood Festival. (575) 437-6120. ◆ Sept. TBA. White Sands Star Party. Dark sky observation, workshops, speaker, observatory tours. White Sands National Monument. (575) 437-2840, (877) 333-6589. www.zianet.com/wssp/ ◆ Sept. 17-18. Tularosa Basin Wine & Music Fest. Food, local art, wine and live music. www.rotaryclubofalamogordo.org

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  103


◆ Sept. 17-18. White Sands Balloon Invitational.

(575) 437-6120, (575) 430-1300. www.white-sandsnew-mexico.com/hot_air_balloon_invitational.htm ◆ Oct. 1. Trinity Site Tour. Chartered bus to site. Reservations required. (575) 437-6120. Free showing of Trinity: The Atomic Bomb Movie at the Clyde W. Tombaugh IMAX Dome Theater. N.M. Museum of Space History. (575) 437-2840, (877) 333-6589. www.nmspacemuseum.org ◆ Oct. 29. Zoo Boo. (575) 439-4142. ◆ Nov. 11. Veterans Day. Free admission for veterans. N.M. Museum of Space History. (575) 437-2840, (877) 333-6589. www.nmspacemuseum.org ◆ Nov. 12-13. Christmas Craft Show. (575) 439-4142. ◆ Dec. TBA. Luminaries at White Sands. Celebrate the holidays with live music, interpretive programs and many luminarias. (575) 679-2599. www.nps.gov/whsa

ALBUQUERQUE CE

www.itsatrip.org www.abqchamber.com www.ahcnm.org www.dukecityfix.com

Attractions n ABQ Trolley Co. Open-air trolley tours. “Best of ABQ”

66-minute city tour beginning at Old Town Plaza. (505) 240-8000. www.abqtrolley.com

104  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

n ABQ Uptown. Upscale fashion, home furnishings

and dining. Indian School Rd. and Louisiana Blvd. (505) 880-7030. www.abquptown.com ✰ Albuquerque Aquarium. Gulf of Mexico marine habitats with coral reef fish, stingrays, a moray eel cave, shark tank. 2601 Central NW. (505) 764-6200. www.cabq.gov/biopark ✰ Albuquerque Biological Park. Zoo, aquarium, botanic garden and fishing lakes at Tingley Beach. Adults $12, seniors (65+) and children (3-12) $5, and children 2 and under free. 903 Tenth St. SW. (505) 768-2000. www.cabq.gov/biopark ✰ABQ Jump. Party play center. Seven inflatable play structures in two jump areas. Private parties. 2731 Broadway Blvd. NE., Ste. E. (505) 344-KIDS. www.abqjump.com n Anasazi Fields Winery. Dry, oak-aged fruit wines. Open noon-5 p.m. Wed.-Sun. 26 Camino de Los Pueblitos. (505) 867-3062. www.anasazifieldswinery.com n Casa Rondeña Winery. Tastings and retail. Mon.Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m. 733 Chavez Rd. NW. (505) 344-5911. www.casarondena.com ✰ Cliff’s Amusement Park. Ride the Cliff Hanger and New Mexico’s first super coaster. Thrill rides, family rides, water attractions, Kiddieland, games. Group and birthday rates. Open April-Sept. 4800 Osuna Rd. NE. (505) 881-9373. www.cliffsamusementpark.com n Coronado Center. New Mexico’s largest mall with more than 150 stores. 6600 Menaul Blvd. NE., Ste. 1. (505) 881-2700. www.coronadocenter.com n Corrales Winery. Handcrafting small quantities of wines, free tasting and tours. Wed.-Sun. noon-5 p.m. 6275 Corrales Rd. (505) 898-5165. www.corraleswinery.com ✰ Golfernoggins Indoor Mini Golf. Food, game room, toddler area. Parties and groups welcome. 4910-B Lomas Blvd. NE. (505) 999-1067. www.golfernoggins.com n Gruet Winery. Tasting, tours, retail. 8400 Pan American Freeway NE. (505) 821-0055. www.gruetwinery.com ✰ Hinkle Family Fun Center. Lazer Tag, go-karts, miniature golf, bumper boats, paintball, arcades, parties. 12931 Indian School Rd. NE. (505) 299-3100. www.hinklefamilyfuncenter.com ✰ Hoot’s Ultimate Party Zone. 3501 Vista Alameda NE. (505) 922-6178. www.hootspartyzone.com ✰ IT’Z, LLC. More than 150 video games, rides, attractions. Pizza, pasta and salads. 4595 San Mateo Blvd. NE. (505) 883-3677. www.itzusa.com n Ponderosa Valley Winery. Tasting, tours. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.- 5 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. 3171 N.M. 290. (575) 834-7487. www.ponderosawinery.com ✰ Rio Grande Botanic Garden. Walled gardens, glass conservatory, xeric plants. 2601 Central Ave. NW. (505) 764-6200. www.cabq.gov/biopark ✰ Rio Grande Zoological Park. More than 1,000 animals in their natural habitats, including Adventure Africa and Tropical America exhibits. 903 10th SW. (505) 764-6200. www.cabq.gov/biopark

www.newmexico.org


✰ Sandía Peak Aerial Tramway. Longest aerial tram in the world, 2.7 miles to top of 10,378-foot Sandía Peak. Dine either at top or at base. Closed for maintenance April 7-10 and 14-17. 10 Tramway Loop NE. (505) 856-7325. www.sandiapeak.com n St. Clair Winery & Bistro (Old Town). Daily lunches. Call for dinner schedule. Old Town. Package wines available. 901 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, Ste. B-100. (505) 243-9916. www.stclairvineyards.com

Museums and Historic Sites n Albuquerque Museum of Art & History. Per-

manent and traveling exhibitions. Sculpture garden, museum store, café. Historic Old Town. 2000 Mountain Rd. NW. (505) 243-7255. www.cabq.gov/museum n American International Rattlesnake Museum. World’s largest collection. 202 San Felipe St. NW, Ste. A. (505) 242-6569. www.rattlesnakes.com n Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum. Exhibits and programs on the history, culture, art, science and sport of ballooning. Open Tues.-Sun. 9201 Balloon Museum Dr. NE. (505) 768-6020. www.cabq.gov/balloon n Archaeology and Material Culture Museum. Open May-Nov. 22 Calvary Rd., 4 miles north of N.M. 14. RV park. (505) 281-2005. n Coronado State Monument. Museum, Pueblo ruins, 14th-century murals. Open Wed.-Mon. 485 Kuaua Rd. (I-25 exit 242), 1 mile west of Bernalillo. (505) 867-5351. www.nmmonuments.org n Ernie Pyle Memorial Branch Library. Memorabiliafilled 1940s home of late World War II correspondent. Open Tues.-Sat. 900 Girard Blvd. SE. (505) 256-2065. www.cabq.gov/library ✰ Explora. More than 250 interactive exhibits in science, technology and art for all ages. Old Town. 1701 Mountain Rd. NW. (505) 224-8300. www.explora.us n Historic Nob Hill. Historic shopping and dining district on Route 66 from Girard to Washington; Lomas to Silver. 2118 Central Ave. SE. (505) 265-0433. www.rt66central.com n Historic Old Town. More than 130 shops, boutiques, galleries, restaurants in Spanish-style plaza. P.O. Box 7483, 87194. (505) 842-8102. www.albuquerqueoldtown.com n Holocaust & Intolerance Museum of New Mexico. Open 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Tues.-Sat. 616 Central Ave. SW. (505) 247-0606. www.nmholocaustmuseum.org n Hubbell House Museum. An 1840s adobe coaching station, trading post and museum. Open Tues., Thurs. and Sat. 6029 Isleta Blvd. SW. (505) 244-0507. www.hubbellhousealliance.org n Huning Highlands Historic District. Grand Avenue Area. A sector of town named for Franz Huning, a German immigrant who moved to New Mexico in the mid-1800s and by the late 1880s had become a prominent Albuquerque citizen. Turn-of-the-century building styles run the gamut from Queen Anne to Italiante. www.cabq.gov/aes/s2cental.html

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n Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. Showcases the

history and accomplishments of the Pueblo people from pre-Columbian to contemporary time. 2401 12th St. NW. (505) 843-7270. www.indianpueblo.org n J&R Vintage Auto Museum. More than 60 cars, books and diecast toys. 3650-A N.M. 528, 87124. (505) 867-2881. www.jrvintageautos.com n Living Wildlife Museum and Wildlife West Nature Park. Twenty-four species of native-rescued wildlife on a 122-acre zoo. Overnight wildlife adventures. 87 N. Frontage Rd. (505) 281-7655. www.wildlifewest.org

n Madonna of the Trail Monument. The 12 memo-

rial statues of pioneer women symbolize the westward migration along the National Old Trails Road. The sixth monument is on the southeast corner of 4th St. and Marble Ave. www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nmsodar/ nmso/lewwallace/lwmadonna.htm n Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. UNM Campus. (505) 277-1400. www.unm.edu/~maxwell n Mexican Consulate. Rotating art exhibits feature Mexican and New Mexican artists. 1610 4th St. NW. (505) 247-2147. portal.sre.gob.mx/albuquerque

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n Museum of Southwestern Biology. Research and

science museum open to the public by appt. only. UNM campus. (505) 277-1360. www.msb.unm.edu n National Hispanic Cultural Center. Art museum, plays, concerts, library, educational activities, films, lectures, restaurant, gift shop. 1701 Fourth St. SW. (505) 246-2261. www.nhccnm.org n National Museum of Nuclear Science & History. Open daily. National museum of nuclear science and history, weapons and peaceful uses of technology. 601 Eubank Blvd. SE. (505) 245-2137. www.nuclearmuseum.org ✰ New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science. A modern museum with12 billion years of natural history. Dinosaurs, Ice Age cave experience, active volcano, Naturalist Center discovery room, interactive displays, planetarium, Extreme Screen DynaTheater, M Café, Natureworks gift shop. 1801 Mountain Rd. NW, 87104. (505) 841-2800. www.nmnaturalhistory.org n New Mexico Veterans Memorial. Open Fri.-Mon. 1100 Louisiana Blvd. SE. (505) 256-2042. www.nmvetsmemorial.org n San Felipe de Neri Catholic Church. 300 years in the heart of Old Town. P.O. Box 7007, 87194. (505) 243-4628. www.sanfelipedeneri.org n Silver Family Geology Museum. Minerals, rocks, fossils, gemstones from N.M. and world, dinosaur bone, glow-in-the-dark fluorescent minerals, exhibits on Jémez caldera, Harding pegamite deposit. Meteoritics Institute, 6th largest meteorite collection in the U.S. First floor of Northrop Hall, Room 107, UNM campus. (505) 277-4204. epswww.unm.edu n Special Collections Library. Specializing in nationwide genealogical research and New Mexico history. Tues.-Sat. 423 Central Ave. NE. (505) 848-1376. www.cabq.gov/library/specol.html n Telephone Museum of N.M. Four floors of N.M. communications history featuring instruments/equipment from 1876 model phone to modern fiber optics. 110 4th St. NW. (505) 842-2937. www.nmculture.org n Tijeras Pueblo Archaeological Site and Interpretive Center. 14th-century Ancestral Pueblo site, self-guided tour, illustrated signs, scale models. Off I-40 exit 175, 1/2 mile south on N.M. 337 to Tijeras, behind Sandia Ranger Station. (505) 281-3304. www.friendsoftijeraspueblo.org n Tinkertown Museum. Lifework of Ross Ward’s renowned folk-art collection, including miniature Western town, 3-ring circus display, compound surrounded by more than 52,000 bottles. Open daily April 1-Oct. 31. 121 Sandia Crest Rd, Sandia Park. 17 miles east of Albuquerque via I-40 and N.M. 14 (exit 175), then 6 miles until N.M. 536. (505) 281-5233. www.tinkertown.com

n Turquoise Museum. Learn about turquoise, mines,

history, lapidary, consumer education. 2107 Central Ave. NW. (505) 247-8650. www.turquoisemuseum.com n Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway. N.M. 536 to Sandia Crest and N.M. 14, scenic route to Santa Fe. Art and restored ghost towns. 121 Sandia Crest Rd., P.O. Box 303, 87047. (505) 281-5233. www.turquoisetrail.org n Unser Racing Museum. Featuring more than 30 race cars. Open daily. 1776 Montano Rd. NW. (505) 341-1776. www.unserracingmuseum.com

Outdoor Getaways
 n City of Albuquerque Open Space Visitor Center.

6500 Coors Blvd. NW. (505) 897-8831. www.cabq.gov/openspace n Cíbola National Forest Headquarters. 2113 Osuna Rd. NE. (505) 346-3900. www.fs.fed.us/r3/cibola n Elena Gallegos, Albert G. Simms Park. 640 acres with a nature preserve and hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, picnicking and sightseeing. 7100 Tramway Blvd. NE. (505) 452-5200. www.cabq.gov/openspace/elenagallegos.html n Petroglyph National Monument. Walk on trails to view Native American- and Spanish-made petroglyphs (rock carvings). Only fee is for Boca Negra Canyon. $1/weekdays and $2/weekends. 6001 Unser Blvd. NW. (505) 899-0205. www.nps.gov/petr ✰ Río Grande Nature Center State Park. Migratory bird sanctuary, fauna/flora exhibits, 3-mile hiking trail, native plant garden, ponds, wetlands, visitor center. 2901 Candelaria NW. (505) 344-7240. www.emnrd.state.nm.us/prd/RGNC.htm n Sandía Crest. Highest scenic drive in the Southwest, to summit of the Sandía Mountains. 10,678-foot elevation. East of Albuquerque, off I-40 exit 175 to N.M. 14, then N.M. 536 near Tijeras and Cedar Crest. (505) 243-0605. n Sandía Lakes Recreation Area. Fishing, hiking, bird watching, playground, shelters, tackle store, picnicking. North of Albuquerque via N.M. 313. 11143 U.S. 85 NW. (505) 771-5190. www.sandiapueblo.nsn.us/indexlakes.html ✰ Shady Lakes. Water-lily gardens frequented by many birds and turtles. Fishing for kids. 2 miles from I-25 via N.M. 313 and Tramway Blvd. (505) 898-2568. www.shadylakes.com n Tingley Beach. Three fishing lakes and a model boat pond. Pedal boats available during summer. On Tingley Dr. south of Central Ave. Open daily. (505) 768-6200. www.cabq.gov/biopark n Wildlife West Nature Park. View wolves, cougars, elk, deer, raptors and javelina. Overnight wildlife adventures available. 87 N. Frontage Rd. (505) 281-7655. www.wildlifewest.org

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n 516 ARTS. Nonprofit, museum-style gallery featur-

ing local and international artists in all visual media. 516 Central Ave. SW. (505) 242-1445. www.516arts.org

n African-American Performing Arts Center &

Exhibit Hall. 310 San Pedro NE. (505) 222-0777. www.exponm.com n Albuquerque Little Theatre. Seventy-nine years of live community theater. Year-round. South of Old Town. 224 San Pasquale Ave. SW. (505) 242-4750. www.albuquerquelittletheatre.org n Albuquerque Guild of the Santa Fe Opera. P.O. Box 14316, 87191-4316. (505) 867-5961. www.santafeopera.org n Albuquerque Theatre Guild. Your guide to live theater in Albuquerque. P.O. Box 26395, 87125-6395. www.abqtheatre.org n Arts Alliance Gallery. Greater Albuquerque arts council and gallery, serving arts organizations, artists and the public. 1100 San Mateo Blvd. NE. (505) 268-1920. www.abqarts.org n Ballet Theater of N.M. Call for schedule. 6913 Natalie NE. Performances at KiMo Theatre. (505) 888-1054. www.btnm.org n The Cell Theatre. Professional theater and music year-round. Home of Fusion Theatre Company. 700 1st St. NW. (505) 766-9412. www.liveatthecell.com, www.fusionabq.org n Chamber Music Albuquerque. Call for schedule. (505) 268-1990. www.cma-abq.org n Fine Arts Gallery. N.M. artists; contemporary, Western, traditional fine art. Expo New Mexico (state fairgrounds). Gates 3, 4, San Pedro Blvd. NE. (505) 222-9738. n Hard Rock Pavilion. Outdoor concerts, big-name acts. Reserved, general, lawn seating. Food, beverage, alcohol services. On Bobby Foster Rd., off I-25, Río Bravo Blvd. and Broadway, or S. University Blvd. past airport. (505) 246-8742, 452-5100. www.livenation. com/Hard-Rock-Casino-Albuquerque-Presents-ThePavilion-tickets-Albuquerque/venue/246150 n Harwood Art Center. Music, dance, art exhibitions, art classes, workshops. 1114 7th St. NW. (505) 242-6367. www.harwoodartcenter.org n Jonson Gallery. Works by Raymond Jonson, contemporary artists. UNM Campus, 1909 Las Lomas NE. (505) 277-4967. www.unm.edu/~jonsong n KiMo Theatre. Music, drama, plays, dance, performance art. 423 Central Ave. NW. (505) 768-3522. www.cabq.gov/kimo n Mother Road Theatre Company. Workshops, theater performances and special events. 1024 4th St. SW. (505) 379-5153. www.motherroad.org n Musical Theatre SW. Call for schedule. 2401 Ross SE. (505) 265-9119. www.musicaltheatresw.com n N.M. Ballet Co. P.O. Box 21518, 87154. Call for schedule. (505) 292-4245. newmexicoballet.org n N.M. Jazz Workshop. Concerts and educational programs. 5500 Lomas Blvd. NE. (505) 255-9798. www.nmjazz.org n N.M. Symphony Orchestra. Call for schedule. 4407 Menaul Blvd. NE. (505) 881-8999. www.nmso.org n Opera Southwest. KiMo Theatre. P.O. Box 27671, 87125. (505) 243-0591. www.operasouthwest.org

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n Outpost Performance

Space. Intimate nonprofit NW NE performing arts venue preC senting jazz and more. 210 Yale SE. (505) 268-0044. SW SE www.outpostspace.org n Popejoy Hall. National touring acts. Call for schedule. UNM Campus, Stanford/Central Ave. NE. (505) 277-3824. www.popejoypresents.com n The Rodey & Experimental Theatre. Call for schedule. UNM Campus. 1412 Center for the Arts. (505) 277-4332. theatre.unm.edu n South Broadway Cultural Center. National touring shows, year-round art exhibits, gallery, theater. 1025 Broadway SE. (505) 848-1320. www.cabq.gov/sbcc n Tamarind Institute. Lithograph archives, studio and gallery. Tours first Friday of month. 110 Cornell Dr. SE. (505) 277-3901. tamarind.unm.edu n Tricklock Company. Resident touring ensemble. 1705 Mesa Vista Rd. NE. (505) 254-8393. www.tricklock.com n UNM Art Museum. Students, faculty, guest art shows. UNM Campus near Central and Cornell. Center for the Arts building. (505) 277-4001. unmartmuseum.unm.edu n Vortex Theatre. Classic and cutting-edge theater. Call for schedule. 2004 Central SE. (505) 247-8600. www.vortexabq.org

n N.M. State Fair Horse Racing. Fall season early

through late Sept. Simulcasting Mon.-Fri., slot machines. Expo New Mexico (state fairgrounds): (505) 265-1791; Downs at Albuquerque: (505) 266-5555. www.abqdowns.com n N.M. Touring Society. Cycling. P.O. Box 1261, 87103-1261. (505) 237-9700. www.swcp.com/~nmts/ ✰ Outpost CooLLOOP Ice Arenas. Four arenas, public skating on loop of ice one-fifth mile, curling, hockey, figure and speed skating. 9530 Tramway Blvd. NE. (505) 856-7595. www.outposticearena.com n Sandía Motor Speedway. Paved oval, road course. Local, natl. events, hospitality area. Available for testing, practice, race meets, instruction, driving training. 100 Speedway Blvd. SW. (505) 352-8888. www.sandiamotorsports.com n Sandía Peak Mountain Biking. Bike-trail system 15-plus miles, full-service rental shop, bike/chairlift, scenic rides, outdoor grill. Open weekends, holidays, Memorial Day-Labor Day & Balloon Fiesta. Sandia Peak Ski Area. (505) 242-9052. www.sandiapeak.com ✰ Sandía Peak Ski Area. Snowmaking throughout season, intermediate ski area, 25 ski runs, uphill lift capacity 4,500 skiers per hour. Alpine & snowboard lessons, rentals, food. Restaurants at base and top of Sandía Peak Aerial Tramway. N.M. 536, the Sandía Crest Natl. Scenic Byway. (505) 242-9052. www.sandiapeak.com

n Shooting Range Park. West of Albuquerque,

12 miles west of the intersection of I-25 and I-40. The park provides a safe environment for shooters of all ages to practice and learn the skills of using a firearm. 16001 Shooting Range Access Rd. NW. (505) 836-8785. n Sierra Vista West Tennis Complex. 10 courts, swimming pool. Sat.-Sun 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 5100 Montano NW. (505) 848-1381. ✰ Stone Age Climbing Gym. Climbing school, group events, Sandía wilderness guided climbs. 4201 Yale Ave. NE, Ste. I. (505) 341-2016. www.stoneageclimbinggym.com ✰ UNM Athletic Dept. (The Lobos). Tickets: (505) 925-LOBO. Ticket office located on southeast corner of The Pit, off Avenida Cesar Chávez and University Blvd. (505) 925-5014. www.GoLobos.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. ¡Aqui Estamos! Works from the

permanent collection. National Hispanic Cultural Center (505) 246-2261. www.nhccnm.org ◆ Throughout the year. Artscrawl/First Fridays. Openings and art events. (505) 244-0362. www.artscrawlabq.org ◆ Throughout the year. Dawn of the Dinosaurs: New Mexico's Triassic. N.M. Museum of Natural History and Science. (505) 841-2800. www.nmnaturalhistory.org ◆ Throughout the year. EXPO New Mexico Flea Market. Every weekend (except during State Fair). Expo N.M.-State Fairgrounds. (505) 265-1791. www.exponm.com/en/fleamarket

Sporting Fun n Active Knowledge Trips & Tours. Hiking, biking

and rafting. Nob Hill. 3407 Central Ave. NE. (505) 238-8638. www.activeknow.com n Albuquerque Golf Training Center at Balloon Fiesta Park. Driving range, grass putting course, lessons. Night lights. (505) 857-8437. www.cabq.gov/golf ✰ Albuquerque Indoor Karting. 5110 Copper NE. (505) 265-7223. www.abqkarting.com ✰ Albuquerque Isotopes Baseball Club. Pacific Coast League. April-Sept. 1601 Avenida Cesar Chávez SE. (505) 924-2255. www.albuquerquebaseball.com ✰ City of Albuquerque Skate Parks. Recreation areas for in-line skaters, BMX bicyclists and skateboarders. Tower Skate Park, 86th and Tower NW. Los Altos Skate Park, 10140 Lomas NE. Coronado Skate Park, Fourth St. and McKnight NW. Alamosa Skate Park, 6900 Gonzales Rd. SW. Northwest Modular Skate Park, Coors Blvd. Bypass and Seven Bar Loop. (505) 768-5300. www.cabq.gov/recreation n The Downs at Albuquerque. Horse racing in season (spring meet, State Fair), year-round simulcasting, slot machines. Expo New Mexico (state fairgrounds). (505) 266-5555. www.abqdowns.com ✰ Albuquerque Thunderbirds - NBA Minor League Basketball Team. Nov.-April. 111 Lomas Blvd. NW, Ste. 240. (505) 265-3865. www.abqtbirds.com n Jerry Cline Tennis Complex. 18 tennis courts. Reservations are taken two days in advance. 7205 Constitution Ave. NE. (505) 768-5387. www.cabq.gov/recreation www.newmexico.org

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◆ Throughout the year.

First Friday Fractals. (FriNW NE day nights, 3 shows.) Live, C narrated show. Advance tickets available only online. SW SE New Mexico Museum of Natural History. (505) 841-2800. www.naturalhistoryfoundation.org ◆ Throughout the year. Indian Dances and Artist Demonstrations. Every weekend. Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. (505) 843-7270. www.indianpueblo.org ◆ Throughout the year. N.M. Symphony Orchestra. Various concerts with highlights including Dvorák & Gershwin, Ravel, Tchaikovsky. (505) 881-9590. www.nmso.org ◆ Throughout the year. Old Town, New Fun. Live music up to five nights a week—spring through fall. Some events during the winter. (505) 768-3544. ◆ Throughout the year. Tricklock Company. Various theater performances. (505) 254-8393. www.tricklock.com ◆ Through Jan. The Portrait Tradition: Albuquerque Photographers Exhibit. The Albuquerque Museum of Art & History. (505) 243-7255. www.cabq.gov/museum ◆ Through Jan 29. Weaving Generations Together: Evolving Creativity in the Maya of the Chiapas. Maxwell Museum. (505) 277-4405. www.unm.edu/~maxwell ◆ Through Feb. 2. Glide! Exhibition. AndersonAbruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum. (505) 768-6020. www.balloonmuseum.com ◆ Through Feb. 28. Saints of the Pueblos Exhibit. Wooden retablos depicting the patron saints of each of the 19 pueblos, including those of four “lost” pueblos. (505) 843-7270. www.indianpueblo.org ◆ Through Feb. 28. Sky Sailing Exhibition. Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum. (505) 768-6020. www.balloonmuseum.com ◆ Through May 1. Quilts-Up Above the Ground: A Celebration of Flight. Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum. (505) 768-6020. www.balloonmuseum.com ◆ Through June 15. New Mexico Furniture is Art Exhibit. Features the work of contemporary Hispanic furniture artists. (505) 246-2261. www.nhccnm.org ◆ Through June 30. Church of Beethoven: Chamber Music Concert. Weekly professional music and poetry performances. The Kosmos. www.churchofbeethoven.com ◆ Through Aug. Gathering the Clouds: Many Art Forms, One Story. Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. (505) 843-7270. www.indianpueblo.org ◆ Feb. 26-27. USA Track & Field Indoor Championships. See world-class athletes and Olympians compete. www.usatf.org ◆ Feb. 26-27. Celebration of Gourds. (505) 892-0124. www.newmexicogourdsociety.org ◆ March to Dec. Old Town Walking Tours. (505) 243-7255. www.cabq.gov/museum ◆ March 1-31. Women in Creativity Celebration. Features more than 50 events and exhibitions. National Hispanic Cultural Center. (505) 246-2261. www.cabq.gov ◆ March 4-6. Fiery Food & BBQ Show. Sandia Resort & Casino. (305) 873-8680. www.fiery-foods.com/ffshow

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◆ March 11-13 . Rio Grande Arts & Crafts Festival.

Expo NM. (505) 292-7457. www.riograndefestivals.com ◆ March 13-19. Albuquerque Restaurant Week. Discounted specials at restaurants throughout the city. www.newmexicorestaurantweek.com ◆ March 18-20. Treasurers of the Earth. More than 40 vendors selling minerals, gems, rocks, jewelry, beads,more. (505) 255-5478. www.agmc.info ◆ April TBA. Fiesta de Albuquerque. Music, dance, performances, outdoor market, children’s activities, festival foods. (505) 768-3556. www.cabq.gov/crs/fiestas-de-albuquerque.html ◆ April-Sept. Albuquerque Isotopes. AAA baseball, Isotopes Park. (505) 924-2255. www.albuquerquebaseball.com ◆ April-Nov. Sculpture Garden Walking Tours. (505) 243-7255. www.cabq.gov/museum ◆ April 16-17. Spring Indian Art Market. Artists, retailers, wholesalers, museums and collectors at the world’s largest Native American trade show. (505) 265-9149. www.iaca.com ◆ April 23-May 1. American Indian Pueblo Days. Native dances. 843-7270. www.indianpueblo.org ◆ April 28-30. Gathering of Nations Pow Wow. Dancing and singing competition, the Indian Traders Market, Stage 49, crowning of Miss Indian World. UNM football field. (505) 836-2810. www.gatheringofnations.com ◆ May-Aug. Art in the Park. (505) 768-3555. www.cabq.gov/crs. ◆ May-Aug. Salsa Under the Stars. Music by local and national groups on Friday nights. (505) 255-9798. www.nmjazz.org ◆ May-Aug. Jazz/Blues Under the Stars. Music by local and national groups on Saturday nights. (505) 255-9798. www.nmjazz.org ◆ May 28-30. Albuquerque Wine Festival. Balloon Fiesta Park. (866) 494-6366. www.nmwine.com ◆ June TBA. ABQ Century. Urban cycling event. (505) 266-5716. www.abqcentury.com ◆ June TBA. Albuquerque Folk Festival. Expo N.M. (505) 294-6909. www.abqfolkfest.org ◆ June-July. Concert Band Series. Wednesdays. (505) 768-3555. www.cabq.gov/crs ◆ June-July. Summerfest. Saturdays. Local and national music and dance. Various locations (505) 768-3555. www.cabq.gov/crs ◆ June-July. Wine Down Thursdays. Food, arts & crafts, wine, music. (505) 768-3555. www.cabq.gov/crs ◆ June-Aug. Summer Nights. Thursdays. Concert series at the Rio Grande Botanic Garden. (505) 764-6200. www.cabq.gov/biopark ◆ June-Aug. Zoo Music. Music by regional, national and international talent. Fridays. (505) 764-6200. www.cabq.gov/biopark ◆ June-Oct. Downtown Growers Market & Festival. Saturdays. Robinson Park. (505) 243-2230. www.downtownabq.com ◆ June-Oct. Locally Grown Music. At the Downtown Growers Market. Saturdays. (505) 768-3555. www.cabq.gov/crs ◆ June 3-12. Savor Albuquerque. Event showcasing Albuquerque’s arts and cuture, including the Festival Flamenco Internacional de Albuquerque. www.savorabq.com

◆ June 8-12. Festival Flamenco Internacional

de Albuquerque. (505) 242-7600. www.nationalinstituteofflamenco.org ◆ June 8-12. ABQ Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender Pride. Expo N.M. (505) 873-8084. www.abqpride.com ◆ TBA. N.M. Arts & Crafts Fair. Expo NM. (505) 884-9043. www.mnmartsandcraftsfair.org ◆ July 4. Freedom Fourth. Independence Day celebration. (505) 768-3556. www.cabq.gov ◆ July 6-10. Mariachi Spectacular de Albuquerque. The best in Mariachi music. (505) 255-1501. www.mariachispectacular.com ◆ July 12-24. New Mexico Jazz Festival. More than a dozen jazz concerts in Albuquerque and Santa Fe. (505) 268-0044. www.newmexicojazzfestival.org ◆ July 23-30. Youth National Arabian & Half Arabian Championship Horse Show. Junior competions in various riding styles plus leadership training, contests, parades. (303) 696-4500. www.arabianhorses/YNL ◆ Aug. TBA. Great Southwestern Antiques, Indian & Old West Show. Expo New Mexico. (505) 255-4054. www.cowboysandiansnm.com ◆ Aug. TBA. Albuquerque Film Festival. Celebration of cinema, painting, performance art, photography and music. (505) 710-9641. albuquerquefilmfestival.org ◆ Aug. 6-14. Ballet Pro Musica Festival. National Hispanic Cultural Center. (505) 246-2261. www.nhccnm.org ◆ Aug. 6-7. Salsa Fiesta. Salsa music, dance. (505) 822-1662. www.cabq.gov/crs ◆ Sept.-Nov. UNM Lobo football games. (505) 925-LOBO. www.golobos.com ◆ Sept. 3-5. N.M. Wine Festival. Wine tasting, entertainment, arts & crafts. (505) 867-3311. www.nmwine.com ◆ Sept. 9-25. New Mexico State Fair. PRCA rodeo, concerts, Indian and Spanish villages. (505) 265-1791. www.exponm.com ◆ Sept. 23-24. Globalquerque. Celebration of world music and culture. (505) 232-9868. www.globalquerque.com ◆ Sept. 24. Insulator, Bottle, Barbwire, Marbles and Collectibles Show & Sale. (505) 899-8755. (505) 898-5592. www.insulators.info ◆ Sept. 30-Oct. 2, Oct. 7-9. Rio Grande Arts & Crafts Fair during Balloon Fiesta. Paseo del Norte and I-25. (505) 292-7457. www.riograndefestivals.com ◆ Oct. TBA. Day of the Tread. Bike or run in this Halloween fitness event. (505) 245-7100. www.dayofthetread.com ◆ Oct. TBA. Fall Indian Art Market. Artists, retailers, wholesalers, museums, collectors at the world’s largest Native American trade show. (505) 843-7270. www.indianpueblo.com ◆ Oct. TBA. From Field to Feast. A two-week festival celebrating the histories of planting, harvesting, cooking and eating of food, while considering issues of health and well-being. (505) 843-7270. www.indianpueblo.org

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS www.newmexico.org


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NC

◆ Oct. 1-9. Albuquerque

International Balloon NW NE Fiesta. Nine-day event C with 700 hot-air balloons. (505) 821-1000. SW SE www.balloonfiesta.com ◆ Oct. 7-13. SW Gay and Lesbian Film Festival. (505) 243-1870. www.closetcinema.org ◆ Oct. 16. Duke City Marathon. (505) 880-1414. www.dukecitymarathon.com ◆ Nov. TBA Weems Gallery Artfest. Expo N.M. (505) 293-6133. www.weemsgallery.com ◆ Nov. 11. Veterans Day Ceremony. N.M. Veterans Memorial. (505) 256-2042. www.nmvetsmemorial.com ◆ Nov. 25-27. Rio Grande Arts & Crafts Festival Holiday Show. Expo N.M. (505) 292-7457. www.riograndefestival.com ◆ Nov. 26-Dec. 30. River of Lights. Displays of animals, fantastical creatures and plants. Closed Dec. 24 and 25. (505) 764-6281. www.cabq.gov ◆ Dec. TBA. New Mexico Bowl. Mountain West Conference against Western Athletic Conference. UNM football stadium. (505) 925-5999. www.newmexicobowl.com ◆ Dec. 1. Nob Hill Holiday Shop & Stroll. Historic Nob Hill. (505) 842-6931. www.rt66central.com ◆ Dec. 2. Old Town Holiday Stroll. Entertainment, music, lighting of the tree in Plaza don Luis. www.albuquerqueoldtown.com

CONSIDER THESE TRAVELERS’ TIPS TO ENHANCE YOUR NEW MEXICO VISIT CALL AHEAD The community information and calendars in this guide are compiled nearly a year in advance. Before making your plans, be sure to call ahead using the contact information listed to verify dates, times and locations. GET UPDATES Some communities that are not listed in this guide did not respond to our requests for information. Further details about those communities, as well as up-to-date events, can be obtained by contacting the respective chambers of commerce, visitor centers or tribes. SPECIAL EVENTS & PROMOTIONS For the latest events log on to the calendar section of the Tourism Department’s website at www.newmexico.org. Also, check for special travel promotions, discounts and media alerts. FACEBOOK/TWITTER/E-NEWSLETTERS Get the latest news by signing up at www.newmexico.org. Also, get updates from New Mexico Magazine at www.nmmagazine.com.

112  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

◆ Dec. 3. Twinkle Lights Parade. Downtown.

Albuquerque. (505) 768-3556. www.cabq.gov/crs/twinklelight.html ◆ Dec.4. Christmas at Kuaua. Coronado State Monument. (505) 867-5351. ◆ Dec. 12. Feast of Guadalupe. A performing arts event based on centuries-old celebrations, which commemorates the appearances of Santa María de Guadalupe in 13th-century Spain and 16th-century Mexico. (505) 246-2261. www.nhccnm.org ◆ Dec. 24. Luminaria Tour. (800) 284-2282. www.itsatrip.org

ANGEL FIRE NC

www.AngelFireChamber.org www.angelfirefun.com www.Afgov.org

Attractions ■ Angel Fire Summer Chairlift Rides. May 21-

Sept. 21. Call or check website for hours. (800) 633-7463, (575) 377-6401. www.angelfireresort.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park. Honors

vets of Vietnam and other wars; constructed by family of Victor Westphall, whose son was killed in Vietnam. Chapel open 24 hours, visitors/archives center 9 a.m.5 p.m. year-round. C.R. B4 off of U.S. 64. P.O. Box 608, 87710. (575) 377-2293. www.angelfirememorial.com, www.emnrd.state.nm.us/PRD/VietnamVets.htm

Outdoor Getaways ■ Enchanted Circle. 86-mile N.M. Scenic Byway.

Connects Taos, Questa, Red River, Eagle Nest, Angel Fire or vice versa via N.M. 522/N.M. 38/U.S. 64. Beautiful views of N.M.’s highest mountaintops, including Wheeler Peak at 13,161 feet. (800) 446-8117, (575) 377-6661. www.enchantedcircle.org ■ Hiking, Mountain Bike Trails. Angel Fire area & ski mountain. (800) 446-8117. www.AngelFireChamber.org, www.angelfireresort.com ■ Monte Verde Lake. Fishing, pedal and row boating. (800) 633-7463, (575) 377-6401. www.angelfireresort.com

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Angel Fire Mountain Theatre. July season. Texas

Tech students perform 3 plays in weekly rotation. (575) 377-6273. www.angelfiretheatre.org ■ Moreno Valley Arts Council. Missoula Children’s Theater in June, Artsfest 2nd weekend in July, Arts About Town on Sat. of Labor Day weekend. (575) 377-1147. www.morenovalleyarts.org ■ Music From Angel Fire. Concerts in Angel Fire, Las Vegas, Taos, Raton. (888) 377-3300, (575) 377-3233 for schedule. P.O. Box 502, 87710. www.musicfromangelfire.org

Sporting Fun ✰ Angel Fire Resort Ski/Snowboard Area. Popular year-round resort 24 miles east of Taos with N.M.’s only 2 high-speed, quad chair lifts, 67 trails, 2,077-ft. vertical drop, snowmaking. Ski and snowboard half-pipe, terrain park with rail slides, tabletops, spines, glade area. Also 6,000-sq.-ft. children’s ski/snowboard complex, daycare, lighted tubing hill, snow blades, snow skates, guided snowmobile tours. Nordic Center: 13.7 miles (22 km.) of terrain for cross-country skiing & snowshoeing. Summer chairlift rides, mountain biking, hiking, ATV guided tours (800) 633-7463, (575) 377-6401, snowphone: (575) 377-4222. www.angelfireresort.com ■ BIPS-Balloons in Professional Services. Hot-air balloon rides over Moreno Valley. (575) 377-2477. www.bipsnm.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Jan. 1. Polar Bear Plunge. Eagle Nest State Park.

(575) 377-1584. ◆ Jan. 15. USASA Training Clinic. (800) 633-7463. ◆ Jan. 21-30. Powderkeg Mountain Festival. (800) 633-7463. ◆ Jan. 22. USASA Slalom and Giant Slalom. (800) 633-7463. ◆ Feb. TBA. Mardi Gras Ball. (575) 377-1544. ◆ Feb. 11-13. Championship Shovel Races. (800) 633-7463. ◆ Feb. 19. USASA Jedi Challenge Boarder/Skier Cross. (800) 633-7463. ◆ March 8. Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday. (800) 633-7463. ◆ March 12. USASA Slopestyle. (800) 633-7463. ◆ March 12-19. Fiesta del Sol Spring Break Celebration. (800) 633-7463. ◆ May 5-7. Cinco de Mayo Festivities. (575) 377-6661. ◆ May 20. Run for the Wall. Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park.(575) 377-6900. ◆ May 27-30. Memorial Day Events. Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park. (575) 377-6555. ◆ June 3-5. Chile Challenge Mountain Bike Festival. (800) 633-7463. ◆ July 4. Parades and events. Red River and Eagle Nest. ◆ July 7-10. Angel Fire ArtsFest. (575) 377-6273. ◆ Aug.-Sept. Music from Angel Fire. (888) 377-3300. ◆ Aug. 5-7. Angel Fire SummerFest and Balloon Rally. (866) 377-6555. ◆ Sept. 3. Arts about Town. (575) 377-6273. ◆ Sept. 3. Vietnam Veterans Memorial Walkway Brick Installation. Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park. (575) 377-6900. ◆ Oct. 1-2. Angel Fire Peak Challenge 10K and Cross Country Bike Races. (575) 377-6661. ◆ Oct. 8. Red Bull Burner Mountain Bike Race. (800) 633-7463. ◆ Oct. 15. Oktoberfest. (800) 633-7463. ◆ Nov. 11. Veterans Day. Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park. ((575) 377-6900.

www.newmexico.org


◆ Dec. 24. Torchlight Parade and Fireworks.

(800) 633-7463. ◆ Dec. 31. Torchlight Parade and Fireworks. (800) 633-7463.

ANTHONY SW Attractions ■ La Viña Winery. Just 6 miles southwest of Anthony

at 4201 S. N.M. 28, La Union. Open Thurs.-Tues., Noon5 p.m., tours by appointment daily at 11:30 a.m. (575) 882-7632. www.lavinawinery.com

ARTESIA SE

www.artesiachamber.com

Attractions ■ Derrick Floor & Oilfield Pioneer Monuments.

Bronze pieces celebrate area history. 6th St./ W. Main St. (575) 746-1117. ■ Heritage Plaza & Walkway. Fountain displays and murals. Artist installations by Shel Neymark, Debbie Rottmann and Noel Marquez.320 W. Main St. ■ First Lady of Artesia Monument. Bronze monument of Sallie Chisum. 3rd St. and W. Main St. ■ Monumental Ranching Sculptures. Series of bronze sculptures on dowtown street corners honors ranching: The Trail Boss (1st St. and Main St.), Vacquero (2nd St. and Main St.) and The Rustler (2nd St. and Texas Ave.).

◆ May 22. School’s Out Summer Splash.

(575) 476-4112. ◆ June 11-12. Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament. Martin Luther King Jr. Sports Complex. (575) 746-2744. ◆ July 4. Fourth of July Celebration. Parade down Main St., sporting activities, fireworks. (575) 746-2744. ◆ Aug. 1-6. Eddy County Fair & Rodeo. Eddy County Fairgrounds and Horse Council Arena on S. 13th St. (575) 746-2744. ◆ Sept. 16-17. Gathering of Wheels Car Show and Swap Meet. (575) 746-6497. ◆ Sept. TBA. Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Fall Fiesta. Mariachi Mass in the park Sunday morning. (575) 748-1356. ◆ Sept. 23-24. Sporting Clays Crusher Fun Shoot. Eddy County Shooting Range. 131 Firehouse Rd. (575) 746-2744. ◆ Oct. 15. Art in the Park. Central Park. 7th St. and Quay Ave. (575) 746-4212. ◆ Nov. 5. Balloons & Bluegrass. Hot air balloons and bluegrass music festival. (575) 746-2744. ◆ Dec. 1. Light Up Artesia. Downtown Artesia.

AZTEC NW

www.aztecnm.com www.aztecchamber.com

Attractions ■ Animas River 1929 Truss Bridge. On Aztec

business route. ■ MainStreet USA. Functioning historic downtown, from 1889-1909. Galleries, restaurants, specialty shops, feed store. ■ Memorial Rose Garden. More than 300 rose bushes.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Aztec Museum & Pioneer Village. One of finest

collections of authentic pioneer Americana. Oilfield, military, farm equipment exhibits, late 1800s building. 125 N. Main Ave. (505) 334-9829. www.aztecmuseum.org ■ Aztec Ruins National Monument. 12th13th-century Ancestral Pueblo ruins, walking trail, reconstructed great kiva, visitor center, exhibits, daily historical video, self-guided tours, interpretive talks offered twice daily from Memorial Day to Labor Day. 3/4 miles north off N.M. 516 (Aztec Blvd.). (505) 334-6174, ext. 230; TDD: (505) 334-6174, ext. 230. www.nps.gov/azru, www.aztecnm.com ■ Historic Aztec Walking Tour. 75 structures in original town site, 11 buildings listed on Natl. Register of Historic Places and N.M. Register of Cultural Properties. Includes Green’s Opera House, E.C. Waring Jewelry Store, American Hotel, Col. Williams’ General Store, Blitzkie House. (505) 334-9829, 334-9551. www.aztecnm.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Artesia Historical Museum & Art Center. 1904

home, local/Pecos Valley history exhibits, art gallery. 505 W. Richardson Ave. Open Tues.-Fri. 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m., Sat. 1-5 p.m. (575) 748-2390. www.artesiamuseum.org ■ Historical Train Depot/Visitor Center. Walking

tours. 107 N. 1st St. (800) 658-6251, (575) 746-2744. www.artesiachamber.com

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Ocotillo Performing Arts Center. Restored 1935

movie theater. Plays, concerts, workshops, special events. (575) 746-4212. www.artesiaartscouncil.com ■ Land of the Sun. Renovated 1947 movie theater. Two screens. (575) 746-4112.

Sporting Fun ■ Eddy County Shooting Range. 131 Firehouse Rd.

www.ecsra.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Ocotillo Performing Arts Cen-

ter. Musicals, concerts, workshops, plays. (575) 746-4212. www.artesiaartscouncil.com ◆ March 25-26. Main Event Car Show & Cruise. Car show followed by fireworks. (575) 746-9477. www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  113


NC NW

NE C

SW

SE

Natural Wonders ■ Aztec Arches. Stunning

sandstone formations surround Aztec. Arches include Anasazi, Arch, Peephole, Octopus, Pillar, Alien and more. (505) 334-9551.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Navajo Lake State Park. Three recreation areas

(Pine, Sims Mesa and San Juan River), largest lake in northwest region, visitor center, campsites. Trout, bass, crappie, catfish, northern pike, Kokanee salmon; trophy trout in quality waters (San Juan Fishing Easement) below dam. 18 miles east of Aztec via N.M. 173 and N.M. 511. (505) 632-2278. www.nmparks.com ✰ Riverside Park. Borders Animas River, amenities include fishing,pond, BMX track, rodeo arena, soccer fields and trail system. S. Light Plant Rd. off N.M. 516. (505) 334-9551.

Sporting Fun ✰ Alien Run Mountain Bike Trails. Mountain bike trail. 30 scenic miles near alleged Aztec UFO crash site. Off C.R. 2770. Route map online. (505) 334-9551. www.alienrun.com ✰ Aztec Skateboard Park. 11,900 sq. ft. of concrete ramps. 600 Llano St.

■ Aztec Speedway. 1/3-mile dirt track. IMCA stock

cars/modifieds, dwarf cars, Thunder Bombers, ministocks, sprints. 400 Legion Rd. (505) 334-9551. ■ No Limit MX Racing. AMA and NMA sanctioned MX race events. Riverside Park. (877) NOLMT-MX. www.nolimitmxracing.com ■ Quality Waters. World-class trout fishing on the San Juan River. (505) 334-9551.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ March 25-27. UFO Symposium. Speakers, presenta-

tions, art contest and show, vendors, star gazing and crash site tours. (505) 330-4616. www.aztecufo.com ◆ May 8. Alien Run Mountain Bike Competition. Mountain bike race, all ages and skill levels. (505) 334-9551. www.alienrun.com ◆ June 3-5. Aztec Fiesta Days. Music, dancers, entertainment, games, food, arts and crafts, parades, the Frazier Carnival, and sprint car races at Aztec Speedway. (505) 334-9551. ◆ July 9. Animas River Blues Festival. Blues, brews and barbecue. (505) 334-9551. www.animasriverblues.com ◆ Sept. 17. Aztec Founder's Day and Antique Truck Show. Parade, fishing derby, live music, arts & crafts, and more. (505) 334-9551. ◆ Oct. 8. Oktoberfest! Volkswagen parade, live music, food, fun, games, art walk, crafts, demonstrations and children’s area. (505) 334-9551.

◆ Nov. 26-Dec. 31. Fantasy of Lights Holiday Show.

Lighted sculptures featuring holiday scenes, animals and flowers. Riverside Park 6-9 p.m. Sun.-Thurs.; 6-10 p.m. Fri. and Sat. (505) 330-5230.

BELÉN CE

www.belenchamber.org

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Harvey House Museum. Harvey Girls & houses,

Santa Fe Railway, Valencia County and Belén city history. 104 N. 1st St. (at the railway tracks). Open Tues.Sat., 12:30-3:30 p.m., Sun. 1-3 p.m. (505) 861-0581. ■ Our Lady of Refuge Chapel. A restored Spanish mission chapel built in the late 1800s. 1002 Don Felipe. Call first to visit. (505) 864-1825.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Belén State Waterfowl Area. Farming operations

for birds, particularly in the winter. Hunting season. South of Belén. ■ Sen. Willie M. Chávez Educational Center. Along Río Grande in Belén, via N.M. 109. Park open to public Sat. & Sun. only; no overnight camping. (505) 864-3915.

Sporting Fun ■ Valencia Sheriff’s Posse Arena. Events through-

out spring, summer and fall. Barrel racing, team roping, steer/ bull riding, children’s rodeos, Winter Series Rodeo in Feb./Mar., Valencia County rodeo queen contest. (505) 864-7383.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Jan. 29. Hispano Chamber Matanza.

(505) 702-9468. ◆ Feb.-March weekends. Casper Baca Rough Stock Rodeo Series. (505) 287-9534. ◆ April 23. Easter Egg Hunts. Belén Eagle Park. (505) 864-0584. ◆ July 2. All American Independence Day & Music Fest. Main Street. (505) 864-8221. ◆ Aug. 12-14. Our Lady of Belén Fiesta. (505) 864-8043. ◆ Aug. last week. Valencia County Fair & Sheriff ‘s Posse Rodeo. (505) 864-8091. www.valenciafair.com ◆ Aug. 27. Valencia County Fair Parade. (505) 864-8091. www.belenchamber.org ◆ Sept. 24. Annual Río Abajo Days. (505) 864-8091. www.belenchamber.org ◆ Oct. 15. Captain Tamara Long-Archuleta Memorial Open Karate Championships. (505) 864-9568. ◆ Oct. 15. Fall Festival. (505) 864-0584. ◆ Nov. 18. Christmas Festival & Miracle on Main Street Electric Light Parade. (505) 864-0584. ◆ Dec. 3-4. La Gran Pastorela de Belén. Harvey House Museum. (505) 864-8547. ◆ Dec. 10. Children’s Christmas Party. (505) 864-2830.

114  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


NC NW

NE C

SW

SE

EAGLE NEST NE

EDGEWOOD CE

www.eaglenestchamber.org

www.edgewood-nm.gov

Museums and Historic Sites

Outdoor Getaways

■ Elizabethtown. Ghost town.

5 miles north via N.M. 38.

■ Elizabethtown Museum. Original 1860s building,

history, nearby cemetery. Open daily, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Memorial Day through fall. (575) 377-3420.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Eagle Nest Lake State Park. Boating, fishing,

picnicking, waterfowl, eagle viewing. A mile south off N.M. 64 in Moreno Valley. (575) 377-1594. www.nmparks.com ■ Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway. Eastern gateway, from U.S. 64 north on N.M. 38 begins 85-mile road journey. (575) 754-1708, (877) 885-3885.

Sporting Fun ■ Eagle Nest Marina & Mountain View Cabins.

Boat rentals, tackle, hunting/fishing licenses, guided ATV & snowmobile trips. (575) 377-6941. www.cti-excursions.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Jan. 1. Polar Bear Plunge. Eagle Nest Lake State

Park. (575) 377-1594, (575) 377-6188. www.eaglenestchamber.org ◆ Jan. 15. Ice Fishing Tournament. Eagle Nest Lake State Park, south boat ramp. (575) 377-6226. ◆ Feb. 19. Eagle Nest Snowkite Challenge. Strap into a kite harness and zoom over Eagle Nest Lake on a snowboard. (800) 494-9117, (575) 377-2420. www.snowkitenewmexico.com ◆ May 20. Run For The Wall. Senior Center. 74 Tomboy Dr., (800) 494-9117, (575) 377-6900. www.rftw.org ◆ May 27-30. Memorial Day Celebration. Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park. (575) 377-6555. ◆ June-Sept. Farmers Market. Fridays, 11 a.m.3 p.m. Golden Eagle RV Park. (800) 494-9117, (575) 377-2420, (800) 494-9117. www.eaglenestchamber.org ◆ June 24-27. Mountain Man Rendezvous. Experience life in the 1800s with an authentic encampment and period costumes. Enchanted Circle Gateway Museum. (575) 377-2420. ◆ July 2-4. July 4th Extravaganza. Parade U.S. 64. Fireworks over Eagle Nest Lake. (800) 494-9117, (575) 377-2420. www.eaglenestchamber.org ◆ July 30-31. High Country Arts & Crafts Show. Enchanted Eagle Park. (800) 494-9117, (575) 377-2420. www.eaglenestchamber.org ◆ Sept. 17-25. Fishfest. Fishing tournament, fishfry, worm-eating contest. Eagle Nest Lake State Park, Eagle Nest Marina. (575) 377-2420, (800) 494-9117. www.eaglenestchamber.org www.newmexico.org

■ Wildlife West Nature Park. A wildlife preserve

and “enhanced” zoo, near I-40 at 87 N. Frontage Road. Get information on hours, directions, falcon shows, special events and music festivals at website. (877) 981-9453, (505) 281-7655. www.wildlifewest.org

Sporting Fun

■ Founders Ranch. Cowboy Action Shooting Range,

not far from I-40. Get directions at website. Site of Single Action Shooting Society’s events. (505) 286-4566, (714) 694-1800. www.sassnet.com, www.foundersranch.com

ELEPHANT BUTTE SW

www.elephantbuttechamberofcommerce.com Also see listing for Truth or Consequences on Page 167.

Outdoor Getaways ✰ Elephant Butte Lake State Park. 40,000 acres, visitor center, campsites, water sports, nature trails. Fishing for bass, walleye, catfish, crappie, white/black bass, stripers. (575) 744-5421. www.nmparks.com ■ North Monticello Point. Pelicans, bald eagles, waterfowl. I-25 to exit 89, turn at Monticello RV Park, then left back to point. (575) 744-5421. ■ Winding Roadside Picnic Grounds. Oasis-like picnic area overlooks Elephant Butte Lake. (575) 744-5421.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Year-round. Rio Grande Sailing Club Races.

Held monthly. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (866) 834-3697. www.rgsc.org ◆ March-Aug. American Bass Fishing Tournaments. Held monthly. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (575) 744-5944. www.nmparks.com ◆ March 19. Elephant Butte Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament. Sierra del Rio Golf Course. (575) 744-4708. www.elephantbuttechamberofcommerce.com ◆ May-Sept. Southwest Drag Boat Association. Held monthly. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (505) 740-0004. www.swdba.net ◆ May 28. Fly Freedom’s Flag Parade. Decorated boat parade. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (575) 269-0469. www.nmparks.com ◆ June 11. Elephant Butte Chili Challenge CookOff. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (575) 894-3264, (575) 744-5292. www.nmparks.com ◆ June 18-19. Junior Open Fishing Tournament. Kids fishing tournament. (575) 740-0265, (575) 744-0308, (575) 538-8345. ◆ July 2. Fourth of July Fireworks Display. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (575) 744-5923, (575) 744-5421. www.nmparks.com

◆ July 25. Dam It Man Triathlon. (575) 744-0055.

www.damitmantriathlon.com ◆ Sept. 10. C.A.S.T. for Kids Fishing Tournament. Boating, fishing trip for disabled and disadvantaged children. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (575) 744-5923, (575) 744-5998. www.castforkids.org ◆ Sept. 10-11. Elephant Butte Balloon Regatta. Hot-air balloon ascension and splash-n-dash. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (505) 307-4142. www.ebbr.org ◆ Sept. 10-11. Elephant Butte Celebration. Live music, arts & crafts, food booths, parade, boat and car show, and Casino Night. (575) 744-4892. www.cityofelephantbutte.com ◆ Sept. 25. Elephant Man Triathlon. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (575) 744-0055. www.elephantmantriathlon.com ◆ Oct. 1. Desert Diamond Casino Night. Elephant Butte Inn and Ivory Spa. (575) 744-4708. www.elephantbuttechamberofcommerce.com ◆ Dec. 10. Luminaria Beach Walk and Floating Lights Parade. Parade of lighted boats, camping. City of Elephant Butte and Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (575) 744-4708. www.elephantbuttechamberofcommerce.com

ESPAÑOLA NC

www.espanolanmchamber.com

Attractions ■ Black Mesa Winery. 12 miles northeast of

Española, 27 miles south of Taos in Velarde off N.M. 68. (800) 852-6372, (505) 852-2820. www.blackmesawinery.com ■ Embudo Station Restaurant. Microbrewery, historic narrow-gauge train station. Rafting. 25 miles south of Taos on N.M. 68. (800) 852-4707, (505) 852-4707. www.embudostation.com ■ Los Luceros Winery. Open for sales by appt. only. 2nd strawbale winery built in U.S., next to historic Los Luceros property. 10 miles north of Española; N.M. 68 north, left onto C.R. 0048, then left at stop sign at dead end 7/10 mile, follow winery signs on right. (505) 753-7925.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Bond House Museum. Restored historic home

of Bond family. Contemporary art, historic memorabilia and photos of Española Valley, natl. traveling documentary exhibits. Houses San Gabriel Historical Society. (505) 747-8535. www.plazadeespanol.com ■ Historic Holy Cross Catholic Church. Built in 1733, Spanish colonial religious artifacts. In Santa Cruz, 2 miles east on N.M. 76. Open by appointment. (505) 753-3345.

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  125


NC

■ Mission & Convento.

Replica of Juan de Oñate’s NW NE first church, built in 1598, C including park. Plaza de Española. SW SE ■ Oñate Monument & Visitors Center. Promotes history, knowledge of El Camino Real and first official Spanish settlement. Promotes Hispanic, Pueblo heritage of Española Valley and Río Arriba County. Larger-than-life bronze statue of Juan de Oñate by sculptor Sonny Rivera. Open Mon.Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. In Alcalde, 7 miles north on N.M. 68. (505) 852-4639.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Known World Guides. Rafting, kayaking, mountain

biking, hiking, rock climbing. P.O. Box 428, Velarde, 87582. (800) 983-7756. www.knownworldguides.com ■ Santa Fe National Forest Española Ranger District. Hiking, camping, hunting, fishing. 1710 N. Riverside Dr., P.O. Box 3307, 87533. (505) 753-7331. ■ Ohkay Owingeh RV Park & Fishing Lakes. 2 bass and trout lakes, fishing derbies. Ohkay Owingeh, just north of town off N.M. 68. (505) 753-5067. ■ Santa Cruz Lake National Recreation Area. Stocked fishing, RV sites, facilities, picnicking, camping. Take N.M. 503 east off U.S. 285, drive about 14 miles. (505) 927-3314. www.sangres.com/newmexico/blm/santacruzlake.htm ✰ The Wildlife Center. Wildlife rehabilitation/education destination, just south of Española. 25 raptors and mammals, conservation education. Open Sept.-May. on Sat. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and June-Aug. on Wed.-Sat 10 a.m.3 p.m. in La Puebla, just NE of intersection of U.S. 84/285, C.R. 88. (505) 753-9505. www.thewildlifecenter.org

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Cutting Hall. Theater, films, concerts. Open to pub-

lic. Northern N.M. College at El Rito. Call for schedule. (505) 581-4115. www.nnmc.edu ■ Nick L. Salazar Center for the Arts. Northern N.M. College at Española. Call for schedule. (505) 747-2295. www.nnmc.edu

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ April 9-10. Española Valley Student Art Show.

(505) 351-0954. Chimayó Museum. www.chimayomuseum.org. ■ Mid-June-Oct. Española Farmers Market. Mondays, 10 a.m. to dusk. 1027 N. Railroad Ave., near Fairview. (505) 685-4842. ◆ July 8-10. Eight Northern Pueblos Arts & Crafts Show. Ohkay Owingeh. (505) 747-1593. ◆ July 8-10. Española Fiesta. Plaza de Española. (505) 753-2831. ◆ July 8-10. Eight Northern Pueblos Arts & Crafts Show. Ohkay Owingeh. (505) 747-1593. ◆ Aug. TBA. Río Arriba Couny Fair. (505) 685-4523. ◆ Oct. TBA. Española Valley Arts & Wine Festival. (505) 753-2831.

126  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

◆ Oct. 1-2. El Rito Studio Tour. (505) 581-4780. ◆ Dec. 3. Española Valley Christmas on the Plaza.

(505) 929-3502.

EUNICE SE

■ Four Corners Vietnam Memorial Wall. Inscrip-

tions on black granite honor dead or missing; inscriptions on brick honor living vets. On N. Butler at Carlton St. (800) 448-1240.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Animas Parklands/Berg Park. 5-mile park along

www.farmingtonnm.org www.gofarmington.com www.fmtn.org

Animas River downtown. Riverside Nature Center & Wetlands, Harvest Grove Farm & Orchards off Browning Pkwy. (800) 448-1240. ■ Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness. Petrified logs and other fossils scattered among colorful landforms and geological features. 37 miles south on N.M. 321, 2 miles down gravel road #7297. (505) 599-8900. www.nm.blm.gov ■ Morgan Lake. Windsurfing, picnicking, fishing for bass, crappie, catfish. Open year-round. No swimming. Special permit required. Navajo Nation. 15 miles west on U.S. 64. (928) 871-6451. ✰ Riverside Nature Center. Trails on river, handson exhibits, xeriscape demo garden, wildlife wetlands, guided hikes by appt. Public walks, activities every Sat. (505) 599-1422. www.farmingtonmuseum.org

Attractions

Performing Arts/Galleries

Outdoor Getaways ■ Eunice Lake. Fishing, camping facilities.

(575) 394-2755.

Sporting Fun ■ Cardinal Motor Speedway. IMCA car racing.

April-Sept., Sat. 8 p.m. (575) 631-7058, (575) 394-3203. www.cardinalmotorspeedway.com

FARMINGTON NW

■ B-Square Ranch. 12,000-acre ranch, wildlife pre-

serve, experimental farm. Free tours, by appointment, of two museums featuring wildlife, farm machinery collections, electricity-generated equipment. 3901 Bloomfield Hwy. (505) 325-4275. www.bolackmuseum.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Bolack Electrical/Mechanical Museum.

Featuring 1962 New Mexico Gov. Tommy Bolack’s collection of items depicting the early development of electical power, telephone, radio, communications systems, oil-field equipment and the farming industry. 3901 Bloomfield Highway. Tours by appointment. (505) 325-4275. www.bolackmuseum.com ■ Bolack Museum of Fish and Wildlife. Wildlife reserve and museum established by 1962 Gov. Tommy Bolack. 3901 Bloomfield Hwy. Tours by appointment. (505) 325-4275. www.bolackmuseum.com ■ Chaco Culture National Historical Park. (See Crownpoint listings.) (505) 786-7014. www.nps.gov/chcu ✰ E-3 Children’s Museum & Science Center. Interactive exhibits. Open Tues.-Sat. noon-5 p.m. 302 N. Orchard. (505) 599-1425. www.farmingtonmuseum.org ■ Farmington Museum & Visitors Center at Gateway Park. Four Corners history, San Juan Basin oil and gas exhibits, juried art. Free. Visitor center with regional tourism information. Open Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. 3041 E. Main. (505) 599-1174. www.farmingtonmuseum.org ■ Four Corners Region Monument. The reopened monument, with a new plaza and interpretive panels, celebrates the intersection of four states: New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado. www.navajonationparks.org/htm/fourcorners.htm

■ Civic Center Foundation for the Performing

Arts. Call for schedule. 200 W. Arrington. (877) 599-3331, (505) 599-1145. Ticket info: (505) 599-1148. www.farmingtonnm.org ■ Sandstone Productions/Lions Wilderness Park Amphitheater. Season: June-Aug. Call for schedule. 5800 College Blvd. (505) 327-9336, (877) 599-3331. www.fmtn.org/sandstone/ ■ San Juan Symphony. Call for schedule. 302 E. Main St. (505) 564-3600. www.sanjuansymphony.org ■ Silhouette Performing Arts Series. Call for schedule, locations. (505) 566-3430. www.sanjuancollege.edu ■ Theater Ensemble Arts (TEA): Farmington Community Theater. Call for schedule. 4601 College Blvd., P.O. Box 5425, 87499. (505) 327-0076. www.tearts.org ■ Totah Theater. Downtown theater newly renovated. Call for schedule. 315 W. Main St. (505) 327-4145. www.thetotah.com

Sporting Fun ✰ Mountain Biking/Walking Trails. Various locations by Foothills Dr., Kinsey’s Ridge, San Juan College, N.M. 170, Piñon Mesa, Road Apple Trail. Maps available. (800) 448-1240. www.farmingtonnm.org ■ Outdoor Program at San Juan College. Yearround adventure trips, indoor climbing wall, sports equipment rentals. 4601 College Blvd. (505) 566-3487; rentals: (505) 566-3221. www.sanjuancollege.edu ■ San Juan River/Quality Waters Fishing. Worldclass trout fishing on San Juan River at the base of Navajo Dam. Catch and Release Waters. (800) 448-1240.

www.newmexico.org


CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ May 27-29. Riverfest. Music, fine arts, food, 10k

and 5k walk and run, hiking, river rafting. Animas Park. (800) 448-1240, (505) 599-1140. www.riverreachfoundation.com ◆ June 4. XTERRA Four Corners. Outdoor athletic challenge. (800) 448-1240. www.xterrafourcorners.farmingtonnm.org ◆ Mid-June-early Aug. Outdoor Summer Theatre. Lions Wilderness Park. (800) 448-1240. ◆ July 1-4. Freedom Days. Fireworks, parade, auction and triathlon. (800) 448-1240. www.farmington.org ◆ Aug. 5-12. Connie Mack World Series. Rickett’s Park. (800) 448-1240, (505) 320-0496. www.fmtn.org ◆ Aug. 8-13. San Juan County Fair. Largest county fair in New Mexico. McGee Park. (505) 325-5415, (800) 448-1240. ◆ Sept. 3-4. Totah Festival Indian Market & Powwow. Juried art show featuring more than 100 artists. Civic Center. (800) 448-1240. www.farmingtonnm.org ◆ Oct. 6-9. Northern Navajo Nation Shiprock Fair. 100th year. Parade, rodeo, arts & crafts, Powwow , traditional singing and dancing. Shiprock Fairgrounds. (800) 448-1240, (928) 656-3280. shiprocknavajofair.org ◆ Oct. 14-15. Four Corners Storytelling Festival. Berg Park and Totah Theater. (505) 599-1273, (800) 448-1240. www.infoway.org ◆ Dec. 2. Riverglo. Luminarias set the San Juan River glowing. Berg Park. (505) 326-7602, (800) 448-1240. ◆ Dec. 3. San Juan College Luminarias. (505) 566-3403. (800) 448-1240. ◆ Dec. 23. Navajo Nativity. Living Navajothemed nativity from 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. 2102 W. Main St. (505) 325-0255, (888) 325-0255. www.navajoministries.org

FOLSOM NE Museums and Historic Sites ■ Folsom Hotel. A rock building, constructed in the

early 1890s to serve as the first mercantile store in Folsom. Grand Avenue and Wall Street. ■ Folsom Museum. Preserves the pioneering spirit of the region, including the discovery of Folsom Man. The museum is housed in the Doherty Mercantile Building, completed around 1896. Main Street. Summer Mon.Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m. (575) 278-2122. www.folsommuseum.org ■ Folsom Site. Archaeological discoveries at this site in 1925 proved the early arrival of humans in the Americas. Folsom Man, based on the spearheads and mastadon skeletons he left behind, dates back about 12,000 years. Dead Horse Gulch, 8 miles west of Folsom.

www.newmexico.org

Fred Balmer, of Folsom, enjoys riding his Texas Longhorn, Bob, along the Dry Cimarrón River, near Folsom Falls. PHOTO BY TIM KELLER.

FORT SUMNER SE

www.ftsumnerchamber.com

Museums and Historic Sites ✰ Billy the Kid Museum. Historic relics, Kid memorabilia. 1435 E. Sumner Ave. Hours vary. Call ahead. (575) 355-2380. www.billythekidmuseumfortsumner.com ■ Fort Sumner State Monument. Site of Navajo and Apache confinement in 1860s. 3 miles east of Ft. Sumner via U.S. 60, 3 miles south on Billy the Kid Rd. (575) 355-2573. www.nmmonuments.org ✰ Old Fort Sumner Museum. Historical items from 1800s, Billy the Kid memorabilia. Adjacent to Billy the Kid’s grave. 6 miles southeast of Ft. Sumner via U.S. 60 and Billy the Kid Rd., off U.S. 60/84. (575) 355-2942.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ June 8-11. Old Fort Days. Arts and crafts, food

vendors. (575) 355-2573. www.ftsumnerchamber.com Special events June 10-11 at Ft. Sumner State Monument. www.nmmonuments.org. ◆ June 11. Billy the Kid Tombstone Race. (575) 355-7705. www.ftsumnerchamber.com ◆ June 17-19. The Long Run. Motorcyle ride from Kirtland to Bosque Memorial in commemoration of the Long Walk, cookout, testimonials. (575) 355-2573. www.nmmonuments.org ◆ Dec. 10. Winterfest Arts & Crafts Show. Visit from Santa. (575) 355-7705. www.ftsumnerchamber.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Bosque Redondo Lake. Fishing, camping. 5 miles

NE via U.S. 60/84 and Real Wind Dr. (575) 355-7705. ■ Sumner Lake State Park. Fishing, water sports, campsites. 16 miles northwest of Ft. Sumner via U.S. 84 and N.M. 203. (575) 355-2541. www.nmparks.com

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  127


FORT WINGATE NW

Museums and Historic Sites

Outdoor Getaways

commemorate Code Talkers’ WWII contributions. 103 W. Historic Rt. 66 in Gallup/ McKinley Chamber of Commerce Building. (505) 722-2228. ■ Red Rock Museum. Southwest Indian cultures in Gallup area. Katsinas, pottery, rugs, silver/turquoise jewelry. 4.5 miles east of Gallup in Red Rock State Park. (505) 863-1337. ■ Rex Museum. Operated by Gallup Historical Society. Railroad/mining history in Gallup area. 300 W. Historic Rt. 66. (505) 863-1363. ■ Veterans Memorial. In the Courthouse Square located on W. Hill Ave. (505) 863-1216. ■ Murals of Gallup. Murals on buildings throughout the downtown area. (505) 863-1216.

■ Navajo Code Talkers Room. Photos, memorabilia

■ McGaffey Lake. Fishing, picnicking in Zuni Moun-

tains. 11 miles southeast on N.M. 400. (505) 287-8833.

GALISTEO NC Sporting Fun ■ Galarosa Stables. Horseback rides. Between Albu-

querque and Santa Fe. By appt. (505) 466-4654 or (505) 670-2467. www.galarosastables.com ■ Linda Vista Stables. Trail rides, lessons in historic Galisteo area. By appt. (505) 466-8930. E-mail: lindavopino@yahoo.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Bandera Crater/Ice Caves. 86.95 miles east of

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Mid Oct. Galisteo Studio Tour. (505) 466-2121.

www.galisteostudiotour.org

GALLUP NW

www.gallupnm.org www.ci.gallup.nm.us

Gallup. (See Grants listings.) 1-888-ICECAVE. www.icecaves.com ■ Canyon de Chelly National Monument. 98 miles from Gallup. Box 588, Chinle, Ariz. 86503. (928) 674-5500. www.nps.gov/cach ■ Chaco Culture National Historical Park. 96 miles from Gallup. (See Crownpoint listings.) (505) 786-7014. www.nps.gov/chcu ■ El Morro National Monument. 56 miles south of Gallup. (See Ramah listings.) (505) 783-4226. www.nps.gov/elmo

Gallup’s 1937

El Rancho Hotel Western Movie Gallery, Gift Shop, Restaurant—49er Lounge, John Wayne Burgers—Fajitas—Margaritas. Hike Canyon Dechilly and Bike our Mesa Trails.

(505) 863-9311 www.elranchohotel.com Gallup, Exit 22

128  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

■ McGaffey Lake/Look Out Tower. 23 miles east of

Gallup on I-40. Scenic views, campsites, lookout tower. ■ Petrified Forest National Park and Painted Desert. 73 miles from Gallup in northeastern Ariz. (928) 524-6228. www.nps.gov/pefo ■ Ramah. 43 miles south of Gallup. (See Ramah listings.) ■ Red Rock Park. Heritage Canyon display, visitor center, campsites. 4.5 miles east of Gallup via I-40 and N.M. 566. (505) 722-3839. www.ci.gallup.nm.us/rrp/00182_redrock.html ■ Zuni Pueblo. 38 miles south of Gallup. (505) 782-7000. (See Native New Mexico listings.) www.ashiwi.org

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Gallup Community Concerts Assoc. (505) 863-3075. ■ Gallup Cultural Center. Gallery of the Masters,

Kiva Cinema, Storyteller Museum, Angela’s Café con Leche, Storyteller Bookstore, Gift Shop. Southwest Indian Foundation project. 201 E. Historic Rt. 66 in Santa Fe Depot. (505) 863-4131, (505) 722-3730. www.southwestindian.com ■ Gallup Performing Arts Center. 1500 S. Second St., Ste. 4. (505) 722-2258. ■ WPA/New Deal Art Exhibits. Octavia Fellin Public Library. At Hill Ave./2nd St. (505) 863-1291.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Crownpoint Rug Auction.

Held monthly, every second Friday. (505) 786-7386. www.crownpointrugauction.com ◆ April 9. Dawn 'til Dusk 12 Hour Mountain Bike Race. (505) 722-2228. www.dawntilduskrace.net ◆ May TBA. Run for the Wall. (505) 722-2228. ◆ May 5. Cinco de Mayo Celebration. (505) 863-6851. ◆ May 20-22. Route 66 Freedom Ride & Flight. (800) 380-4989, (505) 726-2040. ◆ May 30. Memorial Day Parade. (505) 722-2228. ◆ May 30-Sept. 5. Nightly Indian Dances. (505) 879-6174. ◆ June TBA. Downtown Arts Crawl. (505) 722-2228. ◆ June 3-5. USTRC Team Roping Championship. (505) 722-2228. ◆ June 11. Gallup Triathlon. (505) 722-2228. www.galluptriathlon.com ◆ June 15-18. Lions Club Rodeo. (505) 722-2228. ◆ June 18. 24 Hours in the Enchanted Forest. 24-hour mountain bike race. (505) 722-2228. www.24hitef.com ◆ June 24-25. Relay for Life. Sponsored by the American Cancer Society. (505) 863-3075. ◆ July 8-9. Wild Thing Bull Riding Championship (505) 722-3839. ◆ Aug.10-14. Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial. (505) 863-3896. www.theceremonial.com

www.newmexico.org


◆ Sept. 24-25. Squash

NC NW

NE C

SW

SE

Blossom Classic. Mountain bike race, 5-k run, half marathon. (800) 380-4989. (505) 722-9121. www.squashblossomclassic.com ◆ Dec. 2-4. Red Rock Balloon Rally. (800) 380-4989, (505) 726-2040.

GLENWOOD SW Museums and Historic Sites ■ Alma. Ghost town. 7 miles north of Glenwood

via U.S. 180. ■ Clairmont. Ghost town. 19 miles northeast of Glenwood off U.S. 180 via F.R. 119. By appt. only. (575) 533-6922. ■ Mogollon. Mining/ghost town. 13 miles northeast of Glenwood via U.S. 180 and N.M. 159. ■ Silver Creek Inn. Historic building, now B&B, art gallery in Mogollon. (866) 276-4882. www.silvercreekinn.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ The Catwalk. Steep trail over suspended bridges

through Whitewater Canyon, handicapped accessible. 5 miles east of Glenwood via N.M. 174. (575) 539-2481. ■ Gila National Forest Glenwood Ranger District. Just south of Glenwood off U.S. 180. P.O. Box 8, 88039. (575) 539-2481. ■ Glenwood State Trout Hatchery. Fishing pond, picnicking. Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep nearby. On Catwalk Rd., P.O. Box 67, 88039. (575) 539-2461. ■ Glenwood to Reserve. Scenic drive on U.S. 180 to N.M. 159 to F.R. 28 to 141. 4,700 ft. to 9,000 ft. Beautiful in fall. Open May-Oct. ■ Pueblo Park to Luna Mountain. Scenic drive on U.S. 180 to F.R. 232 to F.R. 209 & back to U.S. 180, 6 miles south of Luna. 4x4 recommended. ■ Snow Lake. 72-acre lake in Gila Natl. Forest. Fishing, handicap access ramp, camping nearby. 47 miles northeast of Glenwood off N.M. 159. Possible detour through Reserve. ■ Sundial Springs. Hot springs, pools by the hour, RV park, camping facilities. Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep in area. Reservations: (575) 539-2712. www.sundialsprings.com

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Local Theater and Music. Performances sponsored

by Glenwood Women’s Club. (575) 539-2646.

Sporting Fun ■ Glenwood-Catron County Park & Arena. ■ Mogollon Mountain Gun Club. Gun Range.

www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  129


GRANTS NW www.grants.org

Attractions ■ Northwest N.M. Visitor Center. Information,

exhibits, maps, books, videos, programs. South of I-40, exit 85, 1900 E. Santa Fe Ave. (505) 876-2783.

Museums and Historic Sites ✰ N.M. Mining Museum. Indian artifacts, geology exhibits, simulated uranium mine. 100 N. Iron Ave. (800) 748-2142, (505) 287-4802. www.grants.org

Natural Wonders ✰ Bandera Crater/Ice Caves. 800-ft. volcanic cone, hiking trail along rim. System of volcanic trenches, caves, collapses. 25 miles southwest of Grants off N.M. 53. (888) 423-2283. www.icecaves.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Bluewater Lake State Park. Trout fishing,

camping, boating, wildlife viewing. The reservoir is in a valley carved in shale and limestone, 28 miles west of Grants via I-40 and N.M. 412.(505) 876-2391. www.nmparks.com ■ Cíbola National Forest. Mt. Taylor Ranger District, 1800 Lobo Canyon Rd., Grants. (505) 287-8833. www.fs.fed.us/r3/cibola ■ El Malpais National Monument. Preserves 114,000 acres of volcanic terrain, different-aged lava flows, cinder cones, pressure ridges, other volcanic features. Wilderness camping, hiking. South of Grants via I-40 and either N.M. 117 or N.M. 53. NPS center 23 miles south of Grants via N.M. 53, (505) 783-4774. NWNM Visitor Center in Grants provides NPS information, (505) 876-2783. Call for weather conditions. www.nps.gov/elmo ■ Mount Taylor. 11,300 feet. Sacred to Navajos. Wildlife, hiking, camping, hunting, sightseeing. Lobo Canyon Campground (day use), Coal Mine Campground (overnight). 12 miles northwest of Grants on N.M. 547. (505) 287-8833. www.fs.fed.us/r3/cibola ■ Zuni Mountain Railroad Interpretive Tour. Self-guided. Lobo Canyon Rd., (505) 287-8833. www.fs.fed.us/r3/cibola

Performing Arts/Galleries

◆ Feb. 19. Mt. Taylor Winter Quadrathlon.

22-mile race. Bike, run, ski, snowshoe. (800) 748-2142. www.mttaylorquad.org ◆ April 23. Easter Egg Hunt. (505) 285-3573. ◆ May 6-8. La Fiesta de Colores. Hispanic art show, free entertainment. (800) 748-2142. ◆ May 21. Golf Tournament. (505) 287-4802. ◆ June 4. N.M. Game and Fish Annual Free Children's Fishing Clinic. (800) 748-2142. ◆ July 4. Grants Rodeo Wild West Days & Fourth of July Parade. (800) 748-2142. www.grants.org. ◆ July 15-17. Fire & Ice Bike Rally. (505) 285-3573. ◆ Sept. 2-5. Bi-County Fair. Fairgrounds, Prewitt. (505) 862-7891. ◆ Oct. 1-2, Oct. 8-9. Ancient Way Festival. (800) 748-2142. ◆ Oct. 8. Cíbola County Cultural Fair. (800) 748-2142. ◆ Nov. 18-20. Holiday Arts Market. (800) 748-2142. ◆ Dec. 2-4. Arts & Crafts Fair. (505) 285-3542.

HATCH SW

www.villageofhatch.org

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Sept. 3-5. Hatch Chile Festival. Food, entertainment,

chile-eating contests. Hatch Airport. (575) 267-5050, (575) 522-1232. www.hatchchilefest.com

HILLSBORO SW www.hillsboronm.org www.hillsboronm.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Hillsboro. Historic 1870s mining town. 16 miles

west of I-25 on N.M. 152. Eateries (including historic Barber Shop Café), shops, accommodations, galleries, courthouse ruins. (575) 895-5686. ■ Lake Valley. Ghost town. Staff available to answer questions Thurs.-Mon. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 17 miles south of Hillsboro on N.M. 27. (575) 895-5603.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Lake Valley Backcountry Byway. Begin at Caballo,

■ Grants Rodeo Grounds. P.O. Box 1088, 87020.

16 miles south of T or C on I-25, go 17 miles west on N.M. 152 to Hillsboro, 13 miles south on N.M. 27 to Lake Valley ghost town, continue on N.M. 27 to Nutt. Informational kiosks on N.M. 27 in Lake Valley area and N.M. 152, 8 miles east of Hillsboro. Open daily. Signs along route. (575) 525-4300. www.newmexico.org/western/explore/lake_valley.php

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

■ Cíbola Arts Council. Sponsors art shows, perfor-

mances. Proprietors of Double 6 Art Gallery. 1001 W. Santa Fe Ave. (505) 287-7311.

Sporting Fun

◆ Throughout the year. Cibola Arts Council. Various

exhibits. (505) 287-7311.

130  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

HOBBS SE

www.hobbschamber.org

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Commemorative Air Force Museum.

Reservations, tours: (575) 392-6046. ■ Hobbs Pool Discovery Oil Well Location. W. Stanolind Rd., across from Grimes on south side. ■ Thelma A. Webber Southwest Heritage Room. Display of Prehistoric Indians, early homestead, ranch/ oilfield artifacts, more than 40,000 books. College of the Southwest on N.M. 18 in Scarborourgh Memorial Library. (575) 392-6561 ext. 1066. ■ Western Heritage Museum & Lea County Cowboy Hall of Fame. Museum highlights cultural heritage of the Llano Estacado. It showcases the renowned Lea County Cowboy Hall of Fame. The county has more rodeo champion cowboys than any other region in the world. On the campus of New Mexico Junior College, 5317 Lovington Highway. (575) 392-6730. www.nmjc.edu/westernheritagemuseum/

Outdoor Getaways ■ Green Meadows Lake. Fishing, just northwest of

Hobbs via N.M. 18. ■ Harry McAdams Park. RV hookups, campsites, fishing. 4 miles north of Hobbs via N.M. 18. (575) 392-5845. ■ Maddox Lake. Fishing. 10 miles west of Hobbs via U.S. 62.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Hobbs Community Playhouse. 1700 N. Grimes.

(505) 393-0676. ■ Lea County Commission for the Arts. 122 W. Broadway. (575) 397-2787. www.lcca.us ■ Lea County Events Center. 5101 Lovington Hwy. (575) 391-2900. www.leacounty.net ■ N.M. Junior College Performing Arts. Music, theater departments. (575) 392-4510. ■ Southwest Symphony Orchestra. Call for schedule. (575) 738-1041. www.swsymphony.org

Sporting Fun ■ Hobbs Industrial Airpark. Shooting/archery ranges,

Natl. Soaring Society, jogging/walking trail, Ocotillo Golf Course, Harry McAdams Park. 4 miles north of Hobbs via N.M. 18. (505) 397-9205. ■ Hobbs Motorsports Park. N. A St. (575) 392-3724. www.hobbsmotorsportspark.com ■ Soaring Society of America. Sail plane and glider flying, hang gliding. Jack Gomez Blvd. (575) 392-1177. www.ssa.org ■ Zia Park Racetrack & Casino. Slots, horse racing. 3901 W. Millen Dr. (888) 942-7275, (575) 492-7000. www.blackgoldcasino.net

◆ Dec. 3. Christmas in the Foothills.

(575) 895-5797.

www.newmexico.org


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

NC NW

NE

◆ Throughout the Year.

Southwest Symphony Orchestra Concerts. SW SE (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org, ww.swsymphony.org ◆ Feb. 5-6. Hobbs Kennel Club Dog Show. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ March 39. Laura Bush Distinguished Lecture Series. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ March TBA. Fiesta de Salud. Hobbs Hispano Chamber. (575) 393-1030. ◆ May TBA. Cinco de Mayo Celebration. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ May TBA. Movies Under the Stars Kickoff. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ June TBA. 18 Meter National Contest. Soaring. (575) 392-1177. www.ssa.org. ◆ June TBA. Juneteenth Celebrations. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ July TBA. Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ July 4. City of Hobbs Fourth of July Celebration. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ July 29-Aug.6.. Lea County Fair and Rodeo. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Aug. TBA. Hobbs August Nites. Car show. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Sept. TBA. Fiestas de Septiembre. (575) 983-1030. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Sept. TBA. Staked Plains Roundup. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Sept. TBA. United Way Chili Fest. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Sept. -Dec. Zia Park Racetrack. Live horse racing. 3901 W. Millen Dr. (888) 942-7275, (575) 492-7000. www.blackgoldcasino.net ◆Oct. TBA. Halloween City Carnival. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Nov. 4-5. Santa Cruise Shopping Begins. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Dec. TBA. Light up the Night. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Dec. TBA. Mariachi Christmas. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org ◆ Dec. TBA. Hobbs Winter Wonderland. (575) 397-3202. www.hobbschamber.org C

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS www.newmexico.org

JAL SE

www.jalnm.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Making Their Mark. Metal sculpture, 50 feet long,

13 feet tall, depicts cattle branding on old Jal Ranch. Across from Jal Lake Park. (575) 395-2620. ■ The Trail Ahead. Metal sculpture, 21 feet tall, 400 feet across landscape, depicts cattle drive. 2½ miles north. (575) 395-2620. ■ Woolworth Community Library. Woolworth Room dedicated to Jal pioneer family and memorabilia display of Jal native Kathy Whitworth, Hall of Fame golfer who won 88 pro tournaments. (575) 395-3268. www.woolworth.org

Sporting Fun ✰ Jal Lake Park/Recreation Area. Fishing, camping, free RV parking, basketball, tennis, volleyball. (575) 395-2620.

JÉMEZ SPRINGS CE

✰ Valles Caldera National Preserve. 89,000 acres in the top of a dormant volcano. Large elk herd and sweeping views. Guided and unguided hiking, crosscountry skiing, van tours, mountain biking, fishing, hunting, photo excursions, stargazing, horseback riding, wagon and sleigh rides, workshops, facilities rentals and group tours. 5 miles south of Los Alamos on N.M. 501 to N.M. 4, then 16 miles west. Office: 18161 N.M. 4, Jémez Springs. (866) 382-5537. www.vallescaldera.gov

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ April 17. Earth Day at Jémez State Monument.

1.5-mile hike up Oak Canyon. Jémez Springs. (575) 829-3530. ◆ May 28-30. Jémez Red Rocks Arts and Crafts Show. (505) 834-7235. ◆ Aug. 7. Pueblo Independence Day at Jémez State Monument. Half-marathon, traditional dances, Native American flute music. (575) 829-3530. ◆ Dec. 10. Light Among the Ruins: Christmas at Jémez State Monument. Ruins decorated with luminarias, traditional flute music, performances, refreshments. (575) 829-3530.

www.jemezsprings.org

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Jémez State Monument. 14th-century pueblo,

17th-century mission ruins. Quarter mile north of Jémez Springs on N.M. 4. (800) 426-7850, (575) 829-3530. www.nmmonuments.org

KELLY SW Attractions ■ Kelly. Ghost town. Cemetery, foundation ruins,

rockhounding, picnicking, hiking, sightseeing. 3 miles southeast of Magdalena on F.R. 505. (575) 854-2401.

Natural Wonders ■ Soda Dam. 300-ft.-long natural dam formed from min-

eral deposits. 2 miles north of Jémez Springs via N.M. 4.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Battleship Rock/McCauley Hot Springs. Off

N.M. 4, about 5 miles north of Jémez Springs. (575) 829-3535. ■ Fenton Lake State Park. Fishing, picnicking, campsites. 19 miles northwest of Jémez Springs off N.M. 4 and N.M. 126. (575) 829-3630. ■ Giggling Springs. Hot springs pool next to Jémez River, park-like setting, shower, poolside drink service, gift shop. Open 11 a.m.-dark, closed Mon., Tues. P.O. Box 60, 87025. (575) 829-9175. www.gigglingsprings.com ■ Jémez Springs Bath House. 062 Jémez Springs Plaza. (575) 829-3303. www.jemezspringsbathhouse.com ■ Las Conchas Trail. Forested hiking along east fork of Jémez River. (575) 829-3535. ■ Seven Springs State Trout Hatchery. 22 miles northwest of Jémez Springs on N.M. 126. (575) 829-3740. ■ Spence Hot Springs. Off N.M. 4, about 7 miles north of Jémez Springs. (575) 829-3535.

KINGSTON SW

www.kingstonnewmexico.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Kingston. Historic mining town. 8 miles west

of Hillsboro via I-25 and N.M. 152. Bed & breakfast accommodations. ■ Historic Percha Bank Museum and Gallery. Historic museum of mining artifacts and antiques, gallery and gift shop. The Percha Bank building is the only fully intact structure in the town of Kingston, once the largest town in N.M. Open Fri.-Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appt. Free. (575) 895-5010. www.newmexico.org/experience/museums/ percha_bank.php

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  131


www.townofbernalillo.org www.sandovalcounty.org www.sandovalchamber.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Coronado State Monument. Kuaua Pueblo Ruins,

Outdoor Getaways ■ Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument.

2-mile trail, hiking only. Parking fee. Near Cochití Lake. Open daily, April 1-Oct. 31, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Nov. 1March 31, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. BLM Rio Puerco Field Office: (505) 761-8700. www.nm.blm.gov

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Sandoval County Historical

Society. Monthly art shows. (505) 867-5872. ◆ April 16. Nature’s First Green. Earth Day. Birding, kite flying, atlatl-throwing contest, preparation for planting, tours of the bosque. Coronado State Monument. (505) 867-5351.

(505) 897-0502. Bernalillo (505) 867-3311. ◆ Aug. 6-7. Sandoval County Sheriff’s Posse Roedo. Bernalillo. (505) 867-8433. ◆ Aug. 9-10. Las Fiestas de San Lorenzo. Bernalillo. (505) 867-3311. ◆ Sept. 3-5. New Mexico Wine Festival. (505) 867-3311. www.nmwine.com ◆ Oct. 22. Fiesta of Cultures. Celebration of Pueblo, Hispanic and Anglo traditions with emphasis on craft demonstrations, folk art and pre-industrial lifeways. Coronado State Monument. (505) 867-5351. ◆ Dec. 4. Christmas at Kuaua. Luminarias, lights, Santa’s Workshop, music, Pueblo dancing, Native American storytelling, bonfire, refreshments. Coronado State Monument. (505) 867-5351.

BERNARDO SW Outdoor Getaways ■ Ladd S. Gordon Waterfowl Complex. State

waterfowl area, crops grown for birds. Wildlife viewing, fishing/hunting in season. 1.4 miles north of Bernardo on N.M. 116. Bernardo Unit: 1,600 acres along Río Grande. La Joya Unit: 3,550 acres along Río Grande. Waterfowl hunting in season, wildlife viewing. 5 miles south of Bernardo on I-25. Bélen Unit: 250 acres in Jarales. Casa Colorada: 420 acres. (505) 864-9187.

www.newmexico.org

combined, BLM administered. Bisti: oddly sculpted shale/ sandstone formations, 37 miles south of Farmington via N.M. 371, 2 miles on dirt road to parking lot. De-Na-Zin: 38 miles south of Bloomfield via U.S. 550 and C.R. 7500. (505) 599-8900. www.nm.blm.gov ■ Carson National Forest Jicarilla Ranger Station. Camping, hunting. 664 E. Broadway. (505) 632-2956. www.fs.fed.us/r3/carson ■ Roy J. Retherford Wildlife Area. Riverside park, hiking, birding. 2 miles east of Bloomfield on U.S. 64. (505) 632-6300. ■ San Juan River Park. Picnic tables, river trail. S. 1st St. (505) 632-5600.

Sporting Fun ■ Chamblee Soccer Complex. Covered picnic areas,

soccer fields. S. 1st St. (505) 632-5600. ■ Keffalos Baseball Complex. S. 1st St. (505) 632-5600. ■ McGee Park. Indoor/outdoor riding arenas, raft launch to San Juan River. Between Bloomfield and Farmington on U.S. 64. (505) 325-5415. ■ Riverside Park. Fishing, raft launch to San Juan River, two grass soccer fields in season. S. 1st St. (505) 632-5600. ■ Salmon Park. Tennis, picnic tables, barbecue grills, sand volleyball. N. 5th St. (505) 632-5600.

BLOOMFIELD NW www.bloomfieldnm.info

Gotten Nibbles on other Rivers?

Attractions ■ SunRay Park and Casino. Live (seasonal) simulcast

horse racing, video poker, slots, restaurant, lounge. Between Bloomfield and Farmington on U.S. 64. (505) 566-1200. www.sunraygaming.com ■ Wines of the San Juan. Vineyard, winery and tasting room. 233 N.M. 511 in Turley, east of Bloomfield via U.S. 64. (505) 632-0879. www.winesofthesanjuan.com

Ju an

an River Bit e

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Salmon Ruins Museum, Research Library and

Heritage Park. Features 11th-century Ancestral Pueblo ruins, 19th- and early 20th-century pioneer homestead complex, replica habitations of Four Corners-region cultures. Related to sites in Chaco Canyon, Aztec Ruins. P.O. Box 125, 87413. Located 2 miles west via U.S. 64. (505) 632-2013. www.salmonruins.com ■ San Juan County Archaeological Research Center & Library at Salmon Ruins. Exhibits, artifacts, records from excavation of Salmon Ruins. 2 miles west on U.S. 64. (505) 632-2013. www.salmonruins.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS

■ Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness Areas. 42,000 acres

s!

museum, gallery with kiva paintings. Self-guided trail. Open daily, except Tues., 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Riverwalk, overlook of the Río Grande, 1 mile northwest of Bernalillo on U.S. 550 (N.M. 44) off I-25. Camping (505) 980-8256; monument (505) 867-5351. www.nmmonuments.org ■ DeLavy House/Sandoval County Historical Society Museum. More than 1,000 photographs from 1880 to 1980, village histories, genealogical information. Visits prearranged. Off U.S. 550 in Bernalillo between Santa Ana Star Casino and Coronado State Monument. (505) 867-2755. ■ El Zócalo (Abenicio Salazar Building). Built in 1922-23, former high school until 1965, declared historic site in 1980. ■ Old Convent Building. Built in 1875, donated by José Leandro Perea to Archbishop Lamy. Sisters of Loretto opened girls school in 1878. ■ Old Stone Jail. Used in 1800s, sits behind Sandoval County Courthouse. ■ Perea/Baca House. Last stage stop before Santa Fe on El Camino Real, later an emergency school operated by Sisters of Loretto in 1905. ■ Rose’s Pottery House. Pottery, Southwest artifacts. 925 Camino del Pueblo. (505) 867-2338. ■ Sandoval County Courthouse. Built in 1926 on site of former burned courthouse. ■ Santuario de San Lorenzo. Built in 1856, next to Our Lady of Sorrows Church. 301 Camino del Pueblo. Call (505) 867-5252 or go to Our Lady of Sorrows Church to gain entry. ■ Silva’s Saloon. Built in 1933, site of many Western movies, memorabilia collection. (505) 867-9976.

◆ Mid April-Nov. Growers Markets. Corrales

S

BERNALILLO CE

■ Angel Peak Scenic Area. 9 sites for tent camping

(developed picnic sites at 3), nature trail, spectacular scenery. 15 miles south of Bloomfield via U.S. 550 and C.R. 7175 (last 6 miles on gravel road along canyon rim). (505) 599-8900. www.nm.blm.gov

Experience one of Field and Stream Magazine’s Top Fishing Spots...20,000 Trout per Mile! Bloomfield Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Center 224 West Broadway Bloomfield, New Mexico 87413 505-632-0880 FAX 505-634-1431 1-800-461-1245 www.bloomfieldnm.info 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  115


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

NC NW

NE

◆ April 23. Bloomfield

Spring Egg-citement Egg C Hunt. Kids ages 3-10 years SW SE old. Salmon Park at 11:30 a.m. (505) 632-0880. ◆ May 13-15. Bloomfield Days. Entertainment, food, arts & crafts vendors, parade, four-wheeler trail ride and duck race. (505) 632-0880. ◆ June 17-19. San Juan River Balloon Rally. 8-12 balloons, including special shapes. Bloomfield soccer fields. (505) 632-0880. ◆ July 15 through fall. Growers Market. 4:30-6 p.m. Thursdays. 1st St. and Broadway St. (505) 632-0880. ◆ Aug. 13. Bloomfield Classic Golf Tournament. Hidden Valley Golf Course. (505) 632-0880. ◆ Aug. 27. BBQ Cook-Off and Live Music in the Park. Salmon Park, 501 N. 5th St. (505) 632-5600. ◆ Oct. 30. Bloomfield PAL Halloween Carnival. Concessions, games, cake walk. (505) 632-6311. ◆ Dec. 6. Christmas Parade. 6:30 p.m. (505) 632-0880. ◆ Dec. 6-Jan. 2. Celebration of Lights. Christmas Displays. Salmon Park, 501 N. 5th St. (505) 632-5600. ◆ Dec. 13. Deck the House. Holiday home and business displays. (505) 632-0880. ◆ Dec. 13. Santa in the Park. Salmon Park, 501 N. 5th St. (505) 632-0880.

CAPITÁN SE

www.villageofcapitan.com www.smokeybearpark.com

Attractions ✰ Smokey Bear Historical Park. Visitor center, Smokey’s grave. Open 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 7 days, closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s. 118 Smokey Bear Blvd. (505) 354-2748. www.smokeybearpark.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Billy the Kid Outlaw Gang. Promotes legend

of Billy/Pat Garrett. P.O. Box 1881, Capitán, 88316. (575) 354-2380. www.billythekidoutlawgang.com ■ Capitán Museum. Southwest family antiques, historic memorabilia. By appointment only. 416 5th St. Open May-Oct. Donations welcome. (575) 354-2962. ■ Smokey Bear Museum. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s. 102 W. Smokey Bear Blvd. Free. (575) 354-2298. www.villageofcapitan.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Fort Stanton Cave. 11 miles of spelunking trails.

Permit required. (575) 627-0272. www.blm.gov/nm

■ Fort Stanton Recreation Area. Hike on Río Bonito

Petroglyph National Recreation Trail. Other trails for mountain biking and horseback riding. (575) 627-0272. www.blm.gov/nm

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ May 6-7. Smokey Bear Days. Chain-saw carving,

Smokey Bear memorabilia, car show, street dance. (575) 354-2273. ◆ July 4. Smokey Bear Stampede Parade and Rodeo. Parade, rodeo, fun run, dance, fireworks. (575) 354-2273.

CAPULÍN NE Museums and Historic Sites ■ Folsom Museum. Displays of Folsom Man (circa

12,000 B.C.), replicas of Folsom spear points excavated in 1920s. Open 7 days a week, Memorial Day-Labor Day, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., weekends in May, Sept., rest of year by appt. In Folsom, 10 miles north of Capulín. P.O. Box 385, Folsom, 88419. (575) 278-2122 (summer), (575) 278-3616 (winter). www.folsommuseum.org

Outdoor Getaways ✰ Capulín Volcano National Monument. View 4 states from rim of dormant 1,000-foot-high symmetrical volcanic cinder cone. Wildlife, birds, wildflowers. 12 miles west of Des Moines via U.S. 64/87 and N.M. 325. (575) 278-2201. www.nps.gov/cavo

CARLSBAD SE

www.carlsbadchamber.com carlsbadmainstreetnm.com

Attractions ✰ Fiesta Drive-In. One of last drive-in movie facilities in state, 3 screens. 401 W. Fiesta. (575) 885-4126. www.fiestadrivein.com ✰ Living Desert Zoo and Gardens State Park. Features plants and animals typical of Chihuahuan Desert landscape along a 1.3-mile trail. Only zoo in U.S. to house pure endangered Bolson tortoises, a painting black bear. In Carlsbad off U.S. 285. (575) 887-5516. www.nmparks.com ■ Pecos River Flume. 100-year-old aqueduct, once world’s largest concrete structure. Ripley’s Believe It or Not bills it “The River That Crosses Itself.” Natl. landmark still in use. Corner of Calloway/Westridge. (575) 887-6516.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Carlsbad Museum/Art Center. Art, archaeology,

A display features a replica of the popular symbol at Smokey Bear State Park in Capitán.

local history. 418 W. Fox St. (575) 887-0276. ■ Discover Carlsbad Driving Tour. Begins at Canal/ Green streets, follow trailblazer signs. (575) 887-6516.

PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

116  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


The Big Room at Carlsbad Caverns National Park enchants visitors of all ages. ■ Eddy House. One of the first permanent houses.

(575) 887-6516. ■ Freedom Trail Memorial. Honors city’s Vietnam vets. (575) 887-6516.

Natural Wonders ✰ Carlsbad Caverns National Park. World Heritage Site, one of largest caves in the world. Walking, caving, elevators, tours. Dusk bat flights, May-mid-Oct. 27 miles south of Carlsbad on U.S. 62/180. (575) 785-2232. www.nps.gov/cave ■ Slaughter Canyon Cave. 1.25-mile guided tour, undeveloped steep hike. Bring flashlight, good hiking shoes, water. 30 miles south of Carlsbad. Fee. Call for reservations. (877) 444-6777, (575) 785-2232.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Brantley Lake State Park. 2,800-acre lake, fishing,

camping, picnicking. 12 miles north of Carlsbad on U.S. 285. (575) 457-2384. www.nmparks.com ✰ Carlsbad Recreation Area. 4 miles along Pecos River. Footbridges, picnicking, grills, playgrounds, swimming beach, boating, paddle/kayaks and catamaran flume tours. Green/Park Drive. (575) 887-6516. ■ Guadalupe Mountains National Park. 56 miles southwest, near Texas border. (915) 828-3251. www.carlsbadchamber.com, www.nps.gov/gumo ■ Lincoln National Forest Guadalupe Ranger District. In Queen, 50 miles southwest of Carlsbad on N.M. 137. Take U.S. 285 to N.M. 137, go south. (575) 885-4181. ■ Sitting Bull Falls. Within national forest. Picnicking. Head north of Carlsbad via U.S. 285, southwest on N.M. 137, then west on C.R. 276 to falls. (575) 885-4181.

www.newmexico.org

PHOTO BY K. RAMEY NEWELL.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Carlsbad Community Theater. 4709 National

Parks Hwy. (575) 887-3157.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ March 12. River Blitz. Help keep Carlsbad

beautiful. (575) 885-2408.

◆ April TBA. March for Parks. (575) 785-3124. ◆ April 14. Taste of Carlsbad. (575) 887-6516. ◆ May 5-8. Mescal Roast and Mountain Spirit

Dance. Bonfire with Mescalero Apache dancers in colorful ceremonial dress. Living Desert Zoo and Gardens State Park. (575) 887-5516. www.nmparks.com ◆ May 20-22. Shooting Shindig. Hosted by Seven Rivers Regulators with 10 stages and side matches. (575) 885-4157, (575) 885-9879. ◆ June TBA. AJRA Rodeo and Western Week. Parade, barbecue, carnival. Downtown Carlsbad/Eddy County Sheriff’s Posse Arena. (575) 200-9079. ◆ June TBA . Shake-n-on-the-Pecos Bull Riding. Sheriff’s Posse Arena. (575) 706-4338. ◆ June-Oct. Night Sky Watching. Carlsbad Caverns National Park. (575) 785-2232. ◆ June 4. Annual Car Show and Chili Cook-Off. Beach Band Shell. Sponsored by the Carlsbad Automotive Restoration Society. Car show: (575) 887-8853, cook-off: (575) 887-7563. ◆ Mid-June-mid Sept. Main Street Farmers Market. Saturday mornings. Courthouse lawn. (575) 628-3768. ◆ July TBA. Annual Bat Flight Breakfast. Thousands of bats fly back into the natural entrance in early morning. Carlsbad Caverns National Park. (575) 785-2232. www.nps.gov/cave/

◆ July TBA. Eddy County Fair. Eddy County Fair

Grounds. (575) 887-6595. ◆ July 2. Independence Day Fireworks Celebration. Beach Band Shell. (575) 887-6516. www.carlsbadchamber.com

◆ Sept. TBA. PRCA Rodeo. Sheriff’s Posse Arena.

(575) 200-9079. ◆ Mid-Oct.-Nov. McKittrick Canyon Fall Color Tour. Guadalupe Mountains National Park. (915) 828-3251. ◆ Nov. 25-26. Calico Christmas. Arts and crafts. Pecos River Village Conference Center. 711 Muscatel. (575) 887-6516. www.carlsbadchamber.com ◆ Nov. 26. Downtown Holiday Stroll. Downtown Carlsbad. Sponsored by the Carlsbad MainStreet Project. Shop downtown merchants for holiday gifts. (575) 628-3768. carlsbadmainstreetnm.com ◆ Nov. 26. Electric Light Parade. Starts downtown and ends at the beach. (575) 628-3768. carlsbadmainstreetnm.com ◆ Nov. 26-Dec. 31. Christmas on the Pecos. Holiday riverboat light tours depart nightly. Reservations accepted after Oct. 15. Sponsored by the Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce. Pecos River Village Conference Center. 711 Muscatel. (575) 887-6516 www.christmasonthepecos.com

CARRIZOZO SE

www.townofcarrizozo.org www.carrizozochamber.org

Attractions ■ Carrizozo Municipal Airport. P.O. Box 597,

Carrizozo, 88301. (575) 648-9996.

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  117


■ Carrizozo Visitor Center. Authentic RR caboose.

U.S. 54/8th St. (575) 648-2732. www.carrizozochamber.org ■ Carrizozo Golf Course at Valle del Sol. Newly rebuilt 9-hole golf course. Carts available. Snack bar, tennis court, fishing lake. 6634 U.S. 380. (575) 648-2770. ■ Carrizozo Municipal Swimming Pool. (575) 648-2937.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Carrizozo Heritage Museum. Historical exhibits,

■ White Mountain Wilderness Area. Hiking and

backpacking. Crest Trail No. 25. (575) 434-7200.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Music in the Garden. Intimate concerts by local

talent (June-Oct.). Sculpture garden at Gallery 408. 408 12th St. (575) 648-2598. www.gallery408.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Feb. 14. Women's Club Valentine's Day Bake

Sale. 908 11th St. (575) 354-0760. ◆ April 23-24. Artists of White Oaks Studio Tour. Paintings, ceramics, woven art. (575) 648-2985. www.whiteoaksnewmexico.com ◆ May-Sept. Carrizozo Music in the Parks. Third Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. (575) 648-2757. www.carrizozomusic.org ◆ June 4-5. Gold Rush Days. Gold panning, parade, re-enactment shootouts, chuck wagon, campfire grub. (806) 717-3777. www.whiteoaksnewmexico.com ◆ June 11-12. Carrizozo Cowboy Days. Rodeo, parade, vendors. (575) 648-2912. ◆ July 4. Star-Spangled Spectacular Fourth of July Celebration. Music, vendors, activities, fireworks. Valle del Sol Subdivision. (575) 648-2732. ◆ July 8-10. Art Loop. In open art studios displaying "Art Loop" flag. (575) 648-2598. ◆ Aug. 19-21. St. Rita's Fiesta. Walkathon, golf and basketball tournaments, music, food and vendors all weekend. (575) 648-2853. ◆ Sept. 5. Labor Day Street Fair & Parade. Music, vendors, games, birdhouse auction. McDonald Park on 12th St. (575) 648-2802. ◆ Oct. TBA. Woman’s Club Rummage Sale. 908 11th St. (575) 354-0760. ◆ Dec. 3. Woman's Club Christmas Hoedown. Food, vendors, more. (575) 354-0760 ◆ Dec. 23. Christmas Lighting Contest. (575) 648-2732. www.carrizozochamber.org ◆ Dec. 24. Annual Luminaria Display. Thousands of luminarias light town. (575) 648-2732. www.carrizozochamber.org

emphasizes railroad heritage, Lincoln County history. Affiliated with Lincoln County Historical Society. 103 12th St. (575) 648-1105. ■ Carrizozo Historic Walking Tours. Pamphlet available. (575) 648-2732. ■ Carrizozo Women’s Club. 1939 WPA building on state and national historic registries. 11th and D Ave. (575) 648-2219. ■ Gallery 408. Historic two-story building, once owned by Lane sisters who ran seamstress shop at turn of century. Local, natl. artists; artist-in-residence program; art workshops in painting, figure drawing, felting; outdoor sculpture garden; summer concerts (June-Oct.). 408 12th St. (575) 648-2598. www.gallery408.com ■ Gallery 401. Building dates to 1917. Sophisticated country collection of antiques from France, Sweden, Italy, Wales and Latin America. (575) 648-2762. ■ Miner’s Home and Toolshed Museum. Restored 1800s family home in White Oaks (see next listing) from gold-boom era. Photos, drawings, displays, selfguided tour. Tool shed displays antique mining tools. Museum and home open daily, May-Sept., and by appt. Gold Rush Day, first Sat. in June. HC 31, Box 40, Carrizozo, 88301. (575) 648-2363. ■ Historic White Oaks. Cedarvale Cemetery (state historic site, grave of first N.M. governor, W.C. McDonald). Old White Oaks schoolhouse museum, artist studios. 3 miles north of U.S. 54 to White Oaks turnoff (12 miles northeast of Carrizozo via U.S. 54 and N.M. 349). www.whiteoaksnewmexico.com ■ Paden Building. Now Roy’s Gift Shop and Gallery. Once a hospital clinic built by Dr. Melvin Paden. Natl. landmark, on state historic registry. 12th St. & U.S. 54. (575) 648-2921. ■ Rolland’s Drug Store Building. Listed on state historic registry. 12th St. (575) 648-2732, (575) 648-3007.

www.turquoisetrail.org

Outdoor Getaways

Museums and Historic Sites

✰ Valley of Fires Recreation Area. Extinct lava flows, group shelters, tent campsites, nature trails, handicappedaccessible trail and showers, full RV hookups, bookstore. 3 miles west of Carrizozo via U.S. 380. (575) 648-2241. ■ Three Rivers Petroglyph Park. 20,000 petroglyphs along a one-mile trail. Just 25 miles south of Carrizozo. County Road B-30 off U.S. 54. (575) 525-4300. ■ Lincoln National Forest Sacramento Mountains. Hiking, camping, fishing. 20 miles east of Carrizozo. (575) 434-7200.

118  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

CERRILLOS NC

■ Casa Grande Trading Post, Cerrillos Turquoise Min-

ing Museum, Petting Zoo. Gift shop, old photos, mining equipment, artifacts, dioramas. Open daily. 17 Waldo St. (505) 438-3008. www.casagrandetradingpost.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Cerrillos Hills State Park. Trails, self-guided hikes,

educational programs. P.O. Box 460, 87010. 37 Main St. (505) 474-0196, (888) NM-PARKS. www.cerrilloshills.org, www.nmparks.com

■ Ortiz Mountains Educational Preserve. 1,350-

acre mountain preserve maintained by the Santa Fe Botanical Garden. Docent-led hiking (April-October). Call to schedule a tour. (505) 471-9103. www.santafebotanicalgarden.org

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Tom Morin Studio. Sculpture, collages, reliefs from

wood, metal. Open year-round. (505) 474-3147. www.diamondthacienda.com/artiststudio/artiststudio.html

CHAMA NC

www.chamavalley.com

Attractions ✰ Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad. Historic narrow-gauge steam locomotive 64 miles from Chama to Antonito, Colo. Choose to ride in a parlor car, tourist or coach-class seats. Late May to mid-Oct. Depot in Chama, 500 Terrace. (888) 286-2737, (575) 756-2151. www.cumbrestoltec.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Foster Hotel (formerly Chama Hotel). Built in 1881

to support the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad’s entry into the area, this hotel was one of the first community buildings in Chama and the only one to survive several disastrous fires. Terrace Ave. and Fourth Street. (575) 756-2296.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Edward Sargent State Wildlife Area. 20,400-acre

elk habitat from Chama to Colo. border. Wildlife viewing with GAIN permit, official state elk herd, elk hunting by permit, trout fishing, cross-country skiing. North and adjacent to Chama off N.M. 17 and U.S. 64/84. (505) 222-4700. www.wildlife.state.nm.us ■ Río de los Pinos State Wildlife & Fishing Area. Fishing, camping, hunting. East of Chama. Go through Cumbres, Colo., on CO. 17, get on U.S. 285, turn south back into N.M., then turn west onto F.R. 284. ■ W.A. “Bill” Humphries State Wildlife Area. 9,000 acres. Elk habitat accessed on horseback or foot. Wildlife viewing, designated-area camping, elk hunting by permit. 10 miles west of Chama on U.S. 64/84, before junction to Dulce.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Missoula Children’s Theatre. Children’s art program,

yearly production at Chama Community Center. Call for date. (575) 756-2306.

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS www.newmexico.org


Sporting Fun ■ Lone Pine Outfitters. Hunting, trail rides, overnight

trips. Chama. (575) 756-2992. ■ Lodge at Chama. Hunting, fishing, winter play. Half-mile south off U.S. 84. (575) 756-2133. www.lodgeatchama.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Jan. 15-16. Chama Chile Ski Classic and Snow-

shoe Race. (575) 756-2306. www.chamaski.com ◆ Feb. 26-27. Sno Ball Rally in Chama. (575) 756-2306. ◆ April 16. Earth Day. Heron Lake State Park. (575) 588-7231. ◆ May 21. Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad Opening Day. (575) 756-2306. ◆ June 4. Chama Book Festival. (575) 756-2306. ◆ July 4. Chama Fireworks Display. (575) 756-2306. ◆ July 8-10. Osprey Festival. El Vado Lake, Heron Lake. (575) 756-2306. www.osprey.com ◆ Aug. 12-14. Chama Days. (575) 756-2306. ◆ Sept. 3. Chama Valley Studio Tour. (575) 756-1014, (575) 756-2306. www.chamavalleystudiotour.com ◆ Dec. 3. Christmas Festival. (575) 756-2306.

CHIMAYÓ NC

CHLORIDE SW

www.sierracounty.net

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Pioneer Store Museum and Silver Mining Ghost

Rancho de Chimayó

Restaurante

Town. View authentic 1880s furnishings, merchandise and records. The restored Monte Cristo Saloon features works by local artists. RV park, guest cabin, rest area, self-guided tour. Open 10 a.m. – 4 p.m daily. Go 40 miles west of T or C on I-25, take N.M. 52 to Winston and 2 miles southwest on the hard surface road. (575) 743-2736. www.pioneerstoremuseum.com.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Sept 10. Monte Cristo Gallery Bash. Chloride.

(575) 743-0190.

CIMARRÓN NE

www.cimarronnm.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Historic Old Town. Walk to 14 marked sites,

self-guiding brochure. Cimarrón. (575) 376-2417.

A Timeless Tradition!

Serving world renowned traditional and contemporary Native New Mexican cuisine since 1965 in an exceptional setting — Chimayó, New Mexico.

505-984-2100 or 505-351-4444 Located on Santa Fe County Rd. 98 on the scenic “High Rd. to Taos” ranchodechimayo.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Chimayó History Museum. On historic Plaza del

Cerro, dating to 1700. Area exhibits. Open Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. P.O. Box 727, 87522. (505) 351-0945. www.chimayomuseum.org ■ Santuario de Chimayó. Legendary shrine, built 1813-16, miraculous healing earth. Destination of statewide Good Friday pilgrimage. In village on C.R. 98. P.O. Box 235, 87522. (505) 351-4889. www.holychimayo.us

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ High Road Artists. Dozens of artists have studios

along the High Road to Taos. Weaving shops, pottery studios and galleries. (505) 689-2689, (866) 343-5381. www.highroadnewmexico.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Sept. 17-18, 24-25. The High Road Art Tour.

More than 70 artists and crafts persons open their homes and studios in this centuries-old region. High Road to Taos, N.M. 76 and N.M. 75. (866) 343-5381, (505) 689-2689. www.highroadnewmexico.com

www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  119


✰ Kit Carson Museum. Site of Lucien Maxwell and Kit Carson’s 1848 fortified C settlement in Rayado. SW SE Carson’s reconstructed home in Mexican hacienda style offers glimpse of 1850s settlement life. At Philmont Scout Ranch, 11 miles south of Cimarrón via N.M. 21. Costumed staffers offer tours daily, early June to mid-Aug. (575) 376-4621. ■ Old Mill Museum. Houses working mill parts, life-size figures of local history. 220 W. 17th St. (575) 376-2417. ■ Philmont Museum/Seton Memorial Library. Art, natural history exhibits of late author-naturalist and chief scout for Boy Scouts of America. At Philmont Scout Ranch. 4 miles west of Cimarrón via N.M. 21. Open daily, June-Aug., 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sept.-May, Mon.-Sat., 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (closes 4 p.m. Sat.). (575) 376-2281. ■ St. James Hotel. Began as saloon in 1873, hotel added to serve Santa Fe Trail traders, mountain men, desperadoes, some of whom reputedly haunt it today. Bullet holes in ceiling from gunfights. 617 S. Collison St. (575) 376-2664. ■ Villa Philmonte. Summer home of oilman Waite Phillips. Built in Spanish Mediterranean style 1926-27, original family furnishings. Tours available May-Sept. (575) 376-2281. NC

NW

NE

Natural Wonders ✰ Cimarrón Canyon State Park. Hike, fish in park’s 8-mile section of river through Cimarrón Canyon. known for towering granite cliffs. Three miles east of Eagle Nest along U.S. 64. (575) 377-6271. www.nmparks.com ■ Tooth of Time. Old Santa Fe Trail landmark, prominent rock formation on eastern slopes of Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Colin Neblett Wildlife Area. Largest state-run

wildlife area, 33,116 acres. Deer, elk, other animals, GAIN permit required for camping and hiking. Hunting in season. (575) 445-2311. www.wildlife.state.nm.us ■ Express UU Bar Ranch. 170,000 acres. Outdoor recreational opportunities and lodging. Big game, upland bird hunts and summer fishing. 11 miles south of Cimarrón. 1115 N.M. 21. (575) 376-2035. www.expressuubar.com ■ Elliott S. Barker Wildlife Area. 5,415 acres. Hiking, wildlife viewing, horseback riding with GAIN permit. Hunting. High-clearance vehicles recommended. 14 miles northwest of Cimarrón via N.M. 204. (575) 376-2417. ■ Stubblefield Lake. 10 miles northeast of Cimarrón via U.S. 64 north, near Maxwell. ■ Valle Vidal. 100,000-acre special management area. Prime elk habitat. Fishing, hiking, renovated campground, backcountry camping. In Carson Natl. Forest. 27 miles north of Cimarrón. (575) 586-0520.

120  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Sporting Fun

Performing Arts/Galleries

■ Maverick Club Arena. Rodeo grounds. West of N.M.

■ Northeast NM Arts, Crafts, Culture. Promotes

21, parallel to U.S. 64, enter from N.M. 21; also, enter next to baseball grounds off U.S. 64. (575) 376-2417.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ May 20-21. Run For The Wall. Veterans ceremony.

(575) 376-2417. www.cimarronnm.com ◆ June 4-5. Gallery Tour. (575) 376-2417. www.cimarronnm.com ◆ June 18-19. Santa Fe Trail Celebration. Santa Fe Trail re-enactment and wagon train. (575) 376-2417. www.cimarronnm.com ◆ July 3-4. Maverick Club Dance and Rodeo. Open rodeo on July 4. (575) 376-2001. www.cimarronmavericks.com ◆ July 23. Art Studio and Gallery Tour. (575) 376-2417. www.cimarronnm.com ◆ Sept. 9-11. Short Grass Music Festival. Three days of music. (575) 483-0121. ◆ Nov. 25-26. Holiday Tour. Refreshments and shopping in the historic village. (575) 376-2417. www.cimarronnm.com ◆ Dec.10. Christmas in Cimarrón. Holiday songs, refreshments, Santa visit. (575) 376-2417. www.cimarronnm.com

CLAYTON NE

www.claytonnewmexico.org www.nenewmexico.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Black Jack Ketchum’s Grave. Train robber hanged

in 1901 at Union County Courthouse in Clayton. Buried at Clayton Cemetery on Princeton Ave. (575) 374-9253. ■ Eklund Hotel, Dining Room/Saloon. Restored hotel built 1892-1902, Wild West photos. 15 Main St. ■ Herzstein Memorial Museum. Homestead memorabilia, art collection. Corner of 2nd/Walnut streets. (575) 374-2977. ■ McNees Crossing. Santa Fe Trail site named for trader killed there in 1828. Nearby SFT ruts. 25 miles north of Clayton via N.M. 402. (575) 374-9652, 988-6888. ■ WPA Museum. Clayton High School, 323 S. 5th St. (575) 374-9611.

Outdoor Getaways ✰ Clayton Lake State Park. Fishing & boating, trolling only (Mar.-Oct.), picnicking, hiking, camping, dinosaur tracks. 12 miles northeast of Clayton in Seneca via N.M. 370. (888) 667-2757, (575) 374-8808. ■ Dry Cimarrón Scenic Drive. Take N.M. 406 north to N.M. 456, 40 miles north of Clayton. (575) 374-9253. ■ Hunting/fishing information. (575) 445-2311. ■ Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands. Grasslands for outdoor recreation, range, watershed, fish, wildlife. Santa Fe Trail hiking, 2 miles of SFT ruts. 15 miles south of Clayton via N.M. 402 or east via U.S. 87. Rita Blanca is 17 miles east of Clayton via U.S. 56/64. (575) 374-9652. www.fs.fed.us/r3/cibola/

NE N.M. through website with events calendar, photo gallery, community forum, maps, community links. www.nenewmexico.com

Sporting Fun ■ Clayton Municipal Golf Course. 9 holes. Water St.

(575) 374-9253. ■ Union County Fairgrounds. Arena, racetrack, horse stalls, livestock pens. W. Van Buren St. (575) 374-9361.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ April TBA. Old Western Dance. Competition

and public dance. (575) 374-3393. ◆ April 27. Union County Health Fair. (575) 374-9361. ◆ June TBA. Clayton Lake Trout Derby. (800) 390 7858, (575) 374-9253. www.claytonnewmexico.org ◆ July 3. Free Street Dance. Call to confirm times/ date. Main St. (800) 390-7858, (575) 374-9253. www.claytonnewmexico.org ◆ July 4. Parade, Barbecue and Fireworks. Downtown Clayton. (800) 390-7858, (575) 374-9253. www.claytonnewmexico.org ◆ July 3-4. Rabbit Ears Roundup Rodeo and Celebration. Call to confirm dates. (575) 374-9323. ◆ Aug. 10-13. Union County Fair. (575) 374-9361. unionextension.nmsu.edu ◆ Oct. 1-2. Clayton Arts Festival. (575) 374-9810. ◆ Dec. TBA. Christmas Light Parade. Downtown Clayton. (800) 390-7858, (575) 374-9253. www.claytonnewmexico.org

CLOUDCROFT SE www.cloudcroft.net

Attractions ■ Burro Street Shopping. Souvenirs, gifts, cafes.

1 block N. of U.S. 82 in Old Town. ✰ National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak. For study of sun. Visitor center. 16 miles south of Cloudcroft along Sunspot Natl. Scenic Byway (N.M. 6563). (575) 434-7000. nsosp.nso.edu/pr/ ■ Sunspot National Scenic Byway (N.M. 6563). 16 miles between Cloudcroft & Sunspot.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Historic Sites Walking Tour. (575) 682-2932.

✰ Sacramento Mountains Historical Society Museum & Pioneer Village. Pioneer/RR artifacts, restored log cabin. 1000 U.S. 82. (575) 682-2932. ■ Trestle Recreation Area. Trail to 1899 trestle. (575) 682-2551.

www.newmexico.org


Outdoor Getaways ■ Bluff Springs. Many bird species, including turkeys,

hummingbirds. South of Cloudcroft. Take U.S. 82 to N.M. 130, turn on N.M. 6563 toward Sunspot, then 8 miles to F.R. 164, turn left, go 4 miles. (575) 682-2551. ■ Karr Canyon. Prime viewing for warblers, other birds. West of Cloudcroft. Take U.S. 82 east from Alamogordo, 8½ miles to High Rolls, another 5 miles on F.R. 63. (575) 682-2551. ■ Lincoln National Forest Sacramento Ranger District. Hiking, ATV trails, maps available at office. 61 Curlew Pl., along U.S. 82. (505) 682-2551.

Sporting Fun ■ Ski Cloudcroft. Ski area with summer activities.

2 miles east of Cloudcroft on U.S. 82. (575) 682-2333 www.skicloudcroft.net ✰ Triple M Snowplay. Tubing, snowmobiling. Take N.M. 130 south from Cloudcroft, turn on the Sunspot Hwy., watch for sign on left. P.O. Box 1215. (800) 766-7529, (575) 682-2205. www.triplemsnowplay.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Feb. 4-6. Murder Mystery Weekend at The

Lodge Resort. (800) 395-6343. www.TheLodgeResort.com ◆ March 4-6. Mardi Gras in the Clouds. Parade, food, entertainment under “The Big Tent.” (866) 874-4447. www.cloudcroft.net

www.newmexico.org

◆ April 23. Easter Egg Hunt. Zenith Park. 1001

James Canyon Hwy. (575) 682-2733. ◆ May 27-29. Melodrama at the Open Air Pavilion in Zenith Park. (575) 682-2733. www.cloudcrofttheatre.com ◆ June-Aug. Cloudcroft Weekly Art Workshops. (575) 513-7057. www.cloudcroftart.com ◆ June 4. National Trails Day. (575) 682-2733. www.nmrailstotrails.org ◆ June 18. Mountain Music Festival. Sacramento Mountains Historical Museum fundraiser. (575) 682-2932. www.cloudcroftmuseum.com ◆ June 18-19. High Rolls Cherry Festival. Arts, crafts, food. 56 Cottage Row. (575) 682-5591. www.hrmplions.com ◆ July 1-3, 8-9, 15-16. Melodrama at the Open Air Pavilion in Zenith Park. (575) 682-2733. www.cloudcrofttheatre.com ◆ July 9-10. Heritage Days. Living history, food, music. Sacramento Mountains Historical Museum. (575) 682-2932. www.cloudcroftmuseum.com ◆ July 9-10. July Jamboree. Arts and crafts fair in Zenith Park. (866) 874-4447. www.cloudcroft.net ◆ Sept. 3-5. Labor Day Fiesta. (866) 874-4447. www.cloudcroft.net ◆ Sept.16-17. Melodrama at the Open Air Pavilion in Zenith Park. (575) 682-2733. www.cloudcrofttheatre.com ◆ Sept. 17. Lumberjack Day. Chain saw, saw-and-axe competitions. (866) 874-4447. www.cloudcroft.net

◆ Oct. 1-2. Octoberfest Juried Art Show. Zenith

Park. (866) 874-4447. www.cloudcroft.net ◆ Oct. 15-16. High Rolls Apple Festival. 56 Cottage Row. (575) 682-5591. www.hrmplions.net ◆ Oct. 28-30. Halloween at The Lodge Resort. Haunted hotel. (800) 395-6343. www.TheLodgeResort.com ◆ Oct. 29. Great Pumpkin Race & Kids’ Costume Contest. (866) 874-4447. www.cloudcroft.net ◆ Nov. 4-6. Murder Mystery Weekend at The Lodge Resort. (800) 395-6343. www.TheLodgeResort.com ◆ Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Santa Land. Bonfire, Santa, Mrs. Claus, marshmallow roast, hot cocoa. 6 p.m. in Zenith Park. (866) 874-4447. www.cloudcroft.net ◆ Dec. 10. Pet Parade on Burro Ave. (575) 682-2733. www.cloudcroft.net

CLOVIS SE

www.clovisnm.org

Attractions ■ Cannon Air Force Base. 8 miles west of Clovis on

U.S. 60/84. (575) 784-4131. www.cannon.af.mil ■ Hillcrest Park Sunken Garden. Beautiful rose and flower garden, reserved for weddings/photo shoots. 10th/Sycamore. (575) 769-7870.

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  121


✰ Hillcrest Park/Zoo. State’s second-largest zoo. Tennis, basketball, volleyball, baseball, softball, soccer, picnicking, golf course. 10th/Sycamore. (575) 769-7873.

Museums and Historic Sites ✰ Clovis Depot Model Train Museum. RR history exhibits, model RR exhibits, historic building. 221 W. 1st St. (888) 762-0064, (575) 762-0066. www.clovisdepot.com ■ Eula Mae Edwards Museum/Art Gallery. Prehistoric artifacts, art shows. Clovis Community College campus, 417 Shepps Blvd. (575) 769-4956. ■ H.A. “Pappy” Thornton Homestead & Museum. In Ned Houk Park. Antique farm equipment, area farm dwellings used before 1926. Old Homestead Museum. Multi-use recreational trails. (575) 389-5146. ■ Norman & Vi Petty Rock & Roll Museum. 105 E. Grand Street. Museum pays homage to Norman & Vi Petty. Norman Petty recorded Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison and Fireballs. Rock ’n’ roll memorabilia. Exhibits. (800) 261-7656, (575) 763-3435. www.pettymuseum.com ■ Norman Petty Studio. Petty, Buddy Holly, Buddy Knox, Roy Orbison & Fireballs recorded here. Tours available by appt. only. 1313 W. 7th St. (575) 356-6422.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Ned Houk Park. Picnic facilities, playgrounds,

multi-use trail, fishing pond, museum, disc golf course. 10 miles north of Clovis on N.M. 209. (575) 389-5146.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Lyceum Theater. Restored vaudeville theater,

performances. 411 N. Main St. (575) 763-6085. ■ State Theater. Monthly shows by Bill Case Combo. Call for schedule. 504 Main St. (575) 762-9225.

Sporting Fun ■ Curry County Fairgrounds. Arena, stalls, barns,

exhibit & entertainment areas. 600 S. Norris. (575) 762-8827. www.currycountyfair.com ■ Guy Leeder Softball Complex. 5-field complex. (575) 769-7870. ■ Mounted Patrol Arena. Outdoor arena, 3,500 seats. 600 S. Norris. (575) 762-8827.

122  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ June 2-4. Pioneer Days. (575) 763-3435.

www.clovisnm.org ◆ July TBA. High Plains Jr. Rodeo Finals. (575) 763-3435. www.clovisnm.org ◆ July 4. Smoke on the Water Fourth of July Celebration. (575) 763-3435. www.clovisnm.org ◆ Sept. 8-11. Clovis Music Festival. (575) 763-3435. www.clovisnm.org

◆ May 14. Cactus Carnival. Pancho Villa State Park.

(575) 531-2711. ◆ Sept. 24. Pancho’s Car Show. Pancho Villa State Park. (575) 531-2711.

CORRALES CE

www.visitcorrales.com www.corrales-mainstreet.org www.corrales-nm.org

COLUMBUS SW

Attractions

Attractions

noon-5 p.m. 6275 Corrales Rd., P.O. Box 527, 87048. (505) 898-5165. www.corraleswinery.com

■ U.S./Mexico Port of Entry. Columbus/ Palomas,

Mexico. N.M.’s only 24-hour crossing in award-winning building, 2 museums related to Pancho Villa raid. 3 miles south of Columbus off N.M. 11. USCS: (575) 531-2686, INS: (575) 531-2694, USDA: (575) 531-2714. ■ Tres Hermanas and Florida Mountains. 5-10 minutes north.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Columbus Historical Society Museum. Rural

approach to history, Southern Pacific RR depot. Corner of N.M. 9/N.M. 11. (575) 531-2620. ■ Pancho Villa State Park. Museum features artifacts from 1916 Pancho Villa raid. Botanical gardens, camping, picnic areas. 32 miles south of Deming via N.M. 11. (575) 531-2711. www.nmparks.com

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Tumbleweed Theater. Call for schedule. Each Wed.

spaghetti dinner and open mic, 5:30 p.m., breakfast Sun.-Fri., 120 shows annually. Dinner with plays. P.O. Box 768, 205 Broadway, 88029. (575) 531-2311.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ March 12. Camp Furlong Days. Commemorates the March 9, 1916 attack on Columbus by Mexican Gen. Pancho Villa. Pancho Villa State Park. (575) 531-2711.

■ Corrales Winery. Free tasting, tours. Wed.-Sun.,

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Casa San Ysidro. Spanish Colonial rancho.

Period artifacts. Open for tours Feb. through Nov. Information: (505) 898-3915. www.cabq.gov/museum/history/casatour.html ■ Old San Ysidro Church. Built in 1860s. (505) 897-1513.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Corrales Bosque Nature Preserve. Hiking, walk-

ing, bird watching. Along Río Grande. (505) 897-0502.

Sporting Fun ■ Cycling. Variety of routes/lanes. Corrales Cycling

Club. (505) 898-6206.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Music in Corrales. Series of

concerts by well-known musicians. Historic Old San Ysidro Church. (877) 287-0082. www.musicincorrales.org ◆ Throughout the year. History Lecture series. Series of talks on history topics. Historic Old San Ysidro Church. (505) 890-5583. www.corraleshistory.org ◆ From April-Nov. Corrales Growers Market. Sundays. 9 a.m.-noon. Fresh produce and music. (505) 898-7927. ◆ April 30. Mudding Day. Volunteers plaster Old San Ysidro Church with mud as it was first constructed in 1869. 966 Old Church Road. www.corraleshistory.org ◆ April 30-May 1. Corrales Art Studio Tour. More than 60 artists open their studios to show and sell their art. www.corralesartstudiotour.com ◆ May 14-15. Heritage Days. Living history, music, performances and artists demontrations, children’s activities and feast day Mass. Old San Ysidro Church. (505) 898-3915. www.cabq.gov/museum www.corraleshistory.org ◆ May 15. Ditch Pony Promenade. Classes, serious Western and hunter equitation. Horse show at 9 a.m. Top Form Arena. (505) 345-2220. www.dansboots.com ◆ May 15. Art in the Park. Outdoor art exhibition and free children’s art workshop. La Entrada Park. Third Sunday of every month. www.corralesartists.org www.newmexico.org


◆ June 4-5. Old Church Artfest. Show, sale, food,

entertainment. (505) 301-0042. www.corraleshistory.org ◆ June 5. Corrales Garden Tour. www.corrales-mainstreet.org. ◆ June19. Art in the Park/Sunday in Corrales. Outdoor art exhibition. La Entrada Park. www.corralesartists.org; www.corrales-mainstreet.org. ◆ July 4. Parade and Family Fun Day. Old-fashioned parade with llamas, kazoo band, horses, old cars, costumed pets. 10 a.m. (505) 350-3955. www.corrales-mainstreet.org ◆ July 17. Art in the Park/Sunday in Corrales. Outdoor art exhibition. La Entrada Park. www.corralesartists.org, www.corrales-mainstreet.org. ◆ Aug. 14. The Lefty Converse Memorial Horse Show. Classes and show. Top Form Arena. (505) 345-2220. www.dansboots.com ◆ Sept. 24-25. Corrales Harvest Festival. Growers market, arts and crafts show, fun run, pet parade, hay rides, Casa San Ysidro tour, food, live entertainment. (505) 349-3809. www.corralesharvestfestival.com ◆ Sept. 24-25. Harvest Festival Casa San Ysidro. Living history, live music, arts and crafts and puppets. Hacienda open for viewing. Free admission. (505) 898-3915. www.cabq.gov/museum ◆ Sept. 24 -25. Mercado Antigua. Tinwork, santos and straw inlay by traditional Hispanic artisans. Children's activities. www.corraleshistory.org ◆ Oct. 1-8. Fine Art Show. (505) 301-0042. www.corraleshistory.org ◆ Oct. 1-31. Scarecrow Showcase. Creatively decorated scarecrows along Corrales Road. (505) 350-3955. www.corrales-mainstreet.org ◆ From Nov.- April. Corrales Winter Market. First Sunday of each month. (505) 898-7927. ◆ Nov. 25-27. Corrales Holiday Art Fest. Affordable and collectible arts and crafts, including handcrafted jewelry, pottery, photography, sculpture, paintings by local artisans. Free admission and parking. Corrales Recreation Center on Jones Road. www.corralesartists.org ◆ Dec. 2-4. Old Church Craft Show. (505) 301-0042. www.corraleshistory.org ◆ Dec. 3. Holiday Open House at Casa San Ysidro. 5-8 p.m. Ornament making and caroling. (505) 898-3915. www.cabq.gov/museum ◆ Dec. 3. Starlight Parade. Corrales Road. (505) 350-3955. www.corrales-mainstreet.org ◆ Dec. 3-4. Jolly Holidays in Corrales. Shopping in specialty shops decorated for the holidays, children’s activities, music and caroling. (505) 350-3955. www.corrales-mainstreet.org

CROWNPOINT NW Museums and Historic Sites ■ Chaco Culture National Historical Park. World

Heritage Site, 13 major ruins, 49 campsites, most sophisticated 12th-century Ancestral Pueblo economic/ ceremonial center in U.S. In the 25,000-square-mile San Juan Basin. 40 miles north of Crownpoint via N.M. 371/I.R. 9/N.M. 57 or north entrance from U.S. 550, then C.R. 7900, 7950. (505) 786-7014. www.nps.gov/chcu

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction. Monthly.

Viewing 4-6:30 p.m., auction 7 p.m. at elementary school. Crownpoint Rug Weavers, P.O. Box 1630, 87313. (505) 786-7386. www.crownpointrugauction.com

CUBA CE

www.cubanewmexico.com

Attractions ■ Cuba Regional Visitor Center. General info, artist

features, arts & crafts for sale. At N.M. 126 and U.S. 550. (575) 289-3808.

■ Bluebird Mesa. Recreational area, magnificent

views, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling. Off N.M. 126, F.R. 98. (575) 289-3808. ■ Cabezón Peak Recreation Area. Southwest via U.S. 550, C.R. 39 (San Luís Rd.). (505) 761-8700. www.nm.blm.gov ■ Chaco Culture National Historical Park. From U.S. 550 take C.R. 7900, C.R. 7950. Cuba offers closest lodging facilities to park. (505) 786-7014. www.nps.gov/chcu ■ Cuba Ranger District. Features Bluebird Mesa, Clear Creek Campground, Río de las Vacas Campground. Hiking, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, camping, birding. 10-15 miles east on N.M. 126. (575) 289-3265. ■ Cuba Sand Castles. (575) 289-3265. ■ Jémez Mountain Trail Scenic Byway. (505) 289-3808. ■ Nogales Cliff House. Ruins left by ancient Gallinas culture. Off N.M. 112 on F.R. 313. Hike to base. (575) 289-3808. ■ San Pedro Parks Wilderness and San Gregorio Reservoir. Fishing, hiking, backpacking, birding. N.M. 126 on F.R. 70. (575) 289-3264.

■ Sandoval County Fair and Rodeo Grounds.

(575) 282-0062.

www.newmexico.org

Before heading out to the Crownpoint Rug Auction, consider stopping at one of the area trading posts. Several are included in New Mexico’s Fiber Arts Trails. For more information or for a copy of the guide, call (505) 827-6490, (800) 979-4278. You’ll also find a story about Navajo weaving and maps at www.nmarts.org in the section about the Fiber Arts Trails.

DATIL SW Outdoor Getaways ■ Datil Well National Recreation Site. 22 camp-

sites, group shelter, 3 miles hiking trails. 1.25 miles east of Datil on U.S. 60/N.M. 12. (575) 835-0412.

Outdoor Getaways

Sporting Fun

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS

Explore Fiber Arts Trail

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Aug. 4-7. Sandoval County Fair. Cuba.

(575) 282-0062.

DEMING SW

www.demingchamber.com

Attractions ■ St. Clair Winery. 1325 De Baca Rd., P.O. Box 1180,

88031. (575) 546-9324. www.stclairvineyards.com www.southwestwines.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Deming Luna Mimbres Museum. Frontier, mili-

tary history/Mimbres exhibits, gems, minerals, geodes. Mimbres pottery room. 301 S. Silver. (575) 546-2382. ■ Historic Walking Tour. 16 buildings on State Historic Registry, 4 on Natl. Registry of Historical Places, including post office, St. Anne’s Catholic Church, Luna County Courthouse. Begins at Deming Luna Mimbres Museum. (800) 848-4955, (575) 546-2674. www.demingchamber.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Butterfield Trail. From El Paso to Deming, Lords-

burg, Las Cruces, Silver City. Inner Loop: 75-mile drive branches into Gila Natl. Forest. Side trips: La Mesilla, Rock Hound/Pancho Villa state parks, Shakespeare, Pinos Altos, Gila Cliff Dwellings. (800) 848-4955, (575) 546-2674. ✰ City of Rocks State Park. Rocks from centuriesold volcanic-ash flow, some 50 feet high. Visitor center, botanical garden, campsites, handicapped-accessible showers. 30 miles northwest of Deming via U.S. 180 and N.M. 61. (575) 536-2800. www.nmparks.com 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  123


■ Florida Mountains. Gym Peak at 7,106 feet, Florida

Peak at 7,295 feet. Seasonal quail/ibex hunts, by permit, applications due early April. 15 miles south of Deming. (575) 532-2100. ✰ Rockhound State Park. Visitors can take up to 15 lbs. of rocks. Visitor center, campsites. 14 miles southeast of Deming via N.M. 11 (4-5 miles south), east on Rockhound Rd. to N.M. 143, turn right. (575) 546-6182. www.nmparks.com ■ Spring Canyon Park. Open 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Wed.-Sun., year-round. Wildlife viewing, including Persian ibex. 15 miles south of Deming via N.M. 11 east to Rockhound Rd. to N.M. 143, turn right to N.M. 198. (575) 546-6182.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Deming Arts Center. Juried regional/natl. art

shows. 100 S. Gold. (575) 546-3663.

Sporting Fun ■ Arroyo Seco Motor Plex. I-10, exit 102 heading

south. Follow Rockhound State Park signs to gate, 3/4 mile west. 20030 N.M. 549 SE, Deming, 88030. (575) 544-3440, (575) 494-4794, (575) 494-4796. www.arroyosecoraceway.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ March 10-13. Rockhound Round Up. SWNM

Fairgrounds. (575) 543-8915. ◆ March 12. Camp Furlong Day. Pancho Villa State Park. (575) 531-2711. ◆ March 18-19. Luna County’s 110th Anniversary. SWNM Fairgrounds. (575) 546-0870. ◆ April TBA. Smokin’ Oldies Car Show. Deming Courthouse Park. (575) 546-6243. ◆ April 9. Desert Alive & Native Plant Sale. Rockhound State Park. (575) 546-6182. ◆ April 14-17. Old-Timers Reunion. Special Events Center. (575) 546-3200. ◆ April 23. Easter Egg Hunt. (575) 546-8848. ◆ May TBA. Health Fair. Special Events Center. (575) 546-2174. ◆ May 7. Cactus Carnival. Pancho Villa State Park. (575) 531-2711. ◆ May 7. Cinco de Mayo Celebration. (575) 546-2674. ◆ June TBA. Luna Rosa Wine Festival. Luna Rosa Winery. (575) 544-1160. ◆ June-Oct. Kool Tunes. First Friday every month. St. Claire Winery. (575) 546-1179. ◆ July 21-24. Men’s Golf Tournament. (575) 546-9481. ◆ Aug. 25-28. Great American Duck Race. Deming Courthouse Park. (575) 544-3483. ◆ Sept. 11. St. Anne’s Fiesta. Deming Courthouse Park. (575) 546-3343. ◆ Sept. 21-25. SWNM State Fair. (575) 543-5736. ◆ Sept. 24. Pancho’s Car Show. Pancho Villa State Park. (575) 531-2711. ◆ Oct. 15-16. St. Claire Wine Festival. St. Claire Winery. (575) 546-1179.

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◆ Oct. 16. Klobase B-B-Q. Deming Courthouse Park. (575) 546-9783. ◆ Dec. TBA. Columbus Christmas Festival. Columbus. (575) 531-2711. ◆ Dec. 3. Christmas Light Parade. (575) 546-2674. ◆ Dec. 11. Green Tea. Deming Luna Mimbres Museum. (575) 546-2382.

DES MOINES NE Attraction ■ The Mandala Center. Nonprofit ecumenical

retreat center on slopes of Sierra Grande Mt.; outdoor labyrinth, historic Shrine of San Lorenzo memorializes local homesteader; worldwide art, furnishings. Tours by appt. 2.5 miles west of Des Moines via U.S. 87/U.S. 64. P.O. Box 158, Des Moines, 88418. (575) 278-3002. www.mandalacenter.org

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. The Mandala Center. Vari-

ous presentations and workshops. (575) 278-3002. www.mandalacenter.org

DEXTER SE Attractions ■ Miraculous Tortilla Shrine. Built around tortilla

that bears image of Christ. First appeared in 1977. At Rubio House in Lake Arthur on N.M. 2. First clapboard house on the right. Shrine behind home.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Dexter National Fish Hatchery and Technology

Center. Recovers imperiled Southwest fish species. 7116 Hatchery Rd. (575) 734-5910. ■ Lake Van. Fishing, camping, RV full hookups, playground, swimming pool, tennis, horseshoes, volleyball. P.O. Box 249, 88230. (575) 734-5482.

DIXON NC Attractions ■ La Chiripada Winery. Dixon on N.M. 75. P.O. Box

191, 87527. (505) 579-4437. www.lachiripada.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Harding Mine. UNM site open to rock and mineral

collectors. A mile north of Dixon. Call UNM Earth and Planetary Sciences Dept. for release forms. (505) 277-4204. epswww.unm.edu/harding/harding_.htm

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Nov 5-6. Dixon Studio Tour. www.dixonarts.org

www.newmexico.org


The Organ Mountains, east of Las Cruces, provide many recreational opportunities.

LAMY NC Museums and Historical Sites ■ Lamy Railroad & History Museum. Old Legal

Tender Saloon Building. Call for seasonal hours of operation. (505) 466-1650. www.lamymuseum.org ■ Lamy Station Café. In a restored Atlantic Coast line dining car, one of only three of its type in existence. (505) 466-1904.

PHOTO BY TERRY THOMPSON.

■ St. Clair Winery & Bistro. Tasting room, gift shop.

1800 Avenida de Mesilla. (575) 524-2408. www.stclairvineyards.com ✰ Traxx Family Fun Center. Miniature golf, bumper boats. 401 Walnut. (575) 525-3850. ■ Veterans Park. Doña Ana County Veterans Wall, Bataan Death March Monument. Wall lists names of local veterans, monument dedicated to Heroes of Bataan. Along Roadrunner Pkwy. (575) 541-2444.

Museums and Historic Sites

LAS CRUCES SW www.lascruces.org www.MustSeeLC.org www.las-cruces.org

Attractions ■ Las Cruces Farmers/Crafts Market. Wed., Sat.

mornings. Produce, art, crafts, baked goods, Southwestern products. Downtown. (575) 541-2288. www.las-cruces.org/cd ✰ Stahmann Farms. Family-owned pecan grower, millions of pounds annually. Country store, tours of candy-making operation. 7 miles south of Las Cruces on N.M. 28. (800) 654-6887. www.stahmanns.com

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■ Alameda Depot Historic District. City’s first railroad

depot community, dates to late 1800s, restored houses. Walking tour. West of Main St. between Picacho/Amador. ■ Branigan Cultural Center. Local, regional artists. Fine art and culture, contemporary art, history exhibits. Open Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 501 N. Main St. (575) 541-2155. www.las-cruces.org/museums ■ El Molino. Grinding wheel from 1853 flour mill. Water/Lohman streets. (575) 541-2444. ■ Fort Selden State Monument. Ruins of 19thcentury adobe fort. Visitor center, self-guided tours, living-history demonstrations May-Sept., every Sat. and Sun. 19th-century military encampments 2nd Sat. monthly, year-round. Open Wed.-Mon. 16 miles north of Las Cruces via I-25 and exit 19. (575) 526-8911. www.nmmonuments.org

■ Historical Museum of Lawmen. Law-enforcement

memorabilia, dates to turn of 20th century. Sheriff’s dept., 845 N. Motel Blvd. (575) 525-1911. ■ Las Cruces Museum of Art. Curated, traveling, juried, invitational contemporary art. Open Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. (575) 541-2155. www.las-cruces.org/museums ✰ Las Cruces Museum of Natural History. Southwest, emphasis on Chihuahuan Desert. Open Mon.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.- 8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 1-5 p.m. Mesilla Valley Mall, 700 S. Telshor. (575) 522-3120. www.las-cruces.org/museums ■ Las Cruces Railroad Museum. Interprets New Mexico railroad and local history. Open Thu.-Sat. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. West of Main St. between Picacho and Amador. 351 N. Mesilla St. (575) 647-4480. www.las-cruces.org/public-services/museums/ rrmuseum.shtm ■ Mesquite Street. Historic district, small adobes in green, pink, blue. Part of original 1849 townsite. East of Main St. between Picacho/Lohman. (575) 541-2444. ■ Mural Water Towers. Depict historical/cultural scenes. Throughout city. (575) 541-2444.

www.newmexico.org


✰ N.M. Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum. 47-acre interactive museum with livestock and demonstrations. 3,000 years of N.M. agricultural history. Open Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m. 4100 Dripping Springs Rd., University Ave. exit east of I-25. (575) 522-4100. www.frhm.org ■ NMSU Museum. Southwest archaeology, borderregion history exhibits. NMSU campus, Kent Hall, corner of University and Solano. (575) 646-3739. www.nmsu.edu/~museum ■ Our Lady at the Foot of the Cross Shrine. Reproduction of Michelangelo’s Pieta, dedicated in 1875 to establishment of Loretto Academy. Lohman/Main St. ✰ Space Murals Museum. Artifacts, gift shop, water tanks with murals of spacecraft, astronauts, spaceprogram symbols. 10 miles east via U.S. 70. 12450 E. U.S. 70. (575) 382-0977. ■ Three Crosses. Commemorates long told but historically unverified legend of an 1830 group of travelers killed by Indians and from which Las Cruces possibly derives its name. N. Main/ Solano. ✰ White Sands Missile Range Museum. Highlights origin of U.S. missile/space activity, Atomic Age. Inform guard you are going to visit museum or Missile Park. Open Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; closed holidays. 25 miles east of Las Cruces on U.S. 70. On White Sands Missile Range. (575) 678-8824. www.wsmr-history.org ■ The Zuhl Collection. Extensive collection of fossil remains of extinct animals, plants, dinosaur bones, ancient amphibian tracks. Open Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. NMSU campus, 775 College Dr. (575) 646-3616.

Performing Arts/Galleries ✰ A Children’s Theater of the Mesilla Valley. Year-round productions for and by children. NMSU Music Center Recital Hall. (575) 571-1413. www.zianet.com/act ■ American Southwest Theatre Co. Local productions, original presentations. Hershel Zohn Theater, NMSU campus. (575) 646-4515, (800) 525-2782. theatre.nmsu.edu/astc ■ Black Box Theatre/No Strings Theatre Co. Call for schedule. 430 N. Downtown Mall. (575) 523-1223. www.no-strings.org ■ Doña Ana Lyric Opera. Call for schedule. NMSU Music Center Recital Hall. (575) 646-2421. ■ Las Cruces Chamber Ballet. Well-known productions, original presentations year-round. NMSU Music Center Recital Hall. (575) 523-1654. ■ Las Cruces Civic Concert Assoc. Call for schedule. Shows at Rio Grande Theatre. 211 N. Downtown Mall. (575)-521-4051. ■ Las Cruces Community Theatre. Call for schedule. 313 N. Downtown Mall, in the Old State Theater Building. (575) 523-1200. www.lcctnm.org ■ Las Cruces Symphony at NMSU. Season: Oct.-May. Call for schedule. NMSU Music Center Recital Hall. P.O. Box 1622, 88004. (575) 646-3709. www.lascrucessymphony.com ■ Mesilla Valley Concert Band. Call for schedule. Corner Espina/Horseshoe in NMSU Music Recital Hall. (575) 646-1582.

■ NMSU Art Gallery. Contemporary American art,

retablo collection. In Williams Hall on University Ave. at corner of Solano Ave. (575) 646-2545. www.nmsu.edu/~artgal ■ NMSU Choral Dept. Call for schedule. NMSU Music Recital Hall. (575) 646-2067. nmsu.edu/~music ■ NMSU Theater. Call for schedule. Box 30001, MSC 3072, 88003. (800) 525-2782, (575) 646-4517. ■ Pan American Center. 13,000-seat multipurpose arena. In addition to Aggie sports events, the venue presents top name entertainers, such as Reba McEntire and Elton John. (575) 646-4413. panam.nmsu.edu ■ Río Grande Theatre. Renovated movie theater. Check schedule online. 211 N. Dowtown Mall. (575) 523-6403. www.riograndetheatre.com

Sporting Fun ✰ NMSU Athletics. www.nmstatesports.com ■ Southern N.M. Speedway. Doña Ana County Fairgrounds west of Las Cruces on I-10. (505) 524-7913. www.snmspeedway.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Auto Racing. Southern New

Mexico Speedway, 12125 Robert Larson Blvd. 11 miles west on I-10, exit 132. Gates open every Saturday at 5:30 p.m. Races start at 7:45 p.m. (575) 524-7913. www.snmspeedway.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Aguirre Springs National Recreation Site. Camp-

sites, hiking, picnicking, drinking water not available, pets on leashes allowed. 22 miles east of Las Cruces via U.S. 70. (575) 644-9143. ■ Burn Lake. Fishing and nonmotorized boating depending on water level. Boathouse, picnicking, playground, restrooms, shelters. 1655 W. Amador. (575) 541-2550. ■ Chihuahuan Desert Nature Park. Self-guided tour of desert flora, geological formations, archaeology, 1.5-mile hiking trail. North via I-25, U.S. 70, Jornada Rd., P.O. Box 891, 88004-0891. (575) 524-3334. www.cdnp.org ■ Dripping Springs Visitor Center. Day use only. Hiking, picnicking at mountain-camp ruins. (Only guide dogs allowed.) 10 miles east of Las Cruces via Dripping Springs Rd. (575) 522-1219. ■ La Cueva Cave. At base of Organ Mountains, former home of hermit/holy man Juan María Agostini, found murdered there. (Only guide dogs allowed.) 10 miles east of Las Cruces via Dripping Springs Rd. (575) 522-1219. ■ Leasburg Dam State Park. Campsites, showers, playground, swimming, fishing, bird-watching, canoeing/kayaking in Río Grande. 15 miles northwest of Las Cruces off N.M. 185, or Radium Springs exit 19 off I-25. (575) 524-4068. www.nmparks.com

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2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  133


NC

◆ Throughout the year. BMX

Racing. Roadrunner BMX NW NE Park. E. Hadley Ave. and N. C Walnut St. Every Thurs. and Sat. at 6 p.m. (575) 650-3998. SW SE www.roadrunnerbmx.org ◆ Throughout the year. Ciclovia Health Event. Cycling, walking, jogging, dancing, aerobics, gymnastics, skating. Young Park, 1905 E. Nevada Ave., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission. (575) 522-0289. ◆ Throughout the year. Concerts. Performances by NMSU Music Dept. including choral/gospel concerts. (575) 646-2067. music.nmsu.edu ◆ Throughout the year. Downtown Ramble. Art openings, exhibits, music, entertainment, open-mic opportunities, shopping, refreshments. First Fridays, 5-7 p.m. Downtown Mall. (575) 523-2950. ◆ Throughout the year. Every Other Tuesday Special Guest. Río Grande Theatre, 211 N. Downtown Mall. (575) 523-6403. ◆ Throughout the Year. Farmers & Crafters Market. Wed. and Sat., 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 300-500 N. Downtown Mall. (575) 541-2288. www.las-cruces.org ◆ Throughout the year. Full Moon Program. Live music and wildlife presentations under the full moon. White Sands National Monument, 45 miles east of Las Cruces. (575) 679-2599 ext. 230, (575) 479-6124 ext. 236. www.nps.gov/whsa ◆ Throughout the year. Lake Lucero Tour. Guided tour on geology, flora and fauna. White Sands National Monument, 45 miles east of Las Cruces. Need a reservation. (575) 679-2599 ext. 230, (575) 479-6124 ext. 236. www.nps.gov/whsa ◆ Year-round. Living History Program. Demonstrations and descriptions of equipment and life at the fort. Second Saturday of every month 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Fort Selden State Monument. 1280 Fort Selden Rd., Radium Springs. 13 miles north of Las Cruces on I-25, exit 19. (575) 526-8911. www.nmmonuments.org ◆ Throughout the year. No Strings Theatre Company. New shows semimonthly. Black Box Theatre, 430 N. Downtown Mall. (575) 523-1223. www.no-strings.org ◆ Throughout the year. Period Cooking Demonstrations. 1800s military and civilian campfire cooking. Fort Selden State Monument, 1280 Fort Selden Rd, Radium Springs. (575) 526-8911, (800) 429-9488. www.nmmonuments.org ◆ Throughout the year. Sunset Stroll. Daily guided walk before sunset. Call for times. White Sands National Monument, 45 miles east of Las Cruces. (575) 679-2599 ext. 230, (575) 479-6124 ext. 236. www.nps.gov/whsa/ ◆ Jan.-Feb. Jam Session. Events focus on the art and culture of jazz. Exhibits, concerts, films, public gallery talks, educational outreach. Río Grande Theatre, 211 N. Downtown Mall. (575) 541-2154. www.lcjazz.org/events.html ◆ Jan.-March. NMSU Aggies Men’s and Women’s Basketball. New Mexico State University Pan American Center, University Avenue and Triviz. (575) 646-1420, (575) 532-2060, (915) 544-8444. www.ticketmaster.com

134  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

◆ Jan.-May. Las Cruces Symphony Orchestra.

Performances of works by composers such as Haydn, Tchaikovsky, Rossini and even ABBA. Pre-concert lunch and discussion dates with maestro Lonnie Klein offer insight on upcoming concerts. Various locations. (575) 646-3709. www.lascrucessymphony.com ◆ Jan. 1. Our Lady of Guadalupe Fiesta at Tortugas. Indian and Danzante dancers in front of the santuario start at 3 p.m. with the rosary and benediction at 4 p.m. (575) 526-8171. ◆ Jan. 15-16. Nostalgia Club Antique & Collectible Show & Sale. St. Genevieve’s Parish Hall, 1025 E. Las Cruces Ave. (575) 526-8624. www.stgen.info ◆ Feb. TBA. Gun Show. Guns, ammo, reloading, blades, outdoor gear. Dickerson's Event Center, 3900 W. Picacho Ave. (575) 526-1106. ◆ Feb.-May. The American Southwest Theatre Company. Various presentations of new stage work. Hershel Zohn Theatre, 3014 McFie Circle. (575) 646-4515, (800) 525-ASTC (2782). theatre.nmsu.edu/astc/ ◆ Feb.-May. NMSU Aggies Baseball. Presley Askew Field, Stewart and Locust St. (575) 646-1420, (575) 532-2060. www.nmstatesports.com ◆ Feb.-May. NMSU Aggie Women's Softball. Softball Complex, Stewart and Payne St. (575) 646-1420, (575) 532-2060. www.nmstatesports.com ◆ Feb. 1-28. For the Love of Art Month. Various galleries and locations in Las Cruces and Mesilla. (575) 523-6403, (575) 523-2950. www.oldmesilla.org ◆ March TBA. Look Who's Dancing! Social dance activity for all ages and skill levels, with local celebrities. NMSU Pan American Center, 1810 E. University Ave. (575) 524-0500, (575) 640-2001. ◆ March TBA. Relay for Life. Young Park, 1905 E. Nevada Ave. 2- 4 p.m. (575) 541-9682. www.relayforlife.org/lascrucesnm ◆ March TBA. Wheels of Dreams Car Show. More than 250 show-class vehicles, automotive swap meet, food vendors, music. Field of Dreams Sports Complex, 2501 W. Tashiro St. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Free admission. (575) 635-2940. www.lcrodrunners.com ◆ March-June. Back by Noon Trips. Guided natural history outings. Reservations required. Rincón, north of Las Cruces on I-25. 7:45 a.m. Free admission. (575) 522-5552. www.wildmesquite.org ◆ March 4. Marriage of Figaro. Atkinson Recital Hall. (575) 646-2067. music.nmsu.edu ◆ March 12-13. Cowboy Days. Roping and riding demonstrations, chuck-wagon cooking, dancing, rodeo, arts & crafts, Western movies, gunfight re-enactments. N.M. Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd. (575) 522-4100, (575) 522-1232. www.frhm.org ◆ March 12-13. Home & Garden Show. Home improvement and new home construction show. How-to and cooking demonstrations. Dickerson’s Event Center, 3920 W. Picacho Ave. (575) 526-6126. www.lascruceshomeandgarden.com ◆ March 19-20. Antique and Collectible Show. American Legion Post 10, 1185 E. Madrid, behind Apodaca Park. (575) 640-7173. ◆ March 23-25. Fine Art and Crafts Fair. More than 70 artists and artisans, children's gallery. Las Cruces Convention Center. (575) 526-9674.

◆ March 26-27. Mesilla Valley Stamp Club Show.

Las Cruces Convention Center. 680 E. Univeristy Ave. (575) 522-2949. ◆ March 27. Bataan Memorial Death March. White Sands National Monument. (575) 678-1134. www.bataanmarch.com ◆ April TBA. ALS Benefit (Motorcycle) Run. Barnett’s Las Cruces Harley Davidson, I-10 at Avenida de Mesilla. (575) 541-1440, (866) 789-7077. www.barnettharleylascruces.com ◆ April TBA. British Car Show. More than 75 British cars. Old Mesilla Plaza, south on N.M. 28. (575) 526-7807. www.oldmesilla.org ◆ April TBA. Full Moon Nights Bike Rides. Guided bike ride under the full moon. Reservations required one month in advance. White Sands National Monument, 45 miles east of Las Cruces, N.M. 70. (575) 679-2599 ext. 230, (575) 479-6124 ext. 236. www.nps.gov/whsa/ ◆ April TBA. Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament. Field of Dreams Sports Complex, 2501 W. Tashiro St. (575) 635-1562, (575) 644-5331. www.macker.com ◆ April TBA. Mesilla Valley Onion Festival. (575) 528-7277. www.mvonionfest.org ◆ April-May. Spring Showcase of Homes. Show for those in the market to buy a home or for decorating and design ideas. Various locations. Free admission. (575) 526-6126. www.lascrucesshowcaseofhomes.com ◆ April 2. Trinity Site Open House. The site of the first atomic bomb explosion on earth. Open to the public twice a year. White Sands Missile Range. Stallion Gate off N.M. 380. (575) 678-1134. www.wsmr.army.mil ◆ April 7-10. White Sands International Film Festival. Short- and feature-length documentaries and narratives from around the world but with a focus on Latino and N.M. filmmaking. Various locations. (877) 345-6973. www.wsiff.com ◆ April 14-17. Border Book Festival. Authors from around the world, performances, food, storytelling, workshops, concerts, readings. Mesilla Community Center, 2251 Calle de Santiago. (575) 523-3988, (575) 524-1499. www.borderbookfestival.org ◆ April 16. We Are One Dance and Drum. Middle Eastern dancers and drummers perform. Río Grande Theatre, 211 N. Downtown Mall. (575) 639-1616, (575) 526-5940. www.myplacejewell.com ◆ April 23-24. La Viña Blues & Jazz Festival. La Viña Winery, 4201 S., N.M. 28, La Union, (575) 882-7632. www.lavinawinery.com ◆ May TBA. Las Cruces Tour of Gardens. (575) 521-0521. lctog.org ◆ May 7-8. Cinco de Mayo Fiesta. Mexican music, food and dancing. Old Mesilla Plaza, Mesilla. (575) 524-3262 ext. 116 or 117. www.oldmesilla.org ◆ May 8. Mother’s Day. Period-themed tea. (10 a.m.-3 p.m.) Free admission for mothers. Ft. Selden State Monument, 13 miles north of Las Cruces, I-25 exit 19. (575) 526-8911. (800) 429-9488. www.nmmonuments.org

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS www.newmexico.org


◆ June 11. Raft the Río Grande Raft Race and

A tin mariachi trumpet player offers a festive touch to Mesilla Plaza.

◆ May 9-13. Celebration of National Tourism

Week. Prizes and refreshments. Las Cruces Convention and Visitors Bureau, 211 N. Water St. (575) 541-2444. www.MustSeeLC.org ◆ May 15. Blessing of the Fields. A celebration of N.M.’s 3,000-year farming heritage. Farming demonstrations, mariachi music, folklorico dancers, a blessing of the fields, evening dance. N.M. Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd. (575) 522-4100. www.frhm.org ◆ May 20-22. American Legion Coin and Stamp Show. American Legion Hall, 1185 E. Madrid Ave. (575) 640-7173.

www.newmexico.org

PHOTO BY EFRAIN M. PADRO.

◆ May 28-30. Picacho Nostalgia District Dealer

Stock Sidewalk Reduction and Parking Lot Sale. Picacho District on W. Picacho Ave. (575) 526-8624, (575) 524-4203. ◆ May 28-30. Southern N.M. Wine Festival. Wine samples, entertainment, vendors. Southern N.M. State Fairgrounds, 11 miles west of Las Cruces, exit 13, I-10. (575) 522-1232. www.snmwinefestival.com ◆ June TBA. Juneteenth Celebration. Apodaca Park, 801 E. Madrid St. (575) 524-0333. www.juneteenth.com ◆ June TBA. San Juan Turtle Fiesta. Music, games, food, Tortugas Open Golf Tournament, San Juan Fiesta Tardeada, Tortugas Turtle Races. Shrine and Parish of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 3600 Paroquia St., Tortugas, south of Las Cruces on Main St. Free admission. (575) 526-8171.

Festival. Homemade rafts compete for prizes. Río Grande, W. Picacho Ave. (575) 522-5552. www.wildmesquite.org ◆ June 11-12. Serra Club Antique & Collectible Show and Sale. St. Genevieve’s Parish Hall, 1025 E. Las Cruces Ave. (575) 526-8624, (575) 524-4203. www.stgen.info ◆ June 18. Kiwanis Kars for Kids. Antique, classic and custom cars, and motorcycles. Young Park, 1905 E. Nevada Ave. (575) 644-7758, (575) 532-1751. ◆ June 19. Father’s Day. Campfire breakfast. (10 a.m.-3 p.m.) Free admission for fathers. Ft. Selden State Monument, 13 miles north of Las Cruces, I-25 exit 19. (575) 526-8911. www.nmmonuments.org ◆ July TBA. Ice Cream Sunday. N.M. Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd. (575) 522-4100. www.frhm.org ◆ July 3-4. Fourth of July Electric Light Parade, Celebration and Fireworks. (575) 541-2000. www.las-cruces.org ◆ July 4. Country Picnic and Open House. La Viña Winery, 4201 S. N.M. 28, La Union. (575) 882-7362. www.lavinawinery.com ◆ Aug. TBA. Butterfly Flutterby. Hands-on activity stations, arts and crafts, face painting, games. Chihuahuan Desert Nature Park, located 6.5 miles north of N.M. 70 on N. Jornada Road. (575) 524-3334. www.asombro.org ◆ Aug. TBA. MainStreet SalsaFest. Massive salsa contest and tasting, music, dancing, entertainment, dance contest. Downtown Mall. (575) 525-1955, (575) 647-3546. ◆ Aug. 13-14. Antiques, Collectibles, Crafts Show & Sale. Antiques, food, crafts, jewelry. University United Methodist Church, 2000 S. Locust St. (575) 522-8220. www.uumclascruces.org ◆ Sept. TBA. 5,000 Flower Art Exhibit. Paintings, sculpture, poetry, quilts and two towers covered in painted flowers memorializing the World Trade Center. Branigan Cultural Center, 501 N. Main St. (575) 541-2155, (575) 541-2174. www.las-cruces.org/museums ◆ Sept. TBA. St. Genevieve Church Fiesta & Celebration. St. Genevieve’s Parish Hall, 1025 E. Las Cruces Ave. (575) 524-9649. www.stgen.info ◆ Sept. TBA. Star Party. Observational astronomy for the general public. Registered participants may “camp” as well. White Sands National Monument, 45 miles east of Las Cruces, N.M. 70. (575) 679-2599 ext. 230, (575) 479-6124 ext. 236. www.nps.gov/whsa/ ◆ Sept. TBA. White Sands Hot-Air Balloon Invitational. (575) 437-6120, (800) 826-0294. www.white-sands-new-mexico.com/hot_air_balloon_ invitational.htm ◆ Through mid-Sept. Doña Ana Doll Club Show & Sale. Dolls, teddy bears, miniatures and toys. Days Inn & Suites, 901 Avenida de Mesilla. (575) 526-8624, (575) 524-4203. ◆ Sept.-Oct. Mesilla Valley Maze. Hayrides, pumpkin patch and corn maze. 3855 W. Picacho Ave. (575) 526-1919. www.mesillavalleymaze.com ◆ Sept.-Nov. NMSU Aggies Football. Aggie Memorial Stadium, Payne St. (575) 646-1420, (575) 532-2060, www.nmstatesports.com 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  135


◆ Sept.-Nov. Mariachi Sundays. Old Mesilla Plaza,

south on N.M. 28. (575) 525-1735, (575) 524-3262. www.lascrucesmariachi.org ◆ Sept. 3-4. Franciscan Festival of Arts. Paintings, pottery, jewelry, stained glass, woodworking, textiles. Holy Cross Retreat, 600 Holy Cross Rd., south on N.M. 478. (575) 524-3688. www.holycrossretreat.org ◆ Sept. 3-4. Hatch Chile Festival. Food, crafts, auction, live music. Hatch, 37 miles north of Las Cruces on I-25. (575) 522-1232, (575) 267-5483, (575) 267-4010. www.hatchchilefest.com ◆ Sept. 3-5. N.M. Wine Harvest Festival. Grape stomping, wine tasting, live entertainment, arts and crafts, vendors, children’s activities, wine seminars. Southern N.M. State Fairgrounds, 11 miles west on I-10 exits 127 and 132. (575) 522-1232. www.wineharvestfestival.com ◆ Sept. 8-Oct. 30. The American Plains Artists Juried Exhibit & Sale. Internationally recognized artists depicting the people, life, wildlife and landscape of the American Great Plains. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. Sept. 8. N.M. Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum. (575) 522-4100, (308) 249-1488. www.frhm.org, www.americanplainsartists.com ◆ Sept. 10-11 Frontier Days. (8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.) Period military re-enactments. Cavalry escort of stagecoach from La Mesilla to Ft. Selden State Monument. (575) 526-8911, (800) 429-9488. www.nmmonuments.org ◆ Sept. 17-18. American Legion Antique Show. American Legion Hall, 1185 E. Madrid Ave. (575) 640-7173. ◆ Sept. 17-18. Diez y Seis de Septiembre Fiesta. Folklorico dances, mariachi music, Mexican cuisine. Old Mesilla Plaza. (575) 524-3262 ext. 116 or 117. www.oldmesilla.org ◆ Sept. 23-25. The Whole Enchilada Fiesta. Street party, food, dancing, parade, world’s biggest enchilada. Hadley Complex, 1801 E. Hadley Ave. and baseball complex. (575) 526-1938. www.enchiladafiesta.com ◆ Sept. 28-Oct. 2. Southern N.M. State Fair & Rodeo. Midway, auction, food, music, livestock shows, rodeo. Southern N.M. State Fairground, 12 miles west of Las Cruces, I-10 west, exit 127 or 132. (575) 524-8602, (575) 524-8612. www.snmstatefair.com. ◆ Oct. TBA. Full Moon Nights Bike Rides. Guided bike ride under the full moon. Reservations required one month in advance. White Sands National Monument, 45 miles east of Las Cruces, N.M. 70. (575) 679-2599 ext. 230, (575) 479-6124 ext. 236. www.nps.gov/whsa ◆ Oct. TBA. La Viña Wine Festival. La Viña Winery, La Union. (575) 882-7632. www.nmwine.com ◆ Oct. TBA. Los Leones de Mesilla Car Show. Cars of all types. Old Mesilla Plaza, south on N.M. 28. (575) 644-3747. www.oldmesilla.org ◆ Oct. TBA. Mesilla Jazz Happening. Live jazz music, wine garden, horse-drawn wagons between venues. Mercado Plaza and the Historic Plaza at Old Mesilla Plaza. (575) 524-3524, (575) 524-3262. www.oldmesilla.org ◆ Oct. TBA. Pow Wow. NMSU campus. (575) 621-4232, (915) 422-1700. ◆ Oct. 1. Trinity Site Open House. The site of the first atomic bomb explosion. Open to the public twice a year. White Sands Missile Range. Stallion Gate off N.M. 380. (575) 678-1134. www.wsmr.army.mil

136  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

◆ Oct. 7-9. Busch Light, Worth Sports, USSSA A

Whole Enchilada Softball Invitational. Largest adult slow pitch softball event in the nation, having produced more than 250 men’s and women’s teams in the past two decades. Harty, Paz and Maag Softball Complexes, off Hadley Ave. and Solano Dr. (575) 647-3034. www.usssa.com ◆ Oct. 8-9. Pumpkin Festival. Lyles Family Farms, 3855 W. Picacho Ave. (575) 522-1232. www.newmexicopumpkinfestival.com ◆ Oct. 14. Empty Bowls. The Potters’ Guild makes more than 1,000 bowls. Restaurants donate soup. Partipants get a handmade bowl. St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 225 W. Griggs. (575) 524-1146. www.potterguildlc.com ◆ Nov. TBA. International Mariachi Conference Parque Festival. Young Park, 1905 E. Nevada Ave. (575) 525-1735. www.lascrucesmariachi.org ◆ Nov. TBA. El Tratado de La Mesilla. Re-enactment of 1854 the ratification of the Gadsen Purchase. Old Mesilla Plaza, south on N.M. 28. (575) 524-3262 ext. 116 or 117. www.oldmesilla.org ◆ Nov. 5-6. Renaissance ArtsFaire. Art show and exhibition, live theater, dancing, music, food. Young Park. (575) 523-6403. www.las-cruces-arts.org ◆ Nov. 11. Veterans Day Ceremony at the Plaza. Old Mesilla, Parque de los Veteranos, south on N.M. 28. (575) 524-3262 ext. 116 or 117. www.oldmesilla.org ◆ Nov. 11. Veterans Day Parade. Downtown Las Cruces. (575) 541-2000, (575) 527-7726. lascrucesvetday.org ◆ Nov. 11-13. International Mariachi Student Showcase Conference & Spectacular Concert. NMSU Pan American Center, University Ave. (575) 525-1735. www.lascrucesmariachi.org www.ticketmaster.com ◆ Nov. 13. International Mariachi Conference Mariachi Mass. NMSU Pan American Center, University Ave. (575) 525-1735. www.lascrucesmariachi.org ◆ Nov. 18-Aug. 2012. New Mexico Statehood: A Centennial Celebration. Exhibit chronicles the state’s first 100 years. N.M. Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum, 4100 Dripping Springs Rd. (575) 522-4100, (575) 522-1232. www.frhm.org ◆ Nov. 20. Toys for Kids Motorcycle Parade. Mesilla Valley Mall, J.C. Penney west parking lot.(575) 523-1061, (575) 646-7603. toysforkids-lc.org ◆ Nov. 26-27. Holiday Antique & Craft Show. St. Genevieve’s Parish Hall, 1025 E. Las Cruces Ave. (575) 526-8624, (575) 524-4203. www.stgen.info ◆ Dec. 10. Luminaria Tour. Living-history military re-enactments, 1,000 luminarias, free cookies and drinks. Ft. Selden State Monument. (575) 526-8911, (800) 429-9488. www.nmmonuments.org ◆ Dec. 2. Lighting of Christmas Tree. (575) 541-2000. www.las-cruces.org ◆ Dec. 2. Trails of Lights. Downtown Mall and Las Cruces Railroad Museum. (575) 541-2288, (575) 541-2296, (575) 541-2000. www.las-cruces.org ◆ Dec. 2-4. La Casa’s Holiday Bazaar. Dickerson’s Event Center, 3902 W. Picacho Ave. (575) 526-2819. www.lascasainc.org ◆ Dec. 9. Lighting of Christmas Tree, Carols, Luminarias and Shopping Late in Mesilla. Old Mesilla Plaza, south on N.M. 28. (575) 524-3262 ext. 116 or 117. www.oldmesilla.org

◆ Dec. 10. Luminaria Tour. Living-history military re-

enactments, 1,000 luminarias, refreshments. Ft. Selden State Monument. (575) 526-8911, (800) 429-9488. www.nmmonuments.org ◆ Dec. 10-12. Our Lady of Guadalupe Fiesta at Tortugas. Mariachis, folklorico and procession up Tortugas Mountain. Tortugas, south on Main St. (575) 526-8171, (575) 526-5675. ◆ Dec. 10-12. Virgin de Guadalupe Fiesta at St. Genevieve’s. St. Genevieve’s Parish Hall, 1025 E. Las Cruces Ave. (575) 524-9649. www.stgen.info ◆ Dec. 24. Christmas Carols and Luminarias at the Plaza. Old Mesilla Plaza. (575) 524-3262 ext.116 or 117. www.oldmesilla.org

LAS TRAMPAS NC Museums and Historical Sites ■ San José de Gracia Church. This is one of the best

preserved and least-altered Spanish Colonial mission churches in New Mexico. It is also one of the most significant 18th-century Spanish churches in the U.S. Las Trampas Plaza. www.nps.gov/history/nhl/

LAS VEGAS NE

www.lasvegasnewmexico.com

Attractions ■ Arts & Cultural District. Galleries, shops and restaurants

in historic buildings. Monthly second Saturdays artwalks, music and events from Old Town Plaza to the Railroad Depot. (505) 425-2606. www.mainstreetlvnm.org ✰ Fort Union Drive-In. Open Fri., Sat., Sun. nights; May-Sept. N.M. 518, just north of town. (505) 425-9934. ■ Madison Vineyards/Winery. 26 miles south on I-25 and 6 miles south on N.M. 3. (575) 421-8028. www.madison-winery.com ■ Salman Raspberry Ranch. Pick your own berries. Historic La Cueva District, mill and mission church. (575) 387-2900. www.salmanraspberryranch.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Carnegie Library. Built in 1904. 500 National Ave.

(505) 454-1401 ext. 272. ■ Castañeda Hotel. Originally Harvey House hotel, built in 1898. 524 Railroad Ave. (505) 425-8631. ■ City of Las Vegas Museum/Rough Riders Memorial Collection. Memorabilia, city history, Santa Fe Trail exhibit. Open year-round, Tues.-Sat., free/donations. 727 Grand Ave. (505) 454-1401 ext. 283. www.lasvegasmuseum.org ■ Fort Union National Monument. Built 1851-91 to guard Santa Fe Trail. 29 miles northeast of Las Vegas via I-25/N.M. 161 exit 366. (505) 425-8025. www.nps.gov/foun/ ■ Historic El Fidel Hotel. Tours. Corner of Grand Ave. and Douglas Ave. (505) 425-6761.

www.newmexico.org


■ Las Vegas Old Town Plaza Park. Trade center for

Hispanics and Americans after 1835, site of Kearny’s proclamation of N.M. as U.S. possession. In Old Town. (800) 832-5947, (505) 425-8631. ■ Loma Parda. Ghost town. 26 miles north of Las Vegas via I-25 and N.M. 161. ■ Montezuma Castle. Opulent 1884 hotel now part of Armand Hammer United World College of the American West. 5 miles northwest of Las Vegas via N.M. 65. Tour info: (505) 454-4221. www.nps.gov/moca ■ Nine Historic Districts. 900 buildings on the National Register, more than any other community west of the Mississippi. Self-guided walking tours, brochures. Guided tours on request. (505) 425-8803. www.lasvegasnmcchp.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ El Porvenir Canyon. Creek, 2 campgrounds, Hermit’s

Peak nearby. 17 miles northwest on N.M. 65 past Montezuma. (505) 425-3534. ■ Gallinas Canyon Recreation Area. Camping, picnicking, cross-country skiing. Fee. 15 miles northwest of Las Vegas via N.M. 65. (505) 425-3534. ■ Hot Springs. Natural spring baths 5 miles west of Las Vegas on Hot Springs Blvd./N.M. 65. Part of Armand Hammer United World College of the American West. ■ Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge. Waterfowl, eagles. Near McAllister Lake, 5 miles SE of Las Vegas via N.M. 104 and N.M. 281. (505) 425-3581. www.fws.gov/ southwest/refuges/newmex/lasvegas/index.html ■ McAllister Lake. Camping, fishing, waterfowl viewing. Eagles nearby in winter. 6 miles southeast of Las Vegas via N.M. 104/281. (575) 445-2311. www.wildlife.state.nm.us ✰ Storrie Lake State Park. Visitor center, windsurfing, fishing, boating, water skiing, camping, picnicking. 6 miles north via N.M. 518. Reservations taken. (505) 425-7278. www.nmparks.com ■ Villanueva State Park. Visitor center, fishing, camping, picnicking. 34 miles southwest of Las Vegas via I-25, N.M. 3. (575) 421-2593. www.nmparks.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

◆ April 16. Kite Festival. Storrie Lake. (505) 425-7278.

◆ Throughout the year. Second Saturdays Artwalk.

(505) 425-2606. ◆ Jan. 1. Polar Bear Plunge at Storrie Lake. (800) 832-5947. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ Feb. TBA. Las Vegas Winterfest. Music and weekend packages. (505) 454-3238. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ March TBA. Faces and Interfaces. Juried exhibition. Las Vegas Arts Council. 140 Bridge St. (505) 452-1085. www.lasvegasartscouncil.org ◆ March 26-27. Civil War Weekend at Glorieta Battlefield. (505) 757-7241. www.nps.gov/peco

www.nmparks.com ◆ May TBA. Cinco de Mayo Celebrations. (800) 832-5947. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ May 30. Memorial Day - Moment of Remembrance. Flag raising ceremony. Pecos National Historical Park. (505) 757-7241. www.nps.gov/peco ◆ April 16. Kite Festival. Storrie Lake. (505) 425-7278. www.nmparks.com ◆ June TBA. Las Vegas Celebrates the Arts Studio Tour. (505) 425-1085. www.lasvegasartscouncil.org

6

www.salmanraspberryranch.com

(866) 281-1515

Store open daily • July–Dec • 9am-5pm Jan–June • Thurs–Mon • 9am-4pm

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Ilfeld Auditorium. Built 1914-21, state’s finest ex-

ample of Romanesque Revival style. Recently renovated, performances. NMHU campus, University Ave. Events: (505) 454-3385. ■ Las Vegas Arts Council. Promotes art, music, theater, literature. P.O. Box 2603, 87701. (505) 425-1085. www.lasvegasartscouncil.org ■ Ray Drew Gallery at Thomas C. Donnelly Library. NMHU campus, 802 National Ave. (505) 454-3338.

Sporting Fun ■ El Rito de San José Cabins. Stables. In El Porvenir on

N.M. 65, 8 miles northwest of Montezuma. HC 33, P.O. Box 186, Montezuma, 87731. (505) 425-7027. www.lasvegasnm.org ■ Santa Fe Trail Events Center. Rodeos, riding events. I-25. (505) 425-3850. www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  137


◆ June 4-5. Civil War Living History Encampment.

Pecos National Historical Park. (505) 757-7241. www.nps.gov/peco ◆ June 25-26. Fort Union Cultural Encounters. Demonstrations reflecting the different cultures present during the fort’s history. (505) 425-8025. www.nps.gov/foun ◆ July TBA. Pecos Sheriff’s Posse Rodeo. (800) 832-5947. www.pecosnewmexico.com ◆ July 1-4. Fourth of July Fiesta. (800) 832-5947. ◆ July 16. First Fort Union Tour. (505) 425-8025. www.nps.gov/foun ◆ July 29-31. Rough Riders Motorcycle Rally. (505) 425-8631. www.roughridermotorcyclerally.com ◆ Aug. TBA. Music from Angel Fire Concert. (505) 377-3300. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ Aug. TBA. People’s Faire & Music in Carnegie Park. (505) 425-1085. www.lasvegasartscouncil.org ◆ Aug. 1. Feast Day Mass. Pecos National Historical Park. (505) 757-7241. www.nps.gov/peco ◆ Aug. 6. Places with a Past Historic Sites Tour. (505) 425-8803. www.lasvegasnmcchp.com ◆ Aug. 6-14. Heritage Week. (505) 425-8803. www.lasvegasnmcchp.com ◆ Aug. 11-14. San Miguel/Mora County Fair. (800) 832-5947. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ Aug. 20. Fort Union Candlelight Tours. (505) 425-8025. www.nps.gov/foun ◆ Sept. 3-4. Cleveland Roller Millfest. (800) 832-5947. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com

◆ Sept. 10. Sabor de Las Vegas. Regional food, music

and art. (800) 832-5947. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ Sept 24. First Fort Tours. (505) 425-8025. www.nps.gov/foun ◆ Sept. 24-25. Pecos Valley Artists Studio Tour. (800) 832-5947. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ Oct. TBA. Día de los Muertos Altars and Art Displays. (800) 832-5947. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ Nov. Las Vegas Wildlife Refuge Fall Wildlife Drive. Sundays. (505) 425-3581. www.fws.gov/southwest/refuges/newmex/lasvegas ◆ Dec. 3. Electric Light Parade. (800) 832-5947. www.lasvegasnewmexico.com ◆ Dec. 10. Holiday Historic Home Tours. (505) 425-8803. www.lasvegasnmcchp.com ◆ Dec. 17. Holiday Celebration Las Luces de Villanueva. Villanueva State Park. (505) 421-2957. www.nmparks.com

LINCOLN SE Museums and Historic Sites ✰ Lincoln State Monument/National Landmark. Historic Western town, site of Billy the Kid’s last escape. Focal point: Lincoln County War (1878). Museums, exhibits: Billy the Kid, 1878 Lincoln County War, cowboys, Apaches, Buffalo Soldiers. Video daily. 32 miles northeast of Ruidoso on U.S. 380. (800) 434-6320, (575) 653-4372. www.nmmonuments.org

■ Wortley Hotel. 1881 living-history museum set in

hotel once owned by Sheriff Pat Garrett. Exhibits, history classes, walking tours, antique furnishings in all rooms, restaurant. On Billy the Kid Scenic Byway. (575) 653-4300. www.wortleyhotel.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

◆ Aug. 5-7. Old Lincoln Days. Living history through

special performances. (575) 653-4372. www.nmmonuments.org ◆ Aug. 6-8. Fort Stanton Live. (575) 653-4372. www.fortstanton.com

LOGAN/UTE LAKE SW Outdoor Getaways

■ Ute Lake State Park. Visitor center, fishing, boating,

waterskiing, marina, RV station. Some of the state’s best walleye fishing. Three miles west of Logan via N.M. 540. (575) 487-2284. www.nmparks.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆July TBA. Fourth of July Weekend Parade. 2nd St.

and 3rd St. (575) 487-2402. ◆ July TBA. Fourth of July Weekend Fireworks Display. Windy Point, Ute Lake State Park. (575) 487-2402.

LORDSBURG SW

www.lordsburghidalgocounty.net

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Lordsburg Hidalgo Museum. 19th-, 20th-century

mining and Old West memorabilia, archaeology and history exhibits, Indian culture, world wars/POW artifacts. 710 E. 2nd St., 88045. (575) 542-9086. ■ Shakespeare. Ghost town. Open monthly for visitors and/or re-enactments; call for dates. 2.5 miles southwest of Lordsburg. P.O. Box 253, 88045. (575) 542-9034. www.shakespeareghostown.com ■ Steins. Ghost town. 20 miles southwest of Lordsburg off I-10 at exit 3. Call for times. (575) 542-9034.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ McKasson Studio/Gallery. P.O. Box 395, Rodeo.

Located at 1 Custie. (575) 557-2457.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Shakespeare Ghost Town

Open for Visitors. Call for times. (575) 542-9034. ◆ Jan. 22-24. Annual Quilt Show. (575) 542-9646. ◆ Feb. 12. Cowboy Poetry Fiesta. Poetry reading, storytelling and singing. (575) 542-9258. ◆ April-Oct. Shakespeare Ghost Town Re-enactments. (575) 542-9034. ◆ July 4. Fourth of July. Rodeo, parade, barbecue, dance, 5K run and fireworks. (575) 542-8844.

138  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


◆ Aug. TBA. Hidalgo County Fair. Rancho de Hidalgo

rodeo, parade, carnival. (575) 542-9291. ◆ Nov. TBA. Historic Lordsburg/Hidalgo Library Festival and Book Sale. (575) 542-9646. ◆ Nov. TBA. Mixed Nuts Arts and Crafts Show. (575) 542-9864. ◆ Dec. 2. Hidalgo County Light Parade and Moonlight Madness Parade. (575) 542-3421.

LOS ALAMOS NC

www.visit.losalamos.com

www.lahighaltitudesports.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Bradbury Science Museum. Features films and

interactive exhibits interpreting Los Alamos National Laboratory’s contributions to modern science, research and technology, including its role in the Manhattan Project and current mission in national security. Open daily except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Free admission; photos are allowed. Open Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun.-Mon. 1 p.m.-5 p.m. At 15th and Central Aves. (505) 667-4444. www.lanl.gov/museum ■ Los Alamos Historical Museum. Manhattan Project, local history. Next to Fuller Lodge. (505) 662-6272. www.losalamoshistory.org

Outdoor Getaways ✰ Bandelier National Monument. 12th-16th- century Ancestral Pueblo cliff dwellings, backcountry hiking. 14 miles south via N.M. 501 and N.M. 4. (505) 672-3861, ext. 517. www.nps.gov/band/ ✰ Valles Caldera National Preserve. 89,000 acres in the top of a dormant volcano. Large elk herd and sweeping views. Guided and unguided hiking, crosscountry skiing, van tours, mountain biking, fishing, hunting, photo excursions, stargazing, horseback riding, wagon and sleigh rides, workshops, facilities rentals and group tours. 5 miles south of Los Alamos on N.M. 501 to N.M. 4, then 16 miles west. Office: 18161 N.M. 4, Jémez Springs. (866) 382-5537. www.vallescaldera.gov ■ White Rock Outdoor Rock Climbing. 11 miles southeast of Los Alamos: 7 miles east on N.M. 502, 4 miles south on N.M. 4 to White Rock. Info center: 35 Rover Blvd., Ste. D. (505) 662-8173.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Los Alamos Little Theater. Season TBA. Perfor-

mances, events at theater. 1670 Nectar. (505) 662-5493. www.lalt.org ■ Fuller Lodge. Rotating exhibits, northern N.M. artists, craftspeople, 2 galleries, arts & crafts fairs. 2132 Central. (505) 662-9331.

Sporting Fun ✰ Los Alamos Ice Rink. Outdoors. 4475 West Rd. (505) 662-4500 (winter). ■ Los Alamos Golf Course. 18 holes. 4250 Diamond Dr. (505) 662-8139. www.newmexico.org

■ Pajarito Mountain Ski Area. 37 runs, 140 inches

snow annually, 80 percent of runs expert/intermediate. Uphill lift capacity: 6,500 skiers per hour. 5 miles west off N.M. 501/502 and Camp May Rd. (505) 662-5725; snowphone: 662-5725. www.skipajarito.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Los Alamos Concert

Association. Various locations. (505) 662-9000. www.losalamosconcert.org ◆ March 12. Empty Bowl Project. Handmade bowls. (505) 662-4666. www.selfhelpla.com ◆ April 23. Earth Day Celebration. Pajarito Environmental Education Center. (505) 662-0460. www.pajaritoeec.org ◆May 7. Spring Arts & Crafts Fair. (505) 663-0477. www.laartscouncil.org ◆ May 13-15. Kite Festival. (505) 663-0477. www.laartscouncil.org ◆May 13-Sept 2. Summer Concert Series. Free weekly concerts. (505) 661-4891. www.gordonsconcerts.com ◆ Aug. 12-14. Los Alamos Festival, Fair & Rodeo. (505) 662-8173. www.losalamosnm.us ◆ Aug. 13. Summer Arts & Crafts Fair. (505) 662-1635. www.artfulnm.org ◆ Aug. 20-21. Los Alamos Triathlon & Kids Triathlon. (505) 662-8173. www.losalamosnm.us/rec ◆ Oct. 28-30. Halloweekend on MainStreet. (505) 661-4844. www.visit.losalamos.com

◆ Nov. 19. Holiday Arts & Crafts Fair.

(505) 663-0477. www.laartscouncil.org ◆ Dec. 2-4. Los Alamos Winter-Fest and Holiday Lights Parade. (505) 661-4844. www.visit.losalamos.com/events ◆ Dec. 2-4. The Nutcracker Ballet. Dance Arts Los Alamos. (505) 672-9462. www.danceartslosalamos.org

LOS LUNAS CE

www.loslunasnm.gov/chamber

Attractions ■ Mystery Rock. Stone preserves abbreviated form of

Ten Commandments. West of Los Lunas on N.M. 6 at base of Mystery Mountain. (505) 352-3596.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Depot.

Constructed in 1879, when the railway reached Los Lunas from Albuquerque, this is one of the oldest remaining depots in the state. (505) 352-3596. ■ Luna Mansion. Elegant mansion on historical register. Restaurant/bar open Thurs.-Sun. dinner. Tours available. 20 miles south of Albuquerque; 1.5 miles from I-25 on Main St. (505) 865-7333. www.lunamansion.com ■ Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church. In center of Peralta community, site of 1862 Civil War battle. (505) 869-2189. 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  139


■ Teofilo’s Restaurant.

NC NW

NE

House built in 1912. 144 Main St. (505) 865-5511.

SE

Sporting Fun

C SW

✰ Badlands BMX. Bicycle motocross. On Morris Rd. off N.M. 314. (505) 352-3596.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

■ San José Church. Completed in 1936, the church

houses a magnificent altar imported in 1919 to commemorate the area’s World War I veterans. (575) 588-7473.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Los Ojos Hatchery. (Formerly Parkview Hatchery.)

Visitor center, trout production, self-guided tours. Closed for cleaning; expected to reopen in spring 2011. Call first. (575) 588-7307.

◆ April 20. Easter Egg Hunt. (505) 352-7726. ◆ June 10-11. Summerfest. Entertainment, carnival,

car show, art fair, swap meet. (505) 352-3596. www.loslunasnm.gov/chamber ◆ July 4. Fourth of July Celebration Parade. (505) 352-3584. www.loslunasnm.gov/chamber ◆ Oct. 31. Haunted House. (505) 352-7726. ◆ Dec. 3. Christmas Electic Light Parade. (505) 352-3596. www.loslunasnm.gov/chamber

LOS OJOS NC Museums and Historic Sites ■ T.D. Burns Store. The first major public building in

Los Ojos, the store served as a community center. U.S. 84.

LOS RANCHOS DE ALBUQUERQUE CE

www.villr.com

Attractions ■ Anderson Valley Vineyards. Tours available,

open Wed.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Gift shop, tasting room. 4920 Río Grande Blvd. NW. (505) 344-7266. ■ Casa Rondeña. Winery. 733 Chávez Rd., Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, 87107 (between Río Grande/4th St.). Open Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m. (800) 706-1699, (505) 344-5911, fax: 343-1823. www.casarondena.com ■ Growers and Crafts Markets. Every Sat. from May-Oct. May-Sept: 7-11 a.m., Oct. 8-11 a.m., Winter Markets 2nd Saturday of every month, Nov.-April 10 a.m.-noon. 6718 Río Grande Blvd. NW 87107. (505) 890-2799. www.villr.com/market.htm ■ Río Grande Community Farm at Los Poblanos Fields. Community garden, crops for wildlife habitat enhancement, youth service-learning, greenhouse production, Maize Maze event, Labor Day weekendHalloween. Off Montano Rd., 1.1 miles west of 4th St., north on Tierra Viva, park in gravel lot to left. (505) 345-4580. www.riograndefarm.org n Unser Racing Museum. 30-plus race cars, history of 4 generations of Unsers. Open daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1776 Montaño Rd. NW, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, 87107. (505) 341-1776. www.unserracingmuseum.com

LOVINGTON SE

www.lovingtonchamber.org

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Lea County Museum. Former landmark hotel, built

in 1918. Local history, pioneer families’ mementos. Also on grounds: Love Home built in 1908, McDonald Mercantile & Post Office from 1912, one-room Baker School built in 1918. 103 N. Love. (575) 396-4805. www.leacountymuseum.org ■ Pyburn B&B. Historic rock home from 1935, on state, natl. historic registry. 203 N. 4th. (575) 396-3460.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ July 4. Party in the Park. (575) 396-5311. ◆ July 4. World’s Greatest Lizard Race. Chaparral

Park. (575) 396-5311. ◆ July 29-Aug. 6. Lea County Fair & Rodeo. (575) 396-5311. ◆ Aug. 3. Lea County Fair Parade. (575) 396-5311. ◆ Oct. 1-2. Lovington Chamber Classic Team Roping. (575) 396-5311. ◆ Nov. 5-6. Fall Arts and Crafts Festival. (575) 396-5311. ◆ Dec. 5. Electric Light Parade. (575) 396-5311.

MADRID NC

www.turquoisetrail.org www.visitmadridnm.com

Attractions ■ Madrid. Historic mining town on N.M. 14. Eateries,

galleries, shops. www.visitmadridnm.com ✰ Eaves Movie Ranch. Western movie set used in Hollywood productions. Open for special events. Staged gunfights & barbecue for large groups. Reservations required. (Not in Madrid.) 14 miles south of Santa Fe, via N.M. 14. Turn west on Bonanza Creek Rd. (C.R. 45). (505) 474-3045. www.eavesmovieranch.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ NW Fourth St. Segments part of original Route 66

and El Camino Real National Scenic Byway.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ July 9-10. Lavender in the Village Festival.

(505) 344-7877. www.lavenderinthevillage.com ◆ Nov. 5-6 . Los Ranchos Art Studio Tour. (505) 344-6582. www.losranchosarttour.com

LOVING SE Outdoor Getaways ■ Loving Heronries. Salt lakes host herons, egrets.

Off N.M. 128 east of Loving. (575) 887-9511.

140  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Art Walk. First Saturdays, every

month. (505)471-1054. www.turquoisetrail.org. ◆ May 30. Memorial Day Ball Game. (505) 438-4146. www.turquoisetrail.org. ◆ June. TBA. Gypsy Festival. (505) 438-8711. www.turquoisetrail.org. ◆ July 4. Fourth of July Parade. (505) 438-8711. www.turquoisetrail.org. ◆ Dec. 3. Christmas Parade. (505) 438-8711. www.turquoisetrail.org ◆ Through Dec. Madrid Christmas Open House Weekends. Every weekend. Holiday activities, light displays. (505) 438-8711. www.turquoisetrail.org.

www.newmexico.org


MAGDALENA SW Attractions

✰ Very Large Array (VLA) National Radio Astronomy Observatory. World’s largest radio-telescope array. Self-guided tours 8:30 a.m.-dusk. On Plains of San Agustín. Fascinating visitor center. 23 miles west of Magdalena on U.S. 60. (575) 835-7000. www.vla.nrao.edu ■ Magdalena. Historic mining town. Eateries, galleries, shops. www.magdalena-nm.com

photo: Leslie Bucklin

www.magdalena-nm.com

Museums and Historic Sites ✰ Box Car Museum. Local history, artifacts of Wild West, mining, cattle drives, circa 1885-1930. Next to AT&SF RR Depot. 108 N. Main St. (575) 854-2361. ■ Historic Buildings. Bank, commercial building, store, house, hotel and more. Downtown. Walking-tour maps available at local hotels, chamber. (866) 854-3217. ■ Magdalena Stock Driveway/Shipping Pens. At end of longest “hoof highway” in N.M. Used from as far away as Springerville, Ariz.; closed when AT&SF RR ceased in 1971. Just north of visitor center. (866) 854-3217.

Natural Wonders ■ Lady on the Mountain. Natural rock formation

resembles profile of Mary Magdalene on side of Magdalena Mountain.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Apache Kid Wilderness Area. In San Mateo Moun-

tains. 52 miles northwest of T or C via I-25, N.M. 1 and F.R. 225. (575) 854-2281. ■ Bear Trap Canyon Campgrounds. 25 miles southwest of Magdalena via west U.S. 60 and south on F.R. 549. (575) 854-2281. ■ Cíbola National Forest Magdalena Ranger District. Maps for hiking/campgrounds. 203 1st St. at south side of U.S. 60/Kelly Rd. (575) 854-2281. ■ Springtime Picnic Area. In Cíbola Natl. Forest. At junction of N.M. 107 and N.M. 1 (off I-25 south of Socorro), take N.M. 1 south, head west on F.R. 225, then F.R. 225A to end. (505) 854-2281.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ London Frontier Theatre Co. Call for schedule.

Presentations, serial theater year-round. P.O. Box 1126, 87825. (575) 854-2519. www.londonfrontiertheatre.com

www.visit.losalamos.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Museums and Historic Sites

◆ May TBA. Hawk Watch/Raptures. Manzano

■ Fountain Theatre. Built in 1905 as vaudeville house.

Mountains. (505) 847-2820. www.nmparks.com

MAXWELL NE Outdoor Getaways ■ Maxwell Lakes. Northern pike, trout, catfish. 2.5

miles northwest of Maxwell via N.M. 505 or N.M. 445. ■ Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge. Nature photography, fishing, wildlife viewing, picnicking. Waterfowl, eagles, prairie dog town. Take N.M. 445 north 0.8 mile, then west on N.M. 505 for 2.5 miles, then north on Lake 13 Rd. for 1.25 mile. (575) 375-2331.

MELROSE SE Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Veterans Memorial. Honors Melrose veterans.

Melrose City Park. Open year-round. U.S. 60/84. ■ WPA Artworks Collection. Melrose Library houses largest collection of Depression-era artwork in N.M. Open during school hours.

MESILLA SW

www.mesilla-nm.org www.oldmesilla.org

Attractions ■ Mesilla Mercado. Market. Every Thurs.,

Independent films. (575) 524-8287. mesillavalleyfilm.org ■ Gadsden Museum. Open by appt. only. Indian/Spanish artifacts, local history, in historic A.J. Fountain home. Corner N.M. 28/Bouts Rd., #1875. (575) 526-6293. ■ San Albino Church. 1851 Mission Church. Mesilla.

Outdoor Getaways

■ Mesilla Valley Bosque State Park. Day-use only

park located along Río Grande, bird watching, trails and educational/interpretive programs. Mesilla. (575) 523-4398. www.nmparks.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ See Las Cruces Calendar of Events on Pages 133-136.

MILAN NW Sporting Fun ■ Zuni Mountain Golf Course. 9-hole public course.

1525 Horizon Blvd., 87021. (505) 287-9239.

MOGOLLON SW Attractions ■ Mining/ghost town. 13 miles northeast of Glenwood. ■ Silver Creek Inn. A rare two-story adobe structure

built by Frank Lauderbaugh, circa 1885. Now a B&B, art gallery. (866) 276-4882. www.silvercreekinn.com

11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., noon-4 p.m. (575) 524-3262.

MANZANO CE Outdoor Getaways ■ Manzano Hawk Watch Site. Hawks, eagles, falcons.

Camping. Near Manzano. Off F.R. 245. (505) 255-7622. www.hawkwatch.org www.newmexico.org

■ Mesilla Plaza. Historic adobe town with shops,

restaurants, galleries, cultural events. (575) 524-3262. www.mesilla-nm.org ■ St. Clair Winery & Bistro. Tasting room, gift shop. 1800 Avenida de Mesilla. (575) 524-2408. www.stclairvineyards.com

MORA NE

www.moravalley.com www.morachamber.com

Attractions ✰ Salman Ranch. Historic La Cueva church, mill, raspberry farm. In La Cueva, 25 miles north of Las Vegas via N.M. 518. (575) 387-2900. www.salmanraspberryranch.com 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  141


■ Tapetes de Lana Weaving Center. Watch local weav-

ers produce rugs and other textiles. Intersection of N.M. 434 and 518. (575) 387-2247. www.tapetesdelana.com ✰ Victory Ranch. Petting/feeding ranch for South American alpacas. Visitor center/gift shop. On N.M. 434, a mile north of Mora. (575) 387-2254. www.victoryranch.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Cleveland Roller Mill Museum. Intact. Local, re-

gional history exhibits. Open weekends late May- Labor Day weekend, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Historic mill operates Labor Day weekend during Millfest, Sat., Sun. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 2 miles northwest of Mora on N.M. 518. (575) 387-2645. www.angelfire.com/folk/roller_mill, www.nmculture.org ■ St. Vrain Mill. Built in 1864 by Ceren St. Vrain. On the National Register of Historic Places. www.taos-history.org/unit/s-v-001.html

Outdoor Getaways ■ Charette Lakes. Fishing. Off I-25, exit 484 and

then 14 miles west via N.M. 569. (505) 445-2311. www.wildlife.state.nm.us ■ Coyote Creek State Park. Fishing, campsites, picnicking, RV hookups and showers. Between Mora, Angel Fire via N.M. 434. (575) 387-2328.

CATCH YOUR BREATH IN PECOS

✰ Mora National Fish Hatchery/Technology Center. 1 of 7 fish technology centers in nation. State-of-the-art water recirculation facility, scientific DNA tracking, several endangered species, new visitor center. On N.M. 434 at N.M. 2. (575) 387-6022. www.fws.gov/southwest/fisheries/mora.html ■ Morphy Lake State Park. Campsites, fishing, picnicking. 7 miles south of Mora via N.M. 94. (575) 387-2328.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ July 22-24. Mora Fiesta. Church services on Friday.

Weekend activities include street dances, parade, rodeo, mudbogs, vendors. ◆ Aug.-Sept./Oct. Salman Ranch Raspberry Picking. Dates vary due to season. Call to confirm field conditions for berry picking. (866) 281-1515, (575) 387-2900. www.salmanranch.com ◆ Aug. 20. John’s Cowboy Kitchen Car Show. Hot rods, show cars. (575) 387-5811. ◆ Sept. 3-4. Labor Day Weekend-Cleveland Roller Mill Festival. Arts and crafts fair, music, family activities. Mill in operation. (575) 387-2645. ◆ Dec. 11. Winterfest. Tree lighting, arts and crafts festival, light parade.

Indian & mission ruins at Abó, Gran Quivira, Quarai in Mountainair vicinity. Visitor center at corner of Ripley and Broadway (U.S. 60). (505) 847-2585. www.nps.gov/sapu ■ Salt Missions Trails. Scenic, historic loop tours along the eastern slopes of the Manzano Mountains. 70 miles southeast of Albuquerque, near Salinas Pueblo Missions Natl. Monument. (505) 847-2585. ■ Shaffer Hotel. Pueblo Deco hotel built in 1923, national landmark, dining room. (505) 847-2888. www.shafferhotel.com

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Cíbola Arts Cooperative Gallery. Local artists.

Open Tues.-Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (505) 847-0324. www.cibolaarts.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Manzano Mountains State Park. More than 200

Attractions

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

■ The Memorial of Perpetual Tears—New Mexico

National DWI Victims’ Memorial. Off I-40, west of N.M. 41. (505) 832-4614. www.dwimemorialofperpetualtears.org ■ Sierra Blanca Brewing Co. Microbrewery, tours and tastings. 1016 Industrial Rd. (505) 832-2337. www.sierrablancabrewery.com

Outdoor Getaways

142  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

■ Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument.

moriartychamber.com

native wildlife. Edgewood. (505) 281-7655. ■ Moriarty Historical Society Museum. Focuses on growth and development of typical homesteading and railroad town in early 20th century. 202 Broadway. (505) 832-0839. www.moriartymuseum.org

COME HOME TO PECOS. www.pecosnewmexico.com

Museums and Historic Sites

MORIARTY CE

■ Wildlife West Nature Park. 24 species of rescued

An ancient place with modern amenities, a village of family-owned lodges, restaurants, shops and guiding services. A wonderful place for hiking, world-class trout fishing, exploring ancient pueblo ruins, walking pivotal Civil War battlegrounds, horseback riding and just being.

www.mountainairchamber.com

species of birds, hiking, camping. The park is steward of numerous species of trees. Park is an hour south of Albuquerque, 16 miles northwest of Mountainair via N.M. 55 and N.M. 131. (505) 847-2820. www.nmparks.com

Museums and Historic Sites

Pecos is for people who want to slow down and hear wind in the high-mountain forest.

MOUNTAINAIR CE

■ Crossley Park. Shady stop for locals/travelers.

Along historic Route 66. (505)-832-4087.

Sporting Fun ■ Sundance Aviation. Hub for soaring. Instructional

flights, recreational rides available daily at airport. P.O. Box 2066. (505) 832-2222. www.soarsundance.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Oct. TBA. Pinto Bean Fiesta. (505) 832-4087.

◆ July TBA. Firecracker Jubilee. (505) 847-2321.

www.mountainairchamber.com ◆ Aug. TBA. Sunflower Festival. (505) 847-2205. www.mountainairarts.org

OJO CALIENTE NC Attractions ■ Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs. One of the oldest natural

health resorts in U.S., 10 mineral pools, lodging, full-service spa, restaurant. 50 Los Baños Dr., off U.S. 285. P.O. Box 68, 87549. (800) 222-9162. (505) 583-2233. www.ojospa.com

PECOS NE

www.pecosnewmexico.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Pecos National Historical Park. Pueblo, Spanish

Colonial mission ruins, abandoned by 1838. Santa Fe Trail landmark. Kozlowski’s Ranch was SFT stage station, site of Civil War battle at Glorieta Pass; Forked Lightning Ranch, summer home late actress Greer Garson, Col. E.E. “Buddy” Fogelson. 2 miles south of Pecos via N.M. 63. (505) 757-7200. www.nps.gov/peco

www.moriartychamber.com

www.newmexico.org


Outdoor Getaways Pecos River. Rainbow/brown trout, picnicking, some camping. Just north of Pecos via N.M. 63. ■ Lisboa Springs Hatchery. Oldest state trout hatchery. Visitor center. 2 miles north of Pecos on N.M. 63. (505) 757-6360.

Sporting Fun

photo: Dale Coker

■ Clancy Fishing/Wildlife Area. Scattered along

■ Cow Creek Ranch. Historic, Orvis endorsed fly-fish-

ing lodge. Horseback riding and pack trips, mountain biking, hiking, sporting clays, archery, spa treatments, children’s programs. P.O. Box 487, Pecos, 87552. (505) 757-2107 (summer). www.cowcreekranch.com ■ Los Pinos Guest Ranch. Historic guest ranch on Pecos River. Lodging, meals, fly-fishing, bird watching, hiking, horseback riding. In Cowles, 45 miles from Santa Fe, 20 miles north of Pecos via N.M. 63. (505) 757-6213. www.lospinosranch.com

www.pinosaltos.org

www.placitaschamber.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Museums and Historic Sites

Attractions

◆ See Las Vegas Calendar of Events on Pages 137-138.

■ Grant County Art Guild (often referred to as

■ Anasazi Fields Winery. Dry, oak-aged fruit wines.

◆ Also check www.pecosnewmexico.com

PEÑASCO NC Outdoor Getaways ■ Camino Real Ranger District. 15160 N.M. 75,

P.O. Box 68, 87553. (575) 587-2255.

PERALTA CE Museums and Historic Sites ■ Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church.

A well-maintained adobe church built between 1879 and 1888. (505) 869-2189.

PIE TOWN SW

www.pietown.com

Attractions ■ Pies. In the 1920s, a gas station owner began selling

apple pies. Norman Craig, who took over the business, continued the tradition. By 1927, the town petitioned the post office for the name Pie Town. Several cafés still offer the tasty treat: Pie-O-Neer Café, (575) 772-2711. www.pie-o-neer.com; Daily Pie Café, (575) 772-2700. www.dailypie.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Sept. 10. Pie Town New Mexico Pie Festival.

(Usually second Saturday). Pie Town Festival. (575) 772-2525. www.pietown.com

www.visit.losalamos.com

PINOS ALTOS SW

Hearst Church). The adobe Methodist-Episcopal church, built in 1898, received a financial gift from Mrs. George Hearst before construction. The gift was in thanks to the town after the family struck it rich in the Pinos Altos gold mines. The funeral hearse of Pat Garrett, the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid, is on display. Also on display are arts and crafts from the Grant County Art Guild artists. The gallery is open from May to early Oct., Fri., Sat., Sun. & holidays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (575) 538-8216. www.pinosaltos.org ■ McDonald Cabin. Indian fighter John McDonald was in this area as early as 1851, before the discovery of gold or the founding of the town. His log cabin is considered one of the oldest in Grant County. Spring Street. (575) 534-0406. ■ Pinos Altos Museum. A history museum specializing in local artifacts. 33 Main St. (575) 388-1882. ■ Pinos Altos Opera House. Built in 1969 and styled after an Old West opera house, the facility is composed of elements from local historic buildings. Displays Mimbres pottery, artifacts and old mining photographs. 34 Main St. Melodramas on weekends in the summer. (575) 388-3848. www.pinosaltos.org ■ Santa Rita del Cobre Fort & Trading Post. Completed in 1980, this is a three-quarter-scale reproduction of the fort built at Santa Rita copper mine in 1804 to protect the area from Apaches. Renamed Fort Webster in 1851. 25 Main Street. (575) 388-2211.

26 Camino de los Pueblitos. Open Wed., Sun., noon-5 p.m. or by appt. (505) 867-3062. www.anasazifieldswinery.com

Natural Wonders ■ Sandía Man Cave. Evidence of ancient man found

here. Self-guided hike. Off N.M. 165 in Sandía Mountains east of Placitas. (505) 281-3304. ■ Las Huertas Canyon. Scenic drive up northwestern slopes of Sandía Mountains, picnic and camping areas, fishing. N.M. 165 east of Placitas. (505) 346-3900.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ May 7-8. Placitas Studio Tour. (505) 867-3011.

www.placitasstudiotour.com

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Pinos Altos Opera House. Melodramas on

weekends in the summer. (575) 388-3848. www.pinosaltos.org/melodrama. Folk concerts by Mimbres Region Art Council. (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ See Silver City Calendar of Events on Page159.

www.newmexico.org

PLACITAS CE

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  143


PONDEROSA CE

Performing Arts/Galleries

Attractions

campus, student/faculty exhibitions, more. (575) 562-2607. www.enmu.edu ■ ENMU School of Music. Concerts in Buchanan Hall. (575) 562-2377. www.enmu.edu ■ ENMU Theatre Center. Call for dates. On northwest side of ENMU campus, just off U.S. 70. (575) 562-2711. www.enmu.edu

■ Ponderosa Valley Winery Inc. 3171 N.M. 290.

Open Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m. (575) 834-7487. www.ponderosawinery.com

PORTALES SE

www.portales.com www.rooseveltcounty.com

Attractions ■ Dalley Windmill Collection. More than 85 wind-

mills from around world with many restored windmills displayed. (800) 635-8036, (575) 356-8541. ■ Historic Downtown. Includes Roosevelt County Courthouse, U.S. Post Office, retail shops. (800) 635-8036, (575) 356-8541. ■ Peanut Processing at Hampton Farms. Each plant processes Valencia peanuts, making candy to peanut butter. Tours by appointment. (505) 359-3129; Sunland (575) 356-6638; Portales Select (575) 359-1454.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Blackwater Draw Archaeological Site &

Museum. First occupied by Clovis people about 11,000 years ago. Museum: 5 miles northeast of Portales on U.S. 70. (575) 562-2202. Site: 5 miles north of Portales on N.M. 467. (575) 356-5235. www.enmu.edu/services/museums/blackwater-draw ■ Miles Mineral Museum. Minerals collected worldwide. Presentations by ENMU faculty. On ENMU campus in Roosevelt Hall. (575) 562-2651. www.enmu.edu/ academics/excellence/museums/miles-mineral/index.shtml ■ Natural History Museum. Wildlife, plants, insects of Llano Estacado and reptiles from other areas. In Roosevelt Hall on ENMU campus. (575) 562-2174. www.enmu.edu/academics/excellence/museums/ natural-history/index.shtml ■ Roosevelt County Historical Museum. Articles from late-19th and 20th centuries, including a supply wagon that traveled over the Llano Estacado Plains, 1890 mobile peanut roaster, movie projector built in the 1920s. Off U.S. 70 on ENMU campus. (575) 562-2592. www.enmu.edu

Outdoor Getaways ■ Grulla National Wildlife Refuge. 25 miles south-

east of Portales via N.M. 88. (806) 946-3341. ■ Oasis State Park. 194 acres, fishing, camping, hiking, picnicking, playground, bird watching. 6 miles north of Portales via N.M. 467. (575) 356-5331. www.nmparks.com ■ Prairie Chicken Wildlife Areas. South of Portales, near Milnesand. Seasonal hunting, wildlife viewing. (505) 476-8101.

144  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

■ Runnels Gallery. In Golden Library on ENMU

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Jan. 17. Martin Luther King Celebration. Parade,

speakers, entertainment. (575) 356-6662 ext. 18. ◆ Feb. 22-23. N.M. Agricultural Expo. (800) 635-8036. ◆ June 17-18. Heritage Days Celebration. Bluegrass music, car show, motorcycle rally, arts and crafts, food. (800) 635-8036. ◆ July 4. Smokin’ 4th of July Bash. Vendors, fireworks, music. (800) 635-8036. ◆ Aug. 27-28. Roosevelt County Fair. Livestock, shows, carnival, music, vendors. (575) 356-4417. ◆ Oct. 14-15. High Plains Quilt Festival. Displays, workshops, vendors. (800) 635-8036. ◆ Oct. 15-16. Peanut Valley Festival. Arts and crafts, food.(800) 562-2631. ◆ Dec. 9. Christmas Jubilee & Lighted Parade. (800) 635-8036.

■ Wild Rivers Recreation Area. Campsites, hiking trails,

visitor center. BLM Natl. Scenic Backcountry Byway. 7 miles north of Questa on N.M. 522, 4 miles on side road. BLM: (505) 758-8851, visitors center: (575) 770-1600.

RAMAH NW Attractions ■ Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary. Rescued/captive-born

wolves, wolf-dogs. Open Tues.-Sun. Call for tour times and admission prices. 20 miles southeast of Ramah off N.M. 53. Take N.M. 53 to B.I.A. 25, go 8 miles, turn right on gravel road B.I.A. 120, 4 miles to sanctuary. HC 61, Box 28, 378 Candy Kitchen Rd., 87321. (505) 775-3304. www.wildspiritwolfsanctuary.org

Museums and Historic Sites ■ El Morro National Monument. Inscription Rock

bears autographs, drawings, petroglyphs, messages from Spanish explorers and westbound pioneers. Ancestral Pueblo ruins on mesatop. 13 miles southeast of Ramah on N.M. 53. (505) 783-4226. www.nps.gov/elmo

Outdoor Getaways ■ Ramah Lake. Trout/bass fishing, boat ramp, pic-

nicking. 2.5 miles northeast of Ramah off I.R. 132.

QUEMADO SW Outdoor Getaways ■ Gila National Forest Quemado Ranger District.

In city on N.M. 36 and N.M. 60. (575) 773-4678. ■ Quemado Lake. Trout fishing, 130 acres. 20 miles south of Quemado via N.M. 32 and N.M. 103. (575) 773-4678.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ The Lightning Field. Installation by Walter

DeMaría. Limited accommodations, reservations. May-Oct. (505) 898-3335. www.lightningfield.org.

QUESTA NC Outdoor Getaways ■ Carson National Forest Questa Ranger District.

2 miles east of Questa on N.M. 38. (575) 586-0520. ■ Red River State Trout Hatchery. Trout production, fishing in Red River, Río Grande. Just south of Questa on N.M. 522 to N.M. 515. (575) 586-0222. ■ Uracca State Wildlife Area. 14,000 acres of elk/ deer habitat. Wildlife viewing, hunting in season. 16 miles north of Questa on N.M. 522. (800) 862-9310.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Old School Gallery. Home of El Morro Area Arts

Council. Fine arts, crafts, events, concerts, workshops. Open Fri.-Mon., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 1 mile east of El Morro Natl. Monument via N.M. 53. (505) 783-4710. www.oldschoolgallery.org

RANCHOS DE TAOS NC Museums and Historic Sites

■ Ranchos de Taos Plaza. Established in 1779, the

plaza is enclosed by 20 buildings, including the historic San Francisco de Asís Church. ■ San Francisco de Asís Church. Built in early 1800s by Franciscans. One of most photographed sites in N.M. 4 miles south of Taos on N.M. 68. 60 Saint Francis Plaza. (575) 758-2754. ■ SMU in Taos at Fort Burgwin. Reconstructed 1850s cavalry fort. 6.4 miles south of Ranchos de Taos on N.M. 518. Offers public lectures every Tues. night in summer, archaeological excavation tours by appointment. (575) 758-8322. www.smu.edu/taos

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS www.newmexico.org


RATON NE

www.ratonmainstreet.com www.raton.info

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Raton Historical District Self-Guided Tours.

(800) 638-6161, (575) 445-3689. www.raton.info ■ Raton Museum. Mining, railroad, ranching artifacts. Art exhibits. Open Wed.-Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. from Sept.-Feb., Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. from April-Aug. 108 S. 2nd St. (575) 445-8979.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Sugarite Canyon State Park. Lakes, visitor center,

showers, campsites, hiking, historic exhibits. 6 miles northeast of Raton via N.M. 526. (575) 445-5607. www.nmparks.com

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Arthur Johnson Memorial Library.

Southwestern art. 244 Cook Ave. (575) 445-9711. ■ Old Pass Gallery. Shows by Raton Arts Council. 145 S. 1st St. Call for showings. (575) 445-2052. ■ Shuler Theater. 131 N. 2nd. (575) 445-4746. www.shulertheater.com

Sporting Fun ■ National Rifle Association Whittington Center.

Shooting ranges, lessons, special hunts, 33,300 acres. 10 miles southwest of Raton via U.S. 64. (800) 494-4853, (575) 445-3615. www.nrawc.org

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Raton Arts Humanities

Council. Special events, performances, exhibitions at various venues. (575) 445-2052. www.artsraton.org. ◆ Throughout the year. The Metropolitan Opera. Live simulcasts. El Raton Theater. (575) 445-7008. ◆ Throughout the year. Shuler Theater. Various productions, including the Raton Youth Theater, Kaleidoscope Players and large production of A Christmas Carol. (575) 445-4746. www.shulertheater.com ◆ May-Sept. Music on Main. Free concerts every Sunday. Ripley Park. (575) 445-4760. www.ratonmainstreet.com ◆ May 7-8. Cinco de Mayo Celebration. Music, food and craft vendors, Chihuahua race. Ripley Park. (575) 445-3689. www.raton.info ◆ May 22. Street Fair & Dance. Downtown Raton. (575) 445-4760. ratonmainstreet.com ◆ June 25-26. Bodacious Butterfly Festival. Sugarite Canyon State Park. (575) 445-5607. ◆ June 24-25. Raton Rodeo. PRCA rodeo. Jim Young Arena. www.exploreraton.com ◆ July 2-4. Santa Fe Trail Balloon Rally. Mass ascencions at dawn and night glows at dusk at La Mesa Airfield. Parade downtown. Music, food, craft vendors at Ripley Park. ( 800) 638-6161, (575) 445-3689. www.raton.info www.newmexico.org

◆ July 4. 4th of July Celebration & Fireworks

Display. (800) 638-6161, (575) 445-3689. www.exploreraton.com ◆ Aug. 5-7. St. Patrick's - St. Joseph's Fiesta. BBQ, karaoke, 5k run/walk. (575) 445-9763. www.exploreraton.com ◆ Sept. TBA. International Art Show. (575) 445-2052. www.artsraton.org ◆ Sept. 1-3. Memories of the Frontier: A Centennial Reflection. Theatrical presentation on women of the Santa Fe Trail. Sugarite Canyon State Park. (575) 445-5607. ◆ Sept. 17. Street Fair & Dance. Downtown Raton. (575) 445-4760. ratonmainstreet.com ◆ Sept. 30-Oct. 2. Raton Fall Festival & Baseball Bash. Junior college baseball tournament, arts & crafts fair. (575) 445-9181, (575) 445-2761. www.ratonnm.org ◆ Oct. 1. Centennial Event: Historic Homes of Original Raton Tour. (575) 445-8226. ◆ Oct. 31. Safe Trick or Treat Festival. Downtown Raton. (575) 445-4760. ratonmainstreet.com ◆ Nov. TBA. Centennial Tribute to Art. Old Pass Gallery. (575) 445-2052. ◆ Nov. 26-Jan. 1. City of Bethlehem. Drive from 2nd Ave. to Río Grande and up to Climax Canyon to enjoy holiday lights and displays. www.exploreraton.com ◆ Dec. 4. Electric Light Parade. Downtown Raton. (575) 445-3689. www.raton.info

RED RIVER NC

www.redriver.org

Attractions ■ Frye’s Old Town Shootout. Staged Old West

gunfight. Summer: Tues., Thurs., Sat., 4 p.m. Main St. (575) 754-3028. ■ Main Street Shopping. 1.5 miles downtown, art, souvenirs, gifts, restaurants. (800) 348-6444, (575) 754-2366. ■ Pioneer Canyon Trail. Hike, drive original gold-mining canyon. Map, history at chamber. (800) 348-6444.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Little Red Schoolhouse Museum. Historic one-

room schoolhouse. Old-time artifacts, photos, mining history. Jayhawk Trail behind Red River Library. (877) 754-1708, (575) 754-1714.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Greenie Peak. Locals claim this is N.M.’s highest

drivable peak. Directions at chamber. (800) 348-6444, (575) 754-2366. ■ Red River Chairlift Rides. (575) 754-2223. www.redriverskiarea.com

■ Wheeler Peak Wilderness. Hiking, camping,

N.M.’s highest peak at 13,161 feet. Maps at chamber. (800) 348-6444, (575) 754-2366.

Sporting Fun ■ Bobcat Pass Wilderness Adventures. ATVs,

snowmobiling, horseback riding, fishing. Cowboy Evening, chuck-wagon dinner Tues., Thurs., Sat. 4 miles east of Red River on N.M. 38 on top of Bobcat Pass. (575) 754-2769. www.bobcatpass.com ✰ Childrens’ Fishing Pond. Pioneer Rd. (800) 348-6444, (575) 754-2366. ■ Enchanted Forest Cross-Country Ski and Snowshoe Area. In Sangre de Cristos. 18.6 miles (30 km.) of ski, 9.4 miles (15 km.) of snowshoe trails, 5 km. of designated dog trails. Warming hut, restrooms. (800) 966-9381, (575) 754-2374. www.enchantedforestxc.com ■ N.M. Adventure Co. Jeep tours, mountain bikes, rafting, ATVs, guided fishing, rock climbing. 220 E. Main St. (575) 754-2721. ✰ Red River Ski and Snowboard Area. Most lodging, amenities within walking distance of lifts. General, private, children’s lessons. Uphill capacity 7,920 skiers per hour, 58 runs, 6 chairlifts: 2 triple, 4 double, 1 surface. (575) 754-2223. www.redriverskiarea.com ■ Red River Disc Golf Course. At Red River Ski Area, 9 holes. Course map at Sitzmark Sports. ■ Sitzmark Sports. Cycling, disc golf. On W. Main St. (800) 843-7547, (575) 754-2456. www.sitzmarksportsnm.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS For all events: (877) 754-1708, (575) 754-3030. www.redriver.org ◆ March 3-8. Mardi Gras in the Mountains. Parade, masquerade ball, Cajun food and music. ◆ May 13-14. Northern New Mexico Hunting and Fishing Conservation Expo. ◆ May 27-30. Memorial Day Weekend Motorcycle Rally. 30,000 motorcycles, 100 vendors. ◆ June 3-5. Red River Classic Car Show. ◆ June 10-11. River and Brews Blues Fest. ◆ June 18-19. Fine Art and Wine Festival. ◆ July 4. Fourth of July Parade. Main St. ◆ Aug. 18-20. Hot Chili Days, Cool Mountain Nights Music Festival & Cook-off. ◆ Aug. 20. N.M. State Green Chile Championship. ◆ Sept. 10-11. Enchanted Circle Century Tour & Top of the World Mountain Bike Race. ◆ Sept. 16-18. Aspencade Arts and Crafts Festival and Raffle. ◆ Sept. 31-Oct. 2. Days of 1895: Pioneer Days. ◆ Oct. 7-9. Oktoberfest. ◆ Nov. 24. Switch on the Holidays. ◆ Dec. 31. Old-Fashioned New Year’s Eve Party.

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  145


RIO RANCHO CE

www.RioRanchoNM.org www.rrrcc.org www.sandovalcounty.org www.ci.rio-rancho.nm.us

Museums and Historic Sites ■ J&R Vintage Auto Museum. More than 65 re-

stored cars, trucks, 10 cars that ran the Great American Race. Die-cast toys, tours, minimal admission fee. 3650 N.M. 528 (half-mile south of U.S. 550). (505) 8672881. www.jrvintageautos.com

Sporting Fun ■ N.M. Mustangs.

NAHL hockey at the Santa Ana Star Center. (505) 891-7300. www.nmmustangs.com ■ N.M. Thunderbirds. NBA D-League Basketball. (505) 265-3865, (505) 891-7300. www.nba.com/dleague/newmexico/ ■ N.M. Wildcats. AIFA Arena Football at the Santa Ana Star Center, 3001 Civic Centre Dr. (505) 999-9836, (505) 891-7300. www.santaanastar.com/promotion/ new-mexico-wildcats-schedule ■ Santa Ana Star Center. Concerts, sporting events, trade shows, car shows, championship ice shows, motorcycle rallies and more. 3001 Civic Centre Dr. (505) 891-7300. www.santaanastarcenter.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS For all events: (888) 746-7262, (505) 891-7258. www.RioRanchoNM.org ◆ Throughout the year. Sporting events, concerts, special events. (505) 891-7300. www.santaanastarcenter.com ◆ April 23. Park in the Park. Classic car show, food, vendors, 300+ vintage cars and trucks. (505) 891-4737. www.rioranchonm.org/ParkNthePark ◆ May 31. Memorial Day Parade. (505) 891-6196. www.ci.rio-rancho.nm.us ◆ Late June. Drums Along the Sandias. Marching music event. (888) 306-DRUM. www.drumsalongthesandias.com ◆ July 1-3. Corbin Hayes 4-on-4 Flag Football. (505) 891-5015. www.ci.rio-rancho.nm.us ◆ July 1-3. Pork & Brew State BBQ Championship and July 4th Celebration. Food, live entertainment, fireworks. www.rioranchonm.org/porkandbrew ◆ July 24-30. Don Mattingly World Series. American Amateur Baseball Congress in action. (505) 350-4110. www.newmexicobaseball.com/donmattingly-page.html ◆ Aug. 21. Mayor’s Sundae is Funday. Music, food, kid’s activities, vendor booths. (505) 891-5015. www.ci.rio-rancho.nm.us ◆ Sept. TBA. N.M. Mustangs Hockey. Season opener. (505) 891-5015. www.nmmustangs.com

◆ Nov. TBA. N.M. Thunderbirds Basketball. Season starts.

(505) 891-7300. www.nba.com/dleague/newmexico/ ◆ Dec. 3. Winterfest Parade. (505) 891-5015. www.ci.rio-rancho.nm.us

RODEO SW

www.hidalgocounty.org

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Chiricahua Gallery. Artist co-op, Southwestern

arts/crafts. Rodeo, on N.M. 80. (575) 557-2225.

ROSWELL SE

www.roswellmysteries.com www.roswellnm.org

Attractions ■ Alien Zone. Area 51 museum with alien picture-

taking props, blacklight space city. 216 N. Main St. (575) 627-6982. ■ POW/MIA Vest Pocket Park. Iron Cross placed by German WWII POWs, piece of Berlin Wall. 10th/ Pennsylvania streets. (575) 624-6720. ■ Spring River Park/Zoo. More than 250 animals of 60 species, miniature train ride, carousel, children’s fishing lake, free. 1306 E. College Blvd. (575) 624-6760. ■ Star Child. Roswell’s first UFO/Alien gift shop. 108 W. 1st St. (575) 627-6990. ■ Zone II. Hanger 84, alien merchandise. 106 S. Main St. (575) 627-6060.

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Anderson Museum of Contemporary Art/

Roswell Artists-in-Residence Foundation. 22,000 sq. ft., showcases 400-plus artworks by former fellows of RAIR Program. Open Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat., Sun. 1-5 p.m., free. 409 E. College Blvd. (575) 623-5600. roswellamoca.org ■ Gen. Douglas L. McBride Museum. History of New Mexico Military Institute and its Corps of Cadets. NMMI campus, 101 W. College Blvd. (575) 622-6250. www.nmmi.edu ■ Historical Center for Southeast N.M. Historical home built in 1912, museum, archives, antiques, 11,000 photos, research facilities, books, manuscripts. 200 N. Lea. (575) 622-8333. www.hssnm.net ■ International UFO Museum/Research Center. Displays on 1947 Roswell Incident, UFOs, related subjects, research library. Open daily 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 114 N. Main St. (575)625-9495. www.roswellufomuseum.com ■ Roswell Historic District Walking, Driving Tour. Many structures listed in natl. historic register, styles include Queen Anne, Prairie, Bungalow, Victorian, Italiante, Tudor. Self-guided. Historical Society for SE N.M. (575) 622-8333. www.hssnm.net

146  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


NC

■ Roswell Museum/Art

Center. Robert H. Goddard NW NE Planetarium. Science C exhibits, Goddard rockets, fine art, large collection of SW SE Peter Hurd paintings. Open Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 1-5 p.m. 100 W. 11th. (575) 624-6744. www.roswellmuseum.org ■ Wilson-Cobb History & Genealogy Research Library. History, genealogy, family research materials. Open Mon., Wed., Fri. 1-4 p.m. 301 S. Richardson. (575) 622-3322.

Outdoor Getaways ■ Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Wetlands

with 357 identified bird species, dragonfly population. Bird watching, wildlife photography, hiking, hunting, biking, observation blind with telescope. Tours: Oct.- May. N. Main St., east on Pine Lodge Rd., about 7 miles. (575) 622-6755. southwest.fws.gov/refuges/newmex/bitterlake ■ Bottomless Lakes State Park. Swimming, nonmotorized boating, paddleboat rentals, fishing, hiking, camping, mountain bike trail, showers, bathrooms. 12 miles east on U.S. 380, then south on N.M. 409. (575) 624-6058. www.nmparks.com ■ Spring River Bike/Hike Trail. Scenic paved bicycle-jogging-walking trail through the Spring River corridor. (575) 624-6718.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Roswell Community Little Theatre. Call for

schedule. 1101 N. Virginia, P.O. Box 305, Roswell, 88202. (575) 622-1982. www.roswelllittletheatre.com ■ Roswell Fine Arts League Gallery. Monthly receptions for guest artists (2nd Sun. each month, 1-4 p.m.), 25 exhibiting artists. Mon.-Sat., 10:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. Juried art show in Aug. 107 E. 5th St. (575) 625-5263. ■ Roswell Symphony Orchestra. Call for schedule. 1717 W. 2nd St., Ste. 112, 88201. (800) 300-9822, (575) 623-5882. www.roswellsymphony.org

Sporting Fun ■ Haystack Mountain OHV Area. Biking, motorcy-

cling. Northwest of Roswell. Information: 2909 W. 2nd St. (575) 627-0272. ■ Mescalero Sands North Dunes OHV Area. Motorcycling, quad cycles. East of Roswell off U.S. 380. Information: 2909 W. 2nd St. (575) 627-0272.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Feb. 26. Pecos Valley Stampede. (575) 623-8785. ◆ March 12. Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast. (575) 317-3695. ◆ March 19. Hobby Show and Spring Motorcycle

Show. (575) 624-6718. ◆ April 22-23. ArtFaire. (575) 622-0985. ◆ May 6-7. Party on the River/Cinco de Mayo/ Thunder on the River. (575) 624-6720. www.newmexico.org

◆ May 14. Race for the Zoo. (575) 623-8785. ◆ May 27-29. Hike It and Spike It 4-on-4 Charity

Flag Football Tournament. (575) 623-5695. ◆ June 4. Milkman Triathlon. (575) 624-6720. ◆ July 1-3. Roswell UFO Festival. (888) ROS-FEST. www.UFOfestivalroswell.com ◆ July 2. Alien Chase. (575) 623-8785. ◆ July 4. Independence Day Celebration and Mike Satterfield Memorial Fireworks Extravaganza. (575) 624-6720. ◆ Aug. 11-21. Roswell Fine Arts League Juried Art Show. (575) 622-4985. ◆ Aug. 19-20. New Mexico Championship Ranch Rodeo. (575) 622-5580. ◆ Sept. TBA. Rio Pecos Kennel Club Dog Show. (575) 623-9190. ◆ Sept. TBA. Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament. (575) 624-7704. ◆ Sept. 5. RSO Labor Day Pop Concert. (575) 623-5882. ◆ Sept. 5. Turtle Marathon. (575) 623-8785. ◆ Sept. 9-11. Piñatafest. (575) 624-6720. ◆ Sept. 23-24. Chile Cheese Festival. (575) 420-5718. ◆ Oct. TBA. Río Pecos Kennel Club Halloween Event. (575) 623-9190. ◆ Oct. 3. Eastern New Mexico State Fair Parade Day. (575) 623-9411. ◆ Oct. 3-8. Eastern New Mexico State Fair. (575) 623-9411. ◆ Oct. 3-8. Roswell Jazz Festival. (575) 624-7704. ◆ Nov. 11-13. Pecos Valley Potter’s Guild Art Fair. (575) 624-0257. ◆ Nov. 12. Bruce Ritter Memorial Run. (575) 624-6720. ◆ Nov. 18-19. Holly-Day Magic Arts and Crafts Fair. (575) 622-4985. ◆ Nov. 22. Kiwanis All Civic Luncheon. (575) 624-2059. ◆ Nov. 25-26. Christmas Fantasy. (575) 622-0985. ◆ Dec. 3. Reindeer Run and Electric Light Christmas Parade. (575) 420-5718, (575) 624-6720.

ROY NE Outdoor Getaways ■ Mills Canyon. Mountain lion, wild turkey, bald/golden

eagles, mule deer, antelope, bear, Barbary sheep, ducks, geese. 800-foot-deep Canadian River canyon. North of Roy, along Canadian River, via N.M. 39. (575) 374-9652.

RUIDOSO/RUIDOSO DOWNS SE

www.ruidosoconventioncenter.com www.ruidosonow.com www.raceruidoso.com

Museums and Historic Sites ■ Billy the Kid National Scenic Byway Visitors

Center. Maps, brochures, display room, maps carpeted on floor, walls show area sights. On E. U.S. 70, next to Hubbard Museum in Ruidoso Downs. (575) 378-5318. 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  147


■ Fort Stanton. Grounds and museum off Airport

Hwy. N.M. 220. Open Thurs.-Mon., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Military re-enactments and horse riding events. (575) 354-0341. www.fortstanton.com ■ Historic White Oaks. Cedarvale Cemetery (state historic site, grave of first N.M. governor, W.C. McDonald). Old White Oaks schoolhouse museum, artist studios. 3 miles north of U.S. 54 to White Oaks turnoff (12 miles northeast of Carrizozo via U.S. 54 and N.M. 349). www.whiteoaksnewmexico.com ■ Hubbard Museum of the American West. 10,000-plus items relating to horses & West, home of Anne C. Stradling’s collection. On U.S. 70 near racetrack. (575) 378-4142. www.hubbardmuseum.org ■ Ruidoso River Museum. 1878 Lincoln County War artifacts, photos and documents. Jewel collection. (575) 257-0296. www.ruidosorivermuseum.com

Outdoor Getaways ■ Bonito Lake. Rainbow/brook trout, campsites.

West off N.M. 37, north of Ruidoso. (575) 336-4157. ■ Smokey Bear Ranger Station in Lincoln National Forest. 901 Mechem. (575) 257-4095. ■ Village of Ruidoso Parks & Recreation Department. (575) 257-5030.

Performing Arts/Galleries ■ Flying J Ranch. Music, Western show, chuck-wagon

dinner. (888) 458-3595, (575) 336-4330. www.flyingjranch.com ■ Mountain Annie’s Dinner Theater. (575) 257-7982. www.mountainannies.com ■ Spencer Theater for the Performing Arts. World-class cultural center, Broadway shows, modern dance, classical/jazz music, family/children’s programs, 514-seat theater. Call for schedule. Free 10 a.m. tours Tues. & Thurs. Airport N.M. 220 in Alto. 108 Spencer Road. P.O. Box 140, Alto, 88312. (888) 818-7872, (575) 336-4800. www.spencertheater.com

Sporting Fun ■ Disc Golf. From Sudderth Drive, take Carrizo Canyon

Rd. 0.8 miles. Turn right on Grindstone Canyon Rd., then left on Resort Dr. to entrance of Grindstone Disc Golf Course. (575) 257-5030. ■ Geocaching. A high-tech treasure hunt. (877) 784-3676, (575) 257-7395. www.geocaching.com ■ Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort & Casino. Las Vegas-style gaming, golf, Mescalero Apache guided biggame hunts, horseback riding, camping, hiking, fishing. P.O. Box 269, Mescalero, 88340. (888) 721-9357, (575) 464-7777. www.innofthemountaingods.com ■ Ruidoso Downs. Arguably the No. 1 quarterhorse racetrack in country. Schedule: May-Labor Day. Closing-day $2 million All American Futurity, world’s richest quarter-horse race. Billy the Kid Casino. Near Ruidoso, off U.S. 70 West in Ruidoso Downs. (575) 378-4431. www.raceruidoso.com ■ Ski Apache. Owned by Mescalero Apache Tribe, near Ruidoso. 55 runs, 11 chairlifts. Uphill lift capacity top in state. Full-service ski school, lessons in Alpine skiing/ snowboarding, ski instruction offered in Spanish. Beginners ski free with purchase of lesson. At end of N.M. 532 near Ruidoso. (575) 464-3600; snowphone: (575) 257-9001. www.skiapache.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Jan. 29. Ski Apache Disabled (Adaptive) Skiers

Silent Auction. (575) 464-3193. www.skiapache.com ◆ March 18-20. Mountain Living Home & Garden Show. (575) 653-4882. www.nmmtnliving.com ◆ April 22-24. Kite Festival. (575) 257-3006. www.ruidosokitefestival.com ◆ May 6-7. Smokey Bear Days. (575) 354-2748. ◆ May 14. Fiesta de Hondo. (575) 653-4411. ◆ May 19-22. Aspencash Motorcycle Run & Trade Show. (800) 452-8045, (575) 257-8696. www.motorcyclerally.com ◆ May 28. Flying J Ranch Grand Opening. Gunfight re-enactment, dinner, show. Reservations required. (888) 458-3595, (575) 336-4330. ◆ May 28-29. Ruidoso Valley Noon Lions Gun & Collectible Show. (575) 258-1345. ◆ June 4. Mountain of Blues Festival. (866) 207-4816, (575) 257-9535. www.ruidosoblues.com ◆ July 1-4. Mescalero Apache Ceremonial and Rodeo. (575) 464-4494.

148  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

◆ July TBA. Smokey Bear Stampede and Rodeo.

Usually 4th of July weekend. (575) 354-3232. www.villageofcapitan.com ◆ July 29-31. Ruidoso Art Festival. (877) 784-3676. www.ruidosonow.com/artfestival ◆ July 30-31. Zia Weekend at Ruidoso Downs. (575) 378-4431. www.raceruidoso.com ◆ Aug. 5-7. Old Lincoln Days. Last escape of Billy the Kid pageant, parade, vendors. (575) 653-4025. www.billythekidpageant.org ◆ Aug. 6-7. Alto Artists Studio Tour. (575) 336-4778. www.altoartists.com ◆ Aug 26-28. Ruidoso Valley Noon Lions Antique Show & Sale. Ruidoso Convention Center. (575) 258-1345. ◆ Sept. 3-4. All American Gun & Western Collectible Show. Ruidoso Convention Center. (575) 257-6171. www.trekwest.com/gunshow ◆ Sept. 5 . All American Futurity. Ruidoso Downs Racetrack and Casino. Last weekend of the 2011 season. (575) 378-4431. www.raceruidoso.com ◆ Sept. 14-18. Golden Aspen Motorcycle Rally. (800) 452-8045, (575) 257-8696. www.motorcyclerally.com ◆ Sept. 24. Tour de Ruidoso. Century ride (100 miles), 100 K (62 miles), flat 20 miles. (575) 258-0028. www.active.com ◆ Oct. 1-2. Aspenfest Weekend. Parade, arts and crafts show, chile cook-offs, championship barbecue, Rod Run Car Show. Ruidoso Downs Race Track. (877) 784-3676. www.ruidosonow.com/aspenfest ◆ Oct. 7-9. Lincoln County Cowboy Symposium. (575) 378-4431. www.cowboysymposium.org ◆ Oct. 15. Ski Run Road Challenge. High-altitude running event. (575) 257-9507, (575) 937-7106. www.skirunroadchallenge.com ◆ Oct. 16-17. Ruidoso Oktoberfest. (575) 257-6171. www.trekwest.com/oktoberfest ◆ Nov. 1, 12, 13-23. Christmas Jubilee. Ruidoso Convention Center. (575) 336-8206, (575) 336-6918. www.christmasjubilee.net ◆ Nov. 25. Lighting of the Village. (575) 257-7395. www.ruidosonow.com/fol ◆ Dec. 1. Christmas in the Park. (888) 71- LIGHTS, (888)715-4448. . www.ruidosonow.com/fol ◆ Dec. 3. Parade of Lights. (877) 257-7395. www.ruidosonow.com/fol

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS www.newmexico.org


SANTA CRUZ NC Attractions Santa Cruz Lake Recreation Area. The dam was created between 1926 and 1929 to provide irrigation water to about 5,000 acres of land along the Río Santa Cruz. N.M. 76, 14 miles east of Española. Fishing, camping, hiking and boating. www.nm.blm.gov/recreation/taos/santa_cruz_lake.htm n

n Amelia White Park. Santa Fe Trail remnants, near

trail’s end. Corner Old Santa Fe Tr./Camino Corrales. (505) 955-2100. n Archbishop Lamy’s Chapel. A modest structure built in the foothills north of Santa Fe as a private retreat for the first bishop of New Mexico, Jean Baptiste Lamy. Bishop’s Lodge Resort. Bishop’s Lodge Road. (505) 983-6377. n Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Depot. Constructed in 1909 in California Mission style to introduce passengers to regional architecture. Garfield St.

n Barrio de Analco. Oldest Santa Fe neighborhood,

dates to Analco Indians of 1200s. San Miguel Mission is promoted as oldest church in USA, oldest house, galleries and restaurants. E. De Vargas St. at Old Santa Fe Tr. (505) 988-4127. n Bataan Memorial and Museum/Library. Military memorabilia. 1050 Old Pecos Tr. (505) 474-1670. n Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis. Constructed under Archbishop Jean Baptiste Lamy in 1869-93. 131 Cathedral Pl. (505) 982-5619. www.cbsfa.org

Museums and Historic Sites La Iglesia de Santa Cruz de la Cañada. Built in 1733, the mission is one of the largest in New Mexico and holds a treasury of Spanish-Mexican art. n

SANTA FE NC

www.santafe.org www.santafechamber.com www.SeeSantaFe.org

Attractions n Canyon Road. Initially Native American foot trail into

mountains. Shops, art galleries, restaurants. East from Paseo de Peralta. (800) 777-2489, (505) 955-6200. n Santa Fe Farmers Market. Produce, meats, other agricultural products year-round. Every Sat., AprilNov., 7 a.m.-noon; indoors 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov.-March. Tues. mornings mid-May-Oct. At Farmers Market Pavilion, 1607 Paseo de Peralta at Guadalupe. Thurs. 3 p.m.-6:30 p.m. July-Sept., Santa Fe Place parking lot at Rodeo Road and Zafarano Dr. (505) 983-4098. www.santafefarmersmarket.com n Santa Fe Railyard. Revitalized area features 13 acres of open space with pedestrian and cyclist trails, galleries, Santa Fe Farmers Market, museums and plaza. Service on the New Mexico Rail Runner Express train, for schedules www.nmrailrunner.com or call (505) 245-7245. For info on the Santa Fe Railyard, www.sfrailyardcc.org or call (505) 982-3376. n Santa Fe Southern Railway. 36-mile roundtrip between Santa Fe/Lamy. Restored vintage passenger cars, day trips, cocktail trains, BBQ trains, year-round events. 410 S. Guadalupe. (888) 989-8600, (505) 989-8600. www.sfsr.com n Santa Fe Vineyards. Open daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun. noon-5 p.m. 20 miles north of Santa Fe on U.S. 84/285. (800) 477-2571, (505) 753-8100. www.santafevineyards.com n Whitehawk Antique Shows. Premier natl. venue for buying, selling, trading antique Indian and ethnographic art. Shows at Santa Fe Community Convention Center. (505) 992-8929. www.whitehawkshows.com

Museums and Historic Sites n Acequia Madre. Acequias played a critical role in the

early history of Santa Fe, particularly in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Garcia and Acequia Madre streets.

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A native Santa Fean portrays a Spanish conquistador during re-enactment festivities at La Fiesta de Santa Fe. PHOTO BY EFRAIN M. PADRO.

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n Cristo Rey Church. Built between 1939 and 1940, the

church shelters the large stone reredos (sculpted religious panels) commissioned in 1760. After its original home was demolished, the plaque was stored for nearly 100 years before being displayed here. Corner of Cristo Rey and Canyon Rd. (505) 983-8528. n Cross of the Martyrs. Honors 21 Franciscans killed in 1680 Pueblo Revolt. Walk the many steps to the top of the hill for a great view of downtown. 600 block Paseo de Peralta. ✰ El Rancho de las Golondrinas. Living-history museum highlights Spanish Colonial period. Former El Camino Real stop, morada, mills, frontier schoolhouse, 18th- and 19th-century structures. Open Wed.-Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; guided tours April-Oct.; self-guided tours June-Sept. 15 miles south of Santa Fe Plaza, I-25 exit 276. exit 276B from Albuquerque. (505) 471-2261. www.golondrinas.org n El Zaguán. Territorial hacienda, home of historic Santa Fe Foundation, gardens. Open Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 545 Canyon Rd. (505) 983-2567. www.historicsantafe.org n Fort Marcy. Built in 1846, overlooks Santa Fe, protected U.S. interests. Rampart ruins. Prince Park, south of Kearney and Prince avenues. (800) 777-2489, (505) 955-6200. n Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Learn about O’Keeffe’s life and her achievements in exhibitions that feature her work, that of her contemporaries and those of living artists whose work has been influenced by her. Open daily, except for exhibition changes, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free Friday evenings 5-8 p.m. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center one block away offers behind-the-scenes tours of O’Keeffe’s artifacts when museum is closed. 217 Johnson St. (505) 946-1000. www.okeeffemuseum.org n Institute of American Indian Arts Museum. Contemporary art, tours. Open Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m. 108 Cathedral Pl. (505) 983-8900. www.iaia.edu/museum n Laboratory of Anthropology. By appt. only. Native American anthropology research. Museum Hill, 708 Camino Lejo. (505) 476-1250. www.miaclab.org n Loretto Chapel. Gothic chapel, miraculous staircase (double helix) built by mysterious carpenter believed by some to be St. Joseph. 207 Old Santa Fe Tr. (505) 982-0092. www.lorettochapel.com n Museum Hill. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of International Folk Art, Laboratory of Anthropology, Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. Milner Plaza, network of linking trails, Museum Hill Café. Santa Fe Trail sculpture by Sonny Rivera. Camino Lejo, off Old Santa Fe Tr. www.museumhill.org n Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. A premier repository of Native art and material culture, tells the story of the Southwest people from ancestral cultures to contemporary art, through changing exhibits, public lectures, field trips and education programs. Museum Hill, 710 Camino Lejo. (505) 476-1250. www.indianartsandculture.org

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✰ Museum of International Folk Art. Girard Collection of 106,000 objects from more than 100 countries. Miniature scenes of worldwide village life. Hispanic Heritage Wing with historic Spanish Colonial and contemporary Hispanic folk art. Neutrogena Wing with textiles, costumes. Museum Hill on Camino Lejo. (505) 476-1200. www.moifa.org www.internationalfolkart.org n Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. Collection spans 4 centuries, 5 continents. Rotating exhibits feature 20th-century and New Mexican arts. Open Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. On Museum Hill, 750 Camino Lejo, 87505. (505) 982-2226. www.spanishcolonial.org nmvisitors_ranchojacona_useb_press.pdf

n New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the

Governors. More than 400 years of stories are told through exhibitions in the state’s newest museum, the New Mexico History Museum. It is adjacent to the Palace of the Governors, the oldest continuously occupied public building in America. Built in 1610 as the colonial capitol of New Mexico, it housed Spanish governors, a Pueblo Indian community and the territorial governments of the Mexican and American republics. Native vendors sell arts and crafts under the portal. 105 Palace Ave., corner of Lincoln and Palace avenues. (505) 476-5100. www.palaceofthegovernors.org www.nmhistorymuseum.org 8/10/2007

R ancho J acona C asitas

3:48:02 PM

Let our houses be yours.

www.ranchojacona.com 505 455 7948 Furnished, fully equipped adobe casitas, from one to four bedrooms. Complete family kitchens. TVs and DVD players. Fireplaces, barbecues, wireless access. Farm animals, trees and flowers, skies full of stars. Child and pet friendly, partner and family friendly.

Twenty minutes from the plaza - forever from the everyday world.

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www.southwestsafaris.com

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n New Mexico Museum of Art. Contemporary and historic art, Southwest artists. St. Francis Auditorium hosts musical events. Open daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 107 W. Palace Ave. (505) 476-5072. www.nmartmuseum.org n Oldest House. Billed as “oldest house in USA,” dates back to Analco Indians of 1200s, then Spanish colonization in 1607; some vigas dated to 1646. Museum shop, gallery with works of WPA artist Louie Ewing, other artists. Open year-round, Mon.-Sun. 215 E. De Vargas St., 87501. (505) 988-4127. n Río Grande Depot. Built in 1903, the depot was used by the Santa Fe Central, Denver & Rio Grande, and Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railways. Now a restaurant. Guadalupe and Garfield streets. n San Miguel Mission Church. Billed as oldest church. Site dates to first Spanish colonization, rebuilt after 1680 Pueblo Revolt. 401 Old Santa Fe Tr. (505) 983-3974. ✰ Santa Fe Children’s Museum. Hands-on art, science, humanities exhibits, programs. 1050 Old Pecos Trail. Open to public Wed.-Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m. (505) 989-8359. www.santafechildrensmuseum.org n Santa Fe Plaza. Shops, galleries, historic buildings. End of Santa Fe Tr. and El Camino Real. Between Lincoln St./Washington Ave., San Francisco St./Palace Ave. (800) 777-2489, (505) 955-6200. n Santuario de Guadalupe. 18th-century mission museum, oldest shrine to Our Lady of Guadalupe in U.S., Spanish Colonial arts with a gift shop. 100 S. Guadalupe. (505) 983-8868.

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NC

n SITE Santa Fe. Contem-

porary art museum. Intl., natl., regional art exhibitions, lectures, education programs, SW SE all ages. Open Wed.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri., 10 a.m.7 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m. 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 87501. (505) 989-1199. www.sitesantafe.org n School for Advanced Research. Indian arts research center, more than 11,000 pieces of Indian basketry, jewelry, pottery, textiles, katsinas. Tours on Fri., 2 p.m., reservations required, fees. 660 Garcia. (505) 954-7200. www.sarweb.org n Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. Founded in 1937. Ongoing exhibitions of contemporary and historic Native American art with an emphasis on the Southwest. Exhibitions feature works by established and emerging Native American artists and photographers. Case Trading Post hosts ongoing events and sells jewelry, baskets, folk art, pottery and weavings. Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 1-5 p.m. Free. Museum Hill, 704 Camino Lejo. (505) 982-4636, (800) 607-4636. www.wheelwright.org NW

NE

C

Relax.

Outdoor Getaways n Hyde Memorial State Park. Campsites, group

shelters. 8 miles northeast of Santa Fe via N.M. 475 (Artist Rd.). (505) 983-7175. www.nmparks.com n Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve. Restored through Santa Fe Botanical Garden by volunteers, state funds. Visible ruts left by wagons on El Camino Real, bird watching, hiking, wildflower appreciation. Environmental-science workshops, events. In La Cienega area, south of Santa Fe. Tours through Santa Fe Botanical Garden May-Oct. on Sat. 9 a.m.-noon, Sun. 1-4 p.m. or by appt. (505) 428-1684. n Randall Davey Audubon Center. Nature trails, historic buildings, art. End of Upper Canyon Rd. (505) 983-4609. nm.audubon.org n Santa Fe Mountain Adventures. Guided hiking, GPS scavenger hunts, snowshoeing, mountain biking, whitewater rafting and horseback riding. (505) 988-4000. www.santafemountainadventures.com n Santa Fe National Forest Supervisors Office. Hiking/camping in Pecos Wilderness and Winsor, Aspen Vista, Arroyo Chamisa, Little/Big Tesuque trails. 1474 Rodeo Rd. (505) 438-7840. www.fs.fed.us/r3/sfe www.publiclands.org

www.innonthealameda.com 1-888-984-2127 VacationGuide2009.indd 1

INN ON THE ALAMEDA Santa fe, nm 9/2/08 3:15:56 PM

Performing Arts/Galleries n Allan Houser Sculpture Garden. Sculpture

garden, gallery on many acres. 15 miles southeast of Santa Fe. Open to public by appt. only. (505) 471-1528. www.allanhouser.com

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2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  153


n Aspen Santa Fe Ballet.

Dance company. 500-B St. Michael’s Dr. Performances at Lensic. (505) 983-5591. www.aspensantafeballet.com n Capitol Art Foundation. Permanent collection of contemporary art by artists who live and work in the state. It is housed at the State Capitol complex. June 7-Aug. 30: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular hours Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (505) 986-4614. n Center for Contemporary Arts. Monthly performances TBA. Year-round contemporary art, performances, ongoing film series, Native Cinema Showcase. 1050 Old Pecos Tr. (505) 982-1338. www.ccasantafe.org n Eldorado Studio Tour. More than 100 artisans. (505) 466-3256, 466-6245. www.eldoradoarts.org n Fine Arts Gallery. Southwest Annex next to Fogelson Library Center, College of Santa Fe. (505) 473-6508. www.csf.edu n Governor’s Gallery. N.M. artists in rotating exhibits. 4th floor, State Capitol, Old Santa Fe Tr. (505) 827-3089. n Greer Garson Theater Center. Call for schedule. College of Santa Fe, 1600 St. Michael’s Dr. (505) 473-6511. www.csf.edu n Juan Siddi Flamenco Theatre Company. Season: June to Aug. Performances at The Lodge of Santa Fe, 750 N. St. Francis Dr. Tickets: (505) 988-1234. juansiddiflamenco.com n Lensic Performing Arts Center. Versatile, wellequipped restored theater; well-known local/intl. performers, year-round. 211 W. San Francisco St. (505) 988-1234. www.lensic.org n Northern New Mexico Arts and Crafts Guild. Rotating artspace on Plaza, arts/crafts shows. Apprenticeship program. P.O. Box 8521, 87504. (505) 473-5590. www.artsandcraftsguild.org n Paolo Soleri Outdoor Amphitheater. Concerts in spring, summer, fall. Santa Fe Indian School Campus, 1501 Cerrillos Rd. (505) 989-6320. Tickets: (505) 988-1234. n Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. Summer season. Performances in St. Francis Auditorium, Lensic PAC. P.O. Box 2227, 87504-2227. (505) 983-2075, (888) 221-9836. www.sfcmf.org n Santa Fe Community Orchestra. Call for schedule. St. Francis Auditorium. (505) 466-4879. www.sfco.org n Santa Fe Concert Assoc. (505) 984-8759. Call Lensic for performances. Tickets: (505) 988-1234. www.santafeconcerts.org n Santa Fe Council for the Arts. Community arts exhibits, arts/crafts shows, lectures; Photo Arts Santa Fe. P.O. Box 8921, 87504. (505) 424-1878. www.photoartssantafe.com n Santa Fe Desert Chorale. Summer, winter seasons. 811 St. Michael’s Dr., Ste. 208. (800) 244-4011, (505) 988-2282. www.desertchorale.org n Santa Fe Film Festival. Community-wide celebration of cinema, special guests, concerts, talks, parties. (505) 988-7414, (505) 989-1495. www.santafefilmfestival.com n Santa Fe Gallery Assoc. Gallery resource. (505) 982-1648. www.santafegalleryassociation.org

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n Santa Fe New Music. Concerts and educational

events celebrating the music of our time. New classical music of the 20th and 21st century over a year-round season. For performance dates, locations: (505) 474-6601. www.sfnm.org n Santa Fe Opera. World-class performances. 7 miles north on U.S. 84/285. (800) 280-4654, (505) 986-5900. www.santafeopera.org n Santa Fe Performing Arts/Armory for the Arts Theater. Performances on weekends at armory theater. Call for schedule. 1050 Old Pecos Tr, P.O. Box 22372, 87502. Tickets: (505) 984-1370. www.sfperformingarts.org n Santa Fe Playhouse. Year-round. Check online for schedule. 142 E. DeVargas St. (505) 988-4262. www.santafeplayhouse.org n Santa Fe Pro Música. Orchestral and ensemble concerts. Call for schedule, locations. 1405 Luisa St., Ste. 2; P.O. Box 2091, 87504-2091. (800) 960-6680, (505) 988-4640. www.santafepromusica.com n Santa Fe Symphony & Chorus. Call for schedule. Concerts at Lensic. Children under 6 not admitted. 551 W. Cordova Road. (505) 983-3530. Tickets: (505) 983-1414. www.santafesymphony.org n Santa Fe Women’s Ensemble. Spring and holiday concerts. P.O. Box 1142, 87504-1142. (505) 954-4922. www.sfwe.org n Serenata of Santa Fe. Classical chamber music at Santuario de Guadalupe. 100 Guadalupe St., P.O. Box 8410, 87504. (505) 989-7988. n Shidoni Sculpture Garden. 8 acres. Free. 5 miles north of Santa Fe. 1508 Bishop’s Lodge Rd. (505) 988-8001. www.shidoni.com ✰ Southwest Children’s Theatre. Season TBA. Call for schedule. Performances at Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E. DeVargas St. (505) 984-3055. www.southwestchildrenstheatre.com n St. Francis Auditorium. In Museum of Fine Arts. Various musical events, plays, lectures and to rent. 107 W. Palace Ave. (505) 476-5072. www.mfasantafe.org n St. John’s College Art Gallery. 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca. (505) 984-6099. www.stjohnscollege.edu n Theaterwork. Season: year-round. New plays, classical plays, local artists. James A. Little Theater. (505) 471-1799. www.theaterwork.org

Sporting Fun n Kokopelli Rafting Adventures, Santa Fe

Adventure Tours LLC. Rafting, kayaking, camping, hiking, biking. 1103 Cerrillos Rd., Mail: 551 Cordova Rd. #540, 87505. (800) 879-9035, (505) 983-3734. www.santafeadventure.com n Los Pescadores Fly-Fishing Club-Gateway to N.M. Outdoors. Fly-fishing, clinics and classes, bird and game hunting, horseback riding, wilderness adventures. North Central and Northeast regions. 223 N. Guadalupe St, #159, Santa Fe. (505) 699-0919. www.lpffc.com n New Wave Rafting Co. P.O. Box 70 Embudo, 87531. (505) 579-0075. www.newwaverafting.com

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✰ Santa Fe Climbing Center. Indoor climbing, instruction, tours. 825 Early St., Ste. A. (505) 986-8944. www.climbsantafe.com n Santa Fe Rafting Co. 1000 Cerrillos Rd. Mail: P.O. Box 23525, 87502-3525. (888) 988-4914, (505) 988-4914. www.santaferafting.com n Ski Santa Fe. 69 runs, uphill lift capacity 9,350 skiers per hour, 1,725-ft. vertical drop. Lessons at all levels of Alpine, snowboard, Telemark. Handicapped access to main lodge, disabled-skiers program. Fall chairlift rides (late Sept.-early Oct.). 16 miles northeast of Santa Fe on N.M. 475. (505) 982-4429; snowphone: (505) 983-9155. www.skisantafe.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Buchsbaum Gallery of

Southwestern Pottery. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1250. ◆ Throughout the year. Here, Now and Always. More than 1,300 Native American artifacts. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1250. ◆ Throughout the year. How The West Is One: The Art of New Mexico. N.M. Museum of Art. (505) 476-5072. www.nmartmuseum.org ◆ Throughout the year. Let’s Take a Look. Bring artifacts for museum curators to evaluate. Third Thursday each month. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1250. ◆ Throughout the year. Multiple Visions: A Common Bond. Toys and traditional folk art. Museum of International Folk Art. (505) 476-1200. www.moifa.org ◆ Throughout the year. N.M. History Museum. Various lectures and presentations. (505) 476-5200. www.nmhistorymuseum.org ◆ Throughout the year. O’Keeffe’s Legacy. N.M. Museum of Art. (505) 476-5072. www.nmartmuseum.org ◆ Throughout the year. Santa Fe Concert Association. (505) 984-8759. Variety of national acts.

Celebrating 37 Years of Tradition On the Plaza, 60 East San Francisco Street Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.983.4562 505.982.6679 www.SantaFeGoldworks.com

Call Lensic for performances. Tickets: (505) 988-1234. www.santafeconcerts.org ◆ Throughout the year. Santa Fe New Music. Works by contemporary composers and from the last century. (505) 474-6601. www.sfnm.org ◆ Throughout the year. Santa Fe Pro Música.

Orchestral and ensemble concerts. Call for schedule, locations. 1405 Luisa St., Ste. 2; P.O. Box 2091, 87504-2091. (800) 960-6680, (505) 988-4640. www.santafepromusica.com ◆ Throughout the year. Santa Fe Symphony & Chorus. Concerts include works by Beethoven, Brahms, Handel, Cherubini and more. www.sfwe.org ◆ Throughout the year. Santa Fe Women’s Ensemble. Spring and holiday concerts. (505) 9544922. www.sf-symphony.org ◆ Throughout the year. Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now. Exhibition of the state’s people. N.M. History Museum. (505) 476-5200.

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◆ Through March. A Century of Masters: The NEA

National Heritage Fellows of N.M. Weavings, pottery, tinwork, straw appliqué, retablos, woodcarving. Museum of International Folk Art. (505) 476-1200. www.moifa.org ◆ Through May. Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives That Transform Communities. Museum of International Folk Art. (505) 476-1200. www.moifa.org ◆ Through May 8. Photography & Environmental Activism: Ansel Adams, Eliot Porter & Their Legacy. N.M. Museum of Art. (505) 476-5041. www.nmartmuseum.org ◆ Through May 8. Wild at Heart: Ernest Thompson Seton. N.M. History Museum. (505) 476-5200. www.nmhistorymuseum.org ◆ Through May 21. Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time. Artifacts and documents detailing the first 100 years of Santa Fe. N.M. History Museum. (505) 476-5200. www.nmhistorymuseum.org ◆ Through Aug. 7. Material World: Textiles & Dress from the Collection. Rarely-seen items ranging from household articles to ceremonial wear. Museum of International Folk Art. (505) 476-1200. www.moifa.org ◆ Through Oct. 1. A River Apart: the Pottery of Cochiti and Santo Domingo Pueblos. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1250. ◆ Through Jan. 2012. Huichol Art and Culture: Balancing The World. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1250. ◆ Jan. 29. Souper Bowl XVII. Top chefs compete for best soup. (505) 471-1633. www.thefooddepot.org ◆ Jan. 30. Hutton Broadcasting Santa Fe Wedding Fair, Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W Marcy St., (505) 471-1067. www.huttonbroadcasting.com ◆ Feb. 11, 2011-Jan. 1, 2012. The Art of Tony Da. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1250. ◆ Feb. 25-27. ARTFeast. Special dining events range from brunches to the Edible Art Tour, where more than 40 galleries share space with food from top chefs. (505) 603-4643. www.artfeast.com

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◆ March 6-12. Restaurant Week: Savor the

Flavor, Relish the Price. Restaurants and hotels offering three-course, prix fixe dinners at greatly reduced prices. (505) 847-3333. www.restaurantweeknm.com ◆ April 2. Japanese Cultural Festival Theme: Calligraphy. Santa Fe Community Convention Center. (505) 471-9022. www.santafejin.org ◆ April 3. Ski Santa Fe Season Ends. (505) 983-9155. www.skisantafe.com ◆ April 17, 2011- April 2012. Folk Art of the Andes. Exhibit opening. Museum of International Folk Art. (505) 476-1200. www.moifa.org ◆ April 18- Aug. 28. Earth Now: American Photographers and the Environment. N.M. Museum of Art. (505) 476-5041. www.nmartmuseum.org ◆ April 23. Avanyu Trail Earth Day. Earth Day activities. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1250, (505) 476-1272. ◆ May TBA. Community Days. The Plaza. Food, entertainment, music, children’s activities, nonprofit organization exhibits. lmgallegos@santafenm.gov ◆ May-Sept. Pequeño Home and Garden Tours. Tour three beautiful homes and high-desert gardens. By reservation. Santa Fe Garden Club. (505) 984-0022. ◆ May-Oct. Art Shows at Cathedral Park and the Plaza. Juried fine arts and crafts. Call sponsoring groups for times and locations: Santa Fe Council for the Arts. (505) 424-1878; N.M. Fine Arts & Crafts Guild. (505) 473-5590, (505) 412-1407. www.artsandcraftsguild.org; Challenge N.M. (505) 988-7621 ext.114. www.challengenewmexico.org ◆ May 7-8. Battlefield New Mexico: The Civil War and More. Military drills, camp life, lectures and reenactments of Civil War battles fought in New Mexico. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.golondrinas.org ◆ May 14-15. Home and Remodeling Show. Santa Fe Area Home Builders Association. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. (505) 982-1774. www.sfahba.com ◆ May 15. Century Bike Run. (505) 982-1282. www.santafecentury.com

◆ May 27. Native Treasures Reception.

(505) 476-1250. www.nativetreasuressantafe.org ◆ May 28-29. Native Treasures Indian Arts Festival. Santa Fe Convention Center. (505) 476-1250. www.nativetreasuressantafe.org ◆ June-Aug. Juan Siddi Flamenco Season. (505) 988-1234. www.juansiddiflamenco.com ◆ June TBA. Rodeo de Santa Fe. Santa Fe Rodeo Grounds, 3237 Rodeo Rd. (505) 471-4300. www.rodeodesantafe.org ◆ June TBA. Thirsty Ear Music Festival. Rootsmusic event hosts both local and national acts. (505) 988-1234. www.thirstyearfestival.com ◆ June 4-5. Spring Festival and Children’s Fair. Costumed villagers shearing sheep and baking bread. Hands-on activities for kids. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.golondrinas.org ◆ June 14, 16, 21, 23, 28. Arts Alive! Hands-on workshops for kids. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1250. ◆ June 17-Sept. 11. Home Lands: How Women Made the West. Artifacts, art, photographs and biographies of individual women. N.M. History Museum. (505) 476-5200. www.nmhistorymuseum.org ◆ July TBA. N.M. Jazz Festival. Various venues. (505) 988-1234. www.ticketssantafe.org ◆ July 1-Aug. 27. Santa Fe Opera Season. This year’s offerings include Faust, Puccini, Vivaldi, Menotti, Berg. Santa Fe Opera, U.S. 84/285 exit 168. (505) 986-5900, (800) 280-4654. www.santafeopera.org ◆ July 2-3. Santa Fe Wine Festival. Tasting, vintners, food, music, art. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.santafewinefestival.com ◆ July 3-10. International Folk Arts Week. (505) 476-1200. www.internationalfolkart.org ◆ July 4. Pancakes on the Plaza. Breakfast, car show, entertainment, arts & crafts. Santa Fe Plaza. (505) 984-0022. www.pancakesontheplaza.com ◆ July 4. Fireworks Display. Santa Fe High School. (505) 983-6632. ◆ July 8-10. Santa Fe International Folk Art Market. Annual market showcases work of more than 170 artisans from 50 countries. Museum Hill, 710 Camino Lejo. (505) 476-1197. www.folkartmarket.org ◆ July 7-10. Art Santa Fe. Art from international galleries under one roof. Venue TBA. (505) 988-8883. www.artsantafe.com ◆ July 16-17. ¡Viva México! Celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine and crafts. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.golondrinas.org ◆ July 17-Aug. 22. Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. (888) 221-9836, (505) 982-1890. www.sfcmf.org ◆ July 19, 26. Behind Adobe Walls. Home/garden tours. (505) 984-0022. www.westwindtravel.net ◆ July 23-24. Herb and Lavender Fair. Herb garden tours, lavender and herb products, lectures and activities. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.golondrinas.org

www.newmexico.org


◆ July 30-31. Contemporary & Traditional

Spanish Markets. The Plaza. Contemporary: (505) 438-4367. www.contemporaryhispanicmarket.com; Traditional: (505) 982-2226. www.spanishmarket.org ◆ Aug. 4-7. SOFA West. The Sculpture Objects and Functional Art Fair. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. (800) 563-7632. www.sofaexpo.com ◆ Aug. 6-7. Girls Inc. Arts and Crafts Fair. (505) 982-2042. www.girlsincofsantafe.org ◆ Aug. 6-7. Summer Festival, Frontier Days and Horses of the West. Mountain men and women demonstrating their skills and spinning tales of the past. Peruvian Paso horse shows. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.golondrinas.org ◆ Aug. 11-13. Antique Ethnographic Art Show. Whitehawk. (505) 992-8929. www.whitehawkshows.com ◆ Aug. 12, 17, 24, 26. Breakfast with the Curators. Museum Hill Café. Reservations required. (505) 476-1271, (505) 476-1247. ◆ Aug. 12-14, 18-21. Haciendas Parade of Homes. (505) 988-1234. www.ticketssantafe.org ◆ Aug. 14-16. Invitational Antique Indian Art Show. Whitehawk. (505) 992-8929. www.whitehawkshows.com ◆ Aug. 20-21. Indian Market. Artwork by top Native American artists. (505) 983-5220. www.swaia.org ◆ Aug. 20-21. Native Cinema Showcase. Nativemade and -directed films dealing with issues of indigenous life and identity. CCA Cinematheque, 1050 Old Pecos Tr. (505) 982-1338. www.ccasantafe.com ◆ Aug. 26-28. Bluegrass & Old Time Music Festival. Local and national acts on three stages. Santa Fe County Fair Grounds. www.southwestpickers.org ◆ Sept. 3-4. Fiesta de los Niños. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.golondrinas.org ◆ Sept. 8. Burning of Zozobra. Torching of 50-foottall Old Man Gloom. Kiwanis event. Fort Marcy Park. (505) 660-1965. www.zozobra.com ◆ Sept. 9-11. Fiesta de Santa Fe. (505) 988-7575, (505) 204-1335. www.santafefiesta.org ◆ Sept. 17. Barkin' Ball. The Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society’s annual fundraiser. Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. (505) 983-4309. www.sfhumanesociety.org ◆ Sept. 17-18. Santa Fe Renaissance Fair. Jousting, jugglers, dancers, vendors, food, mead. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.sfrenfair.org ◆ Sept. 21-25. Santa Fe Wine & Chile Festival. (505) 438-8060. www.santafewineandchile.org ◆ Oct. TBA. Farmer’s Market Fall Fiesta. Farmers Market Building Pavilion, 1607 Paseo de Peralta. (505) 983-7726. www.farmersmarketinstitute.org ◆ Oct. 1, 2011-Sept. 16, 2012. Old Shirts, Young Brides: Macedonian Village Dress. Museum of International Folk Art. (505) 476-1200. www.moifa.org

www.newmexico.org

◆ Oct. 1-2. Harvest Festival. Crush grapes, string

ristras. El Rancho de las Golondrinas. (505) 471-2261. www.golondrinas.org ◆ Oct. 21-25. Santa Fe Film Festival. Various venues. (505) 989-1495. www.santafefilmfestival.com ◆ Oct. 21, 2011-Jan. 22, 2012. The St. John’s Bible: Illuminating the Word. Excerpts from the handwritten and illuminated St. John’s Bible. N.M. History Museum. (505) 476-5200. www.nmhistorymuseum.org ◆ Oct. 21, 2011-Jan. 28, 2012. The Contemplative Landscape. A photographic celebration of the places that move us. N.M. History Museum. (505) 476-5200. www.nmhistorymuseum.org ◆ Oct. 22-23. Laboratory of Anthropology Book Sale. Museum of Indian Arts & Culture. (505) 476-1264. www.indianartsandculture.org/booksale ◆ Nov. TBA. Lighting of the Christmas Tree on the Plaza. (505) 955-6200, (800) 777-2489. ◆ Nov. 1. Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos progam. Community dinners, processions, art shows, altar displays. Museum of International Folk Art. (505) 476-1200. www.moifa.org; El Museo Cultural. (505) 992-0591. www.elmuseocultural.org ◆ Nov. 11-13. Recycle Santa Fe Arts Festival. Area artists mold reusables into everything from licenseplate lamps to typewriter-key jewelry. (505) 603-0558. www.recyclesantafe.org ◆ Nov. 12. Santa Fe Art Auction. Western art from the mid-19th to mid-20th centuries. Venue TBA. (505) 954-5858. www.santafeartauction.com ◆ Nov. 18, 2011-April 2014. Fancy Basket: Indian Basketmaker Artists and Their Patrons. Museum of Indian Arts & Culture. (505) 476-1250. ◆ Nov. 24. Santa Fe Ski Season Opens. Dependent on weather. (505) 983-9155. www.skisantafe.com ◆ Nov. 26-27. Winter Indian Market. (505) 983-5220. www.swaia.org ◆ Dec. TBA. Baumann Marionette Holiday Performance. N.M. Museum of Art. (505) 476-5068. www.nmartmuseum.org ◆ Dec. TBA. Christmas at the Palace. (505) 476-5100. www.palaceofthegovernors.org ◆ Dec. TBA. Las Posadas. (505) 476-5100. www.palaceofthegovernors.org ◆ Dec. 3-4. Winter Spanish Market. (505) 982-2226. www.spanishmarket.org ◆ Dec. 4. Winter Traditions. Activities and demonstrations of Native American arts and crafts. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. (505) 476-1272. ◆ Dec. 24. Canyon Road Farolito Walk. Begins at dusk. (505) 955-6200, (800) 777-2489.

SANTA ROSA NE

www.santarosanm.org

Museums and Historic Sites ✰ Route 66 Auto Museum. Dedicated to the preservation of Route 66 custom cars and memorabilia. 2411 Historic Route 66. Santa Rosa, NM 88435. (575) 472-1966. 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  157


NC

n Bless Me Última Statue.

Santa Rosa Public Art project C at Rudolfo Anaya Landscape Park. Bronze statue by sculpSW SE tor Reynaldo Rivera of author Rudolfo Anaya writing amid a stone waterfall with a tranquil pool with mosaic golden carp; bronze hojas (metal pages) along the walkway have passages from the New Mexico classic novel. A bronze bas-relief depicts the history of Santa Rosa farming and ranching, the development of the railroad and Route 66. (575) 472-3763. NW

NE

Natural Wonders n Blue Hole. Natural, 81-ft.-deep, crystal-clear arte-

sian spring. Year-round scuba diving. (575) 472-3763.

Outdoor Getaways n Janes-Wallace Memorial Park. Lake stocked with

rainbow trout, bass, channel catfish. Just south of Santa Rosa on N.M. 91. (575) 472-3763. n Perch Lake. Scuba diving and fishing. N.M. 91 near Santa Rosa. (575) 472-3370. n Puerto de Luna-Pecos River Canyon. Scenic canyon via N.M. 91. (575) 472-3763. n Rock Lake State Fish Hatchery. 2 miles south of Santa Rosa on River Rd. (575) 472-3690.

✰ Santa Rosa Lake State Park. Visitor center, eagle sighting, campsites. Catfish, bass, crappie, walleye. 7 miles north of Santa Rosa via N.M. 91. (575) 472-3110. www.nmparks.com ✰ Santa Rosa Park Lake. Swimming Memorial to Labor Day, certified lifeguards, waterplay slide, pedal boats, canoes, stocked fishing ponds, company picnics. (575) 472-3763.

Sporting Fun n Santa Rosa Golf Course & Country Club.

Half mile off Historic Rt. 66 on Chuck-n-Dale Lane. (575) 472-4653.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ May 28-30. Santa Rosa Days. Memorial Day soft-

ball tournament, food and concession booths, contests for kids, kids jumps, rock climbing, entertainment, arts and crafts. Park Lake. (575) 472-3763. ◆ June 17-18. Smokeout Rally-Motorcycle Rally. Varieties of choppers, vendors, entertainment, beer garden, races and contests. The Long Road. (575) 472-3763. www.smokeoutrally.com ◆ July 2. Nuestra Señora de Refugio Fiesta in Puerto de Luna. Food, games, music, fiesta dance. Historic Puerto de Luna. 10 miles south of Santa Rosa. (575) 472-3763. ◆ July 2-4. Firecracker Tournament. Class D & E softball teams. Fireworks display. waterslides, pedal boats, swimming and fishing. Park Lake. (575) 472-3763.

◆ July 4. Fourth of July Celebration. Fireworks,

food and entertainment. Park Lake. (575) 472-3763. ◆ Aug. 4-7. Guadalupe County Fair. Exhibits, pet parade, Garden Club flower show, BBQ, rodeo, dance, Marla Lujan Memorial, horseshoes and cook-off. (575) 472-3652. www.guadalupecountyfair.com ◆ Aug. 19-20. Santa Rosa de Lima Fiesta. Food, games, mariachis, dance and bingo. (575) 472-3724. ◆ Sept. 3-5. Labor Day Softball and Beach Volleyball Tournaments. (575) 472-3763. ◆ Sept. 9-10. Route 66 Festival. The Pecos River Motorcycle Rally and Poker Run. Entertainment, bike rodeo, Wild West Shootout and dance. (575) 472-3763. www.santarosanm.org ◆ Oct. 2. Santa Rosa de Lima Church Duathlon. Cycling and running event. (575) 799-9697. ◆ Dec. 11. Christmas Light Parade and Main Street Celebration. (575) 472-3763.

SANTA TERESA SW Museums and Historic Sites n War Eagles Air Museum. WWII warbirds, Korean

War jet fighters, antique automobiles. Open Tues.Sun., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 8012 Airport Rd. at Santa Teresa Airport, 9 miles north of Santa Teresa. (575) 589-2000. www.war-eagles-air-museum.com

SHIPROCK NW Natural Wonders ✰ Four Corners Monument. Slab designates where N.M., Ariz., Utah, Colo. meet. Visitor center, crafts, food booths. 30 miles northwest of Shiprock off U.S. 64 and U.S. 160. Navajo Parks/ Rec., P.O. Box 9000, Window Rock, Ariz. 86515. (928) 871-6647. www.navajonationparks.org n Ship Rock. Formation rises 1,700 feet from desert floor. Sacred to Navajos. Viewing allowed, off-limits to hikers, mountain climbers. 10 miles southwest of Shiprock off U.S. 491.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ See Farmington Calendar of Events on Page 126.

SILVER CITY SW

www.silvercity.org www.oldwestcountry.com

Museums and Historic Sites n Fort Bayard. 1863 U.S. Infantry post, once housed

Buffalo Soldiers. Original officers’ quarters still in use. 10 miles east of Silver City off N.M. 180. (575) 538-3785.

158  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

www.newmexico.org


n Georgetown. An almost forgotten silver-mining

ghost town on Georgetown Road. The road runs 8 miles through the Gila National Forest and connects to the Trail of the Mountain Spirits National Scenic Byway on N.M. 35 in the Mimbres Valley and on N.M. 152 near the Santa Rita Mine Overlook. On your ride you will see a kiosk with Georgetown historical pictures and information, the Georgetown cemetery and the valley once home to 1,200 townsfolk. (575) 534-4529. www.georgetowncabins.com ✰ Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument. 13thcentury cliff-dwelling ruins. 44 miles north of Silver City via N.M. 15. (RVs, trailers, large vehicles take N.M. 152 east of Silver City 21 miles to N.M. 35, then north for 26 miles to N.M. 15 and 19 miles to dwellings.) (575) 536-9461. www.nps.gov/gicl n Royal Scepter Mineral Museum. Minerals and jewelry. 1805 Little Walnut Rd. (575) 538-9001. n San Lorenzo. Historic church, 24 miles east of Silver City via U.S. 180 and N.M. 152. n Silver City Museum. Regional history, mining exhibits, Victorian furnishings, Indian artifacts. 312 W. Broadway. (575) 538-5921. www.silvercitymuseum.org n Western N.M. University Museum. World’s largest permanent exhibit of Mimbres pottery, natural/local history. Traveling exhibits. On campus at end of 10th St. (575) 538-6386. www.wnmu.edu/univ/museum.htm

Natural Wonders n Kneeling Nun. Monolith resembles praying nun.

20 miles east of Silver City via U.S. 180, off N.M. 152.

Outdoor Getaways n Bear Canyon Reservoir. Fishing, recreational facili-

ties. 29 miles northeast of Silver City via N.M. 152 and N.M. 35. n Big Ditch. Formed after flood lowered Main St. 55 feet. Now park for events, enjoyment. n Bill Evans Lake. Fishing, primitive camping. 35 miles northwest of Silver City via U.S. 180. n Fort Bayard Wildlife Refuge. 10 miles east of Silver City, off U.S. 180. n Gila National Forest Supervisor—Silver City Ranger District. 3005 E. Camino del Bosque. (505) 388-8201. www.fs.fed.us/r3/gila n Gila River Management Area, Riparian Area. Many bird species. South of Cliff along confluence of Mogollón Creek/Gila River. 35 miles from Silver City, northwest on U.S. 180 and south on F.R. 809. (575) 388-8201. n Lake Roberts. Trout fishing, 71 acres. 40 miles north of Silver City via N.M. 15 and N.M. 35. n Lightfeather Hot Spring. 44 miles north of Silver City via N.M. 15 to Gila Cliff Dwellings Visitor Center. Half mile up Middle Fork Trail, walk through 2 river crossings. (575) 536-9461. n Trail of the Mountain Spirits (Inner Loop) Scenic Byway. North on N.M. 15 or east on N.M. 35 miles from Silver City.

www.newmexico.org

Performing Arts/Galleries n The McCray Gallery. Visual art. On WNMU Campus,

behind Fine Arts Center Theater. (575) 538-6517. n Mimbres Region Arts Council. Call for schedule. 1201 Pope St. (888) 758-7289, (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org n Pinos Altos Melodrama Theater. In Pinos Altos opera house adjacent to Buckhorn Saloon. Original hysterical melodramas. Call for schedule. P.O. Box 53189, 88053. (575) 388-3848. www.pinosaltos.org/melodrama n San Vicente Art Walks. Self-guided, 11 a.m.5 p.m. Call for brochure with sites map. Most galleries, studios listed are downtown or within walking distance; some outside city. San Vicente Artists of Silver City, P.O. Box 1911, 88062. (575) 388-4854. www.silvercityartists.org/selfguidedartwalk.html

Sporting Fun n Breathe Inn Lodge. Birding, fishing, stargazing. 28

miles north of Silver City at intersection of N.M. 35/N.M. 15. (575) 536-3206. www.breatheinnlodge.com n Southwestern N.M. Birding Trail. Maps at visitor center. 201 N. Hudson. (800) 548-9378.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Evening with the Artist.

WNMU Parotti Hall. (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org ◆ Throughout the year. Grant County Community Concert Association. Various musical performances. (575) 538-5862. www.gcconcerts.org ◆ Throughout the year. Mimbres Region Arts Council Folk Series. National touring acts. Buckhorn Opera House, Pinos Altos. (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org ◆ Throughout the year. Mimbres Region Arts Council Performance Events. WNMU Fine Arts Center Theater. (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org ◆ Throughout the year. Wells Fargo Gallery Receptions. (575) 538-2505. Wells Fargo Gallery, 1201 Pope St. www.mimbresarts.org ◆ Jan. 21-23. Red Paint Pow Wow. (575) 534-1379. www.redpaintpowwow.net ◆ Feb. 12. Chocolate Fantasia. Gourmet chocolatecreation samples. (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org ◆ April TBA. Celebration of Spring Festival. (575) 534-1700. www.silvercitymainstreet.com ◆ April 27-May 1. Tour of the Gila. Five-day stage race. (575) 388-3222. www.tourofthegila.com ◆ May 27-29. Silver City Blues Festival. Gough Park. (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org ◆ May 31-June 4. Wild Wild West Pro Rodeo. (575) 388-5057. ◆ June 4. Cowboy Days. Games, vendors, food, music. Gough Park. (575) 538-3785. www.silvercity.org ◆ July 4. Fourth of July Park Festival and Parade. Gough Park. (575) 538-3785.

◆ July 4. Silver City Museum Ice Cream Social.

(575) 388-5921. www.silvercitymuseum.org ◆ Aug. 13-14. Silver City Gun Show. (575) 590-2006. ◆ Aug. 19-20. Run to Copper Country Car Show. (505) 537-4873, (505) 536-2898. www.coppercountrycruizers.com ◆ Aug. 20. Fort Bayard Birthday. (575) 538-3785. www.fortbayardhistoricpreservationsociety.org/events.html ◆ Sept. 3-4. San Vicente Artists Art Fair. (575) 534-1700, (575) 534-4401, (575) 534-9500. ◆ Sept. 3-5. Rolling Stones Gem and Mineral Show. www.rollingstonesgms.blogspot.com ◆ Sept. TBA Pickamania! Gough Park. (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org ◆ Sept. 15-18. Gila River Festival. (575) 538-8078. www.gilaconservation.org ◆ Sept. 16-17. Fort Bayard Days. (575) 538-3785. www.fortbayardhistoricpreservationsociety.org/events.html ◆ Sept. 24. Mimbres Harvest Festial. (575) 3135247. www.mimbresharvestfest.com/festival.html ◆ Sept. 28-Oct. 3. Cliff-Gila Grant County Fair. (575) 388-1559. ◆ Oct. 7. Taste of Downtown Silver City. (575) 534-9005. www.silvercitymainstreet.com ◆ Oct. 7-10. Weekend at the Galleries. (575) 538-2505. www.mimbresarts.org ◆ Nov. 26. Lighted Christmas Parade. (575) 534-9005. www.silvercitymainstreet.org ◆ Dec. 15. Victorian Frontier Christmas Evening. (575) 388-5921. www.silvercitymuseum.org

SIPAPU (in Vadito) NC www.sipapunm.com

Sporting Fun ✰ Sipapu Ski & Summer Resort. First northern N.M. ski area. Caters to families, reasonably priced. Rental shop, family-oriented ski school, 45 lodging units (most with kitchens, fireplaces). 39 trails, 2 terrain parks, 4 chairlifts, uphill capacity of 2,900 skiers per hour. Also, disc golf, fly-fishing, off-road trails, rock climbing, motorcycle rallies, arts/craft fairs, workshops. 11 miles east of Peñasco via N.M. 75 and N.M. 518 or 20 miles southeast of Taos via N.M. 518. (800) 587-2240, (575) 587-2240. www.sipapunm.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Dec. 31. New Year’s Eve Party. Talent show,

karaoke, midnight celebration. Sipapu Ski & Summer Resort. (800) 587-2240. www.taossacredplaces.com www.sipapunm.com

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  159


NC NW

NE C

SW

SOCORRO SW

www.socorro-nm.com www.socorronm.gov

SE

Attractions n Festival of the Cranes. Birding event. City, Bosque

del Apache Natl. Wildlife Refuge present 100 plus field events, workshops, live exhibits, entertainment citywide & on refuge, special programs throughout the region. Refuge: (575) 835-1828; Friends of the Bosque: (575) 838-2120. www.friendsofthebosque.org n Socorro Heritage and Visitors Center. Features culture, heritage, life experiences, people contributing to development of Socorro, surrounding areas. Brochures, maps, information on events, area attractions. 217 Fisher Ave., 87801. (575) 835-8927. n Trinity Site. Location of world’s first atomic bomb explosion in 1945. Open twice a year. 12 miles east of San Antonio on U.S. 380, then 5 miles south through Stallion Range Center. Van shuttle to Trinity. (575) 835-1501.

Museums and Historic Sites n El Camino Real International Heritage Center.

This New Mexico State Monument presents through exhibits and programs the history of the 400-year-old El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (the Royal Road of the Interior Lands). I-25, exit 115. (575) 854-3600. www.elcaminoreal.org n Hammel Museum. Former brewery on Natl. Historic Register. Open first Sat. each month and during Oktoberfest (1st Oct. Sat). On 6th St. (575) 835-8927.

n Historic Walking Tour. Garcia Opera House, Socorro

Plaza, Spanish Colonial & Territorial architecture. (575) 835-8927. Also, Old San Miguel Mission, active 1915-28; south wall dates from 1598. 403 El Camino Real. (575) 835-2891. n Mineralogical Museum. Fossils, more than 15,000 mineral specimens. At Workman addition, N.M. Institute of Mining & Technology. (575) 835-5420. www.geoinfo.nmt.edu

Outdoor Getaways ✰ Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. Migratory waterfowl, including sandhill cranes; 377 identified species. Year-round birding, auto tour, hiking, free guided tours weekends. Dec.-Feb. Opens an hour before sunrise, closes an hour after sunset. Visitor center open daily. Ecology tours by appt. for schools, youth groups. 16 miles south of Socorro via I-25, San Antonio exit 139, U.S. 380 and N.M. 1. Refuge: (575) 835-1828, Friends of the Bosque: (575) 838-2120. www.friendsofthebosque.org n Escondida Lake Park. Fishing, camping, RV hookups, facilities. 2 miles north, exit 152, east at stop sign until road turns, then 2 miles to lake. (575) 835-8927.

160  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

n Langmuir Laboratory. Late June to late Aug.,

lightning and thunderstorm research; gate blocks last mile to laboratory (gate is often closed). Hikers, picnickers welcome year-round. Take U.S. 60 west from Socorro for 16 miles to Water Canyon Rd. (F.R. 235). Go 4.5 miles down F.R. 235 to campground, turn left. Remaining 10 miles of F.R. 235 are dirt, steep. Cars with low clearance, travel trailers and motor homes discouraged. (575) 835-5423. www.ee.nmt.edu/~langmuir n Quebradas Backcountry Byway. 24 miles, showcases wildlife, rock formations, colored cliffs, arroyos. Two access areas. 1) Go 2 miles north of Socorro on I-25, take Escondida exit. Head east, then north. Turn right past Escondida Lake. Go east through Pueblitos. Turn south on road following east side of Río Grande. Take dirt road east, about .6 mile down road. Stay on road, follow Backcountry Byway signs. 2) Drive 9 miles south of Socorro on I-25, go 11 miles east of San Antonio on N.M. 380. Turn left on C.R. A-129 for 3 miles north. Turn west; follow the signs. (575) 887-6544. n San Lorenzo Canyon. Chihuahuan Desert plants/ animals, geological formations, hiking. (575) 835-8927, (505) 864-4021. n Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge. Visitor center, some areas open to public, most areas closed. Open house with guided tours in Oct. (505) 864-4021. n Water Canyon. Pronghorn antelope, golden eagles, other birds. 13 miles west of Socorro off N.M. 60 and Water Canyon Rd. (575) 835-8927.

Performing Arts/Galleries Socorro County Art. An organization of artists promoting the arts and artists of Socorro County. (575) 835-0424, (575) 835-8927. www.socorrocountyarts.com n

Sporting Fun ✰ Socorro Fat Tire Trails. Quebradas to east, Río Grande floodplain and Bosque del Apache to south, Magdalena/San Mateo mountains to west, to north San Lorenzo Canyon and petroglyphs at San Acacia. (575) 835-8927.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. N.M. Tech Hosted Golf

Tournaments. N.M. Tech Golf Course. (575) 835-5335. externalweb.nmt.edu/nmtgolf ◆ Throughout the year. N.M. Tech Performing Arts Series. National touring shows. Macey Center. (575) 835-5688. www.nmtpas.org ◆ Feb. 5. Community Arts Party. Hands-on art projects. Finley Gym. (575) 835-5688. www.socorronm.gov ◆ Feb. 19. Science Olympiad. Middle and high school teams compete for N.M.’s place at the national tournament. N.M. Tech campus. (575) 835-5678. infohost.nmt.edu/~science/olympiad ◆ Feb. 19. Historic Forts Day. Living-history re-enactments of soldier camp activities including bullet-making, black powder demonstration, treadle sewing and open fire cooking. El Camino Real International Heritage Center. (575) 854-3600. www.elcaminoreal.org

◆ Feb. 25-27. Battles for Socorro Civil War

Re-enactment. Siege of Socorro, Battle of Valverde, fashion show & ladies tea social, fandango. (575) 835-8927. www.socorronm.gov ◆ March TBA. Socorro Warrior Baseball Invite. SHS Baseball Field. (505) 621-3825. ◆ March 26. Socorro County Arts Spring Open House. Art demonstrations, entertainment. (575) 838-2724. www.socorrocountyarts.com ◆ April 1-2. N.M. State Science & Engineering Fair. N.M. Tech campus. (575) 835-5678. www.infohost.nmt.edu/~science/fair ◆ April 2. Trinity Site Open to Public. (575) 479-6124. Van shuttle service: (575) 835-1501. www.wsmr.army.mil ◆ April 2. Very Large Array Guided Tours. 50 miles west on N.M. 60. (575) 835-7243. Van shuttle service: (575) 835-1501. www.vla.nrao.edu ◆ April 2. Friends of the Library Book Sale. N.M. Tech campus. (575) 835-1114. ◆ April 16-17. Tour of Socorro Mountain Bike Race. (505) 350-4116. www.socorro.com/fattire ◆ April 22. Earth Day Celebration. (575) 835-8927. www.socorronm.gov ◆ May TBA. NMAA AAAA State High School Golf Tournament. N.M. Tech Golf Course. (575) 835-5335. externalweb.nmt.edu/nmtgolf ◆ May 1-2. “M” Mountain AYSO Soccer Tournament. (575) 838-5135. ◆ May 7-8. Mother’s Day Pow Wow. Drumming, dancing, arts and crafts. Sedillo Park. (505) 881-8847. ◆ June TBA. North South A-AA & North South AAA. SHS Baseball Field. (505) 621-3825. ◆ June 7-11. Socorro Open Golf Tournament. Pro-Am event, featuring the Elfego Baca shoot down the mountain. N.M. Tech Golf Course. (575) 835-5335. externalweb.nmt.edu/nmtgolf ◆ July-Oct. Socorro Farmers Market. Historic Plaza. (575) 835-8927. www.socorronm.gov ◆ July 4. Concerts and Firework Display. Free outdoor concert, waterslide, BBQ. N.M. Tech campus. (575) 835-5688. www.socorronm.gov ◆ July 8-10. Magdalena Old Timers Reunion. Parade, rodeo, crafts, street dance and crowning of the queen. Magdalena Village. (575) 854-2261. www.socorronm.gov ◆ July 25-27. Sun Country Junior Championship, N.M. Tech Golf Course. (575) 835-5335. externalweb.nmt.edu/nmtgolf ◆ Aug. TBA. Toy Train Show and Swap Meet. Best Western Conference Center. (575) 418-7534. ◆ Aug. 6. Chile Harvest Triathlon. Three-part races. (575) 550-4116. www.socorro.com/ssr/chile ◆ Sept. TBA. M Mountain Fly-In. Socorro Municipal Airport. Gathering of regional aviators. (505) 401-2391. www.socorronm.gov

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS www.newmexico.org


Sandhill cranes return to Bosque del Apache during a breathtaking New Mexico sunset. PHOTO BY MARK KANE.

www.newmexico.org

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  161


◆ Sept. 1-3. County Fair &

NC

Rodeo. Professional rodeo, dance, livestock auction, C exhibits. (575) 835-0610. SW SE socorroextension.nmsu.edu/ socorro-county-fair.html ◆ Sept. 3. Socorro County Fair Parade. Socorro Visitors Center. (575) 835-8927. www.socorronm.gov ◆ Sept. 10. Hispanic Heritage Celebration. El Camino Real International Heritage Center. (575) 854-3600. www.elcaminoreal.org ◆ Sept. 28-Oct. 1. Enchanted Skies Star Party. Sky gazing, lecture, chuck-wagon dinner. Etscorn Observatory, N.M. Tech campus, South Baldy. (575) 835-8927. www.enchantedskies.org ◆ Sept. 30-Oct.2. San Miguel Fiesta. Entertainment, bingo, silent auction, food, games. (575) 835-2891. www.sdc.org/~smiguel/ ◆ Oct. TBA. Alamo Indian Days. Gourd dancing, food. Alamo Reservation. (575) 854-2759. www.socorronm.gov ◆ Oct. TBA. Chile Proppers Model Aircraft Fly. (575) 835-4568. ◆ Oct. 1. Blessing of the Animals. Historic Plaza. (575) 835-2891. ◆ Oct. 1. Oktoberfest. Hammel Museum. (575) 835-5325. www.socorronm.gov ◆ Oct.1. Trinity Site Open to Public. (575) 479-6124. Van shuttle service: (575) 835-1501. www.wsmr.army.mil ◆ Oct. 1. Very Large Array Guided Tours. 50 miles west on N.M. 60. (575) 835-7243. Van shuttle service: (575) 835-1501. www.vla.nrao.edu ◆ Oct. 7-8. Socorro Fest. Live entertainment, N.M. beer and wine, food, arts & crafts, sandbuilding contest, games. Historic Plaza, Socorro Visitors Center. (575) 835-8927. www.socorrofest.com ◆ Oct. 15. Sevilleta & La Joya Open House. Tours, speakers. (575) 864-4021. www.fws.gov/southwest/ refuges/newmex/sevilleta/index.html ◆ Oct. 21-23. 49ers Celebration. N.M. Tech campus. (575) 835-5352. infohost.nmt.edu ◆ Oct. 30. Hamfest. Socorro Amateur Radio Association. Examination certification. (575) 835-3370. www.socorroara.org ◆ Nov. 12-13. N.M. Mineral Symposium. Forum for professionals and amateurs, formal papers. N.M. Tech campus. (575) 835-5140. www.geoinfo.nmt.edu/museum/minsymp/home.html ◆ Nov. 15-20. Festival of the Cranes. Tours, lectures, workshops, exhibits. Bosque del Apache Refuge. (575) 835-2077. www.friendsofthebosque.org/crane ◆ Nov. 18-20. Festival of the Cranes Arts & Crafts Fair. Garcia Opera House. (575) 835-8927. www.socorronm.gov ◆ Nov. 19. Celebración de Otoño. Presentations, traditional music and dance, arts and crafts. El Camino Real Heritage Center. (575) 854-3600. www.elcaminoreal.org NW

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◆ Nov. 19-20. Enchilada Dinner and Crafts Fair.

San Antonio School. (575) 835-1758. ◆ Nov. 19-20. Turkey Tune-Up Soccer Tournament. (575) 838-2525. ◆ Nov. 26. Christmas Candy Cane Electric Light Parade & Social. Historic Plaza. (575) 835-8927. www.socorronm.gov ◆ Nov. 26. Posole Cook-off. Cooking and activities. Socorro Plaza. (575) 835-8927. www.socorronm.gov ◆ Dec. TBA. M Mountain Classic Basketball Tournament. (575) 835-0700. ◆ Dec. 2. Luminarias on the Plaza Arts Crawl. Historic Plaza. (575) 835-8927. www.socorrocountyarts.com ◆ Dec. 10. Christmas at El Camino Real International Heritage Center. Posada procession, special performances, visit from Santa, ornament making. (575) 854-3600. www.elcaminoreal.org ◆ Dec. 10. Shop Socorro AUCTION. Chamber of Commerce. (575) 835-0424. www.socorro-nm.com

SPRINGER NE Museums and Historic Sites n Mills Mansion. 3-story adobe built in 1877 by

Melvin Mills, district attorney. Tours. 804 1st St. (888) BILL-KID (245-5543.), (575) 483-2998. www.santafetrailnm.org/millsmansion.html n Point of Rocks. Santa Fe Natl. Historic Trail certified, SFT wagon ruts, 11 graves, historic Indian campsites, historym lore, rock/mineral collecting. No off-roading, please. 23.5 miles east of Springer on U.S. 56, north 7 miles from rest area, 2 miles east, then 1 mile north. Knock first at the ranch house and sign in at the SFT box. (575) 485-2473. n Santa Fe Trail Interpretive Center and Museum. (Generally open Memorial Day to Labor Day.) In restored 1882 Colfax County Courthouse. SFT exhibit, historic photos, artifacts unique to northeastern N.M. Territorial Period, cultural exhibits. 606 Maxwell Ave. (575) 483-5554. n Springer Chamber of Commerce. Historic painting, local history. Inquire about tours of historic buildings in area. 516 Maxwell Ave. (575) 483-2998. n Springer Hotel. 2-story adobe built in 1879 for RR depot by Melvin Mills. Tours of Colfax County War Museum. 3rd St. & Culbert Ave. (888) BILL-KID (245-5543), (575) 483-2998.

Outdoor Getaways n Charette Lakes. Fishing, picnicking, camping,

wildlife viewing. 34 miles southwest of Springer via I-25/N.M. 569. (575) 483-2998. n Springer Lake. Prize-winning northern pike, catfish. Picnicking, camping. 4 miles northwest of Springer on C.R. 17. (575) 483-2998.

Performing Arts/Galleries n Springer Art Murals. Scenes of historical/cultural

heritage of northeastern N.M. on exterior walls of downtown Springer. (575) 483-2998.

Sporting Fun n Stonewall Park. Horseshoe-pitching rink for NHPA-

registered tourneys, recreational matches. Westside Springer on N.M. 21. (575) 483-2998.

SUNLAND PARK SW Sporting Fun n Sunland Park Racetrack/Casino. State’s longest

meet. Dec.-Apr., Tues., Fri., Sat., Sun. racing for quarter horses, thoroughbreds. Daily simulcasting, slots. 1200 Futurity Dr. (575) 874-5200. www.sunland-park.com

TAOS NC

www.taoschamber.com Also see Ranchos de Taos on Page 144 and Taos Ski Valley on Page 164.

Attractions n Historic Taos Trolley Tours. Narrated sightseeing.

May-Oct. (575) 751-0366. www.taostrolleytours.com n Río Grande Gorge Bridge. 650 feet above river. Observation platforms, picnic area. 11 miles northwest of Taos on U.S. 64. n Taos Plaza. Heart of Taos. Hub for shops, galleries, restaurants, lodging, entertainment, Hotel La Fonda with collection of D.H. Lawrence paintings. n Taos Pueblo. World Heritage Site, continuously inhabited for more than 1,000 years. (575) 758-1028. www.taospueblo.com

Museums and Historic Sites n E.L. Blumenschein Home & Museum. Art, family

furnishings, adobe home of Taos Society of Artists co-founder. 222 Ledoux St. (575) 758-0505. www.taoshistoricmuseums.com n Gov. Bent House & Museum. One block north of Plaza, half-block west of Taos Inn. Frontier artifacts, family furnishings in adobe home of first Territorial governor. 117A Bent St. (575) 758-2376. n Harwood Museum. Southwestern art, works by Agnes Martin. Open Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m. 238 Ledoux St. (575) 758-9826. harwoodmuseum.org. n Kit Carson Park. Graves of Kit Carson, Mabel Dodge Luhan. North of Taos Plaza, 211 Paseo del Norte. (575) 758-8234. n La Hacienda de los Martínez. Restored Spanish Colonial hacienda, built about 1800. Hispanic culture demonstrations. 2 miles from Taos Plaza on N.M. 240. 708 Ranchitos Rd. (575) 758-0505. www.taoshistoricmuseums.com www.newmexico.org


n Millicent Rogers Museum. Southwest and northern

N.M. art, history, culture. Maria Martinez pottery. Open daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m., except holidays. 4 miles north of Taos Plaza on Millicent Rogers Rd. (575) 758-2462. www.millicentrogers.org taosmuseums.org/view/millicent-rogers-museum n Taos Art Museum & Fechin House. In the beautiful historic home of Russian emigre Nicolai Fechin, exhibiting his work, as well as the Taos Society of Artists, traveling exhibits and Taos contemporary. Open Tues.- Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., 227 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, two blocks from the Plaza. (575)-7582690. www.taosartmuseum.org

Outdoor Getaways n Carson National Forest Supervisor’s Office. 208

Cruz Alta Rd. (575) 758-6200. www.fs.fed.us/r3/carson n Orilla Verde Recreation Area. Southern end of Río Grande Wild & Scenic River. Campsites. 12-13 miles southwest of Taos via N.M. 68. (575) 758-8851. n Tres Piedras State Wildlife Area. 3,300 acres, high prairie for big game. Between Tres Piedras & Taos. Wildlife viewing. 25 miles northwest of Taos off U.S. 64. (800) 862-9310.

Performing Arts/Galleries n High Road Art Tour. Art, culture in villages along

High Road to Taos. Last two weekends in September. (866) 343-5381. www.highroadnewmexico.com n The Firehouse Art Collection. More than 100 works by Taos pioneers, contemporary artists. 323 Camino de la Placita, behind Civic Plaza, in fire department. (575) 758-3386. n Taos Center for the Arts. Theater, music performances, visual arts, film. Check schedule online. (575) 758-2052. www.tcataos.org n Taos School of Music. Performances at Taos Community Auditorium, Hotel St. Bernard in Taos Ski Valley. Call for schedule. P.O. Box 1879, 87571. (575) 776-2388. www.taosschoolofmusic.com

Sporting Fun n Big River Raft Trips. 16 miles southwest of Taos

in Pilar at N.M. 68 and N.M. 570. (800) 748-3746, (575) 758-9711. www.bigriverrafts.com n El Paseo Llama Expeditions. Day, overnight trips. (800) 455-2627, (575) 758-3111. www.elpaseollama.com n Paradise Ballooning. Hot-air balloon rides, ultra-light flights. (575) 751-6098. www.taosballooning.com n Far Flung Adventures. Rafting. Phone first. 2 miles north of Taos in El Prado. (800) 359-2627, (575) 758-2628. www.farflung.com n Mountain Skills Climbing School & Guide Service. Professional guides, insured, permitted. Beginner to advanced. P.O. Box 206, Arroyo Seco, 87514. (575) 776-2222. www.climbingschoolusa.com n Native Sons Adventure Company. Rafting, biking. 1335 Paseo del Pueblo Sur, 87571. (800) 753-7559, (575) 758-9342. www.nativesonsadventures.com n Pueblo Balloon Co. Hot-air balloon rides. (575) 751-9877. www.puebloballoon.com www.newmexico.org

n Wild Earth Llama Adventures. Naturalist-guided

educational adventures to Sangre de Cristo Mts., Río Grande Gorge. Gourmet meals. P.O. Box 1298, 87571. (800) 758-5262. www.LlamaAdventures.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Jan. TBA. Winter Wine Festival. World class ski-

ing, fine wine and cuisine. (505) 776-2291 ext. 1427. skitaos.org/wine_festival ◆ Jan. 1. Saturday Arts for Families. Exploration of art and art making for all ages. (575) 758-9826 ext. 105. www.taossacredplaces.com ◆ Jan. 1. Turtle Dance. Traditional dance marks the beginning of a new year. Taos Pueblo. (575) 758-1028. ◆ Jan. 1-15. College Days. Student discounts. Entertainment and contests. Red River Ski Area. (575) 754-2366. ◆ Jan. 6. Buffalo Dance. A symbol of abundance during the winter months. Taos Pueblo. (575) 758-1028. www.taospueblo.com ◆ Feb. 26. Just Desserts Eat and Ski. Cross-country skiing and delicious desserts. (575) 754-6112. www.enchantedforestxc.com ◆ April 24. Easter Egg Hunt. Kit Carson Park. (575) 758-8398. www.taossacredplaces.com ◆ Throughout May. Taos Spring Arts Celebration. Museum exhibitions, gallery openings, music, performances, dining. (800) 732-8267, (575) 758-3872. www.taossacredplaces.com ◆ May-Sept. Taos Plaza Live! Music every Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. at Taos Plaza. (575) 751-8800. www.taosplazalive.com ◆ May 27-30. Memorial Day Motorcycle Rally/Run. 25-mile parade to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Thousands of motorcycles, music and food. Red River. (575) 754-2366. ◆ May 27-30. Memorial Weekend Ceremonies. Flag march, service and speakers. Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park, Angel Fire. (575) 377-6900. ◆ June-Aug. Taos School of Music. One of the oldest and most respected summer chamber music programs in the country. Concerts throughout the summer. (575) 776-2388. taosschoolofmusic.com ◆ June 13. San Antonio Feast Day. Traditional Corn Dance. Taos Pueblo. (575) 758-1028. ◆ June 24. San Juan Feast Day. (575) 758-1028. www.taospueblo.com ◆ June 25-26. Taos Solar Music Festival. Kit Carson Park. (575) 758-9191. www.solarmusicfest.com ◆ July TBA. Toast of Taos Wine Festival. Tastings, gallery tour, wine class, dinners, art/wine auction. (575) 751-5811. www.toastoftaos.com ◆ July 4. Arroyo Seco Parade. (575) 776-8776. ◆ July 8-10. Taos Pueblo Pow Wow. (575) 758-1028. www.taospueblopowwow.com

◆ July 11-18. Summer Writers Conference. With keynote speaker Cristina Garcia. The Sagebrush Inn, 1508 Paseo del Pueblo Sur. (505) 277-5572. www.unm.edu/~taosconf/

◆ July 22-24. Las Fiestas de Taos. (575) 758-3733. fiestasdetaos.com

◆ July 25-26. Feast Days of Santiago and Santa Ana. Corn dances. (575) 758-1028. www.taospueblo.com ◆ Aug. TBA. County Fair. Taos County Fair Grounds. (575) 758-3982. www.taoscountyfair.com ◆ Aug. TBA. Autumn Run Car Show. Classic cars, games, a poker run, street dance, barbecue. (800) 732-8267. www.taoschamber.com ◆ Sept. TBA. Quick Draw & Art Auction. (575) 758-2052. ◆ Sept. TBA. San Geronimo Eve & Feast Day. Celebrate with food and crafts. Tribes from all over N.M. and North America. (575) 758-1028. www.taospueblo.com ◆ Sept. TBA. The TAO of Art presents: Studio Tour and Art Week. Numerous tours of artists’ studios. (575) 751-0071. taosartist.org/tao/events.html ◆ Sept.-Oct. Taos Fall Arts Festival. Various locations. (575) 758-2475. www.taosconvention.com. ◆ Oct. TBA. Mountain Balloon Rally. (575) 758-9210. taosballoonrally.com ◆ Oct. TBA. Mountain Film Festival. (575) 751-3658. mountainfilm.net ◆ Oct. TBA. Storyteller Festival. (575) 758-0081, (877) 758-7343. somostaos.org ◆ Oct. 1-2. Taos Wool Festival. (800) 684-0340. www.taoswoolfestival.org ◆ Nov. 2011-May 2012. Taos Chamber Music Festival. Repertoire spans baroque to contemporary music. (575) 758-0150. www.taoschambermusicgroup.org ◆ Nov. 24, 2011-Jan.1, 2012. Yuletide in Taos. Holiday activities. (575) 751-8800. www.taoschamber.com.

◆ Dec. 10. The Lighting of Ledoux Street. (575) 758-1028. ◆ Dec. 24. Christmas Eve Procession. (575) 758-1028. www.taospueblo.com ◆ Dec. 25. Deer or Matachines Dance. (575) 758-1028. www.taospueblo.com

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Taos Ski Valley is home to some of the best skiing in the country. PHOTO BY MICHAEL HOLMQUIST.

TAOS SKI VALLEY NC www.taosskivalley.com

Outdoor Getaways n Wheeler Peak Wilderness Area. In Carson Natl.

Forest. Old miners’ cabins, ruins of copper-mining company, 13,161-foot-high Wheeler Peak. Hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, llama trekking. (575) 758-6300.

Sporting Fun n Río Grande Stables. (888) 259-8267,

(575) 776-5913. www.lajitasstables.com n Taos Ski Valley. No. 1-rated ski school. Extensive system of trails for beginners and intermediates. Uphill lift capacity 15,500 skiers per hour; 72 trails, 51 percent expert. Snowboarding. Snowmaking covers 98 percent of beginner and intermediate slopes. (866) 968-7386, (575) 776-2291; snowphone: 776-2916. www.skitaos.org

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ May 27-June 27. Taos Opera Institute. A highly

intensive program for serious singers. (575) 776-1413. www.taosoi.org ◆ June-Oct. Hiking & Disc Golf. (575) 776-1413. www.taosskivalley.com ◆ June 21-Aug. 7. Taos School of Music. (575) 776-2388. www.taosskivalley.com ◆ June 23-Sept. 25. Summer Chairlift Rides. Lift #1. (575) 776-1413. www.taosskivalley.com ◆ July 1-30. Jillana School of Ballet. Intensive ballet program for students 11-17 years and adults 18 and over. (575) 776-1413. www.jillanaschool.com ◆ July 4. Independence Day and the Village’s Birthday. Parade, music and events. (575) 776-1413. www.taosskivalley.com ◆ July 15, Aug. 13, Sept. 12. Full Moon Hike to Williams Lake. (575) 776-1413. www.taosskivalley.com ◆ July 23-24. Frazer Mountain Madness. (575) 776-3233. www.frazermountainmadness.com ◆ Aug. 20. Up & Over 10K Trail Run. Begins at 9,207 feet with a 2,612-foot elevation gain in the first 3 miles. (575) 776-1413. www.taosskivalley.com/trailrun ◆ Sept. TBA. Taos Mountain Music Festival. (575) 776-1413. www.taosskivalley.com ◆ Sept. 15-Oct. 15. Fall Foliage. Watch the aspen trees turn to gold. (575) 776-1413. www.taosskivalley.com ◆ Sept. 17. Oktoberfest. Beer tents, oompah band, German food. (575) 776-1416. www.taosskivalley.com ◆ Dec. 24. Torchlight Parade and Festival of Illumination. Farolitos from Amizette to the Resort Center. (866) 968-7386. www.skitaos.org ◆ Dec. 31. New Year’s Eve Celebration. (866) 968-7386. www.skitaos.org

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TATUM SE Museums and Historic Sites n Casamero Pueblo. Single structure, 22 ground-

floor rooms, 6 rooms on 2nd story. Once occupied by Chacoan Ancestral Pueblo people between A.D. 1000 and 1125. 15 miles east on I-40. Take Prewitt exit 63 north, then east half mile on old Rt. 66 to junction of McKinley C.R. 19, turn north across RR tracks for 4 miles, cross more RR tracks, look for Casamero signs. (505) 287-7911.

Outdoor Getaways n Bluewater Lake State Park. Visitor center, camp-

sites. Fishing for rainbow trout, catfish. 2,350 acres. 7 miles southwest of Prewitt, off I-25 exit 63 to N.M. 412. (505) 876-2391. www.nmparks.com n Haystack Mountain. Once rich source of uranium, creating 30-year boom in Grants. 15 miles east of Thoreau via N.M. 122, off C.R. 23.

n Rice Park. Migratory waterfowl, elk. In Cíbola

National Forest. Go southwest 10 miles on N.M. 612, turn on F.R. 569, then drive 7 to 8 miles to Rice Park. (505) 287-8833. www.fs.fed.us/r3/cibola

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Oct. 8. Cow Pasture Golf Tournament. (575) 398-6460, (575) 398-5681. ◆ Dec. 2-4. Battle of the Border. Tatum High School. Basketball teams from N.M. and Texas compete. (575) 398-5455.

TIERRA AMARILLA NC Museums and Historic Sites n Los Ojos. Villagers raise churro sheep, weave wool

using historic Río Grande traditions. 2 miles north on U.S. 84. n Tierra Wools. Los Ojos hand weavers. Weavers, dyers, spinners at work. 91 Main St., P.O. Box 229, Los Ojos, 87551. (888) 709-0979, (575) 588-7231. www.handweavers.com

Outdoor Getaways n Canjilón Lakes. 16 miles south of Tierra Amarilla

on U.S. 84, 13 miles east off N.M. 554. n El Vado Lake State Park. Boating docks, camping. 14 miles southwest of Tierra Amarilla on N.M. 112. (575) 588-7247. www.nmparks.com n Heron Lake State Park. Marina, visitor center, campsites. Sailing, windsurfing, fishing, 6,000 acres. 8 miles west of Tierra Amarilla; 5 miles north on U.S. 84 and west on N.M. 95 for 8 miles. (575) 588-7470. www.nmparks.com n Hopewell Lake. Fishing for brook and rainbow trout; camping, picnicking, wildlife viewing. 27 miles east on U.S. 64, in San Juan Mountains between Tres Piedras and Tierra Amarilla. n Río Chama State Wildlife & Fishing Area. 13,000 acres, access to 12 miles of Río Chama, El Vado Lake. Fishing, hunting, camping, picnicking. 2 miles west on N.M. 112. (505) 222-4700. www.wildlife.state.nm.us

Visitors are treated to some striking panoramic views on N.M. 150, between Taos and Taos Ski Valley.

www.newmexico.org

PHOTO BY TIM KELLER.

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  165


Las Palomas Plaza at Geronimo Springs Museum, in Sierra County, by ceramic artist Shel Neymark. PHOTO BY DIANNE STROMBERG.

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TOMÉ CE Museums and Historic Sites n Immaculate Conception Catholic Church. Oldest

Hispanic settlement in Valencia County, established 1739. Open Tues.-Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. (505) 865-7497. n Tomé Hill. On El Camino Real. Self-guided tour of ancient petroglyphs, unique sculpture, Camino Real history. n Tomé Parish Museum. Local religious history exhibit, open 24/7. 5.5 miles north of Belén via N.M. 47 in Plaza. (505) 865-7497. n Tomé Plaza. A courthouse and jail built in 1875 with rock quarried from a nearby volcanic formation. Plaza.

TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES SW

www.truthorconsequencesnm.net www.sierracounty.net www.sierracountynewmexico.info www.truthorconsequenceschamberofcommerce.com Also see listings for Elephant Butte on Page 125.

Attractions n Geronimo Trail Interpretive & Visitor Center. Details

on events, attractions and businesses in Sierra County. Maps, brochures. 211 Main. T or C. (575) 894-1968. n Historic Hot Mineral Springs, Baths, Spas. Bath houses, indoor tubs, saunas. Take I-25 exit 75 or 79 into downtown Palomas Hot Springs Dist. (800) 831-9487, (575) 894-3536. n Spaceport America. The “world’s first purposebuilt spaceport” plans to offer weekly sub-orbital flights, numerous launch observation decks and more. Projected to open in 2011. 30 miles east of T or C. (575) 373-6110. www.spaceportamerica.com n Veterans Memorial Park. Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall. 996 S. Broadway. (575) 740-7111.

Museums and Historic Sites n Chloride. Historic mining town. 40 miles NW of T or

C via I-25, then N.M. 52 to Winston and SW 2.5 miles on F.R. 226. (575) 743-2736. www.pioneerstoremuseum.com n Geronimo Springs Museum. Pottery collection in Da-Whe Room (including Mimbres), Sierra County history in Wilson, Ralph Edwards, Heritage, Apache rooms. Local and military history, minerals from prehistoric times to present, miner’s cabin. Open Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. 211 Main St. (575) 894-6600.

■ DESTINATIONS ✰ KID-FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES ◆ CALENDAR EVENTS www.newmexico.org

n Winston.

Ghost town. 38 miles northwest of T or C via I-25 and N.M. 52.

Outdoor Getaways Black Range Ranger District. Maps, camping, picnicking, hiking, backpacking. 1804 N. Date St. (575) 894-6677. n Caballo Lake State Park. Visitor center, campsites, showers, picnicking, boat launch sites. Fishing for bass, crappie, catfish, walleye. 11,000 acres. 16 miles south via I-25. (575) 743-3942. www.nmparks.com n Emory Pass Scenic Vista. 5-mile scenic trail to lookout tower at Hillsboro Peak. 50 miles west of T or C on N.M. 152 through Hillsboro. Parking available, no overnight camping. (575) 894-6677. n Geronimo Trail Scenic Byway. Through T or C, Caballo, Hillsboro, Kingston, Black Range Mountains, San Lorenzo or T or C, Elephant Butte, Cuchillo, Winston-Chloride, Beaverhead. (575) 894-1968. Road conditions: (800) 432-4269. n Percha Dam State Park. Fishing, picnicking, campsites, showers. 22 miles southwest via I-25. (575) 743-3942. www.nmparks.com n Ralph Edwards Riverside Park. Downtown picnicking on banks of Río Grande. 301 E. Riverside Dr. n

◆ Sept. 24. Elephant Man Triathlon. Elephant

Butte Lake State Park. (575) 744-0055, (575) 744-5923. www.elephantmantriathlon.com www.nmparks.com ◆ Sept. 24. Hot Springs Festival. (575) 740-3902. www.hotspringsfestival.com ◆ Oct. TBA. Migration Sensation. Caballo and Percha Lake State Park. (575) 743-3942. ◆ Oct. 8-9. Sierra County Fair. (575) 894-2375. ◆ Oct. 21-23. Old-Time Fiddlers State Competition. (575) 744-4016. ◆ Nov. 12. Run for the Wall and Car Show. (575) 740-7111. ◆ Dec. 3. Christmas in the Foothills. Hillsboro. (575) 895-5797. ◆ Dec. 9. Old-Fashioned Christmas. Downtown T or C. (575) 740-3902. www.torcmainstreet.org/events ◆ Dec. 10. Luminaria Beachwalk & Floating Parade of Lights. Starts at dusk. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (575) 744-4708.

TUCUMCARI NE

www.tucumcarinm.com

Performing Arts/Galleries Sierra County Arts Council. P.O. Box 1924, T or C, 87901. (575) 894-0615. www.sierracountyartscouncil.org n

Sporting Fun Biking, Hiking, 4-Wheeling, Motocross, Rock Hounding, Birding. Public access to lands throughout Sierra County. Contact chamber for information. (575) 894-3536. www.truthorconsequenceschamberofcommerce.com ✰ Skateboard Park, Ralph Edwards Park. Sporting activities, picnicking. (800) 831-9487, telephone/fax: (575) 894-3536.

Attractions n Tucumcari Convention Center/Exhibit Hall.

Accommodates more than 1,000; receptions, meetings, banquets, outdoor patio, 5,500-sq.-ft. exhibit space. (575) 461-3064. www.cityoftucumcari.com

n

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Feb. 19-20. Sierra County Longhorn Show.

Sierra County Fair Grounds. (915) 252-4118. ◆ Feb. 25-26. Gathering of Quilts. T or C Civic Center. (575) 744-5472. ◆ April 23-24. Fiesta Golf Tournament. (575) 894-2603. ◆ May 6-8. T or C Fiesta. (575) 740-3902. ◆ June 4. Winston/Chloride/Chiz/Dusty Fiesta. Winston. (575) 743-2736. ◆ Aug. 13-14. T or C Open Golf Tournament. (575) 894-2603. ◆ Sept. 9-11. Elephant Butte Annual Celebration. (575) 744-4892. cityofelephantbutte.com ◆ Sept. 10-11. Balloon Regatta. Elephant Butte Lake State Park. (505) 307-4142. www.ebbr.org

Museums and Historic Sites n Blue Swallow Motel. The pre-World War II tourist

motor court became an icon of Route 66 folklore. 815 E. Tucumcari Blvd. ✰ Mesalands Community College’s Dinosaur Museum. Dinosaur, skeleton, fossil, sculpture exhibits, laboratory, classroom, museum shop. 211 E. Laughlin St. (575) 461-3466. www.mesalands.edu/museum/museum.htm n Tucumcari Historical Museum. Farm/ranch exhibits, Indian artifacts, early-town memorabilia. 416 S. Adams. (575) 461-4201. www.tucumcarinm.com

Outdoor Getaways n Conchas Lake State Park. Visitor center, camp-

sites. Bass, sunfish, crappie, catfish, walleye. 34 miles northwest of Tucumcari on N.M. 104. (575) 868-2270, 868-2270. www.nmparks.com n Ute Lake State Park. Fishing, boating, camping, picnicking, swimming, nature trail. 30 miles northeast of Tucumcari via U.S. 54 and N.M. 540. (575) 487-2284. www.nmparks.com

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  167


The St. Francis De Paula Mission in Tularosa, which blooms with oleander and roses in May, was established in 1865. PHOTO BY CHARLES MANN.

Performing Arts/Galleries n Tour the Murals. Largest Rt. 66-dedicated mural

in U.S., 35 and growing most by local artists Doug and Sharon Quarles highlight history, nature, interesting points of Tucumcari area. (575) 461-1694. n Roadside Attraction. Cultural Corridors sculpture, designed by Thomas Coffin, commemorates historic Route 66. Tucumcari Convention Center. 1500 W. Tucumcari Blvd. (575) 461-3064.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Throughout the year. Bluegrass Music Program.

Fourth Saturdays, every month. Quay County Exhibit Hall. (575) 461-0457. ◆ Feb. 12. Rotary Club Shrimp Boil. (505) 980-7925. ◆ March. 11. Iron Pour. Mesalands Community College. (575) 461-4413. ◆ March. 11. Mesalands Community College Foundation Mardi Gras Shrimp Boil. (575) 461-4413. ◆ April 23-24. Chuck-Wagon Cook-Off. Ute Lake State Park. (575) 487-2284. ◆ May 5. Cinco de Mayo Celebration. (575) 461-4413. ◆ May 12-15. Bluegrass Music Festival. Quay County Fairbarn. (575) 461-0457. ◆ May 20-22. Rt. 66 Freedom Ride. (575) 461-1694. ◆ June 10-11. Mother Road Rally. (575) 461-8488. www.motherroadrally.com ◆ July-Sept. Farmers Market. Every Tue. and Sat. (575) 461-0562. ◆ July 4. Elk’s Lodge Rain or Shine Spectacular Fireworks Display. (575) 461-1694. ◆ July 4. Fireworks Display. Ute Lake State Park. (575) 487-2284.

168  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

◆ July 4. Fireworks on the Water. Conchas Lake

State Park. (575) 868-2270. ◆ July 23-24. Quay County 4H Rodeo & Horse Show. (575) 461-0562. ◆ Aug. 4-6. Rattler Reunion. (575) 461-0244. ◆ Aug. 17-20. Quay County Fair and Carnival. (575) 461-1694. ◆ Sept. 16-17. Mesalands Community College National Intercollegiate Rodeo. (575) 461-4413. ◆ Sept. 23-25. Nara Visa Cowboy Poetry Gathering. (575) 633-2272. ◆ Oct. TBA. Rotary Air Show. (575) 461-1200. ◆ Nov. TBA. C.R.A.F.T. Christmas Fair. (575) 461-3721. ◆ Dec. 3. Chamber Parade of Lights. (575) 461-1694.

TULAROSA SE Attractions

WAGON MOUND NE www.nenewmexico.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ◆ Sept. 3-5. Bean Day Celebration. Barbecue on

Labor Day, parade, rodeo, dancing. (575) 387-6072.

WHITES CITY SE www.whitescity.com

Museums and Historic Sites ✰ Whites City Putt Putt. (575) 785-2291.

Outdoor Getaways Rattlesnake Springs. Many bird species, large flock of turkey vultures. Visitor center. Off U.S. 62/180 about 26 miles south of Carlsbad. n

n Tularosa Vineyards.

2.5 miles north of Tularosa on U.S. 54. (575) 585-2260. www.tularosavineyards.com

WINSTON SW

Outdoor Getaways

Museums and Historic Sites

n Three

Rivers Petroglyph National Recreation Site. Campsites, interpretive trails. 17 miles north of Tularosa via U.S. 54. (575) 525-4300.

n Winston. Ghost town. Old country store with grocer-

Sporting Fun

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

n White

Sands Speedway. Racing Fridays from April-Sept.; gates open 6 p.m., racing begins at dusk. Motocross Sept.-April, races 2nd Sun., practice 4th Sun., gates open 9 a.m., practice starts 10 a.m.; 4 miles north of Tularosa. (575) 439-6421. www.whitesandsspeedway.com

ies, sundries, fuel, post office, 1880s buildings remain. 38 miles northwest of T or C via I-25 and N.M. 52.

◆ June 4. Winston/Chloride/Chiz/Dusty Fiesta.

Winston. (575) 743-2736.

www.newmexico.org


FREE INFORMATION To request information from New Mexico Magazine advertisers, circle the reader response number on the card, fill out and mail for a prompt reply. 1) Acoma Business Enterprises–Sky City ........................85

33) Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce ......................... 137

2) Alamogordo, City of ................................................8

34) Lordsburg, City of................................................. 138

3) Albuquerque Convention & Visitors Bureau................3

35) Los Alamos County .................................139, 141, 143

4) Albuquerque Cultural Attractions..................32, 33, 35

36) Los Ranchos, Village of ................................ 106, 107

5) Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce .......104

37) New Mexico Culture Pass ........................................ 13

6) Americas Best Value Inn.......................................... 21

38) New Mexico Fiber Arts Trails ................................. 101

7) Apache Nugget Casino ...........................................89

39) New Mexico Lodging Association ........................... 17

8) Aztec Visitor’s Center .............................................113

40) New Mexico Rail Runner Express ............................20

9) Best Western of New Mexico ................................. IFC

41) NM Bed & Breakfast Association .............................25

10) Buffalo Thunder/Towa Golf Course ........................ 157

42) NM Farm & Ranch Museum ................................. 133

11) Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce ...............................9

43) NM Winegrowers Association ................................22

12) Cloudcroft, Village of ........................................... 121

44) North Central-Region 5 Group .......................... 46, 47

13) Clovis/Portales ........................................................ 63

45) Northeast NM Co-Op ............................................. 57

14) Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad.......................... 180

46) Old West Country, Region 2....................................69

15) Deming, City of .................................................... 124

47) Ortega’s de Chimayó ............................................ 119

16) El Rancho Hotel ................................................... 128

48) Red River, Town of ...................................................1

17) Eldorado Hotel & Spa ........................................... 152

49) Rio Rancho Convention & Visitors Bureau .............. 105

18) Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau ................ 41

50) Roswell, City of..................................................... 146

19) Georgia O’Keeffe Museum......................................99

51) Ruidoso, Village of .............................................. 149

20) Golf on the Santa Fe Trail ........................................77

52) Sandia Casino & Resort........................................... 53

21) Silver City/Grant County ........................................ 158

53) Sandoval County Dept. of Tourism ........................ 114

22) Grants/Cibola County Chamber of Commerce .......... 129

54) Santa Claran Hotel and Casino/Puye Cliffs................ 11

23) Heart of New Mexico .............................................97

55) Santa Fe Opera .................................................... 154

24) Heritage Hotels & Resorts....................................... 15

56) Santa Rosa, City of .................................................59

25) Hotel Parq Central ................................................109

57) Ski Santa Fe/Sandia Peak Tram ...............................IBC

26) Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort & Spa ........................5

58) Southwest Properties .............................................111

27) Indian Country USA ................................................ 91

59) Spencer Theater ................................................... 147

28) Indian Pueblo Cultural Center ....................................7

60) Taos Lodging & Activities........................................ 51

29) Indian Tourism Program–NMTD ..............................89

61) Taos Visitor Information ..........................................BC

30) Inn of the Mountain Gods.......................................65

62) The Bishop’s Lodge Resort & Spa .......................... 151

31) Inn on the Alameda.............................................. 153

63) Trail of the Ancients ................................................ 43

32) La Fonda on the Plaza .......................................... 155

64) Valles Caldera .........................................................49


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VG11


Numbers To Know Chambers of Commerce & CVBs

The listings for the chambers of commerce (CC) and convention and visitors bureaus (CVB) continue through Page 174. You can call the telephone numbers or visit the websites to get information on lodging, dining and other amenities. An alphabetical listing of the communities begins on page 103 with listings of area attractions, as well as the communities’ calendars of events.

Albuquerque CVB 20 First Plaza, Ste. 601, P.O. Box 26866, Albuquerque, 87125-6866 (800) 733-9918, (505) 842-9918, fax: 247-9101 www.itsatrip.org E-mail: info@itsatrip.org

Alamogordo CC 1301 N. White Sands Blvd., Alamogordo, 88310 (800) 826-0294, (575) 437-6120, fax: 437-6334 www.alamogordo.com E-mail: chamber@alamogordo.com

Angel Fire CC P.O. Box 547, Angel Fire, 87710 (800) 446-8117, (575) 377-6661, fax: 377-3034 www.AngelFireChamber.org E-mail: askus@angelfirechamber.org

Albuquerque CC 115 Gold SW, Ste. 201, Albuquerque, 87102 (505) 764-3700, fax: 764-3714 www.abqchamber.com E-mail: info@abqchamber.com

Angel Fire Visitor Center 3365 Mountain View Blvd. #7 Centro Plaza, Angel Fire, 87710 (866) 668-7787, (575) 377-6555 www.AngelFireFun.com E-mail: Jimmy@AngelFireFun.com

CONSIDER THESE TRAVELERS’ TIPS TO ENHANCE YOUR NEW MEXICO VISIT CALL AHEAD The community information and calendars in this guide are compiled nearly a year in advance. Before making your plans, be sure to call ahead using the contact information listed to verify dates, times and locations. GET UPDATES Some communities that are not listed in this guide did not respond to our requests for information. Further details about those communities, as well as up-to-date events, can be obtained by contacting the respective chambers of commerce, visitor centers or tribes. SPECIAL EVENTS & PROMOTIONS For the latest events log on to the calendar section of the Tourism Department’s website at www.newmexico.org. Also, check for special travel promotions, discounts and media alerts. FACEBOOK/TWITTER/E-NEWSLETTERS Get the latest news by signing up at www.newmexico.org. Also, get updates from New Mexico Magazine at www.nmmagazine.com.

172  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Albuquerque Hispano CC 1309 Fourth St. SW, Albuquerque, 87102 (505) 842-9003, fax: 764-9664 www.ahcnm.org E-mail: bea@ahcnm.org

Carrizozo CC P.O. Box 567, Carrizozo, 88301 (575) 648-2732 www.carrizozochamber.org E-mail: zozoccc@tularosa.net Chama Valley CC P.O. Box 306, Chama, 87520 (800) 477-0149, (575) 756-2306, fax: 756-2892 www.chamavalley.com E-mail: info@chamavalley.com Cimarrón CC 104 N. Lincoln Ave., P.O. Box 604, Cimarrón, 877.14 (575) 376-2417 www.cimarronnm.com E-mail: cimarronnm@gmail.com Clayton/Union Co. CC 1103 S. First St., P.O. Box 476, Clayton, 88415 (575) 374-9253, fax: 374-9250 www.claytonnewmexico.org E-mail: cuchamber@plateautel.net

Artesia CC P.O. Box 99, 88211. 107 N. First St., Artesia, 88210-0099 (800) 658-6251, (575) 746-2744, fax: 746-2745 www.artesiachamber.com E-mail: daniellem@artesiachamber.com

Cloudcroft CC 1001 James Canyon Highway, P.O. Box 1290, Cloudcroft, 88317 (866) 874-4447, (575) 682-2733, fax: 682-6028 www.cloudcroft.net E-mail: cloudcroft@cloudcroft.net

Aztec CC 110 N. Ash, Aztec, 87410 (505) 334-9551, fax: 334-7648 www.aztecchamber.com E-mail: director@aztecchamber.com

Clovis/Curry Co. CC 105 E. Grand St., Clovis, 88101 (800) 261-7656, (575) 763-3435, fax: 763-7266 www.clovisnm.org E-mail: clovisnm@clovisnm.org

Belén CC/Visitor Center 712 Dalies Ave., Belén, 87002 (505) 864-8091, fax: 864-7461 www.belenchamber.org E-mail: belenchamber@belenchamber.org

Corrales Visitor Center 4324 Corrales Road, P.O. Box 1531, Corrales, 87048. (505) 350-3955 www.corrales-mainstreet.org

Bloomfield CC 224 W. Broadway Ave., Bloomfield, 87413 (800) 461-1245, (505) 632-0880, fax: 634-1431 www.bloomfieldnm.info E-mail: askus@bloomfieldchamber.info Capitán CC P.O. Box 441, Capitán, 88316-0441 (575) 354-2273, fax: 354-0072 www.villageofcapitan.com www.smokeybearpark.com E-mail: capitannm@villageofcapitan.com Carlsbad CC/Visitor Information Center 302 S. Canal, Carlsbad, 88220 (866) 822-9226, (575) 887-6516, fax: 885-1455 www.carlsbadchamber.com

Cuba Area CC P.O. Box 1000, Cuba, 87013 (575) 289-3514 www.cubanewmexico.com Deming/Luna Co. CC 800 E. Pine, P.O. Box 8, Deming, 88031 (800) 848-4955, (575) 546-2674, fax: 546-9569 www.demingchamber.com E-mail: info@demingchamber.com Destination Acoma P.O. Box 310, Acoma Pueblo, 87034 (888)-759-2489, (505) 552-1060, fax: 552-1095 www.skycity.com

www.newmexico.org


Eagle Nest CC P.O. Box 322, Eagle Nest, 87718 (800) 494-9117, (575) 377-2420, fax: 377-3697 www.eaglenestchamber.org E-mail: info@eaglenestchamber.org East Mountain CC P.O. Box 2436, Tijeras, 87059 (505) 281-1999 www.eastmountainchamber.com E-mail: info@eastmountainchamber.com Elephant Butte CC P.O. Box 1355, Elephant Butte, 87935-1355 608 Hwy 195, Elephant Butte, 87935 (877) 744-4900, (575) 744-4708, fax: 744-0044 www.elephantbuttechamberofcommerce.com E-mail: info@elephantbuttechamberofcommerce.com Española Valley CC 1 Calle de Españolas, Española, 87532 (505) 753-2831, fax: 753-1252 www.espanolanmchamber.com E-mail: info@espanolanmchamber.com Eunice CC P.O. Box 838, Eunice, 88231 (575) 394-2755, fax: 394-3937 E-mail: eunicecofc@valornet.com Farmington CC 100 W. Broadway, Farmington, 87401 (888) 325-0279, (505) 325-0279, fax: 327-7556 www.gofarmington.com E-mail: chamber@gofarmington.com Farmington CVB 3041 E. Main St., Farmington, 87402 (800) 448-1240, (505) 326-7602, fax: 327-0577 www.farmingtonnm.org E-mail: fmncvb@earthlink.net Fort Sumner/DeBaca Co. CC 707 N. Fourth St., P.O. Box 28, Fort Sumner, 88119 (575) 355-7705, fax: 355-2850 www.ftsumnerchamber.com E-mail: ftsumnercoc@plateautel.net info@ftsumnerchamber.com City of Gallup CVB 110 West Aztec Gallup, NM 87301 (800) 380-4989, (505) 726-2040 www.gallupnm.org E-Mail: cvb@ci.gallup.nm.us, dgarcia@ci.gallup.nm.us Gallup/McKinley Co. CC 103 W. Route 66, Gallup, 87301 (800) 380-4989, (505) 722-2228, fax: 863-2280 www.thegallupchamber.com E-mail: alice@thegallupchamber.com Grants/Cíbola Co. CC NM Mining Museum & Visitors Center 100 N. Iron Ave., P.O. Box 297, Grants, 87020 (800) 748-2142, (505) 287-4802, fax: 287-8224 www.grants.org E-mail: discover@grants.org www.newmexico.org

Greater Las Cruces CC 760 W. Picacho, Las Cruces, 88005 P.O. Drawer 519, Las Cruces, 88004 (575) 524-1968, fax: 527-5546 www.lascruces.org E-mail: chamber@lascruces.org Greater Sandoval County CC 848 South Camino del Pueblo, Room 5 P.O. Box 1116, Bernalillo, 87004-1116 (505) 404-2073, fax: 404-2083 www.sandovalchamber.com E-mail: gsccci@aol.com Hatch Valley CC P.O. Box 38, Hatch, 87937 (575) 267-5050 www.villageofhatch.org mnordyke@zianet.com Hobbs CC 400 N. Marland, Hobbs, 88240 (800) 658-6291, (575) 397-3202, fax: 397-1689 www.hobbschamber.org E-mail: hobbschamber@leaconet.com Jal CC P.O. Box 1205, Jal, 88252 Telephone/fax: (575) 395-2620 www.jalnm.com E-mail: jalchamber@leaco.net Las Cruces CVB 211 N. Water St., Las Cruces, 88001 (800) 343-7827, (575) 541-2444, fax: 541-2164 www.mustseelc.org E-mail: cvb@lascrucescvb.org Las Vegas/San Miguel CC P.O. Box 128, 503 6th St. Las Vegas, NM 87701 (800) 832-5947 (505) 425-8631, fax: 425-3057 www.lasvegasnewmexico.com E-mail: lvexec@qwestoffice.net Logan/Ute Lake CC P.O. Box 277, Logan, 88426 www.utelakeloganchamber.com Lordsburg/Hildalgo Co. CC 206 Main St., Lordsburg, 88045 (575) 542-9864 www.lordsburghidalgocounty.net E-mail: lordsburgcoc@aznex.net Los Alamos CC 109 Central Pk. Square, P.O. Box 460, Los Alamos, 87544-0460 (800) 444-0707, (505) 662-8105, fax: 662-8399 www.visit.losalamos.com E-mail: chelo@losalamos.org Lovington CC 201 S. Main, Lovington, 88260 (575) 396-5311, fax: 396-2823 www.lovingtonchamber.org E-mail: lovingtonchamber@hotmail.com

Magdalena CC P.O. Box 281, Magdalena, 87825 (866) 854-3217 www.magdalena-nm.com info@magdalena-nm.com Melrose CC P.O. Box 216, Melrose, 88124 (575) 253-4530 Mora Valley CC (Mora Valley Tourism Office) P.O. Box 800, Mora, 87732 (575) 387-6072, fax: 387-6072 (call before faxing) www.morachamber.com Moriarty CC P.O. Box 96, Moriarty, 87035 (505) 832-4087, fax: 832-5436 www.moriartychamber.com E-mail: moriartycc@moriartychamber.com Mountainair CC P.O. Box 595, Mountainair, 87036 (505) 847-2795 www.mountainairchamber.com E-mail: mcc@mountainairchamber.com N.M. Route 66 Association 1415 Central Ave. NE, Albuquerque, 87106 (505) 852-2995 www.rt66nm.org E-mail: info@rt66nm.org Old West Country P.O. Box 884, 88062 (800) 290-8330 www.oldwestcountry.com E-mail: info@oldwestcountry.com Portales/Roosevelt Co. CC 100 S. Ave. A, Portales, 88130 (800) 635-8036, (575) 356-8541, fax: 356-8542 www.portales.com E-mail: chamber@portales.com Raton Chamber & Economic Development Council Inc. P.O. Box 1211, 100 Clayton Rd., Raton, 87740 (575) 445-3689, fax: 445-3680 www.raton.info E-mail: ratonchamber@bacavalley.com Red River CC P.O. Box 870, Red River, 87558 (575) 754-2366, fax: 754-3104 www.redrivernewmex.com E-mail: rrinfo@redrivernewmex.com Red River Visitor Information Center 100 East Main St., Red River, 87558 (877) 754-1708, (575) 754-3030 www.redriver.org Rio Rancho CC & Visitor Center 4001 Southern Blvd. SE, Rio Rancho, 87124-2069 (505) 892-1533, fax: 892-6157 www.rrrcc.org 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  173


Rio Rancho CVB 3200 Civic Center Circle, Rio Rancho, 87144 (888) 746-7262, (505) 891-7258, fax: 892-8328 www.rioranchonm.org E-mail: info@rioranchonm.org

Socorro Co. CC P.O. Box 743, Socorro, 87801 (575) 835-0424, fax: 835-9744 www.socorro-nm.com E-mail: chamber@socorro-nm.com

Roswell CC 131 W. Second St., P.O. Box 70, Roswell, 88201 (877) 849-7679, (575) 623-5695, fax: 624-6870 www.roswellnm.org E-mail: reception@roswellnm.org

Socorro Heritage and Visitor Center 217 Fisher Ave., Socorro, 87801 (575) 835-8927, fax: 835-2097 www.socorronm.gov E-mail: tourism@socorronm.gov

Roswell CVB 912 N. Main, Roswell, 88201 (575) 624-7704, fax: 624-6863 www.roswellmysteries.com E-mail: roswellpr@cableone.net

Springer CC P.O. Box 323, Springer, 87747 (575) 483-5554

Roswell Hispano CC 327 N. Main, Roswell, 88201 (888) 616-0889, (575) 624-0889, fax: 624-0538 www.roswellhcc.org E-mail: roswellhispanoch@qwest.net Roswell Visitor Bureau 912 N. Main, Roswell, 88201 (888) 767-9355, (575) 624-7704, fax: 624-7712 E-mail: vis1@cableone.net Ruidoso Convention Center 111 Sierra Blanca Dr., Ruidoso, 88345 (877) 700-5445, (575) 258-5445, fax: 258-5040 www.ruidosoconventioncenter.com E-mail: sales@ruidosoconventioncenter.com Ruidoso Valley CC/Visitor Center 720 Sudderth Dr., Ruidoso, 88435 (877) 784-3676, (575) 257-7395, fax: 257-4693 www.ruidosonow.com E-mail: info@ruidosonow.com Sandoval Co. Visitor Center P.O. Box 40, 264 S. Camino del Pueblo, Bernalillo, 87004 (800) 252-0191, (505) 867-8687, fax: 867-8325 www.sandovalcounty.org Santa Fe CC 8380 Cerrillos Rd., Ste. 302, Santa Fe, 87507 P.O. Box 1928, Santa Fe, 87504 (505) 988-3279, fax: 984-2205 www.santafechamber.com E-mail: info@santafechamber.com Santa Fe CVB P.O. Box 909, 201 W. Marcy St., Santa Fe, 87504-0909 (800) 777-2489, (505) 955-6200, fax: 955-6222 www.santafe.org E-mail: scenter@santafenm.gov Santa Rosa Visitor Information Center 244 S. Main St. (in City Hall), Santa Rosa, 88435 (575) 472-3763, fax: 472-3848 www.santarosanm.org Silver City/Grant Co. CC 201 N. Hudson St., Silver City, 88061 (800) 548-9378, (575) 538-3785, fax: 538-3786 www.silvercity.org E-mail: info@silvercity.org

174  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

Taos CC P.O. Box I300, Taos, 87571 (575) 751-8800, fax: 751-8801 www.taoschamber.com E-mail: info@taoschamber.com Taos Visitor Center 1139 Paseo del Pueblo Sur, Taos, 87571 (800) 732-8267, (575) 758-3873 www.taosvisitor.com Tatum CC P.O. Box 814, Tatum, 88267 (575) 398-5455 E-mail: mburns@leaco.net Truth or Consequences/Sierra Co. CC P.O. Drawer 31, 400 W. 4th St. at Civic Center, Truth or Consequences, 87901 (575) 894-3536, fax: 894-3536 www.truthorconsequencesnm.net E-mail: cofc@riolink.com Tucumcari/Quay Co. CC 404 W. Route 66 Blvd., P.O. Drawer E, Tucumcari, 88401 (575) 461-1694, fax: 461-3884 www.tucumcarinm.com E-mail: chamber@tucumcarinm.com Turquoise Trail Association P.O. Box 303, Sandía Park, 87047 (505) 281-5233 www.turquoisetrail.org E-mail: trail@turquoisetrail.org Valencia Co. CC 3447 Lambros, P.O. Box 13, Los Lunas, 87031 (505) 352-3596, Fax: 352-3591 www.loslunasnm.gov/chamber E-mail: chamberdirector@loslunasnm.gov Village of Taos Ski Valley CC P.O. Box 91, Taos Ski Valley, 87525 (800) 517-9816, (575) 776-1413, fax: 776-5540 www.taosskivalley.com E-mail: info@taosskivalley.com Whites City 17 Carlsbad Caverns Hwy., P.O. Box 128, Whites City, 88268 (800) 228-3767, (575) 785-2291, fax: 785-2283 www.whitescity.com E-mail: whitescity@whitescity.com

Emergency Numbers/ Driving Conditions Emergency: Call 911. Road conditions: Call 511. To check road conditions online: www.nmshtd.state.nm.us For a map of closed roads: nmroads.com For the latest weather: www.nws.noaa.gov HELP FOR STRANDED MOTORISTS: The N.M. Department of Public Safety (state police) offers assistance to stranded motorists and those encountering other problems on the road. Accidents and road emergencies can be reported to the following district and subdistrict offices. GENERAL CALLS: (505) 827-8000 CENTRAL REGION Albuquerque (505) 242-2677  Cuba (575) 289-9157  Edgewood (505) 281-5717  Los Lunas (505) 841-9256 NORTHWEST REGION Aztec (505) 325-7547  Farmington (505) 325-7547  Gallup (505) 722-2231  Grants (505) 287-4404 NORTH CENTRAL REGION Chama (575) 756-2343  Española (505) 753-2277  Santa Fe (505) 827-9300  Taos (575) 758-8878 NORTHEAST REGION Las Vegas (505) 425-6771  Ratón (575) 445-5571  Santa Rosa (575) 461-3300  Springer (505) 425-6771  Tucumcari (575) 461-3300 SOUTHEAST REGION Alamogordo (575) 437-1313  Artesia (575) 622-7200  Carlsbad (575) 885-3138  Clovis (575) 762-1305  Hobbs (575) 392-5580  Roswell (575) 622-7200  Ruidoso (575) 437-1313 SOUTHWEST REGION Deming (575) 546-8548  Las Cruces (575) 524-6111  Lordsburg (575) 542-9563  Quemado (575) 773-4501  Silver City (575) 388-1542  Socorro (575) 835-0741  Truth or Consequences (575) 894-7118

www.newmexico.org


2011 New Mexico Vacation Guide

NC NW C SW

Publisher: Ethel Hess

NE

SE

Visitor Information Centers On the road and not sure where to go? Stop at one of the statewide New Mexico Visitor Information Centers (VIC) located in the various tourism regions for some direction. (See map on Page 10.)

Associate Publisher: Jon Bowman Editor: Emily Drabanski Copy Editors: Penny Landay, Walter K. Lopez Writer/Proofreader: Jeremy Huggard Research: Terry Tiedeman, Sean Gardner Art Director: Fabian West Design/Production: Melanie Boylan Ad Production: Lisa Malaguti Regional Maps: Darlene McElroy Tourism Department Distribution: Toby Martinez

VISITOR CENTER PROGRAM DIRECTOR Norma Waring, NMVIC program director Lamy Building 491 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, 87501 (505) 827-7400 norma.waring@state.nm.us

SOUTHWEST (Region 2) Lordsburg Visitor Information Center I-10, Exit 20 rest area 191 Stagecoach Rd., Lordsburg, 88045 (575) 542-8149, fax: (575) 542-8184 lordsburg.vic@state.nm.us

NORTH REGION COORDINATOR Jonni Valdez-Silva Raton Visitor Information Center (575) 445-2761 Jonni.Valdez-Silva@state.nm.us

SOUTHEAST (Region 3) Texico Visitor Information Center No. 336 U.S. 60/70/84 Texico, 88135 (575) 482-3321, fax: (575) 482-3475 texico.vic@state.nm.us

Warehouse: Miguel Lujan, Mona Archuleta Advertising Director: Wendy Ortega Financial Manager: Pamela Rodriguez Advertising Representatives: Santa Fe/Las Vegas, West Albuquerque, Northwestern New Mexico: Kristen Warner,   (866) 989-4448, (505) 989-4448,   fax: (505) 988-5201,   E-mail: adsnmm@aol.com East Albuquerque, Ruidoso/Las Cruces, Southern New Mexico, Northeast/  North Central New Mexico: Lori Barrett,   (505) 385-8056, fax: (505) 213-0213  SKYPE: lakotanm  E-mail: lori@lakotanm.com

The 2011 New Mexico Vacation Guide is copyrighted in its entirety and is published by New Mexico Magazine for the New Mexico Tourism Department. Permission must be obtained from the editor to reproduce   any material from the issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS:   (800) 898-6639 BOOK AND GIFT ORDERS:   (800) 711-9525 New Mexico Magazine Lew Wallace Building 495 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, NM, 87501 (505) 827-7447 www.nmmagazine.com

www.newmexico.org

CENTRAL REGION COORDINATOR Eddie Smithson Santa Fe Visitor Information Center (505) 827-7336 Eddie.Smithson@state.nm.us SOUTH REGION COORDINATOR Janice Hamilton Texico Visitor Information Center (575) 482-3321 Janice.Hamilton@state.nm.us TOURISM DEPARTMENT DISTRIBUTION Toby Martinez, fulfillment program Manager/Events Coordinator 491 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, 87501 (505) 827-7400 or (800) 545-2070 TobyD.Martinez@state.nm.us NORTHWEST (Region 1) Gallup Visitor Information Center I-40, Exit 3, P.O. Box 816, Gallup, 87305 (505) 905-4440, fax: (505) 905-4429 gallup.vic@state.nm.us SOUTHWEST (Region 2) Anthony Visitor Information Center I-10, North Mile Marker 164 Rest Area P.O. Box 1270, Anthony, 88021 (575) 882-2419, fax: (575) 882-4649 anthony.vic@state.nm.us

NORTHEAST (Region 4) Glenrio Visitor Information Center I-40, first exit (westbound) 37315-C, Glenrio, 88434 (575) 576-2424, fax: (575) 576-2314 glenrio.vic@state.nm.us NORTHEAST (Region 4) Raton Visitor Information Center I-25, Exit 451, 1 mile west 100 Clayton Rd., Raton, 87740 (575) 445-2761, fax: (575) 445-8351 raton.vic@state.nm.us NORTH CENTRAL (Region 5) Chama Visitor Information Center U.S. 17 No. 2372, P.O. Box 697, Chama, 87520 (575) 756-2235, fax: (575) 756-2362 chama.vic@state.nm.us NORTH CENTRAL (Region 5) La Bajada Visitor Information Center I-25, 17 miles south of Santa Fe 491 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, 87508 (505) 424-0823, fax: (505) 424-0823 labajada.vic@state.nm.us NORTH CENTRAL (Region 5) Santa Fe Visitor Information Center Lamy Building 491 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, 87501 (505) 827-7336, fax: (505) 827-7402 santafe.vic@state.nm.us 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  175


Index A

Abó, 10, 142 Abiquiú, 10, 48, 72, 74, 76, 103 Acoma Pueblo, 40, 84-85, 95, 172 Alamogordo, 10, 60, 62, 64, 72, 79, 98, 101, 103, 121, 172, 174 Albuquerque, 14-16, 24, 28-30, 34, 36-37, 72, 74, 76-78, 80-81, 84-86, 91-92, 96-97, 100-102, 104-105, 108-110, 112, 128, 1309-140, 142, 151, 172-175 Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, 29-30, 37, 72, 112 Albuquerque Old Town 30, 34, 36, 105 Alto, 10, 101, 148 Ancestral Pueblo, 18, 38, 50, 108, 113, 115, 123, 139, 144, 165 Angel Fire, 10, 44, 48, 50, 56, 72, 74, 76, 78, 101, 112, 138, 142, 163, 172 Ansel Adams, 156 Anthony, 10, 79, 85, 94, 113, 175 Anthropology, 96, 100, 103, 105, 151, 157 Aquarium, 30, 34, 37, 100, 104 Armand Hammer United World College of the American West, 137 Artesia, 10, 79, 113, 172, 174 Aztec, 10, 79, 113, 172 Aztec Ruins National Monument, 38, 40, 43, 113

B

Ballooning, 9, 72 Balloon Rally, 112, 116, 129, 145, 163 Bandelier National Monument, 44, 48, 50, 139 Bandera Lava Flow and Ice Caves, 130 Barrio de Analco, 149 Belén, 10, 14, 34, 72, 78, 81, 114, 167, 172 Bernalillo, 10, 34, 36, 76, 81, 86, 91-93, 98-99, 105, 115, 173 Bernardo, 10, 115 Bike Race, 112, 114, 128-129, 145, 160 Biking, 71-72, 74 Billy the Kid, 20, 54, 60, 62, 68, 70, 99, 102, 116, 127, 138, 143, 147-148 Birds, 29, 108, 114-116, 121, 142, 160 Bird watching, 66, 74, 108, 122, 141, 143-144, 147, 153 Bisti Badlands, 40, 88 Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge, 74, 147 Blackwater Draw, 60, 62, 100, 144 Bloomfield, 10, 40, 115-116, 126, 172 Blue Hole, 54, 56, 59, 81, 158 Bluewater Lake State Park, 130, 165

176  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

(Numbers in bold indicate either the key listings or related photograph.) Boating, 74, 86, 103, 112, 117, 120, 125, 130, 133, 137-138, 147, 149, 165, 167 Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, 29, 66, 68, 74, 160, 161 Bosque Redondo, 60, 84, 88, 99 Bottomless Lakes State Park, 62, 147 Bradbury Science Museum, 44, 48, 52, 139 Brantley Lake State Park, 117 Budaghers, 10 Buffalo Soldiers, 20, 99, 138, 158 Bureau of Land Management, 71, 74, 80 Butterfield Trail, 123

C

Caballo Lake State Park, 167 Cabeza de Vaca, 18 Cabezón Peak Recreation Area, 123 Camping, 38, 42, 74, 85-86, 88, 103, 114-115, 117-118, 120, 122-127, 129-131, 137, 141-145, 147-149, 153-154, 159-160, 162, 165, 167 Camino Real, 34, 66, 68, 98, 115, 126, 140, 143, 151153, 160, 162, 167 Canyon Road, 48, 101, 149, 157 Capulín, 10, 116 Capulín Volcano National Monument, 54, 56, 58, 116 Capitán, 10, 60, 99, 116, 172 Carlsbad, 10, 12, 16, 29, 64, 71, 74, 79, 116, 168, 172 Carlsbad Caverns National Park, 20, 60, 62, 64, 117 Carrizozo, 10, 62, 117-118, 148, 172 Carson National Forest, 115, 144, 163 Casino, 62, 84-86, 88-93, 102, 110, 115, 125, 130, 148, 162 Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis, 149 Caves, 18, 20, 40, 64, 117, 128, 130 Cedar Crest, 76, 108 Centennial, 21, 136, 145 Cerrillos, 10, 48, 50, 76, 81, 92, 118, 154-155 Cerrillos Hills State Park, 118 Chaco Culture National Historical Park, 38, 40, 42, 88, 123, 126, 128 Chama, 10, 18, 44, 48, 50, 71, 74, 80-81, 86, 103, 118-119, 165, 172 Chama River, 103 Chambers of Commerce, 172-175 Children, 16, 28, 88, 95-98, 104, 110, 112, 114, 118, 122-123, 125-126, 130, 133-134, 136, 143, 145146, 148, 152, 154, 156 Chile, 2, 22, 27, 66, 112, 119, 130, 136, 145, 147-148, 157, 160, 162 Chile Festival, 27, 66, 130, 136, 157 Chimayó, 10, 48, 52, 119, 126 Chloride, 10, 100, 119, 167-168 Christmas on the Pecos, 29, 117

Cíbola National Forest, 37, 108, 130, 141, 165 Cities of Cíbola, 18, 54, 93 City of Rocks State Park, 123 Cimarrón, 10, 54, 56, 119-120, 127, 172 Cimarrón Canyon State Park, 56, 120 Clayton, 10, 54, 56, 78, 120, 172 Clayton Lake State Park, 54, 56, 120 Cleveland Roller Mill, 54, 142 Cloudcroft, 10, 60, 62, 79, 120-121, 172 Clovis, 10, 28, 62, 79, 101, 121-122, 144, 172 Clovis Music Festival, 28, 122 Clovis-Paleo Indians, 18 Cochití Lake, 78, 85, 115 Cochiti Pueblo, 85 Code Talkers, 84, 128 Columbus, 10, 72, 122, 124 Conchas Lake State Park, 167-168 Coronado, 18, 91, 104, 109 Coronado State Monument, 34, 98, 105, 112, 115 Comanche, 83, 94 Corrales, 10, 34, 104, 115, 122-123, 149, 172 Cowboy Symposium, 29, 148 Coyote Creek State Park, 142 Crownpoint, 10, 38, 42, 88, 94, 123, 126, 128 Cuba, 10, 42, 86, 94, 123, 172 Cuisine, 22, 26, 28, 66, 84, 92, 96, 136, 156, 163 Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad, 44, 48, 50, 81, 118-119 Currency exchange, 16 Cycling events, 24, 74, 109-110, 122, 134, 145, 158

D

Datil, 10, 71, 74, 123 De-Na-Zin Wilderness, 38, 40, 115, 126 Deming, 10, 27, 66, 68, 79, 81, 100, 123-124, 172 Des Moines, 10, 116, 124 Dexter, 10, 72, 124 Dinosaurs, 18, 36, 97, 108-109 Dinosaur Museum, 36, 54, 56, 100, 167 Disabled travelers, 16 Dixon, 10, 124 Downs at Albuquerque, 102, 109 Dulce, 40, 86, 102, 118

E

Eagle Nest, 10, 48, 50, 112, 120, 125, 173 Eagle Nest Lake, 56, 125 Eaves Movie Ranch, 140 Edgewood, 10, 125, 142, 174 El Camino Real, 34, 98, 115, 126, 140, 151-153, 167 El Camino Real International Heritage Center, 66, 68, 98, 160, 162 www.newmexico.org


El Malpais National Monument, 38, 40, 42, 130 El Morro National Monument, 38, 40, 43, 128, 144 El Prado, 80, 163 El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 48, 100, 151, 156-157 El Rito, 126, 137 El Vado Lake State Park, 165 Elephant Butte, 10, 74, 125, 173 Elephant Butte Lake State Park, 66, 68, 70, 125, 167 Elevations, 14, 21 Elliott S. Barker Wildlife Area, 120 Elizabethtown, 10, 18, 56, 125 Embudo, 48, 81, 125, 154 Emergency numbers, 174 Enchanted Circle, 44, 48, 50, 56, 112, 125, 145 Enchanted Forest Cross-Country Ski and Snowshoe Area, 145 Española, 10, 48, 52, 78, 90, 92, 102, 125-126, 149, 173 Eunice, 10, 79, 126, 173 Expo New Mexico, 30, 101-102, 108-110

F

Farmington, 10, 38, 40, 42, 72, 79-80, 94-95, 101-102, 115, 126-127, 158, 173 Fauna and flora, 21 Fenton Lake State Park, 131 Festival of the Cranes, 29, 160, 162 Fiesta de Santa Fe, 28, 150, 157 Fishing, 38, 44, 52, 54, 66, 71, 74, 76-77, 85-86, 8889, 91-93, 103-104, 108, 112, 114-115, 117-120, 122-131, 133, 137-139, 141-149, 158-160, 162, 165, 167 Fly-fishing, 143, 154, 159 Folsom, 54, 56, 100, 116, 127 Fort Selden State Monument, 98, 132, 134 Fort Stanton, 71, 74, 116, 138, 148 Fort Sumner, 10, 88, 127, 173 Fort Sumner State Monument, 60, 62, 99, 127 Fort Union National Monument, 54, 56, 58, 136 Fort Wingate, 10, 128 Four Corners Monument, 40, 158 Fuller Lodge, 48, 139

G

Galisteo, 10, 76, 128 Gallup, 10, 14, 38, 40, 42-43, 72, 79, 88, 93-95, 128, 173 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial, 26, 95, 128 Gallup Visitor Information Center, 175 Gathering of Nations, 24, 110 Geology, 20, 38, 58, 81, 108, 130, 134 Georgia O’Keeffe, 20, 48, 100, 151 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, 44, 100, 151 Geronimo, 20, 52, 68, 76, 95, 163, 166-167 Ghost Ranch, 103 Ghost town, 18, 66, 100, 119, 125, 129-131, 137-138, 141, 159, 167-168 Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, 66, 68, 70, 159 www.newmexico.org

Gila National Forest, 66, 129, 144, 159 Gila Wilderness, 68 Glenrio Visitor Information Center, 175 Glenwood, 10, 68, 129, 141 Glorieta, 20, 137, 142 Golf, 40, 44, 48, 60, 66, 72, 77-79, 85, 88, 90-92, 104, 109, 116, 118, 120, 122, 124-125, 130, 132, 135, 139, 141, 145, 148, 158-160, 164-165, 167 Grants, 10, 38, 40, 42-43, 79, 84, 86, 94, 100, 128, 130, 165, 173 Great American Duck Race, 27, 124 Grulla National Wildlife Refuge, 144 Guides, 80, 85, 126, 163

H

Hang Gliding, 81, 130 Hatch, 10, 27, 66, 68, 130, 136, 173 Hatchery, 48, 72, 124, 129, 131, 140, 142-144, 158 Hermit’s Peak, 137 Heron Lake State Park, 119, 165 Hidalgo, 20, 138-139 High Rolls, 121 Hike It and Spike It, 24, 147 Hiking, 2, 36, 38, 42, 44, 52, 60, 64, 71, 74, 86, 88, 98, 103, 108-109, 112, 115, 117-118, 120-123, 126-127, 130-131, 133, 139, 141-145, 147-149, 153-154, 160, 164, 167 Hillsboro, 10, 130-131, 167 History, 18-20 Hobbs, 10, 79, 81, 100-102, 130-131, 173 Horseback riding, 44, 76-77, 108, 116, 120, 131, 139, 143, 145, 148, 153-154, 164 Horse racing, 90, 102, 109, 115, 130-131 Hot Springs, 34, 36, 56, 129, 131, 137, 167 Hubbard Museum of the American West, 60, 62, 100, 148 Hunting, 38, 74, 77, 79-80, 86, 88-89, 93, 114-115, 118-120, 125-126, 130-131, 139, 144-145, 147, 154, 165 Hyde Memorial State Park, 153

I

Ice Skate, 109, 139 Indian Market, 27, 91, 95, 127, 157 Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 30, 34, 84, 100, 105, 110 Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial, 26, 38, 128 International Folk Art Market, 26, 156 International Space Hall of Fame, 103 International travelers, 16 International UFO Museum, 60, 62, 64, 146 Inn of the Mountain Gods, 62, 78-79, 88, 102, 148 Isleta Pueblo, 18, 85 Isotopes, 109-110

J

Jal, 10, 79, 131, 173 Jémez Mountains, 48, 52, 81 Jemez Pueblo, 30, 34, 36, 85-86, 99 Jémez River, 93, 131 Jémez Springs, 10, 99, 131, 139 Jémez State Monument, 30, 36, 99, 131 Jicarilla Apache, 38, 40, 86, 94-95

K

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, 16, 71, 74, 85, 115 Kelly, 10, 131, 141 Kid Spots, 16 Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands, 56, 120 KiMo Theatre, 101, 108 Kingston, 131, 167 Kit Carson, 120, 162-163

L

La Bajada, 175 La Hacienda de los Martínez, 100, 162 La Mesilla, 68, 123, 136 Laboratory of Anthropology, 96, 151, 157 Laguna Pueblo, 86 Lamy, 10, 14, 115, 132, 149, 175 Langmuir, 160 Las Cruces, 10, 14, 21, 28, 66, 68, 79, 96-98, 101, 123, 132-136, 141, 173 Las Trampas, 136 Las Vegas, 10, 14, 54, 56, 58, 72, 74, 78, 112, 136138, 141, 143, 173 Las Vegas-style gaming, 102, 148 Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge, 74, 137 Lavender Festival, 140 Leasburg Dam State Park, 133 Lensic Performing Arts Center, 101, 154 Lightning Field, 144 Lincoln, 10, 20, 26, 29, 60, 62, 64, 72, 76, 98-99, 103, 117-118, 121, 138, 148, 151-152, 172 Lincoln County War, 20, 64, 99, 138, 148 Lincoln National Forest, 103, 117-118, 121, 148 Lincoln State Monument, 60, 62, 64, 99, 138 Living Desert Zoo and Gardens State Park, 62, 116 Logan, 10, 138, 173 Loma Parda, 137 Lordsburg, 10, 68, 123, 138-139, 173 Lordsburg Visitors Information Center, 175 Loretto Chapel, 151 Los Alamos, 10, 16, 20, 44, 48, 50, 52, 78, 92, 131, 139, 173 Los Lunas, 10, 34, 139, 174 Los Ojos, 140, 165 Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, 10, 140 Loving, 10, 140 Lovington, 10, 130, 140, 173 2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  177


M

Madrid, 10, 48, 50, 100-101, 134-136, 140 Magdalena, 10, 68, 70, 101, 131, 141, 173 Manhattan Project, 20, 139 Manzano, 10, 141-142 Manzano Mountains State Park, 142 Maxwell, 10, 72, 74, 100, 105, 110, 120, 141, 162 Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge, 74, 141 Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, 100, 105 Melrose, 10, 141, 173 Mesalands Community College’s Dinosaur Museum, 54, 56, 100, 167 Mescalero Apache, 78, 86, 88, 95, 99, 117, 148 Mesilla, 10, 66, 68, 70, 123, 132-136, 141 Mesilla Valley Bosque State Park, 141 Milan, 10, 141 Mileage, 14 Milner Plaza, 26, 96, 151 Milnesand, 144 Mimbres, 66, 79, 100, 123-124, 143, 159, 167 Mimbres Region Art Council, 143 Miraculous Staircase, 151 Mogollon Creek, 159 Mogollon, 18, 24, 70, 98, 100, 129, 141 Montezuma Castle, 56, 137 Mora, 10, 72, 138, 141-142, 173 Moriarty, 10, 72, 81, 142, 173 Morphy Lake State Park, 142 Mountain Biking, 71, 72, 74, 108-109, 112, 116, 126, 131, 139, 143, 153, 164 Mount Taylor, 130 Mountainair, 10, 34, 142, 173 Museums, 30, 34, 38, 40, 44, 48, 52, 64, 66, 96-101, 103, 105, 110, 112-116, 118-120, 122-123, 125132, 135-136, 138-147, 149, 157-158, 160, 162, 165, 167-168 Museum of Fine Arts, 97,154 Museum Hill, 244, 52, 96, 100, 151, 153, 156-157 Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 52, 96, 151, 155-157 Museum of New Mexico, 48, 96, 105 Museum of International Folk Art, 26, 52, 96, 151, 155-157 Museum of Natural History and Science, 36, 97, 109 Museum of Space History, 60, 62, 98, 103

N

Nambe Pueblo, 88 National Atomic Museum, 108 National Hispanic Cultural Center 96-97, 108 National Park Service (NPS), 71 National Solar Observatory, 60, 61, 62, 120 Native Calendar, 94 Native New Mexico, 83-95 Native Americans, 18, 83-84, 96, 98 Navajo, 83, 88, 99, 130, 158 Navajo Lake State Park, 40, 114 New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, 97

178  2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE

NMSU Museum, 133 N.M. Department of Game and Fish, 72, 76, 80 New Mexico Tourism Department, 6, 10, 175 New Mexico facts, 12 New Mexico Magazine, 16, 112, 175 New Mexico Museum of Art, 97, 152 New Mexico Museum of Space History, 60, 98, 103 New Mexico State Fair, 28, 101, 110, 147 N.M. Touring Society, 74, 109

O

Oasis State Park, 144 Observatory, 60, 62, 70, 103, 120, 141, 162 Ohkay Owingeh, 48, 83, 88-90, 94-95, 102, 126 Ojo Caliente, 10, 48, 142 Oldest Church/House, 149, 152 Oliver Lee Memorial State Park, 103 Oñate Monument, 44, 126 Organ Mountains, 71, 74, 132-133 Orilla Verde Recreation Area, 163

P

Pajarito, 93, 139 Palace of the Governors, 44, 98, 151 Pancho Villa State Park, 66, 68, 122, 124 Pecos, 10, 76, 113, 142-143, 147, 149, 152, 154, 157 Pecos National Historical Park, 54, 56, 59, 137-138, 142 Pecos River, 29, 62, 116-117, 143, 158 Pecos River Flume, 116 Pecos Wilderness, 153 Pedro de Peralta, 18 Peñasco, 10, 76, 90, 143, 159 Peralta, 10, 18, 90, 139, 143, 149, 151, 153, 157 Percha Dam State Park, 167 Petroglyph National Monument, 30, 34, 36, 108 Petroglyphs, 50, 108, 118, 144, 160, 167 Philmont Scout Ranch, 120 Picuris, 83, 90, 94-95 Pie Town, 10, 143 Pinos Altos, 101, 123, 143, 159 Planetarium, 36, 97, 103, 108, 147 Placitas, 10, 143 Pojoaque Pueblo, 78, 90-91 Ponderosa, 10, 21, 104, 144 Popejoy Hall, 101, 109 Population, 12 Po’Pay, 18, 83, 89 Pork & Brew, 24, 146 Portales, 10, 62, 79, 100, 144, 173 Port of Entry, 122 Prewitt, 130, 165 Pueblo Indians, 83, 89, 95 Pueblo Revolt, 18, 83, 85, 89, 91, 95, 149, 151-152 Puerto de Luna, 158 Puye Cliff Dwellings, 92

Q

Quarai, 142 Quemado, 10, 144, 174 Questa, 10, 48, 112, 144

R

Radium Springs, 98, 133-134 Rafting, 44, 71, 80-81, 109, 125-127, 145, 153-155, 163 Railroad, 20, 44, 48, 50, 81, 98, 118-119, 126, 128, 130, 132, 136, 142, 145, 158 Railrunner, 14, 81 Railway, 56, 81, 114, 139, 149 Ramah, 10, 38, 88, 128, 144 Ranchos de Taos, 4, 10, 44, 48, 78, 144, 162 Ranchos de Taos Church, 48 Raton, 10, 14, 21, 54, 56, 76, 78, 100-101, 112, 145, 173 Raton Visitor Information Center, 175 Red Bluff Reservoir, 12 Red River, 10, 48, 72, 76, 81, 101, 112, 144-145, 163, 173 Red Rock State Park, 128 Reserve, 76, 84, 126, 129 Retirees, 16 Río Chama, 18, 71, 74, 80, 165 Río Grande, 12, 18, 37, 52, 66, 71, 74, 76, 80, 85, 9092, 98, 100-101, 114-115, 122, 133-135, 140-141, 144-145, 152, 160, 164-165, 167 Río Grande Gorge, 48, 162-163 Río Grande Nature Center State Park, 108 Río Grande Zoological Park, 30 Rio Rancho, 10, 24, 34, 101, 146, 173 Rita Blanca National Grasslands, 56, 120 Oppenheimer, 20 Rocky Mountains, 20, 44, 48, 56, 71 Rockhound State Park, 68, 81, 124 Rockhounding, 81, 131 Rodeo, 10, 26, 29, 71, 74, 94-95, 101, 110, 113-114, 116-118, 120, 122-123, 127-128, 130-131, 134, 136, 138-140, 142, 145-149, 153, 156, 158-160, 162, 168 Roswell, 10, 24, 74, 76, 79-81, 100-101, 146-147, 174 Roswell Incident, 26, 64, 146 Roswell Museum and Art Center, 60, 62, 100. 147 Route 66, 20, 30, 34, 40, 54, 84, 86, 102, 105, 128, 140, 142, 157-158, 167-168, 173-174 Route 66 Auto Museum, 54, 157 Roy, 28, 101, 115, 118, 122, 147 Ruidoso, 10, 27, 29, 60, 62, 79-81, 86, 88, 100-102, 138, 147-148, 174 Ruidoso Downs, 27, 29, 60, 62, 100, 102, 147-148

S

Sacramento Mountains, 27, 60, 86, 118, 120-121 Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, 34, 142 Salmon Ruins, 38, 40, 115 Salt Missions Trails, 142 San Felipe Pueblo, 91, 102 San Felipe de Neri Church, 36 www.newmexico.org


San Ildefonso Pueblo, 48, 91 San Juan Mountains, 165 San Juan Pueblo, see also Ohkay Owingeh San Juan River, 38, 40, 114-116, 126-127 San Miguel Mission, 68, 149, 152, 160 San Ysidro, 34, 122-123 Sandía Lake Recreation Area, 91, 108 Sandía Man Cave, 143 Sandía Mountains, 37, 91, 108, 143 Sandía Park, 77, 174 Sandía Peak, 30, 74, 105, 109 Sandia Pueblo, 77, 91 Sandia Peak Tramway, 30, 34, 37 Sangre de Cristo Mountains, 44, 88, 90, 92-93, 120 Santa Ana Pueblo, 34, 76-78, 92, 102 Santa Clara Pueblo, 48, 92 Santa Cruz, 10, 71, 74, 94, 125-126, 149 Santa Cruz Lake National Recreation Area, 126, 149 Santa Fe, 10, 14, 20-21, 26-28, 30, 44, 52, 72, 74, 76, 78, 80, 85, 88, 90-92, 95, 97, 100, 102, 110, 115, 118, 128, 130, 140, 143, 149-157, 174 Santa Fe National Forest, 12, 48, 126, 153 Santa Fe Southern Railway, 81, 149 Santa Fe Railway, 56, 114, 139, 149 Santa Fe Opera, 48, 93, 101, 108, 154, 156 Santa Fe Trail, 6, 10, 16, 18, 22, 54, 58-59, 71, 77, 96, 98, 120, 136-137, 142, 145, 149, 151, 162 Santa Fe Visitor’s Information Center, 175 Santa Rosa, 10, 54, 56, 59, 72, 74, 76, 78, 81, 157158, 174 Santa Rosa Lake, 56, 158 Santa Rosa Lake State Park, 158 Santa Teresa, 10, 79, 158 Santo Domingo Pueblo, 92 Santuario de Chimayó, 48, 119 Santuario de Guadalupe, 152, 154 Scenic Byways, 34, 40, 48, 56, 62, 68 Science, 30, 36-37, 44, 48, 52, 97, 105, 108-109, 126, 139, 147, 152, 160 Senior travelers, 16 Shakespeare, 66, 68, 100, 123, 138 Ship Rock, 20, 38, 40, 88, 158 Shiprock, 10, 88, 95, 127, 158 Sierra Blanca, 79, 142, 174 Silver City, 10, 24, 66, 68, 70, 72, 79, 100-101, 123, 143, 158-159, 174 Sipapu, 10, 48, 159 Skiing, 52, 66, 71, 81-82, 112, 118, 123, 131, 137, 139, 148, 163-164 Ski Apache, 81, 88, 148 Ski New Mexico, 82 Smokey Bear, 60, 62, 116, 148 Soaring, 81, 130-131, 142 Socorro, 10, 29, 68, 77, 79, 81, 98, 141, 160, 162, 174 Soda Dam, 131 Sopaipilla, 22 Spaceport America, 66, 103, 167 Spanish Colonial Museum, 52, 100, 151 Spanish Market, 26, 157 www.newmexico.org

Spas, 6, 66, 167 Spelunking, 116 Spencer Theater, 62, 101, 148 Springer, 10, 162, 174 SRAM Tour of the Gila, 24, 159 St. James Hotel, 54, 56, 120 Stargazing, 131, 139, 159 State Parks, 56, 72, 74, 75, 76, 87, 123 State symbols, 12 Statehood, 12, 20, 98, 136 Storrie Lake State Park, 137 Steins, 68, 138 Sugarite Canyon State Park, 145 Sumner Lake State Park, 127 Sunland Park, 10, 102, 162 Sunspot, 60, 120-121 Sunspot National Scenic Byway, 120

T

Tamale, 22 Taos, 10, 48, 50, 71-72, 74, 76, 78, 80-81, 83, 90, 94-95, 97, 100-102, 112, 119, 125, 144, 149, 159, 162-163, 164-165, 174 Taos Pueblo, 44, 52, 92-93, 95, 162-163 Taos Ski Valley, 10, 48, 76, 162-163, 164-165, 174 Tatum, 10, 165, 174 Temperatures, 12, 77 Tennis, 2, 81, 109, 115, 118, 122, 124, 131 Tent Rocks, 16, 71, 74, 85, 115 Tesuque Pueblo, 93, 102 Texico Visitor Information Center, 175 Thoreau, 10, 165 Three Rivers Petroglyph National Recreation Site, 71, 74, 168 Tierra Amarilla, 10, 165 Tijeras, 50, 108, 173 Tinkertown Museum, 108 To’hajiilee, 88 Tomé, 10, 34, 68, 167 Tortilla Shrine, 124 Totah Festival, 94-95, 127 Tourism Department, 2, 6, 10, 112, 172, 175 Tour Operators, 19, 72, 76-77, 80-81 Trains, 14, 56, 81, 103, 114, 118-119, 139, 149 Trains, see also Railroads Tres Piedras State Wildlife Area, 163 Trinity Site, 20, 103-104, 134, 136, 160, 162 Truchas, 10, 48, 52 Truth or Consequences, 10, 66, 68, 79, 101, 125, 167, 174 Tucumcari, 10, 54, 56, 78, 100, 167-168, 174 Tularosa, 10, 64, 98, 103, 118, 168, 172 Turquoise Trail, 48, 50, 100, 108, 140, 174

U

UFO, 26, 40, 60, 62, 64, 114, 146-147 Uracca State Wildlife Area, 144 U.S. Forest Service, 74, 76, 79 Ute Lake State Park, 138, 167-168

V

Valle Vidal, 120 Valles Caldera National Preserve, 34, 48, 131, 139 Valley of Fires Recreation Area, 60, 62, 71, 74, 118 Valverde, 20, 160 Diego de Vargas, 18, 28 Velarde, 80, 125-126 Very Large Array, 68, 70, 141, 160, 162 Vietnam Veterans Memorial, 44, 48, 56, 112, 125, 163, 167 Pancho Villa State Park, 66, 68, 122, 124 Villanueva State Park, 137-138 Vineyards, 22, 136, 140, 149, 168 Visitor information centers, 175

W

Wagon Mound, 10, 168 Waterfowl, 27, 86, 114-115, 125, 137, 141, 160, 165 Weather, 12, 72, 94, 130, 157, 174 Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, 52, 100, 151, 153 Wheeler Peak, 12, 50, 112, 145, 164 White Oaks, 10, 118, 148 White Sands, 64, 103-104, 135, 172 White Sands Missile Range, 79, 103, 133-134, 136 White Sands National Monument, 20-21, 60, 62, 64, 72, 103, 134-136 Whites City, 10, 62, 168, 174 Whole Enchilada Fiesta, 28, 66, 136 Wildlife, 21, 36, 42, 64, 71-72, 76-77, 79-80, 88, 115-116, 118, 120, 124, 126, 130, 134, 136, 140, 143, 162-163, 165 Wildlife refuge, 29, 66, 68, 74, 137-138, 141, 144, 147, 159-160 Wildlife West Nature Park, 105, 108, 125, 142 Wild Rivers Recreation Area, 48, 71, 74, 144 Windsurfing, 103, 126, 137, 165 Wineries, 22, 66 Winston, 10, 76, 119, 167-168

Z

Zia Pueblo, 34, 93 Zoo, 30, 34, 37, 62, 100-101, 103-105, 110, 116-118, 122, 125, 146-147 Zozobra, 28, 157 Zuni Pueblo, 40, 93 Zuni Mountain Railroad, 130

2011 NEW MEXICO VACATION GUIDE  179


New Mexico - 2011 Vacation Guide  

New Mexico - 2011 Vacation Guide

New Mexico - 2011 Vacation Guide  

New Mexico - 2011 Vacation Guide

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