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process book


Representing a Story: Pictures & Meaning

Sally Carmichael Tad Carpenter | Fall 2011


Package design, like all communication, has everything to do with context and experience. It is similar to a museum displaying an object. A good exhibition provides context or a “meaningful box” in which artifacts are viewed. That box often tells a story that speaks to the artifacts maker, use, message, appearence, visual form, or cultural associations and meanings. Every object is a sign that exists in a network of meaning. A display or package protects the object while interpreting the object by uncovering connections. In this assignment, I was asked to create a new DVD package for the Criterion Collection’s New Eclipse line that focuses on producing budget-priced, high quality-editions of hard-to-find films for young audiences. My final deliverables included the 3-fold DVD package itself, the disc art, and an eight page insert booklet.

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I chose “The Baron of Arizona�, a film by Samuel Fuller created in 1950. The film focuses on the true events and life of James Addison Reavis, a con artist and conspirator who forges documents in his plan to become the baron of Arizona. Although the film was in black and white, a distinct color palette is felt throughout the film and I tried to focus on the southwest and desert imagery of the film in my work.

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film notes

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sketches


sketches

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sketches


sketches

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sketches


sketches

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cover designs


cover designs

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cover designs


cover designs

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cover designs


peralta land grant

THE BARON OF ARIZONA

spread designs

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The Baron of Arizona Collected Works.

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spread design


chapter one: the essays

the baron of arizona

spread designs

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THE BARON OF ARIZONA

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spread designs


spread designs

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spread designs v.2


spread designs v.2

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spread designs v.2


spread designs v.2

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ARIZONA a supplement to the film

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spread designs v.3


ARIZONA a supplement to the film

“Five percent of films are made because a man has an idea, an idea which he must express.” - Samuel Fuller, director 5

chapter selection

01.

Opening-Credits

[7:13]

02.

In-the-Night

[7:35]

03.

A-Mighty-Hot-Sun

[8:27]

04.

Aim-to-Collect

[8:20]

05.

A-Long-Journey

[9:02]

06.

House-Rules

[9:56]

07.

Heading-Out

[7:30]

08.

This-One’s-Mine

[11:05]

09.

A-Large-Bounty

[10:26]

10.

End-Titles

[7:41]

The real baron

reception

O

ne of Arizona’s most infamous characters was a man named James Addison Reavis, a man of dubious character and background and one of the great land fraud schemers of the 19th Century. His claim on 18,500 square miles of Arizona and New Mexico territory as part of an ancient Spanish land grant led to him being dubbed the “Baron of Arizona.” Reavis was born on May 10 1843. He served as a soldier in the Confederate Army where he perfected his skills as a forger. He arrived in Arizona Territory in 1880, making claims he owned a large of part of Arizona. He collected rent and tribute from railroads, ranches, farms, and mines for about 11 years. Finally, the United States District Court challenged Reavis’ claims. Reavis lost the case in the U.S. District Land Claims Court and was soon indicted in a criminal court.

“even the most cold blooded plan

ARIZONA

can be warmed a supplement to the film

by affection” - Michael Sellers, Boston Globe

“a bizarre but intriguing little Western” - Craig Butler, NY Times

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booklet design

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spread designs v.3


booklet design

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final spread design


THE BARON OF ARIZONA a film by samuel fuller

final spread design

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final spread design


ARIZONA a supplement to the film

“Five percent of films are made because a man has an idea, an idea which he must express.” - Samuel Fuller, director 5

reception

chapter selection

2

01.

Opening-Credits

[7:13]

02.

In-the-Night

[7:35]

03.

A-Mighty-Hot-Sun

[8:27]

04.

Aim-to-Collect

[8:20]

05.

A-Long-Journey

[9:02]

06.

House-Rules

[9:56]

07.

Heading-Out

[7:30]

08.

This-One’s-Mine

[11:05]

09.

A-Large-Bounty

[10:26]

10.

End-Titles

[7:41]

“even the most

The real baron

cold blooded plan

O

ne of Arizona’s most infamous characters was a man named James Addison Reavis, a man of dubious character and background and one of the great land fraud schemers of the 19th Century. His claim on 18,500 square miles of Arizona and New Mexico territory as part of an ancient Spanish land grant led to him being dubbed the “Baron of Arizona.” Reavis was born on May 10 1843. He served as a soldier in the Confederate Army where he perfected his skills as a forger. He arrived in Arizona Territory in 1880, making claims he owned a large of part of Arizona. He collected rent and tribute from railroads, ranches, farms, and mines for about 11 years. Finally, the United States District Court challenged Reavis’ claims. Reavis lost the case in the U.S. District Land Claims Court and was soon indicted in a criminal court.

ARIZONA

can be warmed a supplement to the film

by affection” - Michael Sellers, Boston Globe

“a bizarre but intriguing little Western” - Craig Butler, NY Times

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final booklet design

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Over the course of this project I have gained a great deal of knowledge. The process that goes into the preparation and planning of what seemed like a simple design for a dvd package proved to be much move difficult than expected. I feel that the research that was required of me made a huge difference in the content and ideas presented in my work. I now have a better ability to generate new ideas quickly, while still considering a solid final outcome. This project has also let me explore both Illustrator and InDesign more, which had aided me immensely. I feel very proud of the work I have done on this project and believe that it successfully conveys the feelings, imagery, and symbolism of Samuel Fuller’s The Baron of Arizona.

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DVD Packaging: The Baron of Arizona