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ROWAN COUNTY SHERIFF Priorities Travis Allen

Age: 39 Address: Darrell Whitley Lane, Mount Ulla Education: B.A. in criminal justice from Pensacola Christian College, master’s in criminal justice, University of Phoenix. Background: Salisbury Police Department, 1994-1998; Rowan County Sheriff’s Office since 1998. Family: wife, Michelle Deal Allen, four children; parents Joe and Kay Allen.

Kevin Auten

Age: 49 Address: Travis Lane Education: graduate of Salisbury High School, Catawba College with bachelor's degree in business administration. Background: worked in the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office since 1987, promoted to chief deputy in 2009; appointed sheriff by board of commissioners in March. Family: wife, Jennifer, one son; parents, Becky and Gene Auten, also of Travis Lane.

Randall Correll

Age: 40 Address: N.C. 801, Mount Ulla Education: graduate of West Rowan High School; B.S. in criminal justice from UNCC. Background: Worked in Rowan Sheriff’s Office from 1993-2002; joined Salisbury Police Department in 2003; 16 years total in law enforcement. Family: engaged, 4-year-old son prior marriage; son of Norman and Sue Correll, Mount Ulla.

Andrew Deal

Age:33 Address: Whisper Drive, China Grove Education: graduate of South Rowan High School, B.S. in criminal justice from UNCC. Background: Master Police officer with Kannapolis Police Department, currently resource officer at A.L. Brown High School. Family: wife, Carrie, two sons; parents, Larry and Diane Deal, China Grove.

Johnny Love

Age: 41 Address: Cemetery Drive, Faith Education: 1986 graduate of East Rowan High School. Background: worked full time with Rowan Sheriff’s Office from 1991-1994; reserve deputy since 2002; employed by Rowan County as mechanic for patrol cars. Family: wife, Beth Everhart Love, two children.

Tony Stirewalt

Age:53 Address: Hidden Pond Lane, China Grove Education: attended Rowan County Schools. Background: self-employed in construction and saw milling, cousin of the late 4-term Rowan Sheriff John Stirewalt. Family: wife, Linda, three children, seven grandchildren.

Tony Yon

Age: 55 Address: Ribelin Road, Gold Hill Education: criminal justice and basic law enforcement training, Polk Community College, Stanly Community College. Background: Served four years in U.S. Navy; eight years with Davidson Sheriff’s Office, currently sergeant of eight-man tactical unit. Family: wife, Sandy, two children.

On traffic enforcement

Republican Reduce break-ins

• Reduce top-heavy administration, redirect resources to patrol, investigators; • Establish more professional hiring, firing and promotion procedures; • Reduce operating costs while keeping performance high.

Traffic enforcement a key in dealing with drugs and stolen property; rather see deputies on local roads than interstate.

Need more patrol visibility in neighborhoods; crack down on pawn shops and scrap metal yards that are buying stolen goods.

• Be accountable, rebuild public trust in Sheriff’s Office; • Financial responsibility — not be a spend-aholic; • Restore resource officers to the middle schools.

Traffic enforcement with purpose in school zones and neighborhoods — not write bulk tickets; favor doing some drug interdiction on I85 and U.S. 70.

Use ACE (Aggressive Criminal Enforcement) and drug detectives to augment regular investigators — break-ins are fueled by the desire to buy drugs.

• Re-evaluate administration to better serve public; • Examine budget, eliminate unnecessary spending; • Create warrant squad to handle warrants, free up patrol officers;

Drug interdiction on I-85 has proved valuable for Iredell and Davidson counties; not sure writing tickets best use of deputies’s time — needs to be re-evaluated.

Forming a warrant squad to handle warrants will free up patrol officers to combat and investigate break-ins.

• Improve working atmosphere in department and relations with other agencies; • Re-establish respect for Sheriff’s Office; • Re-establish community and faith based programs.

Need more drug interdiction efforts, less traffic enforcement. “Drugs cause most of the crime.”

Must get communities involved, build relationships to get information and stop the problems.

• Open Sheriff’s Office 24hours a day; • Put more patrol officers on the street to provide faster response; • Run bare-bones, costeffective sheriff’s office — “not worry about new toys, bells and whistles.”

Let N.C. Highway Patrol handle traffic enforcement; spend more time serving papers, answering calls; too much emphasis on traffic enforcement now.

More patrol officers on the roads will be a deterrent to break-ins; let communities be the eyes and ears of Sheriff’s Office.

• Convict drug dealers; • Investigate home breakns and focus on gangs; • Check on shut-ins and the elderly.

Sheriff’s Office needs to get rid of radars; “County boys need to be in the county taking care of its people … let Highway Patrol take care of I-85.”

Concentrate on drugs and drug dealers … “Get rid of drugs and the thieving will stop … people are too sorry to work, they steal what they need to buy drugs.”

• Get costs under control, trim fat; • Assess programs and operations to improve services; • Emphasize pro-active strategy — increase patrols and drug enforcement;

License check points valuable tool in solving crimes; not big fan of traffic enforcement; drug interdiction team can take drugs and money out of the pipeline and help buy equipment.

Need a pro-active policing strategy to prevent and curtail home and business break-ins; for a break-in task force.


ROWAN SHERIFF Priorities Jack Eller

Age: 49 Address: Woodleaf Road, Woodleaf. Education: attended school in Rowan County, graduated Belford High School, Colbert, Ga. Background: owns trucking company, has lifelong ambition to be sheriff; has worked in private security. Family: wife, Teresa Sides Eller, two children, one grandchild; parents, Bruce and Gail Eller of west Rowan.

John Noble

Age: 62 Address: Hall Street, East Spencer Education: graduate of Dunbar High School, Shaw University with B.A. in criminal justice. Background: 30 years with Rowan County Sheriff’s Office, retired in 2008 as lieutenant in charge of courthouse security. Family: Two daughters, Deedree Sherrill and Angela Lindsay, both Cleveland residents.

Sonny Safrit

Age: 59 Address: Peeler Road Education: Graduate of Boyden High School; has more than 2,400 hours of police and supervisory training. Background: retired from Salisbury Police Department after 26 years; named state officer of the year in 1994; works as assistant funeral director at Summersett Funeral Home.

Todd Sides

Age: 32 Address: Brookmont Avenue Education: graduate of Appalachian State University with B.S. in criminal justice. Background: Joined Salisbury Police Department in 2000; works in violent crimes and gang investigations. Family: wife, Jessica, two sons.

On traffic enforcement

Reduce break-ins

• Ensure deputies treat citizens with respect; • All personnel have physical fitness exam — too many deputies overweight; • Focus more on drugs, thieves, gangs — and less on traffic stops.

Let State Highway Patrol enforce traffic laws; leave drug interdiction on I-85 to Highway Patrol.

Get deputies out in the county, less in downtown Salisbury, work with Community Watch.

• Be available all the time, be visible; • Focus more on drugs, gangs; • Put resource officers back in schools.

Concentrate traffic enforcement on I-85; believes big drug bust would pay for much of department’s needs.

Put officers out in undercover mode — jeans and old cars — at peak times to catch culprits and reduce break-ins.

• Evaluate personnel, put right people in right jobs; • Examine policies and procedures to make sure county covered; • Plan for adjustments to deal with economic problems.

Speeders not main priority, but must do some traffic enforcement to qualify for federal funds needed for operations.

Put as many officers as possible on the roads with supervisors to help; do more follow up on break-ins.

• Reconnect sheriff with community and other agencies; • Streamline administration; • Plan of acton to deal with violent crimes, gangs, break-ins.

Drug interdiction on I-85 great idea but traffic stops provide crucial information — allows deputies to place “Billy Bob” near a crime.

Every break-in needs to be reviewed by investigators; need to collaborate with other agencies and neighboring counties.


U.S. HOUSE 6TH DISTRICT On creating jobs ... Howard Coble Age: 79 Address: Greensboro Occupation: Incumbent congressman. Education: Appalachian State University (1949); Guilford College, history degree (1958); UNC-Chapel Hill Law School (1962). Background: Seeking 14th term. Former N.C. House member. Former N.C. revenue secretary. U.S. Coast Guard (5.5 years active, 18 years reserve). former assistant U.S. attorney. Family: Single

Cathy Brewer Hinson

Age: 58 Address: High Point Occupation; Building manager, Union Square Showroom Education: High Point University, bachelor’s degree, early childhood education; master’s degree, UNC-Greensboro, education (concentration in reading). Background: First time running for office. Family: Married, 4 children, 3 grandchildren.

Jon Mangin

Age: 25 Address: Stokesdale Occupation: IT trainer with Viae Training Education: Guilford College, bachelor’s degrees in economics and business management. Attended high school in New Jersey. Background: First run for public office. Family: Single

Jeff Phillips

Age: 47 Address: Greensboro Occupation: Owner-founder, Phillips Wealth Management Education: Studied computer science, business at University of Central Oklahoma Background: First run for office. N.C. native, but grew up in Okla. Returned to N.C. 1995. Formerly worked for Prudential, Paine Weber/UBS and Wachovia Securities. Family: Married, two children.

James Taylor Age: 45 Address: Pinehurst Occupation: Anesthesiologist, manager of health care operations in Moore, Richmond, Scotland counties. Education: Bachelor’s degree, chemistry, UNC-Chapel Hill; graduate, UNC-Chapel Hill Medical School. Background: Delegate to 2008 Republican National Convention Family: Married, three children.

Billy Yow Age: 47 Address: Greensboro Occupation: Owner, D&Y Well Drilling Inc. Education: Attended Southern Guilford High School and Guilford Technical Community College. Background : Guilford County commissioner since 2000. Served in N.C. National Guard 10 years. Mason. Family : Married, two children

On health care reform ...

On efforts in Iraq, Afghanistan ...

To grow the economy, the government should prioritize its spending, pay down the debt, scrap the enacted healthcare reform and cut taxes, Coble says he opposed the stimulus, thinking it was too light on economic incentives and too heavy on long-term social programs. The U.S. cannot spend its way out of economic troubles, he says.

Before health care reform was enacted, Coble spoke on the House floor, urging Democratic leadership to scrap its plans and send reform back to the drawing board. It represents increased taxes, increased costs and he warned it was “a train wreck waiting to happen.” Coble says the 2,500-plus-page bill invites subterfuge and states will face a huge burden.

Coble wants to get out of both countries “sooner rather than later, but I don’t have a timeline.” Coble was “sorely disappointed’ that the U.S. didn’t have a post-entry strategy in Iraq. “Maybe I didn’t ask enough questions,” he says. In Afghanistan, Coble says there’s the problem of corruption and not knowing “who’s with you today or against you tomorrow.”

Hinson is a big proponent of the Fair Tax and says it will do more to bring back jobs than anything else proposed. It would be an inclusive tax, bringing jobs and corporations back to the U.S., making country globally competitive. She says Congress also must repeal NAFTA , CAFTA trade agreements.

Hinson says she was “sick at heart” when the recent health care bill was enacted. This legislation was about the transfer of power, she says. Republicans also let people down when they controlled the Congress and failed to enact reform, she says. But this legislation “is going to break our country” and should be repealed, according to Hinson.

Before any decision is made on those missions, Hinson says, the military brass must be consulted. “I would give them what they ask for. I wouldn’t want to just quit because of the sacrifice that already has been made. I prefer not to drag it out, but I want to win and bring them home.” The next step would be to secure the U.S. border next to Mexico, she says.

“I’ve said pretty clearly there has to be a change in the public policy on trade,” Mangin says, calling for fair trade over free trade. He supports programs encouraging small business development. Rather than a “fair tax,” Mangin calls for a “flatter” tax and simplifying the tax code. He favors a pilot program to test drive tax-code simplification.

Mangin says patient care could be strengthened by allowing insurance companies to sell across state lines. He says there was a need for reform, but he opposed the Democratic plan, fearing it’s socialized medicine at a time when physicians face more red tape than ever before.

Mangin says both military missions should end and the troops in Iraq and Afghanistan should be brought home. “The strategy is entirely unclear, in my opinion, in both places,” he says. The country doesn’t have the money for the operations, nor is it fair to soldiers when the country can’t say what the end strategy is, Mangin says.

Phillips calls for a regional approach to job creation and attracting new business to the district. He is against any new taxes on business, increases in the capital gains tax “and other initiatives that would stifle ... job growth.” He supports a flatter tax over the “Fair Tax” and says, “We need tax reform desperately.”

Phillips was “deeply disappointed” that Democrats rammed through “a massive new entitlement program ... likely to saddle our children and grandchildren with enormous tax burdens.” He questions its constitutionality. He calls for its repeal and supports tort reform and allowing insurance companies to compete across state lines.

Phillips says the war in Iraq has succeeded in freeing millions from a brutal dictatorship while introducing representative government. He notes recent elections and thinks Iraq represents a crushing defeat for Al-Qaeda. In Afghanistan, he supports Obama’s recent troop surge and thinks the country is headed toward defeating the Taliban.

Taylor supports a balanced budget amendment, reduced spending, addressing the deficit immediately, simplifying taxes and eliminating the capital gains tax on offshore investment so new businesses could produce jobs and goods. He says decrease regulations on business and give tax incentives for new manufacturing companies that provide jobs.

Taylor says any reform discussions should have started with doctors and patients, then moved to hospitals, third-party payers and, lastly, government — not the other way around. He supports allowing insurance companies to compete across state lines, tort reform and allowing doctors to negotiate collectively with insurance companies.

Taylor is “deeply concerned” with an almost 10-year “War on Terrorism.” He says terrorism is one tactic of war. “To wage war against a tactic lends itself to endless wars. When it comes to war, we must get the job done and get out.” Taylor wants more military bases at home to protect southern borders from illegal immigration from Mexico.

He calls for a long-term investment strategy, providing capital to businesses so they can grow. He supports investment in higher education to “retool” America and make it more productive. He supports “real tax reform” and “real simplification,” and calls for every spending bill before Congress to have an expiration date.

Yow says it’s “really ludicrous” on the government’s part to take on this role. But he also questions why Republicans did nothing before. “Had they done their jobs and not been complacent, it would have been done more sensibly,” He calls for industry and citizen panels to formulate an overall plan for reform for Congress to review.

“I believe we need to redefine our role, explain our intentions for a conclusion to our presence and have these countries support our operations financially. I believe we have performed a great service in these countries, but believe it is time to reassess what we intend to accomplish in the future.”


ROWAN COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Top three priorities Jon Barber Age: 50 Address: Umberger Road, Mount Ulla Occupation: Teacher, Southeast Middle Education: Bachelor’s degree, UNC Charlotte. West Rowan High graduate. Political experience: Rowan County Board of Commissioners, 2007-present Community involvement: Board member, Rufty-Holmes Senior Center, county Rescue Squad and Library and Piedmont Behavioral Healthcare.

Wayne Bradshaw

Age: 56 Address: Wallace Lane, Rockwell Occupation: Owner, BeBop’s Diner and Bradshaw Rentals Education: Attended South Rowan High School. Graduate, Rowan Technical College. Political experience: None Community involvement: Participant, car show benefits.

Chris Cohen

Age: 52 Address: Statesville Boulevard, Salisbury Occupation: President, Cohen Roofing and Metal Education: Attended N.C. State and RowanCabarrus Community College. Graduate of West Rowan High School. Political experience: None Community involvement: Member, Rowan Good Neighbor Coalition. Chair of the Western Land Use Study.

Carl Dangerfield Age: 47 Address: Oak Leaf Lane, Salisbury Occupation: Detective, Rowan County Sheriff's Office Education: Associate's degree in criminal justice. Political experience: Ran for Salisbury City Council in 2009 Community involvement: Board of Directors, East Rowan Diamond Sports. Director of security, Youth Football League. Coach, YMCA flag football.

William “Bill” Feather Age: 52 Address: Kerns Street, Granite Quarry Occupation: Consultant, Concord Consulting Associates Education: Attended University of Pittsburgh Johnstown. Political experience: Granite Quarry Town Board, 2003-present Community involvement: Chairman, CabarrusRowan MPO Transportation Advisory Committee.

Jim Greene Age: 62 Address: Bridle Path Farm Road, Cleveland Occupation: Owner, Greene Insurance Education: Bachelor’s degree in English, Catawba College. Graduate of West Rowan High School. Political experience: None Community involvement: Board member, Salisbury-Rowan EDC. Member, former president and former director, Salisbury Civitan Club.

John J. Greene Age: 64 Address: River Birch Drive, Salisbury Occupation: Partner, Evergreen Cremation Services Education: Graduate of Broward County Police Academy in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Political experience: Ran for Rowan County Sheriff in 1986 and 1990 Community involvement: Former member, Salisbury Breakfast Optimist Club.

Tina Hall

Age: 59 Address: Hall Road, Mount Ulla Occupation: Retired teacher, assistant principal, director and principal, Rowan-Salisbury Schools. Education: Bachelor’s degree, Catawba College. Master's degree, Clemson University. Political experience: Rowan County Board of Commissioners, 2008-present Community involvement: Member of Thyatira Presbyterian Church.

Gene Miller

Age: 63 Address: Travis Lane, Salisbury Occupation: Assistant superintendent, Rowan-Salisbury Schools Education: Bachelor’s degree, Appalachian State University. Graduate degree, McIntyre School of Business. Graduate, East Rowan High School. Political experience: None Community involvement: Charter member, Sampson County Civitan Club.

Chad Mitchell Age: 34 Address: Brown Street, Faith Occupation: Teacher, East Rowan High School Education: Bachelor’s degree in political science, Catawba College. Graduate of East Rowan High School. Political experience: Rowan County Board of Commissioners, 2004-present Community involvement: Member, First Baptist Church in Rockwell.

Jim Sides Age: 61 Address: Henkle Craig Farm Road, Salisbury Occupation: Owner, Todays Trading Company Education: Graduate of West Rowan High School. Political experience: Rowan County Board of Commissioners, 1980-84, 2004-08; ran for re-election in 2008 Community involvement: Member, Gospel Light Baptist Church in Salisbury.

On increasing school funding

What makes you a good choice?

“First, we need to create a business-friendly government to create jobs. Second, we need quality schools for an educated workforce. Third, we need to build a tax base so we can keep taxes low... We should have a long-range plan to keep Rowan County a wonderful place to live and work.”

“For us to be successful in creating jobs, it requires a high quality education system. ... Our local education system must be funded at the appropriate level to meet demands of the new economy. I believe that this needs to be a mutual decision in which both the ... Board of Commissioners and the Board of Education find a way to make it happen.”

“As a commissioner, I am civil, I am rational, I show respect and I demonstrate professionalism. I love being a county commissioner... I’m just asking for one more term, and I promise to give it as much effort as I did during my first term.”

“First, try to create some positive attitude within the system, because right now, everything is negative. Second, try to find ways to get jobs in here, so people that’s got laid off can survive. Third, try to find out why people that’s holding these jobs don’t know what they’re doing it for.”

“I just can’t figure out where our lottery money went. That’s what that was for... When ... GA, SC, TN or VA got the lottery in, I saw immediately that schools and roads were better. I don't understand what we’re doing with it. They even call it the education lottery, do they not? What part of that does somebody not understand?”

I will be open-minded, and I will be able to be talked to. I am a working person, so I am for the working people.”

His first priority is creating and retaining jobs by working with existing businesses and attracting new ones. His second is more cooperation within county government and departments. Third is keeping taxes “as low as feasible. In a struggling economy, that’s going to be hard to do, because the revenue is not where it once was.”

“More than likely, we're going to have to shift money around to increase funding to some extent. That’s for student needs. I think we may need to look at high-level administration for somebody we can cut there, because we can keep three or four jobs if we can cut one administrator. I think we may be a little top-heavy at the central office.”

“I’m a business professional. Right now, our county commissioners are concentrated on ex-school officials... We need business people running this county, because they’ve dealt with budgets and they’ve dealt with crisis. They're problem solvers.”

Job creatioin is his first priority. “I believe in giving the Rowan County Economic Development Commission the tools they need to attract them. If that means incentives, then so be it.” Second is being an advocate for county employees,who he says “feel devalued.” Dangerfield’s third priority is helping children, through schools and recreation programs.

“If we can come up with the money to put resource officers back in schools, retain some of our quality teachers and improve education, then I would be for finding all the money we could to help... If it’s for them having a better place and a bigger place to work for the administration, then I would not.”

“With 22 years in law enforcement, I’ve become a problem solver. I’m not a politician. I think when you look at things as a politician, you may have other people’s interests in mind ... and then your decisions are clouded. If you’re in it for the true good of the people who vote you in, then I think that makes you much better candidate, and that’s exactly what I aim to do.”

His first priority is “to build a better relationship in the county between the total citizenship, which would be the towns, municipalities and people in the county.” Second is getting the county and municipalities to work together on improving Rowan’s image to businesses that could bring jobs. Third is to work on some of the county’s budgetary issues.

“I don’t think you can just arbitrarily say you can increase spending to schools, any more than you can to any other part of the county, because with the budgetary issues right now and the economy, that’s extremely hard.” He said cutting teachers is not an appropriate way to deal with budgetary problems. The issue will need to be examined carefully.

“I have experience in government, and I have experience in business. My background through my life has been in managing business. I also have six years on the Granite Quarry Town Board, which gives me some experience in managing government. I think our county board needs more of a diversified group of people, and I think that comes from what my background is.”

Top three priorities are jobs, schools and effective government. Greene said there are two steps to creating jobs and a business-friendly environment: creating “an atmosphere at the county commission level of appreciating and wanting jobs in Rowan County” and “to fund the Economic Development Commission and allow them to work in telling our story.”

“As long as the county could afford it, I would be for funding schools at the state average. So much of it just depends on the money that's available. Right now, the county just has a lack of funds.”

“My background of more than 30 years of being in business and my experience for the last couple of years with the Economic Development Commission has prepared me to take a leadership role in Rowan County.”

His first priority “is probably the vocational workshop on Concord Road. I’m interested in taking care of people who, through no fault of their own, have difficulties.” Second is expanding the Rowan Airport runway “for business reasons.” Third is “making sure the public school system is properly funded, taking into consideration the taxes that are collected.”

“It’s Raleigh’s place to fund the school system, and it’s the county commission’s place to provide facilities... At the same time, we have needs. We have to really put the budget to the pencil, and we’ve got to find the necessary revenue within the budget to fund the schools. New revenue is going to be hard to find.”

“I think that I am a fair, reasonable and responsible person. ... Government needs people that can see things objectively instead of subjectively. ... Being an objective person and having a history of being in private business — being a caring undertaker — and also working for government for 30 years in law enforcement and the DMV ... I have a good balance.”

“First of all, we’ve got to operate within our revenues and face economic reality... Second, I hope that in doing that, we’ll not be having any new taxes during this economic downturn. Third, we want to continue to encourage our small business owners. I'd like to do that through a renewed commitment with the Economic Development Commission.”

“This is a really tough year for Rowan-Salisbury Schools to be asking for an increase. I’m not aware of many school systems that are going to see an increase across the state, because most counties are in the same situation that Rowan is in.”

“I work for the citizens. I don't have strings - I don't have attachments to any particular special interest groups. When I started in office, I felt strongly about that. As I've continued in office, I maintained that, and I'm proud to say that.”

First is improving Rowan’s business environment. The only way the county can “grow and provide services that are needed is to expand our tax base.” Second is to properly support the school system. Third is “proper planning” to conserve natural resources “so we don't abuse it, we don't overbuild and we leave a proper environment in place for the future.”

“We need to provide all the resources that we can to the school system... However, I would not do it at the expense of a tax increase or at the expense of decreasing services in other areas. I think there’s ways to do both, and I would definitely be in support of doing that.”

“I have 15 years of experience as banker, so I’ve seen the private side of business and personnel.” In November, “I will have 28 years of experience working in school systems, managing budgets from as much as $250 million a year. ... With my business background and my experience in managing budgets, I am well-qualified to be a county commissioner.”

First is jobs. “We’ve got to create or modify our current incentive program to incentivize jobs rather than simply investment... Number two, we've got to continue to work on making Rowan County a business-friendly place. Number three, we’ve got to weather the financial storm without overtaxing our citizens or completely destroying our services.”

“I don't think that this year we can afford to raise school funding. If you look at counties around us, no-one's looking at raising school funding. Everybody's looking at cutting it... I don't want to cut, but also I don't think there's room in the budget — where we’re asking every department to make cuts — to increase funding at the moment.”

“If people look at ... the votes that I've had on things and they appreciate those stances and those votes, then I ask for their vote in May. If they don't agree with how I voted, and they think someone else would represent them better, then I certainly have no problem with them voting for that person. Just get out and vote, and if you like what I’ve done so far, support me.”

“My top three priorities are less government, less taxes and less control... Bigger government is not better government. Government can't solve our problems — government is the problem.”

“I would support the same funding they got last year. I would not vote for an increase in spending. The county is not obligated to make up every dime the state takes away. The county is only obligated for capital projects for the schools. Operational expenses are supposed to come from the state.”

“I’m not running against anybody — I'm running on my record. I make no apology for any vote I’ve ever made. Nobody has worked harder to study the issues and the facts. I did that for four years from 1980-84 and four years from 2004-08. There’s nobody that will work any harder to represent all the citizens of Rowan County than I will.”


N.C. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE The role of a judge Kevin Eddinger

Age: 55 Address: Rudolph Road, Salisbury Education: University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, bachelor of arts degree and a Juris Doctor from Wake Forest University School of Law Background: Two prior terms as district court judge; North Carolina 19C Judicial Bar, past president; Rowan County Bar, past president; UNC School of Government, certified juvenile judge; Adolescent & Family Enrichment Council, former board member. A Presbyterian. Family: Wife, Liana, twins, Michael and Mia

Rosalee Hart-Morrison

Age: 41 Address: 5th Street, Spencer Education: UNC-Asheville, bachelor of arts in history; Juris Doctor from Vanderbilt University School of Law Background: Former volunteer and former board member Rowan Blues & Jazz Society, member Cornerstone Church, former co-chair of the Board of Adjustments of Spencer. Family: Husband, Patrick, and daughters, Jordan and Tyler.

Douglas Todd Paris Sr.

Age: 47 Address: East Council Street, Salisbury Education: UNC-Charlotte, bachelor of arts degree in political science and history; UNC-Chapel Hill, juris doctor degree. Background: Salisbury native, attends Southside Baptist, Salisbury; Eagle Scout, served as Cub Master for Shiloh UMC, Faith; former member of Rowan County Wildlife Association's Board of Directors. Family: One son, Douglas, fiancee, Robyn Shute, brother, Matt, and sister, Kim.

June Showfety

Age: 51 Address: Sherrills Ford Road, Salisbury Education: UNC-Charlotte, business degree; University of Tennessee-Knoxville, doctorate in law. Background: A member of the state bar, licensed to practice law in North Carolina and Tennessee. Member of Sacred Heart Catholic Church, member Rowan County Planning Board, Zoning Board of Adjustment, PBH, ARC/Rowan. Family: Did not provide

Streamlining the court process

Your best quality

In criminal cases, to afford all parties the opportunity to be heard and to apply the evidentiary standard of beyond a reasonable doubt; to allot mercy where it is warranted and to punish forcefully when necessary. In civil cases, the judge still decides the facts but utlilizes a different standard.

“Cases can be streamlined only to a point; it requires the full breadth and extent of my experience to perform my job — 22 years practicing law and almost 8 years as a judge.” He reads every civil, abuse neglect and dependency case the night before court. “That’s what expedites the process.”

“I have learned the art of patience and the application of my experience as a judge.” He said this position is learned. “My experience is one of the things that differentiates me from all of the other candidates. My experience is in the ability to separate the wheat from the chaff.”

In criminal cases, a judge must be fair and impartial in applying the law to the facts of a case. A judge must be decisive. There is no time to be indecisive. “A judge's decision can alter a person's life, or even the life of an entire family, substantially. And such a role should not be taken lightly.”

In a perfect economy a biweekly night court would help process many traffic and criminal cases. In reality, “administrative/traffic court” twice a week would help to process more simple cases. Maybe an extra couple of hours every week over several months would process more cases.

“I have represented many clients in criminal and civil court in Rowan County and am familiar with the court system. My respect for the judicial system means I have respect for the courts and for the people in the community who rely upon them for justice, whether they be defendant or plaintiff.”

A judge is charged with “deciding guilt or innocence, protecting the constitutional rights of the accused, safe-guarding victim’s rights and deciding the appropriate punishment, if any.” A prudent judge has to be mindful of these often competing interests and make sure that the state and defendant get a fair trial.

The only “backlog” in Rowan County that I am aware of is in Superior Criminal Court, and the only streamlining available there is the District Attorney's statutory power to offer a plea bargain. It would help if we could get a second superior court judge.

I have over 20 years of daily experience before the district courts. “My case records indicate that since 1984 that I have handled at least 600 to 700 cases per year.” He has appeared in nearly all types of cases that can be heard before the district court and has appeared before numerous judges.

Criminal matters merit punishment and consideration of a victim’s rights. “As a judge, I will strictly enforce the criminal laws. For civil matters, I will be fair and impartial to litigants and make fair resolution of controversies.”

Judges must avoid delay in trial matters, set limits for prosecution of crime, and render swift judgment. Also keep repeat offenders off the street so we won’t have a backlog. She suggests the use of night court for serious logjams.

My life experience coupled with my character. “I am good at listening to adversarial parties, deciphering legal issues and applying the law to the facts impartially. I have good decision-making ability and strong ethics.”


N.C. House District 77 What are your top three priorities?

On Education Funding

On Annexation Reform

Lauren Raper

“My top priority, of course, is our schools.”Her second priority is job creation, through effective advertising and improvements to North Carolina’s business climate. Annexation reform is another important issue, Raper said.

“We’re experiencing cuts from the bottom up, and my philosophy is we need to go from the top down.” Raper said education funds should not pay for administrators or curriculum facilitators at the expense of students and those who work directly with them.

“Simply put, we need to have no forced annexation. That’s what our constituents are asking for, and that’s what’s fair.”

Harry Warren

“First, job creation in the private sector and improving North Carolina’s economy. Second, to reduce the tax burden on working families and small businesses in the state. Third, to work for meaningful reform on our laws concerning annexation, eminent domain and blight.”

“The money set aside for schools each year should be sacred. I don't think that should be touched.” Funds from the North Carolina Education Lottery should be reserved entirely for schools, Warren said.

“Protecting our property is a traditional American right.” Warren said annexation reform legislation should prevent duplication of services, require prior county approval and especially allow people in an affected area to vote before being annexed.

Age: 27 Address: Fourth Street, Spencer Education: Bachelor’s degrees in history and Spanish language and a master’s degree in history, N.C. State University. Graduate of South Rowan High School. Background: Employed as a history teacher at East Rowan High School. Founded the Railroader Heritage Association of Spencer. Family: Fiancé, Reid Walters

Age: 59 Address: Kingsbridge Road, Salisbury Education: Bachelor’s degree in political science and history, Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. Background: Employed as a human resource specialist for Tar Heel Capital Corp. Serves as a Rowan County Republican Party precinct chair and delegate to the County Chairman’s Association and Executive Committee. Family: Wife, Catherine Warren; six children


N.C. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE The role of a judge Name Kevin Eddinger

Age: 55 Address: Rudolph Road, Salisbury Education: University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, bachelor of arts degree and a Juris Doctor from Wake Forest University School of Law Background: Two prior terms as district court judge; North Carolina 19C Judicial Bar, past president; Rowan County Bar, past president; UNC School of Government, certified juvenile judge; Adolescent & Family Enrichment Council, former board member. A Presbyterian. Family: Wife, Liana, twins Michael and Mia

Name Rosalee Hart-Morrison

Age: 41 Address: 5th Street, Spencer Education: UNC-Asheville, bachelor of arts in history; Juris Doctor from Vanderbilt University School of Law Background: Former volunteer and former board member Rowan Blues & Jazz Society, member Cornerstone Church, former co-chair of the Board of Adjustments of Spencer. Family: Husband, Patrick, daughters Jordan and Tyler.

Name Douglas Todd Paris Sr.

Age: 47 Address: East Council Street, Salisbury Education: UNC-Charlotte, bachelor of arts degree in political science and history; UNC-Chapel Hill, juris doctor degree. Background: Salisbury native, attends Southside Baptist, Salisbury; Eagle Scout, served as Cub Master for Shiloh UMC, Faith; former member of Rowan County Wildlife Association's Board of Directors. Family: One son, Douglas, fiancee, Robyn Shute, brother, Matt, and sister, Kim.

Name June Showfety

Age: 51 Address: Sherrills Ford Road, Salisbury Education: UNC-Charlotte, business degree; University of Tennessee-Knoxville, doctorate in law. Background: A member of the state bar, licensed to practice law in North Carolina and Tennessee. Member of Sacred Heart Catholic Church, member Rowan County Planning Board, Zoning Board of Adjustment, PBH, ARC/Rowan. Family: Did not provide

Streamlining the court process

Your best quality

In criminal cases, to afford all parties the opportunity to be heard and to apply the evidentiary standard of beyond a reasonable doubt; to allot mercy where it is warranted and to punish forcefully when necessary. In civil cases, the judge still decides the facts but utlilizes a different standard.

“Cases can be streamlined only to a point; it requires the full breadth and extent of my experience to perform my job — 22 years practicing law and almost 8 years as a judge.” He reads every civil, abuse neglect and dependency case the night before court. “That’s what expedites the process.”

“I have learned the art of patience and the application of my experience as a judge.” He said this position is learned. “My experience is one of the things that differentiates me from all of the other candidates. My experience is in the ability to separate the wheat from the chaff.”

In criminal cases, a judge must be fair and impartial in applying the law to the facts of a case. A judge must be decisive. There is no time to be indecisive. “A judge's decision can alter a person's life, or even the life of an entire family, substantially. And such a role should not be taken lightly.”

In a perfect economy a biweekly night court would help process many traffic and criminal cases. In reality, “administrative/traffic court” twice a week would help to process more simple cases. Maybe an extra couple of hours every week over several months would process more cases.

“I have represented many clients in criminal and civil court in Rowan County and am familiar with the court system. My respect for the judicial system means I have respect for the courts and for the people in the community who rely upon them for justice, whether they be defendant or plaintiff.”

A judge is charged with “deciding guilt or innocence, protecting the constitutional rights of the accused, safe-guarding victim’s rights and deciding the appropriate punishment, if any.” A prudent judge has to be mindful of these often competing interests and make sure that the state and defendant get a fair trial.

The only “backlog” in Rowan County that I am aware of is in Superior Criminal Court, and the only streamlining available there is the District Attorney's statutory power to offer a plea bargain. It would help if we could get a second superior court judge.

I have over 20 years of daily experience before the district courts. “My case records indicate that since 1984 that I have handled at least 600 to 700 cases per year.” He has appeared in nearly all types of cases that can be heard before the district court and has appeared before numerous judges.

Criminal matters merit punishment and consideration of a victim’s rights. “As a judge, I will strictly enforce the criminal laws. For civil matters, I will be fair and impartial to litigants and make fair resolution of controversies.”

Judges must avoid delay in trial matters, set limits for prosecution of crime, and render swift judgment. Also keep repeat offenders off the street so we won’t have a backlog. She suggests the use of night court for serious logjams.

My life experience coupled with my character. “I am good at listening to adversarial parties, deciphering legal issues and applying the law to the facts impartially. I have good decision-making ability and strong ethics.”


U.S. HOUSE 6TH DISTRICT On creating jobs ... Howard Coble Age: 79 Address: Greensboro Occupation: Incumbent congressman. Education: Appalachian State University (1949); Guilford College, history degree (1958); UNC-Chapel Hill Law School (1962). Background: Seeking 14th term. Former N.C. House member. Former N.C. revenue secretary. U.S. Coast Guard (5.5 years active, 18 years reserve). former assistant U.S. attorney. Family: Single

Cathy Brewer Hinson

Age: 58 Address: High Point Occupation; Building manager, Union Square Showroom Education: High Point University, bachelor’s degree, early childhood education; master’s degree, UNC-Greensboro, education (concentration in reading). Background: First time running for office. Family: Married, 4 children, 3 grandchildren.

Jon Mangin

Age: 25 Address: Stokesdale Occupation: IT trainer with Viae Training Education: Guilford College, bachelor’s degrees in economics and business management. Attended high school in New Jersey. Background: First run for public office. Family: Single

Jeff Phillips

Age: 47 Address: Greensboro Occupation: Owner-founder, Phillips Wealth Management Education: Studied computer science, business at University of Central Oklahoma Background: First run for office. N.C. native, but grew up in Okla. Returned to N.C. 1995. Formerly worked for Prudential, Paine Weber/UBS and Wachovia Securities. Family: Married, two children.

James Taylor Age: 45 Address: Pinehurst Occupation: Anesthesiologist, manager of health care operations in Moore, Richmond, Scotland counties. Education: Bachelor’s degree, chemistry, UNC-Chapel Hill; graduate, UNC-Chapel Hill Medical School. Background: Delegate to 2008 Republican National Convention Family: Married, three children.

Billy Yow Age: 47 Address: Greensboro Occupation: Owner, D&Y Well Drilling Inc. Education: Attended Southern Guilford High School and Guilford Technical Community College. Background : Guilford County commissioner since 2000. Served in N.C. National Guard 10 years. Mason. Family : Married, two children

On health care reform ...

On efforts in Iraq, Afghanistan ...

To grow the economy, the government should prioritize its spending, pay down the debt, scrap the enacted healthcare reform and cut taxes, Coble says he opposed the stimulus, thinking it was too light on economic incentives and too heavy on long-term social programs. The U.S. cannot spend its way out of economic troubles, he says.

Before health care reform was enacted, Coble spoke on the House floor, urging Democratic leadership to scrap its plans and send reform back to the drawing board. It represents increased taxes, increased costs and he warned it was “a train wreck waiting to happen.” Coble says the 2,500-plus-page bill invites subterfuge and states will face a huge burden.

Coble wants to get out of both countries “sooner rather than later, but I don’t have a timeline.” Coble was “sorely disappointed’ that the U.S. didn’t have a post-entry strategy in Iraq. “Maybe I didn’t ask enough questions,” he says. In Afghanistan, Coble says there’s the problem of corruption and not knowing “who’s with you today or against you tomorrow.”

Hinson is a big proponent of the Fair Tax and says it will do more to bring back jobs than anything else proposed. It would be an inclusive tax, bringing jobs and corporations back to the U.S., making country globally competitive. She says Congress also must repeal NAFTA , CAFTA trade agreements.

Hinson says she was “sick at heart” when the recent health care bill was enacted. This legislation was about the transfer of power, she says. Republicans also let people down when they controlled the Congress and failed to enact reform, she says. But this legislation “is going to break our country” and should be repealed, according to Hinson.

Before any decision is made on those missions, Hinson says, the military brass must be consulted. “I would give them what they ask for. I wouldn’t want to just quit because of the sacrifice that already has been made. I prefer not to drag it out, but I want to win and bring them home.” The next step would be to secure the U.S. border next to Mexico, she says.

“I’ve said pretty clearly there has to be a change in the public policy on trade,” Mangin says, calling for fair trade over free trade. He supports programs encouraging small business development. Rather than a “fair tax,” Mangin calls for a “flatter” tax and simplifying the tax code. He favors a pilot program to test drive tax-code simplification.

Mangin says patient care could be strengthened by allowing insurance companies to sell across state lines. He says there was a need for reform, but he opposed the Democratic plan, fearing it’s socialized medicine at a time when physicians face more red tape than ever before.

Mangin says both military missions should end and the troops in Iraq and Afghanistan should be brought home. “The strategy is entirely unclear, in my opinion, in both places,” he says. The country doesn’t have the money for the operations, nor is it fair to soldiers when the country can’t say what the end strategy is, Mangin says.

Phillips calls for a regional approach to job creation and attracting new business to the district. He is against any new taxes on business, increases in the capital gains tax “and other initiatives that would stifle ... job growth.” He supports a flatter tax over the “Fair Tax” and says, “We need tax reform desperately.”

Phillips was “deeply disappointed” that Democrats rammed through “a massive new entitlement program ... likely to saddle our children and grandchildren with enormous tax burdens.” He questions its constitutionality. He calls for its repeal and supports tort reform and allowing insurance companies to compete across state lines.

Phillips says the war in Iraq has succeeded in freeing millions from a brutal dictatorship while introducing representative government. He notes recent elections and thinks Iraq represents a crushing defeat for Al-Qaeda. In Afghanistan, he supports Obama’s recent troop surge and thinks the country is headed toward defeating the Taliban.

Taylor supports a balanced budget amendment, reduced spending, addressing the deficit immediately, simplifying taxes and eliminating the capital gains tax on offshore investment so new businesses could produce jobs and goods. He says decrease regulations on business and give tax incentives for new manufacturing companies that provide jobs.

Taylor says any reform discussions should have started with doctors and patients, then moved to hospitals, third-party payers and, lastly, government — not the other way around. He supports allowing insurance companies to compete across state lines, tort reform and allowing doctors to negotiate collectively with insurance companies.

Taylor is “deeply concerned” with an almost 10-year “War on Terrorism.” He says terrorism is one tactic of war. “To wage war against a tactic lends itself to endless wars. When it comes to war, we must get the job done and get out.” Taylor wants more military bases at home to protect southern borders from illegal immigration from Mexico.

He calls for a long-term investment strategy, providing capital to businesses so they can grow. He supports investment in higher education to “retool” America and make it more productive. He supports “real tax reform” and “real simplification,” and calls for every spending bill before Congress to have an expiration date.

Yow says it’s “really ludicrous” on the government’s part to take on this role. But he also questions why Republicans did nothing before. “Had they done their jobs and not been complacent, it would have been done more sensibly,” He calls for industry and citizen panels to formulate an overall plan for reform for Congress to review.

“I believe we need to redefine our role, explain our intentions for a conclusion to our presence and have these countries support our operations financially. I believe we have performed a great service in these countries, but believe it is time to reassess what we intend to accomplish in the future.”


CABARRUS BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS REPUBLICAN PRIMARY What motivates you to run for office?

Larry Burrage

Age: 70 Address: 558 Sagewood Pl., Concord Occupation: Licensed electrical contractor and general contractor; owner of L & L Electric Services of Concord for 33 years Education: Bachelor of Science degree, Gulf Coast Bible College, Houston, Texas

Jerry Conway

Age: 38 Address: 6220 Tuckaseegee Rd., Kannapolis Occupation: Licensed heating and air conditioning contractor Education: Current student, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College; 1990 graduate of A.L Brown High School

How will you bring jobs to Cabarrus County?

What other top issue needs to be addressed?

The county should operate like a business and become debt-free.

Lower taxes and have fewer government regulations; decrease the fees imposed on businesses.

Indebtedness; set policy and provide the same requirements and benefits to all of the citizens of Cabarrus County. In closed sessions, some critical changes and decisions have been implemented (such as the APFO) (...) The public would benefit from knowing the risks being taken with their tax dollars.

I have grown weary of our current government’s ability to act on behalf of its citizens and make sound decisions to benefit the county instead of wasting tax dollars.

I will work personally with the small businesses that are currently in our county and find a way to work together to come up with a solution to the unemployment problem. I would also work with the Chamber of Commerce and help to attract other business to the area.

I would like to see more work geared towards the school budgets.

I have the expertise (30 years with Charlotte Budget Office, Masters Degree in Public Administration), the experience (10 years as Council Member with the Town of Harrisburg) and the passion and commitment to successfully accomplish the responsibilities of the office.

With an unemployment rate of 13.4 percent, job creation in Cabarrus County will be my top priority (...) My first action as County Commissioner would be to create a “blue ribbon” task force composed of top Cabarrus County business leaders (supported by Chamber and County staffs), with the charge to develop recommendations for job creation within a short time frame.

There are five municipalities in Cabarrus County and each has a vision for their respective communities. In order to achieve their vision, additional zoning authority needs to be extended to municipalities. The county would still partner with the municipalities on land use planning.

There’s too much wasteful spending. Why waste a dollar when a dime will get the job done? The county isn’t doing what they should be doing. The county gives incentives to companies who leave as soon as the tax break is over.

You just have to hope for the best. There aren’t jobs anywhere, no jobs to be had right now. I’m all for small businesses. Government wants to help big businesses.

Teachers of Cabarrus County. You’ve got to have teachers. I haven’t heard anyone say they’d take a dime cut themselves. If you ain’t got the teachers, you don’t have the foundation of the building.

Christopher McCartan

My commitment to family and my desire that Cabarrus County remain an incredible hometown for my son. We've fallen in love with the area and are proud of what Cabarrus County has accomplished. I believe the future is bright, and I know I can add to an already-great thing.

I will work to keep the tax rate low, assuring prospective companies that they can invest in their employees instead of government. I will also scrutinize the motivations of all prospective corporations to Cabarrus County, paying deference to those who plan on staying long-term and employing our residents.

Public safety. With the two biggest tourist attractions in the state, a growing population, illegal immigration and crime related to gang activity, law enforcement has many concerns. At the county level, we need to provide our officers with the resources they need to take the bad guys off the street.

Chris Measmer

I was born and raised in Cabarrus County and I want to continue to make our county a better place to live for the current citizens and preserve the county for future generations.

I will ensure that the Board of Commissioners works hand in hand with the Economic Development Committee to attract jobs for Cabarrus County, implement measures to keep those jobs here and fill them with our citizens.

Due to the recession, Cabarrus County has the opportunity to assess how growth has affected all areas of the county and better prepare us for future generations of growth.

Lloyd Morris

I wish to offer a fresh perspective to that race. I also have some questions about the county's relationships with Bruton Smith and David Murdock.

There is a lot of interest in green jobs regarding some new technology that promises great results, such as 90 percent efficient solar cells and battery technology. The federal government has mandated 20 percent conversion to green power by 2020 for all government facilities. This presents great opportunity for small businesses.

The biggest issue is the use or lack of resources, and water and sewer lines. For that reason, I advocate slow or no growth residentially.

Thomas Sheppard

My sense of duty drives me to be more actively involved in local government than ever before. With all the bad government that is going on, I cannot, in good conscience, stand on the sidelines any longer and simply complain.

I will employ the successful formula for prosperity that Ronald Reagan gave us and which fueled one of the longest economic booms our nation has ever seen, smaller government and lower taxes equals more jobs.

Government at all levels consistently ignores or tramples on the rights of citizens under the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Subversion of our rights drives tax policies, eminent domain issues, religious freedom, free speech, gun rights, environmentalism and many other issues that cannot be addressed in this interview.

Jay White (I)

Given these economic times, I am more motivated than ever to bring quality jobs to Cabarrus County, to reduce the scope of government and to protect our local heritage. I want to make what is good about Cabarrus County great, and see our county become the shining star of economic hope for North Carolina.

First, by realizing the dream of the North Carolina Research Campus. We have the opportunity for real economic stability that can only come from a diversified economic base that is able to grow. We must maintain the partnerships that expedite the campus (...) strengthen our schools to create a strong workforce and improve our infrastructure(...)

We must develop a comprehensive residential growth plan that minimizes the negative impact of new growth while allowing all citizens to enjoy the benefits. Better planning will mean more economic opportunities and a better quality of life for all our residents.

Phil Cowherd

Age: 56 Address: 5514 Excalibur Ct., Harrisburg Occupation: Retired from the City of Charlotte Budget Office Education: B.A. in Political Science from UNC Charlotte, 1975; M.A. in Public Administration from UNC Charlotte, 1981 Background: 10 years on Harrisburg Town Council, with two terms as Mayor Pro Tem

Fred Eudy

Age: 60 Address: 6502 Smith Lake Rd., Mount Pleasant Occupation: Farmer Education: Mount Pleasant High School graduate.

Age: 34 Address: 5662 Burck Dr., Concord Occupation: Attorney, Powers and McCartan, PLLC Education: Bachelor's in Political Science, Syracuse University, 1997; Master's in Public Administration, Syracuse University, 1998; Juris Doctorate in Law, University of Buffalo, 2002 Background: Twice elected chairman of the Cabarrus County Republican Party (2007, 2009).

Age: 22 Address: 6300 Homestead Dr., Concord Occupation: Owner, Wayside Family Restaurant Education: George Washington University, Bachelor of Political Science and History

Age: 67 Address: 135 Beech St. NW, Concord Occupation: Retired lab technician Education: AAS in Electrical Engineering, CPCC; AAS in Electronic Engineering, CPCC; B.A. from UNC-Charlotte. Background: U.S. Army veteran

Age: 51 Address: 498 Debra Cir., Concord Occupation: Real estate entrepeneur Education: Associate in Arts and Sciences, Ricks College, 1981; B.S. in Computer Sciences and MIS, Park College, 1987; M.S. in Human Resource Management, NationalLouis University, 1991; M.S. in Project Management, Western Carolina University, 2001; Certified Project Management Professional, Project Management Institute, 2001 Background: U.S. Marine Corps veteran

Age: 45 Address: 5601 Meadow Bluff Ct., Concord Occupation: Attorney, Partner, Hartsell & Williams, P.A. Education: BSBA, Guilford College, 1986; Juris Doctor, Campbell University School of Law, 1991. Background: Chairman, Cabarrus County Board of Commissioners, 2006 to present

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