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SAANICHNEWS

Feature Deals of the Week 104–4494 Chatterton Way $419,900 404–1012 Collinson St. $279,900

National champions Centennial Stadium in Saanich was packed to see the UVic Vikes win the national men’s soccer title. Sports, Page A24 Wednesday, November 16, 2011

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Slippery skater Wes Myron, left, loses an edge as he fights for the puck during the gold medal game at the 2011 World Junior A Championships in Langley Sunday. The Lambrick Park secondary school grad and current member of the Victoria Grizzlies helped Canada West beat Canada East in the nationally televised final. See story on Page A12. Garrett James photo

Campaign trail VOTING LESSONS Too young to vote, Saanich’s Youth Council still wants those who can to get out to the polls.

Coming home Trustees warned Candidates running for

CIVIC C I OTE

OUR VIEW the board of education SEE PAGE A10

Nov. 19, 2011

STORY PAGE A7

in Greater Victoria told to stop campaigning on or near school grounds. STORY PAGE A29

MAIL-IN BALLOTS A BUST Plan to replace mobile polling stations at seniors homes hasn’t worked the way Saanich hoped.

KNOCK KNOCK Mayoral hopefuls go door-to-door.

STORY PAGE A8

STORY PAGE A21

Excitement builds for Mount Doug Idol finals as famous alumni come home to help celebrate the school’s 80th anniversary. STORY PAGE A9

KNOW YOUR CANDIDATES For a look at all the candidates running for the Greater Victoria board of education check out our full-page feature.

SEE PAGE A28

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A2 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH

NEWS

www.saanichnews.com • A31

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, November 16, 2011

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www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com• •A31 A3

SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday,November November16, 16,2011 2011

SAANICHCIVIC OTE’11 • Election Day: Saturday, Nov. 19

• Saanichnews.com/news/election

It’s not easy being noticeably green

All-candidates meetings

Kyle Slavin News staff

There are two allcandidates meetings remaining before the Nov. 19 election. ■ Wednesday, Nov. 16 at 6:30 p.m., Cadboro Bay United Church (2625 Arbutus Rd.) ■ Thursday, Nov. 17 at 7 p.m., Gordon Head United Church (4201 Tyndall Ave.)

P

olicies and procedures that promote a greener, more sustainable Saanich are meaningless if the municipality isn’t walking the talk. Mayoral candidate David Cubberley says Saanich needs to be led by someone who has an understanding of what it means to live green – and that’s not the case right now. “I find that Saanich, on paper, has a strong commitment to farms and farming and food security, and on the ground it’s mixed,” he said. “My record shows I’m innovative and creative in building alternatives to singleoccupant vehicle use. I am an avid cycler, and I have a strong commitment to make progress on improving mobility Frank Leonard and walkability. I am an inveterate recycler; the blue box program, getting electronic waste out of landfills – all that interests me.” He says Saanich, under the direction of Mayor Frank Leonard, has missed several opportunities to capitalize on being a greener community – one that promotes local farming, diverting waste from the landfills and getting people out of their cars. Leonard, however, points to the recent municipal acquisitions of Panama Flats and Haro Woods as indicators that the community is getting more than it could have expected from its mayor and council when it comes to the sustainability file. “We’ve taken the mandate from citizens and created sustainable documents that we work from. These are community goals, set out in the strategic plan,” he said, adding that his opponent is imposing more of a personal agenda, rather than working on the preestablished goals. “We faced challenges David Cubberley with both of those (acquisitions), but (council) gave clear direction to staff based on our goals. We’ve shown that we can deliver outcomes that this community can be proud of,” Leonard said. “I take these as council achievements, but I’m proud to be the mayor that leads this council.”

> AT ISSUE: GOING GREEN

Not registered?

What separates you from the other candidates as far as your priorities for making Saanich a greener, more sustainable community than it already is?

Council candidates Nichola Wade, Vicki Sanders, Dean Murdock, Paul Gerrard, Judy Brownoff and Susan Brice say Saanich has demonstrated its commitment to the environment. They each point to their personal background on sustainability, and say Saanich needs to do more of what it’s already doing. “I’m a firm believer that we, as individuals, need to be responsible for ourselves and not expect somebody else to pick up after us,” Sanders said. “(Saanich’s climate action mitigation strategy and an adaptation strategy) will take us quite a ways with what we need to accomplish, which includes smart growth planning and reduction of our own emissions and community emissions,” added Wade. Harald Wolf, a geologist, says Saanich’s discussions on the environment are too superficial. “My understanding of the concepts are much deeper than the vocabulary, and the idea that we can meet our carbon reduction targets by fudging numbers in spreadsheets and paying carbon offsets,” he said. Leif Wergeland says his priority for the next

If you are not a registered voter in Saanich, you must go to a polling station and produce two pieces of ID that together include your name, Saanich street address and your signature.

Get more from your candidates

On the ballot

We asked all the candidates what they specifically can do to make Saanich even more environmentally sustainable. Check out all their comments at Saanichnews.com.

term would be encouraging residents to change their habits. “We really do have a part to play in the whole climate issue. In reality each one of us has to change, in every area of our life.” Candidate Ingrid Ip is championing curb-side compost pick-up as the best sustainability goal for Saanich to set. Rob Wickson and Vic Derman say a different approach needs to be taken to tackling the environmental issues facing Saanich. “You have to embed (environmental policies) in the decision-making process so they consistently guide the direction of the community,” Derman said. “We’re trying to be greener … but we haven’t got that long-term vision of what sustainable should be and look like.” kslavin@saanichnews.com

Visit SAANICHNEWS.com to read election articles, candidate profiles and their solutions to local issues.

On your Saanich ballot you are entitled to vote for each of the following: ■ 1 mayor; ■ 8 councillors; ■ 4 CRD directors; (The CRD director vote is non-binding). And depending on which school district your residence falls in, you will also get to vote for either: ■ 9 trustees for the Greater Victoria School District (SD61); ■ or 2 trustees for the Saanich School District (SD63).

kslavin@ saanichnews.com

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www.saanichnews.com A4 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011 -- SAANICH NEWS Wednesday,

Thieves continue to target daytime park users, police warn a rash of these incidents last fall. “I don’t know what else to say other than leave your stuff at home,” Jantzen said. “If you don’t, it’s subject to being taken.” One man faces charges relating to the September break and enters at Beaver Lake Park, but police say the basic nature of this crime could mean other people are also committing the same type of crime. kslavin@saanichnews.com

Parks users are once again being reminded not leave anything of value in their vehicles after a set of smash-and-grabs around Mount Douglas Park. In the late afternoon on Nov. 3, two vehicles had their passenger windows broken and items that had been out of sight were stolen. “We believe park users are being watched,” Saanich police Sgt. Dean Jantzen said. The incident is similar to one that occurred in September at Beaver Lake Park. As well, there was

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www.saanichnews.com • • A5 A5 www.saanichnews.com

SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011  SAANICH

Cops crack down on crash corners Kyle Slavin News staff

Ryan Bacica stands at the corner where McKenzie Avenue meets the Trans-Canada Highway during Thursday afternoon rush hour. Donning a pair of khakis, a blue hoodie and a pair of sunglasses, the Integrated Road Safety Unit corporal inconspicuously works undercover, watching road users’ every move. “Grey Acura with a female driver on the cellphone.” Bacica and his fellow Capital Regional District IRSU officers are conducting increased enforcement at intersections throughout Greater Victoria until the new year. “We’re going to be targeting intersections with different types of enforcement techniques,” said IRSU Const. Rob Figueiredo. “We’re there to reduce crashes and injuries, but we’re also watching for any bad driving behaviours. … We’re not going to let anything slip by.” The regional unit will be stepping up its watch at five intersections in Greater Victoria deemed the most dangerous. McKenzie at the Trans-Canada Highway and Highway 17 at Sayward Road in Saanich; Hillside Avenue at Shelbourne Street, Douglas Street at Finlayson Street, and Douglas at Hillside

District of Saanich

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“We’re not out there to write tickets. The whole point is to make the roads safer.”

The 5 worst areas Intersections with the highest number of crashes in the Capital Region:

VOTES SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 8:00 am to 8:00 pm

– Const. Rob Figueiredo

■ McKenzie at the Trans-Canada Highway. ■ Highway 17 at Sayward Road. ■ Hillside Avenue at Shelbourne Street. ■ Douglas Street at Finlayson Street. ■ Douglas at Hillside and Gorge Road.

and Gorge Road in Victoria are the highest crash areas in the Capital Region “From 2008 to 2010, there have been nearly 1,000 collisions involving injuries just at these five intersections alone,” Figueiredo said. Officers will be looking for red and yellow light infractions, as well as compliance with the seatbelt and hands-free laws. Cyclists and pedestrians will also be watched to ensure they’re not putting anyone’s safety at risk with their behaviour. “These are obviously some of the busiest intersections and some of the biggest intersec-

tions in the region,” Figueiredo said. “The nature of the busyness of the intersections, with multiple lane-ways and high volumes of traffic add to the risk of a collision occurring.” The intersection crackdown coincides with a month where IRSU will also be ensuring drivers are travelling at speeds relative to the conditions of the road. “As the weather gets worse, the days get shorter, it gets darker earlier, the roadways get slipperier, so your driving habits must change,” Figueiredo said. “We’re not out there to write tickets. The whole point is to make the roads safer. We are serious about enforcement – we’re trying to reduce the number of crashes, so we hope people think twice before they do something they shouldn’t behind the wheel.” Next month, heightened intersection enforcement will run concurrent to IRSU’s campaign to combat impaired driving. kslavin@saanichnews.com

For more election information, visit www.saanich.ca or contact the Legislative Division at 250-475-1775

There’s more on line - saanichnews.com

Randall Garrison, MP ESQUIMALT–JUAN DE FUCA Constituency office is now open to serve constituents: address:

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A6 A6 •• www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011 -- SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS

Single-car rollover sends Victoria man to hospital Ryan Flaherty News staff

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Judy Brownoff Saanich Councillor and CRD Director

An experienced & approachable politician www.judybrownoff.ca

✔ Affordable care options for our seniors ✔ Food policies to support our future needs ✔ Regional Transportation Plan ✔ Create affordable housing for all ✔ Move forward on climate change initiatives LE ADERSHIP • VISION • INTEGRIT Y

mine what led to the crash. A thermal imaging unit was used to confirm that the driver had been the vehicle’s only occupant. The cause is still under investigation, though initial information suggests alcohol may have been a factor. editor@saanichnews.com

Greater Victoria schools receive free mapbooks Russell and Wesley Mussio, publishers of the Backroad Mapbook books, have donated 300 of their best-selling Vancouver Island B.C. Backroad Mapbooks to five School District 61 inner-city schools. The Mapbook series combines reference information with highly detailed maps, featuring up-to-date logging roads, extensive trail systems, and parks, camping and fishing information, as well as a wide range of recreational features not found on other maps.

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SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011  A7

Voting lessons Natalie North News staff

SANDERS for Saanich t c e l E Re-

Experience, Leadership, Independent Voice

VICKI SANDERS for Saanich Council and CRD Director November 19

vicki_sanders@telus.net • www.vickisanders.com

©Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Thinkstock

Ninu Forrest wants to give young people in Saanich a voice at the municipal level. Forrest is rallying for local youth – specifically the region’s large population of post-secondary students – to get out and vote on Nov. 19. The thing is, at 15 years old, Forrest has three years before she’ll be able to go to the polls herself. “I feel like sometimes these days people complain about stuff in their communities, but if you don’t go out and vote then there’s no way that you can change that,” said Forrest, recruitment director for Saanich Youth Council. “It’s such a privilege to be able to vote that many countries don’t have and sometimes we take it for granted here.” Saanich Youth Council is a group of a dozen high school and university students who meet monthly at municipal hall to discuss issues in their community and consult with Saanich council advisory committees. During Youth Council’s inaugural year, much of their efforts were focused on reaching beyond their own relationship with municipal councillors to identify common concerns of young people in their community – the most common, Forrest said, is transportation. Youth Council has partnered with the Gordon Head Residents’ Association to host an all-candidates meeting with the aim of getting more young people interested in the discussion and out to the polls. The meeting is slated for 7 p.m., Thursday (Nov. 17) at the Gordon Head United Church, 4201 Tyndall Ave. “We do want youth to come out to these kinds of events because we are the leaders of tomorrow, but if we don’t start doing something today, we won’t be able to take over once the time comes,” Forrest said. nnorth@saanichnews.com

www.saanichnews.com • A7

herine t a C , a Alph David , r e z t a Br h ga, Edit n a h u K Loringe ly, Dian l a N c M eborah D , r h o N ls the pol o

et Take m Q: What can one person do to make a positive difference for thousands of children?

A: VOTE for a strong public school system. Saturday, November 19th This message is brought to you by Victoria Public School Teachers


A8••www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com A8

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Mail-in ballots, which were brought in this year to replace mobile polling stations at retirement homes during elections past, aren’t generating nearly the same interest from elderly voters. At Highgate Lodge, where general manager Linda Bishop estimates about 70 per cent of the residents are engaged in the municipal election, only four people have taken advantage of the mail vote. “Saanich was extremely good at making us aware of the mail-in ballots, but we’re dealing with an elderly group,” Bishop said. “They’re cautious of the mail-in ballots. It’s new to them, it doesn’t feel as private

✗ Re-elect

19

Helen Parker Saanich Board of Education

Helen will continue to: • Focus decision-making in the best interests of students • Work with education partners and community to promote open, accessible and accountable public education • Raise awareness locally and provincially on the issues facing public education

“They’re understanding there isn’t a mobile poll (this election), but there isn’t any clear sense of what the alternative is,” Cubberley said. “We’ve gone from convenience to ‘you have to help yourself to get to vote,’ and that’s the wrong direction. It’s not the way to get more people voting.” Mayor Frank Leonard says he’s hearing more positive comments than anything else about the mail-in ballots at retirement homes. “We’ll have to review the practice and recommend what to do three years from now. We’ll all learn from this experience,” he said. As of last week about 300 Saanich residents had applied for a mail-in ballot. The ballot is available to snowbirds, students studying abroad and those with mobility issues. You can still apply to receive a mail-in ballot (until 4 p.m. on Nov. 17) by calling 250-4751775, visiting Saanich municipal hall (770 Vernon Ave.) or by checking saanich.ca/living/ election.html. If you receive a mail-in ballot it is your responsibility to ensure it is returned to the chief elections officer before 8 p.m. on Nov. 19, otherwise it will not be counted. kslavin@saanichnews.com

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as going to put their X in the box when all the formalities were there to keep things secure.” Bishop says an additional two residents – out of 58 total – have signed up to get a ride to a polling station on election day. She says 15 of the residents can drive, so she hopes they’ll take advantage of their mobility to get to a polling station. “They liked it when the mobile poll came here. It was nice and easy for them to just come down and vote,” Bishop said. It’s a sentiment echoed by mayoral candidate David Cubberley, who’s been to three retirement homes where most residents have told him there’s confusion around how they can vote.

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Dean Murdock Saanich Council & CRD www.deanmurdock.ca

✔ Affordable housing ✔ Better public transit & transportation options ✔ Quality sidewalks & bike lanes ✔ Climate & environmental leadership ✔ Farmland protection & food security

LB

Together – we can ensure that Saanich remains a great place to live, work and play


www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com • • A9 A9

SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011 

Mount Doug Idol contestants take the stage Natalie North News staff

Two of Victoria’s best-known musical talents return to their hometown this weekend to judge the city’s latest singing competition with the chance of welcoming its next superstar. Producer David Foster and artist Nelly Furtado, both alumni of Mount Douglas secondary school, are back as celebrity judges for Mount Doug Idol. The talent show is the culmination of nine days of events hosted by the Mount Doug Alumni Association in honour of the school’s 80th anniversary. More than 100 alumni – many living in other areas of Canada or the U.S. – applied in September to take part in the competition. A panel of local judges narrowed the field to 15 semi-finalists and then down to five finalists on Nov. 2 at the Spectrum Community school theatre. Justin Hewitt and Kale Penny of Victoria, Joni Anderson of White Rock, Amanda Wood of Vancouver and Cristine Seeber of California are now vying for the top spot. “We’re all so proud of coming from Mount Doug,� said Foster in an interview with the News in an earlier interview. “It’s a pact, it’s a bond that we share. I’m super proud to be a Canadian and to be from Victoria. I tout Victoria everywhere I go.�

On Saturday, alumni ranging in age and musical genre from teen to senior, and from opera to country will perform at the University of Victoria’s Farquhar Auditorium. Furtado and Foster, honorary president of the alumni association, will take the stage as well as participate in a pre-event social. While there is no promise that the winner will get a record deal from the multi-Grammy awardwinning producer, Wendy Gedney, co-chair of the anniversary celebrations, said the top vocalist will be rewarded with a trip from Air Canada and prizes from Tom Lee Music. “The purpose of the Idol is to showcase talent of the alumni and the bonus is we have David Foster and Nelly Furtado to help us with that because they’re both from Mount Doug and they’ll be playing a little bit and doing their little bit,� Gedney said. “It’s not the David and Nelly show. It’s about Mount Doug. (Foster) wants it that way and so do we.� The competition was open to past and present staff and students of Mount Doug and its feeder schools. The children and grandchildren of former staff and students could also apply. “There’s a huge chance that we could find something great,� Foster said. A sports social, highlighting Mount Doug’s athletics history, will run from 3 to 6 p.m. at the adja-

cent Mount Doug campus, 3970 Gordon Head Rd. This event includes a no-host bar and is open to members of the public over the age of 19. Tickets to the Idol show (across a variety of price ranges), the pre-event reception with Foster and Furtado, as well as the sports social can be purchased through www.mountdougalumni.com. nnorth@saanichnews.com

(OHFW

Rob Wickson 6DDQLFK&RXQFLODQG&5'

Re-Elect ✔ Paul Gerrard For Saanich Council and CRD Director

Vision ✔ Integrity ✔ Experience ✔

“Committed to Community Building in Saanich� www.paulgerrard.ca

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www.robwickson.ca

7RJHWKHUZHFDQJHW6DDQLFKPRYLQJ VOTE NOVEMBER 19 th

For Strong, Independent Leadership to a Better Future For Strong, Independent Leadership to a Better Future On Saturday, November 19 Vote: On Saturday, November 19 Vote:

Vic Vic Derman Derman for for Saanich Saanich Councillor Councillor and and CRD CRD Director Director Visit my website: www.vicderman.com - for complete information


A10 • www.saanichnews.com

SAANICHNEWS

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Jim Zeeben Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Saanich News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-920-2090 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.saanichnews.com

OUR VIEW

Let candidates talk to parents Never would we want to hear of a teacher grooming little Johnny or Sally to one day vote NDP, or for a public school to endorse the Liberal party. But to bar trustee candidates from approaching parents on school property to discuss issues affecting those schools doesn’t make sense. The Victoria Confederation of Parent Advisory Councils, or VCPAC, sent out a letter last week to all trustee candidates in the Greater Victoria school district reminding them that this past spring, the current board of education unanimously voted for a policy that bars campaigning in schools or on school property. The letter goes further, saying some candidates are violating the “spirit” of the policy by having their supporters distribute material to parents on school grounds and by campaigning next to school property. VCPAC’s stance, along with the nine incumbent trustees who voted for it, does a disservice to democracy. With turnout so low for trustee elections (trustees’ names go on the same ballot as council candidates, but earn few X marks), we should be encouraging campaigning in locations where there are people who are most likely to vote. Trustees matter more to parents of students than most other voters and candidates should have access to their potential electorate. At an all-candidates meeting last week for trustee candidates, David Bratzer was more vocal on the policy than others, saying it is a “core Canadian value to stand on the sidewalk and talk to parents. … It teaches kids about democracy.” He added he is respecting the policy by staying off school grounds. Is campaigning so intimidating to parents that regulations are needed to keep it at bay? Perhaps parents who aren’t interested in a candidate’s speech could turn them away. At worst, the process could spark a debate between parents and their children about elections, democracy and school governance. However, keeping candidates from approaching parents at schools will only further erode a process that is already ailing. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@saanichnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Saanich News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2010 WINNER

Local gov’t neglected again for local politicians to go back to The red-headed stepchild of their communities and campaign democracy is shivering on the against accountability. doorstep again. Most won’t open There is much that is not the door. discussed and it goes beyond Local government elections are technical details like performance always overshadowed by louder auditing. How about events, and this year is no amalgamation in different. The “occupy” places where there nonsense, the teachers’ are clearly too many strike, the precarious municipal boundaries, economy and the media’s policing is fragmented fixation on them are part and administration is of the problem. duplicated? You won’t But let’s face it. hear much about that, Public indifference to unless a lot more voters local government has insist on it. left it mainly to selfBusiness groups and serving politicians and special interest groups. Tom Fletcher community newspapers raise it, and it fades away. Community newspapers B.C. Views Not enough people care. soldier on through the Few challengers and three years between even fewer incumbent politicians elections to highlight issues and signed the taxpayers’ pledge choices, but few people join the offered up at local election time debate when it’s time to vote. by the Canadian Federation of The recent Union of B.C. Independent Business. It’s a modest Municipalities convention demonstrated this. Local politicians proposal to match spending growth with real growth. love to tell senior governments Candidates don’t want to talk what to do. They’d much rather about the fact that B.C. municipal debate smart meters or bad old spending, adjusted for inflation, is Ottawa’s RCMP costs than talk growing almost four times as fast as about their own performance. the population. Pay and benefits for Most of the mayors and municipal employees grow much councillors on hand were unhappy faster than private sector rates. Not with the province’s plan to appoint enough people care. a municipal auditor-general to The Canadian Union of Public examine the efficiency of municipal Employees is campaigning against spending. Just another layer of contracted private development bureaucracy, according to these of water utilities. They prefer their experts on the subject. high-cost monopoly. And outside At the convention, I asked NDP their special interest support, not MLA Carole James about this. A enough people care. veteran of local government, she School board elections have observed that it would be awkward

become even more of an insider activity. To take one example, a school trustee candidate forum in Abbotsford last week started with a protest march by 18 teachers. They carried their message inside, demanding smaller classes, more special needs support, the familiar list of demands in their dysfunctional relationship with the provincewide bargaining agent. Of course school trustees have no actual authority over these huge and costly issues. The province took away school board taxing authority long ago, because the teacher and support staff unions have the money and voting numbers to control low-turnout local elections for their own benefit. Now the unions have to settle for vetting candidates according to their willingness to lobby the B.C. government on behalf of unions. (If anyone has attended a trustee forum that wasn’t taken over by teachers, please e-mail me. I haven’t heard of one for years.) There are still things you can do to compare candidates, and it doesn’t take long to sort through a dozen or two hopefuls. Please, check this paper’s website for recent surveys and stories on the local candidates, and take some time on Saturday to back the people who you think have the best experience, independence and understanding of the community’s needs. Occupy the voting booth. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Municipal spending is growing almost four times as fast as the population.’


www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com • • A11 A11

SAANICH November 16, 2011  SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November 16, 2011

LETTERS Province needs to answer questions about sewage treatment costs Perhaps Ida Chong could reveal what economic, environmental, or social benefits have been identified that would justify spending $782 million on sewage treatment? And perhaps Christy Clark could tell us what economic impact the additional taxes we will all end up paying (forever) will have on our community? How about everyone, especially our candidates for election, start demanding “Not another penny without proof?” What is there to hide? Bob Wheaton Saanich

Tax money could be better spent than on flowers in medians I agree fully with the general message of the letter writer regarding the excessive plantings of flowers (annuals). The Maplewood/Cook and Cedar Hill/Blenkinsop areas are just a few. We have many great parks – some with abundant flowers for viewing. These median plantings and their maintenance just take away from much needed spending on infrastructure. In many areas, items like sidewalks and curbs – if they are present at all – are a patchwork of asphalt with the luxury of concrete at intersections. It is no wonder that some people are so glued to their cars and don’t walk along some streets (Tattersall /Blenkinsop) since they have to walk on the street itself. Let’s put the tax dollars where they are truly needed and less on the esthetics. Issues like infrastructure spending are almost enough to make a person run for council. Dave Fellowes Saanich

Smart meter fears evoke fallacies once touted by John Birch Society I was disappointed to see that Saanich News published a letter (Oct. 26), regarding smart meters, with nothing but baseless, evidencefree fantasy and fear mongering. There is absolutely no evidence to suggest smart meters pose any threat to human health, and a great deal of evidence to suggest they don’t. Recently, the largest study on the effects of cellphones on human health ever conducted was published in the British Medical Journal. This study found no correlation between cellphone use and any health outcomes. In the past 20 years, per capita rates of cancer overall and brain cancer in particular have fallen in North America, even as cell phone use has risen from almost zero to almost 100 per cent. More than 40 studies have been conducted on individuals who claim to suffer from electromagnetic hypersensitivity, and systematic reviews of these studies clearly show there is no correlation between exposure to non-ionising radiation like that produced by smart meters and the symptoms from which these individuals claim to suffer. Furthermore, if low-level, non-ionising

Letters to the Editor

radiation were harmful to organic life, life on this planet would never have evolved – the largest source of non-ionising radiation any of us are ever exposed to is the sun, from which we are exposed to hundreds of thousands of times the amount of radiation produced by household electronics. Smart meter fear mongering is the modern equivalent of John Birch Society “fluoridation is a communist plot” fear mongering, and should be treated with equal scorn and derision. Sara Bainbridge Victoria

Occupy group has effectively been given control over public space To occupy is to “take up,” to “take or hold possession or control of” or to “reside in as an owner” according to Miriam Webster’s Online Dictionary. While I wholly support the right to free expression and protest, even if I don’t agree, I can’t support the tactics of the Occupy movement. They have literally taken over a public space as their own and have stated that they’re not going away. So if we want to put lights in the Sequoia tree we have to ask them for permission and if the Downtown Business Association wants to put in a skating rink, they’ll need cooperation. With the (initial) support of Victoria’s city council, the protesters control the square. Bob Broughton Saanich

Wet leaves on roads pose hazard for cyclists commuting in the fall It’s that time of year when leaf blowers are in full force. I spotted a business on Oak Street that had a leaf blower sending the dry leaves off the lawn and onto the road. Would everyone who reads this please remind your employees, contractors, friends and relatives that leaves on the streets are dangerous for cyclists? I know from experience how slippery the wet leaves are for bicyclists. Riding on a patch of wet leaves is a good way to slide towards traffic, then fall into traffic as you slide off the leaves. Jean Chandler Saanich

The News welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters to the editor should discuss issues and stories that have been covered in the pages of the News. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste.

The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity or to discuss using your letter as a guest column. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Saanich News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ Email: editor@saanichnews.com

Greater Victoria Board of Education

Keep the Trust in Trustees Jim Holland

• Anglican Clergyman • Educator • Founder of Island Parent Magazine

Michael McEvoy

• President, BC School Trustees Association • United Way of Greater Victoria, Campaign Chair 2009 • Lawyer • Public Servant

Before deer cull supported, we must remember animals were here first After reading letters from some people who cannot wait for the local deer to be culled, I would like to respond. The reason deer are now in the urban areas in Victoria is because their habitat is being taken away by building where they once lived. It’s a sad thing these lovely wildlife are roaming around with no place to call their own. Iris Nunn Saanich

Dave Pitre

• Retired Principal, Associate Superintendent and Teacher • Co-chair of Success By 6


A12 A12 • • www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com

volunteer notebook

Volunteer Today Wondering What To Do Wednesdays? We’re seeking a driver to take some ladies to a weekly socialization group. Pick them up for the meeting Wednesdays at 1:15, stay for the session if you like and then take them home again. It’s an asset if you can put a fold-up walker in your trunk. If you would like to contribute to brightening up a senior’s life by sharing your time and car call Heather at 250-595-8008. Have Hammer Will Help We’re looking for volunteers to add to our handyman list. Our clients sometimes need a minor home repair; jobs such as a fence mended, a leaky tap stopped or perhaps a lamp fixed. This is an ‘on-call’ position and can be done according to your own schedule. So if fixing things is your forte and everything is fixed at home (or even if its not but you have time to spare) give Heather a call at 250-595-8008 and come in for an interview. Shopping Supporter Going to the grocery store or the mall can be difficult for clients who need the support of a drive to get there, a hand in the store and often help with the purchase. If you like to shop and would like to help someone else at the same time then we’d like to talk to you. This may be a weekly trip with the same client or you may prefer to be called when we get a one-time only request. Call Heather at 250-595-8008 and start shopping soon. Winter’s On The Way The days are shorter, the air is cooler and we want to be prepared should ‘Old Man Winter’ come calling with a ‘gift’ of snow. Your elderly Saanich neighbour may need your shovelling expertise to get to the doctor or the store. To get on our ‘Snow Angel’ list call Heather at 250-595-8008. Community Partners:

District of Saanich

Province of British Columbia Con n e c t i n g pe op l e w h o c a r e w it h c au s e s t h at mat t e r ®

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Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011 -- SAANICH Wednesday, SAANICH

NEWS NEWS

Saanich’s Wes Myron wins gold with Canada West Travis Paterson News staff

With a whirlwind three weeks behind him, Wes Myron is ready to settle down and help the Victoria Grizzlies get back on track. The Lambrick Park secondary grad was on the ice for Canada West’s 4-2 defeat of Canada East in the gold Myron medal match of the World Junior A Championship in Langley on Sunday. Being broadcast on TSN didn’t help the already nervous dressing

room for what was “the biggest stage of my career,” Myron said. As one of five 19-year-olds on the team, he felt it his duty to help keep his teammates dialed in. “I guess I was pretty nervous myself. A lot of pucks were held onto a bit too long in the first period but we kept to a simple game plan of dumping it in and forechecking hard to disrupt the breakout of (Canada East’s) top four defencemen.” Myron skated on a line with Curtis Loik of the Penticton Vees and Riley Kieser of the Humboldt Broncos (Sask.), but knew neither before making the selection camp cut as an extremely late addition two weeks

ago. Myron recorded his only point, an assist on one of Loik’s two goals in Canada West’s 4-1 win over the Czech Republic on Nov. 10. Despite going winless in their first two games, Canada bounced back when the games truly counted including a 2-1 upset over tournament-favourite Sweden on Friday. “Beating Sweden showed us we could do it.” The win caps nearly a month of jumping in and out of the Grizzlies lineup for Myron, who was near the top of the B.C. Hockey League in scoring when he left for a school tour of Boston University and other NCAA

universities in October. Myron committed to a full scholarship offer from Boston University for the 2012-13 season, choosing the school over 12 other offers. He’ll play with current Grizzlies forward Mike Moran and former-Grizzly Justin Courtnall. For now, the graduate of Racquet Club minor hockey and South Island Thunderbirds major midget team is excited to get back into the Grizzlies lineup against the Alberni Valley Bulldogs, 7:15 p.m. at Bear Mountain Arena on Friday (Nov. 18). “Hopefully we can get rolling again and see about winning an RBC Cup.” sports@vicnews.com

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www.saanichnews.com • A13

SAANICH NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011 

Telus contributes $1.5 million to benefit local charities Telus Victoria held its annual Celebration of Giving event Nov. 7, recognizing more than 50 organizations and people for their charitable efforts in the community. The telecommunications company announced that it will contribute more than $1.5 million to

Victoria groups this year through a number of outlets. In addition, the David Foster Foundation, which is based in Victoria, was presented with a $650,000 cheque to support that organization’s mission of providing support to the families of chil-

dren who need organ donations. The company pledged a further $500,000 for next year. “We have such a need, because organ donor awareness has to be brought to the forefront, and they’re the champion of this,” said Mike Ravenhill, CEO of the David

Foster Foundation. “On average it costs around $10,000 to sponsor a family. This is huge.” Among other local groups to benefit are the Rock Solid Foundation’s WITS program, the Canadian Red Cross Society’s Beyond the Hurt program, and the Canadian

Heritage Arts Society’s Canadian College of Performing Arts bursary program. “The Telus team … recognize the importance of giving is greater than ever in our community,” said Mel Cooper, chair of the Telus Victoria Community Board. editor@saanichnews.com

MAYOR

We will continue to promote a healthy community with parks, trails and recreation for all ages while making a genuine commitment to housing affordability. We will work for a sustainable community with a more balanced transportation network and continue to upgrade water, sewer and sidewalk facilities. And we pledge to hold the line on expenditures and ensure our community plans are respected.

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A14 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH

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SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011  SAANICH

www.saanichnews.com • A15

www.saanichnews.com • A15

Pennies help homeless youth Natalie North News staff

One out of every two kids who turn 19 under protection from the Ministry of Children and Family Development will end up homeless within two years. The stark statistic is one of the driving forces behind the work of the Threshold Housing Society, one of the local organizations selected to benefit from Pennies for Presents, Black Press’s annual charity drive. “In Victoria youth housing is in a bit of a crisis because there’s so little of it and the need is so high,” said Mark Muldoon, executive director of the society which provides transitional housing for youth. Recent counts estimate between 250 and 300 youth live homeless in downtown Victoria. “It’s a crisis situation in the core,” he added. The society runs two houses, one for boys and one for girls, each equipped to house four youth between the ages of 16 and 21. Residents attend school or other day programs during their stay, which generally spans from six months to one year. All youth receive life skills training while staff work with them toward securing safe and permanent housing. The society has housed approximately 400 kids over the last 20 years. “We deal with kids with a little motivation who can’t go home because they have no home to go to and understand that they need to start building a life and working toward self-reliance and self-sufficiency,” Muldoon said. At one time the society received the majority of its referrals from the Ministry of Children and Family Development, which meant youth moved into the houses with some funding from the province – enough to cover the cost of food. Currently, the majority of the residents are either self-referred or come via referrals from school counsellors, a change that has cost the society a vital

portion of its funding. With the need for staff supervision, costof-living increases and dwindling community donations, the society has few funds left to cover capital costs, such as maintaining computer resources and appliances in the homes. The challenge of operating housing for youth is much different from that of Muldoon’s previous work in adult corrections transitional housing, and one he’s driven to tackle. “I want to keep kids out of that system at any cost, because in my mind the criminal justice system does more harm than good,” he said. An integral part of that equation is keeping the number of residents in each house low and investing time in self-

esteem-building and reconnecting youth with their families. “The majority of the kids are just wonderful,” Muldoon said. “They’re very dear souls, but they do have problems. They have deep wounds that need healing, but every piece of research says that you have to work with prevention, not the quick fix.” The Threshold Housing Society is one of five organizations supported by businesses, schoolchildren and readers of the Victoria News, Saanich News, Oak Bay News, Goldstream News Gazette, Victoria News Daily and Monday Magazine in a campaign which has generated about $618,000 since its inception 15 years ago. nnorth@saanichnews.com

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Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH

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www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com •• A17 A17

SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday,November November16, 16,2011 2011 

Family law overhauled for more modern times Tom Fletcher Black Press

The B.C. government has introduced sweeping changes to family law, to reflect modern trends from test-tube babies to the rising number of commonlaw relationships. B.C. now has three times the number of couples moving in together as are getting married, and those common-law relationships are more likely to break up. The legislation treats those similar to a marriage, in caring for children and division of assets. The new Family Law Act is designed to encourage out-ofcourt settlements in family breakups, which account for about one fourth of all cases in B.C. courts. It does away with the terms “custody” and “access” and emphasizes parental responsibility and guardianship instead, with new penalties for parents who refuse to provide parenting time or fail to spend time with children as agreed or ordered by a judge. The act also creates a new protection order for cases involving family violence, with any breach of the order treated as a criminal offence. Tracy Porteous, executive director of the Ending Violence Association of B.C., said civil protection orders under the Family Relations Act are not taken seriously by police or coordinated with criminal investigations. Domestic violence cases are the second largest category of criminal charges in B.C. behind impaired driving. “Hopefully, under this

legislation, [judges] are not going to arrange to have someone who’s threatening to kill the mother to have custody of the child,” Porteous said. Eugene Raponi, a family lawyer and mediator in Victoria, said common-law spouses currently have a difficult process to divide assets if they split up. The new legislation exempts inherited assets from settlements, and whether the couple is married or not, it calls for even division of assets accumulated while they are together.

It also protects voluntary agreements from being overturned by a judge, and provides for mediation and arbitration to reach agreements. “I like to say if it costs as much to get divorced as it did to get married, you’re doing well, and I think a mediation can accomplish that goal,” Raponi said. The new law clarifies legal status for children where sperm or egg donors are used. An “intent to parent” definition ensures donors do not have legal standing as parents. editor@saanichnews.com

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A16 •• www.saanichnews.com www.oakbaynews.com A18

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 --SAANICH OAK BAY NEWS NEWS

THE ARTS

Hot ticket: Musica Latina Selecta CD release party, St. Mary the Virgin Church, Nov. 26

Violinist Pablo Diemcke plays a special concert to release his latest album at 2:30 p.m. Tickets, $25 through the McPherson box office, Ivy’s Bookstore or Cadboro Bay Books.

Ode to Samuel Beckett throws away script Sam Van Schie News staff

Usually actors use improv for warmup exercises before practising their scripts. But the Paper Street Theatre company does the opposite. To prepare for their latest show, An Improvised Samuel Beckett, five local improvisers read Beckett’s scripts in rehearsals then threw away the lines to create a completely new, improvised play live on stage. “We try to create a play that’s like something Beckett would have written himself,” artistic director Dave Morris explained. “This isn’t a parody of his work, it’s a homage.” Beckett, who died in 1989, is best known for penning Waiting for Godot and Krapp’s Last Tape. He was among the European playwrights who pioneered theatre of the absurd, a genre that defined hopelessness, where characters realize the world has no meaning and they’re stuck in an endless routine. It may sound depressing, but Morris promises the show will at least be funnier than the group’s inaugural offering, An Improvised Tennessee Williams, which they performed last summer based on the writer of Streetcar Named Desire. “If you like dark humour, you’ll get some

laughs from the show,” Morris said. The cast – which includes Morris, Missie Peters, Chris Gabel, Scott Thompson and Byron Kjeldsen – wear overcoats and bowler hats to get into character. They’ve all studied Beckett’s style and where he got his inspiration. On stage, the characters adopt Beckett’s bleak outlook on life. They use physical comedy in place of words, and when they do speak it’s in quick sentences, offering sullen insight into the human condition. It’s not what you expect to see when you go to an improv show. “Usually improv focuses on narrative and storytelling, and making people laugh,” Morris said. “With Beckett, he creates these dark worlds where nothing happens, and there’s not a lot of dialogue.” Morris says he wants to challenge himself and his fellow improvisers with works outside their usual style. “We want to create improv that feels like theatre,” he said. “Our goal is to make the audience forget we’re improvising.” So, why not just work from a script? “Because I’d get bored,” Morris said. “With script work you only really get to be creative in the early stages of rehearsals and then it’s always the same. With improv we’re creating something new every night.

Steve Orr photo

Characters discover the meaninglessness of life in the black humour production, An Improvised Samuel Beckett, at Intrepid Theatre starting tomorrow. No two shows are ever the same.” An Improvised Samuel Beckett runs Nov. 17 and 18, 8 p.m., at the Intrepid Theatre,

1609 Blanshard St. Tickets are $12 at the door. reporter@goldstreamgazette.com

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Bell Performing Arts Centre 6250 144 St., Surrey 604 507 6355

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www.oakbaynews.com • A17 www.saanichnews.com • A19

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 16, 2011 SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, November 16, 2011 

ARTS LISTINGS IN BRIEF

Sierra Club hosts hosts launch for rainforest book

Sierra Club B.C. presents a book launch for Nowhere Else on Earth: Standing Tall for the Great Bear Rainforest by Caitlyn Vernon (Orca Book Publishers, 2011). The event takes place at Solstice Café, 529 Pandora Avenue on Nov. 17 at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m.

Film night presents Cultures of Resistance

Victoria Friends of Cuba is screening a film called Cultures of Resistance, which explores how creative action contributes to conflict prevention and resolution. It highlights the work of artists, musicians and dancers throughout the world who are working for peace and justice. It takes place at 7 p.m., Nov. 17, at 2994 Douglas St. in the BCGEU Hall. Admission by donation. For more info: http://www.victoriacubafud.wordpress.com.

Stars sought in singing competition

The finale of Island Star Search is fast approaching. The singing competition, which hopes to build on the success of last year’s ReMax Victoria Idol, doubles as a fundraiser for Community Living Victoria. One last preliminary round remains before next month’s semifinals. The third and final preliminary round goes Nov. 20 at Hermann’s Jazz Club, 753 View St. Two previous prelims were held on Nov. 6 and 8. The top 20 singers from those three rounds will advance to the semi-finals, set for Dec. 11 and 15 at Metro Studio, 1411 Quadra St. The finale will be held on Jan. 23 at the McPherson Playhouse. Tickets for the final preliminary round and the two semifinals cost $11, and can be purchased at Long & McQuade on Hillside Avenue or online at www.islandstarsearch. com. editor@oakbaynews.com

Valerie Jodoin Keaton photo

Bedouin Soundclash plays Victoria Fresh off a world tour in support of their latest album, Juno award-winning trio Bedouin Soundclash is headed for Victoria. The group plays Club 9One9 (919 Douglas St.) at 7 p.m. Dec. 2. Tickets are $24, available at www.bedouinsoundclash.com.

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at 7 p.m. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for students and seniors. Workshops are scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday (Nov. 19) at Lambrick, then the showcase concert kicks off at 7 p.m. at Fairfield United Church, 1303 Fairfield Rd. Tickets are $18 or $15 at Ivy’s Bookshop and Hemp and Co.

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A20 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH NEWS Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH NEWS

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A20 • www.saanichnews.com

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www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com ••A21 A21

SAANICH SAANICHNEWS NEWS--Wednesday, Wednesday,November November16, 16,2011 2011

Last week on the campaign trail Mayoral hopefuls spend last days door-knocking Natalie North News staff

Even in the age of social media, with politicians rallying for followers on Twitter and Facebook, some things are better done the old fashioned way. With only a few days left before Saturday’s municipal election, Saanich’s two mayoral candidates – incumbent Frank Leonard and challenger, former Saanich South MLA David Cubberley – have taken to the streets to meet the people they’re hoping to serve. “It’s pretty low-tech campaigning, but it’s the part I enjoy the most: talking to the people I work for,” said Leonard, who has kept up with his full-time mayoral duties around a daily canvassing schedule. Leonard calls the election a performance review – one that hasn’t dealt him any surprises as he continues to talk to residents about their top issues. “Our municipality really is a community-up organization. We

really do focus on community where I’ve been,” Leonard said. consultation on everything we’re “It’s a big municipality, so it doing and we don’t make deci- makes you feel humble when you sions without community input,” mark down where you’ve been he said. “We have a pretty good and how much more you’ve got to do.” idea of what folks are thinking.” Like Leonard, Cubberley is focusing his efforts on the tradi- Candidate calls for tional means of garnering votes: knocking on doors and erecting amalgamation talk signs – activities that, in addiSaanich Council candidate and tion to all-candidates meetings, president of the Gorge Tillicum have the mayoral hopeful feeling Neighbourhood Association Rob good, albeit fairly tired leading Wickson released a proposal to up to the weekend vote. evaluate the regional governance “It’s been long, but it’s ener- structure in Greater Victoria. gizing,” Cubberley said. On Monday, Wickson “Contact with people is issued his plan to look good, because there are at how well regional lots of issues and it’s police, fire, transporinteresting to engage tation and land develpeople in conversation opment are currently about what we can do.” Nov. 19, 2011 planned. Cubberley identifies “Everyone gets speeding and cut-through traffic scared off when you use the ‘A’ in residential areas as concerns word (for amalgamation). Well voiced by residents he’s come I said, ‘Let’s start up the conacross while canvassing. versation,’” Wickson said, call“The doorstep gives you a real ing out mayoral candidates for barometer for what’s top of mind avoiding the topic. “Why are we for people,” he added. afraid to have a conversation Both candidates plan to con- about the governance structure tinue door-knocking across in our community, whether it Saanich until the polls open on needs to be revisited or whether Nov. 19. or not it needs to be adjusted in “We’ve got our map and I’ve some way?” got a highlighter pen to show nnorth@saanichnews.com

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Heals Range is located west of the junction of Willis Point Road and Wallace Drive, in Saanich, BC. The coordinates are 48° 32’ 40” North, 123° 27’ 00” West.

Le champ de tir Heals est situé à l’ouest de la jonction du chemin Willis Point et Wallace Drive, à Saanich, CB. Les coordonnées sont 48° 32’ 40” Nord, 123° 27’ 00” Ouest.

Bilingual signposts indicating that there is to be no trespassing mark the area.

Des affiches bilingues interdisant l’accès indiquent les endroits interdits.

STRAY AMMUNITION AND EXPLOSIVE OBJECTS Bombs, grenades, shells and similar explosive objects are a hazard to life and limb. Do not pick up or retain objects as souvenirs. If you have found or have in your possession any object, which you believe to be an explosive, notify your local police and arrangements will be made to dispose of it. No unauthorized person may enter this area and trespassing is prohibited. BY ORDER Base Commander Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt

MUNITIONS ET EXPLOSIFS PERDUS Les bombes, grenades, obus et autres objets explosifs similaires posent des risques de blessures et de perte de vie. Ne ramassez pas ces objets et ne les gardez pas comme souvenirs. Si vous avez trouvé ou si vous en avez en votre possession un objet que vous croyez être un explosif, signalez-le à la police locale qui prendra les mesures nécessaires pour l’éliminer.

Entrée interdite aux personnes non autorisées. PAR ORDRE DU Commandant Base des Forces Canadiennes Esquimalt


A22 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH

A22 • www.saanichnews.com

Difficulty breathing? You may have COPD (includes chronic bronchitis & emphysema), a chronic lung disease that all too often goes undiagnosed. Smokers and ex-smokers over 40 are at greatest risk.

Metal theft law targets scrap dealers Police hope proposed legislation deters theft Ryan Flaherty News staff

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Saanich Police are hoping that new legislation proposed by the provincial government will help curb a growing criminal problem in the Capital Region. Metal thefts are on the rise, thanks in part to the high value of materials such as copper and aluminum. Phone lines, which are made with copper wire, are among the more popular targets, but increasingly police are seeing other materials being taken. “We saw one case where there was a break-in and a number of brass fittings were stolen,� said Saanich police Sgt. Dean Jantzen. “That’s exactly the type of thing this legislation could help deal with.� Saanich Police have handled 15 cases this year in which metal products were the primary target. That’s up from just five a year ago. The problem with metal thefts, said Jantzen, is that they can create a nuisance -- and potentially a serious risk -for the general public. When phone lines are damaged by thieves, for example, communication systems are compromised, cutting people

Part of the reason metal products are so attractive to thieves is that they can be sold to scrap dealers with little to no scrutiny, something which the new legislation is aimed at stopping. Under Bill 13, the Metal Dealers and Recyclers Act, scrap dealers will have to keep records of the type and weight of metals they purchase, any distinguishing marks, and where the seller says they got it. That information is to be shared with law enforcement on a daily basis, and the records are to be kept for at least one year. Dealers will also be required to maintain a registry of sellers’ personal information, including their name, address, phone number and date of birth. To protect their privacy, each seller will be assigned a unique code. The only way that their Sharon Tiffin/News staff personal info will be released to Gary Bartlett of Ellice Recycle holds a form police is with a court order. At least one local scrap filled out each time sellers bring in scrap metal dealer welcomes the new legisto the yard. lation. “Most of the things in this off from vital emergency services. “When lines go down, 911 goes down,� (legislation), we already do,� said Gary Bartlett, general manager of Victoriasaid Jantzen. “If all you have is a house based Ellice Recycle. “We already check phone, you can’t dial 911.� IDs, we take pictures, we itemize everyIn another recent case, thieves made thing. To me it’s business as usual.� off with a large number of sewer grates What will change, Bartlett hopes, is from a stretch of the Pat Bay Highway, the public’s perception of the industry. creating a hazardous situation for driveditor@saanichnews.com ers and cyclists.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hope through helping handsâ&#x20AC;? is the theme of an art auction aimed at raising money for a local charity. The auction, in support of Options Pregnancy Counselling and Resource Centre, is slated for Nov. 25, from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m., at Lambrick Park Church. Local artists are donating hope-themed pieces for the auction, which will also feature a cafĂŠ with live music. Admission is free. Options Pregnancy Counselling and Resource Centre provides counselling and support services to individuals dealing with unplanned pregnancy. editor@saanichnews.com

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www.saanichnews.com • A23

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, November 16, 2011 

SPORTS

How to reach us

Travis Paterson

250-381-3633 ext 255 sports@vicnews.com

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IN BRIEF

Vikes XC run to bronze, silver

Stan Gill to be honoured as Mt. Doug celebrates its athletic history Travis Paterson News staff

The names of previous track and field winners are printed too small in the souvenir event program for Stan Gill to read without taking off his glasses. As he scans the categories, his finger picks up the names of Mount Douglas secondary athletes and his memory fills in the rest. From his arrival in 1963 until his retirement in 1997, Gill cultured a track and field renaissance with Mount Doug. The school laid claim to dozens of individual and team provincial championships. On Saturday (Nov. 19), Gill and four other coaches, Earl Hockin (basketball), Dave Barker (soccer) Al Cochrane (football) and Mark Townsend (football) will be recognized at Mount Doug’s sports social and coach honouring, with a no-host bar, part of the school’s 80th anniversary celebrations this month. It takes place in the school’s gymnasium, where Gill’s influence is omnipresent on Mount Doug’s Wall of Champions. As “the only phys ed teacher” at Mount Doug in 1963, which was at the site now known as Cedar Hill middle school, Gill willingly took on the role. He was, however, a little unsuspecting of just what the school would soon accomplish: provincial team championships in 1969, ’70, ’75 and ’76, with second place finishes in 1968, and from 1971 to ’74. “I guess there was some luck. We had some great athletes,” Gill says. “And I usually had helpers (coaching), especially with high jump, long

Photo submitted

Stan Gill, centre, holds Mount Douglas secondary’s city track and field trophy in 1973, with John Satchwell, far left, Debbie Reid, Ronnie Hind and Earnie Carson. Gill credited Hind as possibly the top all around athlete to come out of Mt. Doug as both a track star and elite basketball player with the UVic Vikes. understood the art of straight girls team championships. coaching, says UVic Vikes He is now full time with UVic. “The way it is at Oak Bay is what track and field coach Brent Fougner, who was Mount Doug was like in 1969,” Gill B.C.’s top triple-jumper says. “We had specialists and drew when he graduated from athletes from other sports.” Sharon Tiffin/News staff Saturday’s social is a licensed Stan Gill holds the above photo at Mount Doug in 1975. One of Fougner’s first event, a perfect place to ‘warm up’ Centennial Stadium last week. Gill and four other Mt. Doug coaches are being coaching jobs was to before heading across the street celebrated during Saturday’s sports come back and assist Gill to UVic for Mount Doug Idol with David Foster and Nelly Furtado social at Mt. Doug as part of the school’s in the late 1970s. “Gill got the best out later that evening, said alumni coor80th anniversary celebration. of people. I think back dinator Les Bryan. Like Gill, Earl Hockin and Dave jump and throwing.” on how I coach now and To hear his pupils now, Gill clearly I have to admit, I say ‘How would Barker no longer coach at Mount had a gift and his influence was Stan do this, or, approach this situ- Doug but football program creators Al Cochrane and immediate. In 1966, Stephen Hume ation?’ Mark Townsend was part of a group that “started it “A lot of people will I think back on do. Cochrane and all,” Gill says. say Stan was instruTownsend are the Hume, who is now an author and mental in getting them how I coach now and only currently tenjournalist with the Vancouver Sun to continue compet- I have to admit, I say ured coaches to became the first Islander to crack ing after high school.” Fougner’s part of a ‘How would Stan Gill have been singled the two minute mark in the 880out for the sports vast network of peo- do this?’” yard dash (805 metres). social and coach “Gill was far-sighted and at the ple who were influ– Brent Fougner honouring. The leading edge of training techniques,” enced by Gill. Brent’s Rams made footHume recalls. “He coached me in wife Trish (Wellman) the middle distances but made me was B.C.’s top 1,500m runner in ball history, putting Victoria on the work just as hard at sprints and 1982, and Keith Butler, who coaches map with the junior and senior AA the two-mile as well, which really cross country with Fougner at championships in 2009. Tickets for the the sports social improved my all round fitness. That UVic, was B.C.’s top 1,500m runner and coach honouring are $20 and summer I broke a Canadian junior in 1980. Because of Butler, Oak Bay High are available from mountdougarecord in the 1,500 metre steeplechase the first time I ever ran the has been the province’s biggest lumni.com. The event runs from event, entirely due to Gill’s coach- and strongest team, winning six of from 3 to 6 p.m. in the gymnasium. the past seven combined boys and No one under 19 permitted. ing.” sports@vicnews.com Science wasn’t half of it, as Gill girls team trophies, including nine

Victoria rowers prevail at nationals championships Victoria’s Patricia Obee continued her strong season winning both the under-23 and the women’s open lightweight single at the RBC National Rowing Championships in Welland, Ont., over the weekend. Obee bettered second place Lindsay Jennerich and 2008 Olympic bronze medalist Tracy Cameron in third. Obee and Jennerich recently won silver in the double at the 2011 Worlds. “It’s really motivating for the next year,” said Obee. At 20-years-old, Obee is one of the young-

est team members entering the Olympic training camp. Victoria’s David Calder paired with 2008 Olympic silver medal partner Scott Frandsen of Kelowna to win the men’s pair. In the lightweight men’s pair, Eric Woelfl of St. Catharines, Ont., paired with Derek Vinge of Saanich to edge brothers Ben and Jacob Cushnie. “It’s been fun rowing with Eric (who was a Pan Am team mate),” said Vinge.

“There was a big tailwind, so we’re hoping for a fast time, but it was windier than we thought. We caught a lot of the tops of the waves, but we finished, and then had a little bit of a flip.” The lightweight pair were removed safely from the waterway. Performances at the national rowing championships are a factor in determining the Olympic training camp and to determine future training camps and teams. sports@vicnews.com

A rookie effort propelled the UVic’s Vikes women’s team to silver the men’s team to bronze at the 2011 CIS cross country championships in Quebec City on Nov. 12. Conditions were snowy and cold but couldn’t slow Vikes first-year Ellen Pennock (Calgary) to third in the country on the women’s five-kilometre course. The result earned Pennock CIS honours as rookie of the year and, along with fifth-place Stephanie Trenholm (Campbell River), a spot on the CIS all-Canadian first team. Fifth-year veteran Laura Mitic finished 12th to earn second team allCanadian honours. UVic’s Grace Annear was 35th and Shauna McInnis was 36th as the UVic’s women’s team finished second behind only Guelph. It’s also a Canada West conference championship for the Vikes women, who swept that podium. The same goes for the Vikes men who finished third nationally, and first in Canada West. Second-year Dylan Haight was eighth and captain Cliff Childs ninth on the national ranking, as both are second team all-Canadians. Rookies Ryan Cassidy (15th) and Jackson Bocksnick (27th) came in next for the Vikes, with thirdyear Josh Clouthier in 29th out of 134 runners on the 10-km course. Vikes coaches Keith Butler and Brent Fougner both won coach of the year for their team’s success, Butler with the men and Fougner with the women.

Cougars iced over by Glacier Kings

The Victoria Cougars have a chance to exact revenge on the Comox Valley Glacier Kings after losing 6-3 on Nov. 11. Ryan Chan, Robert Zadra and Brody Coulter scored for the Cougars (15-3-1) in the loss. Comox visit Archie Browning Sports Centre, 7:15 p.m. on Thursday, (Nov. 17). Saanich Braves host Campbell River tonight (Nov. 16), 7:30 p.m. at George Pearkes arena.


A24 â&#x20AC;˘ www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 16, 2011 - SAANICH

NEWS


SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, November 16, 2011 

www.saanichnews.com â&#x20AC;˘ A25


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NEWS


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A28 •• www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com A28

CIVIC OTE Nov. 19, 2011

Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011 -- SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS Wednesday,

Board of education candidates The Victoria Confederation of Parent Advisory Councils asked the 16 candidates vying for seats as Greater Victoria school district trustees: “What potential improvements to the education system are you most passionate about and what specific actions would you undertake to implement them if you are elected?” Here are their responses, edited for length. See full responses to this question at Saanichnews.com. * indicates incumbent CATHERINE ALPHA* I am most passionate about funding for students with special needs that meets the real cost of giving these children equitable access to a quality education. Bev Horsman and I moved a motion that set up the needs budget committee of the board. Part of the work being done by this committee is to advocate for funding to fully support the learning of students with special needs. I work with these students and I know the challenges they face every day.

DIANE MCNALLY I want to see Reading Recovery continue and be implemented in every K-5 school. I want a return to previous funding levels for the learning needs of students, as well as a return to specific funding for students identified as learning-disabled in any way. Parents and school staff need a detailed line-by-line budget for every school, and need details of staffing for students with special needs. I want more teachers and education assistants, and fewer iPads.

DAVID BRATZER I am passionate about evidence-based student drug education. Unfortunately, the district policy on substance abuse is so old it still references the Narcotics Control Act (a federal law that was repealed in the mid-1990s). Students are getting suspended based on a law that does not exist anymore. Updating the district policy on substance abuse may be one of the best ways to improve student health and safety.

DEBORAH NOHR Certainly the underfunding of public education is the very first priority. I will commit on a variety of fronts to raise public awareness about the impact of underfunding for every child and the absolute necessity of changing the funding formulas. Re-engaging parents and the public with trustees in a respectful manner is another top priority. It is only possible to do our best creative problem-solving in the context of a positive, respectful engaging, discussion with one another.

TOM FERRIS* The most important improvement to the K-12 education system is in the area of improvements to literacy and numeracy from kindergarten to Grade 3. More support in the classroom is needed where there is a great diversity of learning needs. The board needs to continue to emphasize the importance of success for our early learners when meeting with the minister, with ministry staff, with parent groups and with fellow trustees around the province.

PEG ORCHERTON* I am passionate about the needs of all of our students. Proper resources are necessary in classrooms on a full-time basis in order that each and every one of our children have the opportunity to maximize their opportunities. It has been a longtime dream of mine that every child has an individualized education program as they are all special. While I recognize this as a costly endeavour I believe it will pay off for society in the long term.

JIM HOLLAND*

ROB PAYNTER For me any issue in the education system must be viewed through the lens of students’ needs. The most glaring issue facing our public school system is chronic underfunding combined with downloading of costs and the imposition of new charges. As your trustee I will be tireless in pursuing a provincial budget allocation based upon a ground-up needs assessment that begins with determining the resources needed to support student success.

BEV HORSMAN* I’m passionate about many changes. I would like to see more support for children with special needs so they have an equal opportunity to succeed. I intend to advocate for full funding for the outcome of the teachers’ contract. I would like to work on the establishment of a co-op education agreement between our aboriginal education department and Camosun’s Access Aboriginal Education and Community Connections department to help improve the grad rate.

DAVE PITRE* I have very strong beliefs about the way we work with one another. I seek the opportunity for collaboration, solution-oriented work and peaceful problem solving. I believe trust is a fundamental element. I believe the government must engage trustees as partners in the governance of the public school system. I will urge our board to take advantage of our proximity to the legislature and continue the dialogue with the education minister.

ELAINE LEONARD* Everyone associated with the public school system agrees on one thing: the funding formula needs a drastic overhaul. In order to optimize the learning for all students, supports need to be in place each and every day. We need stable funding we can count on to improve our methods and delivery. The board has started a dialogue with the province about how we see the new funding model being developed. I would like to be at the table to continue that discussion.

DAVID RAND I really believe the time has come in B.C. for a “white paper” on education. I will pursue and advocate this until the minister of education agrees, or gets sick of looking at me.

EDITH LORING-KUHANGA I believe we need to fix the funding formula as it is not working. This includes the formula for students with special needs. We need to address class size and composition since it affects all students in the classroom. Aboriginal students continue to face racism, low expectations and low graduation rates. I have already started discussions with aboriginal parents and will continue to meet with them to determine how we can improve attitudes and retention.

RICHARD STERN I am most passionate about education funding. It seems to me discriminatory practices, including class size and composition regulations, are stop-gap measures to compensate for a lack of adequate human resources. We would not be arguing over how many students with designations were in each classroom if the resources were there. My primary goal will be to advocate more professional educators in schools, and more accessible training for instructors.

MICHAEL MCEVOY* Our graduation rates are good but not nearly good enough. We are not realizing the talent and potential of too many students. My passion as school trustee is to engage more students in learning by broadening their choices. We have excellent sports academies, serving the passions of many children that keep them connected to school. We could widen this approach to encompass more technically focused programs that take our career prep programs to a higher level.

JOHN YOUNG* I would eliminate the use of the letter grade F, indicating failure, from the entire system. There is no satifactory explanation, or definition, of what the letter grade F means. According to existing regulations, the letter grade F means a mark of less than 50 per cent, which means failure. There is no logic in this type of marking system that does not distinguish the subtle differences between student knowledge at the pass level (50 per cent), and the fail level (49 per cent).

Response not provided.


www.saanichnews.com •• A29 A29 www.saanichnews.com

SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 16, 16, 2011 2011  SAANICH

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Trustee candidates warned to stay away from schools people present agreed to abide by the policy as written, a handful of the trustee hopefuls took issue with being asked not to campaign on public property near the schools. David Bratzer was the first to openly admit to approaching parents near school grounds, for which he was met by a round

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for their commitment to uphold the policy – as well as the “spirit of the policy” – by not campaigning adjacent to the boundaries of school campuses. Candidates had a chance to respond the following evening during an all candidates meeting. While all 15

of applause from an otherwise tranquil audience of around 25 spectators. “I understand how important it is to follow the law and any policies that have been put in place, but this is a public sidewalk we’re talking about and it’s a fundamental Canadian value to be able to participate in an election

campaign on a public sidewalk,” Bratzer said. “People in countries all over the world are envious of these rights and freedoms that we have.” Deborah Nohr argued that parents have been very excited to meet candidates in this environment and offer feedback. “Previously the sit-

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ting trustees have done very little campaigning and have relied on name recognition,” Nohr said, admitting she has campaigned near Arbutus middle school, along with candidates Edith Loring-Kuhanga and Rob Paynter. “We are very, very concerned about a stagnation and a reluctance to engage with the parents at a school level.” Board chair Tom Ferris said the policy had been in the works for some time following the 2008 election. “People wanted to keep the politics out of the schools and away from children,” Ferris said. nnorth@saanichnews.com

2008 numbers ■ Peg Orcherton: 16,628 votes ■ Bev Horsman: 15,360 ■ Elaine Leonard: 14,493 ■ John Young: 13,048 ■ Jim Holland: 12,303 ■ Michael McEvoy: 12,147 ■ Tom Ferris: 11,891 ■ Dave Pitre: 11,145 ■ Catherine Alpha: 10,828

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MAIL-IN BALLOTS A BUST Plan to replace mobile polling stations at seniors homes hasn’t worked the way Saanich hoped. KNOCK KNOCK Mayoral hop...

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