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CONSTRUCTING BEAUTY RYAN R. COLLIER, LEED AP PORTFOLIO 2009


“Atmosphere and affect are aspects that the architect has traditionally maintained the agency controls. In fact, affect is a highly determined feature of architecture, whereas much of the importance ascribed to program is intractable - like sand going through your fingers. The affective dimension of architecture not only influences use; at the level of order it also describes zones of intensity that, while real, nevertheless may be experienced in wildly divergent ways. Program by contrast limits these. As (a) measure of people’s practices, rather than what architecture can do, programming is a drain on freedom, on the possibility for selection, and thus on information.” -Jesse Reiser

“Effects are actions and they emanate from relations. The best effects which architects can produce in the contemporary world are those that are proliferating and moving, effects that are anticipatory, unexpected, climactic, cinematic, time-related, non-linear, surprising, mysterious, compelling, and engaging.” - Ben Van Berkel


TABLE OF CONTENTS PORTFOLIO 2009 01_SWELL 02_URBAN INTERVENTION 03_PAVILLION 04_HAZARD RECOVERY SHELTER COMPETITION 05_THINKERING SPACE 06_EDUCATION AND SENSATION 07_SOLAR ARTICULATION/SURFACE AGGREGATION 07_CV


SWELL

DIGITAL FABRICATION STUDIO SUMMER 2009 Professor Gabriel Esquivel Ryan R. Collier – Project Manager Jeremy A. Harper | Nick Cignac | Matt Richardson | Todd Christensen | Mitch S. Rocheleau | Chris Gassaway “Life is nothing but instability and disequilibrium... a swelling tumult continuously on the verge of explosion.” ~ Georges Bataille “Swell” emerged from the posture of presenting an argument emerging from architecture itself. Is it possible to talk about architecture from its own discourse? This project fits within the continuum of architecture through references from works of the classicists to early modernists. A significant part of the research revolved around the discussion of classical ornamentation: a layer of architecturalization that was perhaps best articulated by the early modernist Louis Sullivan as seen in his intricate, highly articulated Guaranty Bank corner to cornice detailing. Not unlike the Baroque, there is a sense of levitation and anticipation – a feeling that the swell condition will either a) cause the entire beam to ultimately invade the floor and spread as a viscous fluid, or b) explode under the pressure of the aforementioned systems. Ironically, although the swell condition creates the illusion of weight, the project is - because of geometry, castellation, and material studies - quite the opposite. Furthermore, the form can be understood as an exaggerated moment diagram, as if the weight of the interior is causing deformation about the middle of beam. This project addresses a classic architectural problem of the column/beam or more literally the corner/beam condition, a swelling condition in this case. The space includes a logic of ornamentation through aggregation of apertures and voids about the surface. To the benefit of the whole, two subservient (submissive) systems work concurrently, interdependently to erect an affect of Swell. Arguably, the one system without the other would be beautiful, but without any sense of abjection. Abject then is the state in which the object begins merging with the subject, literally dissolving the boundary between the two; the abject replaces the object. As the two systems invade the other and create such interaction, the composite condition begins to swell under pressures, literally ripping the surface: apertures graze the surface where there were none. The micro condition of the porous appears taut via stretching of certain geometries, ultimately achieving a high porosity the swelling turning into poché. This poché is the condition of the surface against the softbodies, a system beginning to distend: an infinite cleavage, a condition of invaded interstitial spaces. The interstitial space, implied or contained is interpreted as a suppression of the paradox of physics and metaphysics of space that aims for an argument of desire, or that of the seductive void. The void then can assume various shapes/relations. The question is whether or not the void is understood as a condition of interiority or exteriority. Our subjective affiliation to the project could be explained as the classic repression exercised by the superego, exposing another way to look at it in terms of the “other,” in which otherness is present within the subject: a condition of abjection. “The interiority of exteriority is not understood until the internalization of absolute alterity disrupts the self conscious subject by revealing the presence/absence of an unconsciousness that can never fully enter consciousness”. Since the outside is always inside, the self is, in some sense, forever outside itself. The seductive “within” is not merely a need that can be filled by the possession of an object: the discourse of the other signifies an insatiable desire. “Swelling” is presented as a disruptive condition that argues emotional possibilities, from its sensual and ominous ornamentation to questions whether it is psycho sexual, an explosion, or simply a disruption of the condition of the surface? Project featured on architecture blog SuckerPUNCH and Theoremas.


PROCESS The entire project was designed using Maya, architecturalized in Rhino, and fabricated using a computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling machine. The structure consisted of vorinoi-like castillated ribs guilded with 720 panels, which were then organized using a 3d model for adjacency and a set of construction documenation coupled with alphanumeric code. The interior condition, or softbodies, were planned and placed in reference to certain research. Intenal lighting was designed about the structure and consisted of simple LEDs while external lighting was designed using stage lights with color filters. The project, from design to realization took two weeks and sevearal hundred man hours.


URBAN INTERVENTION FALL 2008

As architects, we look for irregularities in the urban fabric - places of interest - as locations for study. This project proposes an “urban intervention” located between the gross scalar dissonances of campus and suburban landscapes. Despite the shear quantity of space located about the suburban campus, the quality of public space is largely absent. Poche as an urban strategy will be employed in order to contain such an expanse and return it to the subject. To create aggregation which is inherient in the poche, a system was developed to act both perfomatively and affectually Though intense, the invervention is a dual system composed of a beautiful surface and the hyperindexical condition of the column and the figural superstructure. The fluid affect references certain aspects of the Baroque, that being the painterly effect, while the aesthetic references the move from absolute to relative clarity (Wolflinn). In contrast to Modernism (and the Renaissance) the project is not divisible to a kit of parts or collage of building elements, and favors a system of difference and repetition. Affectually, the condition is quite extreme and sublime. The amalgamation of visual anatomical references is rooted in the abject, if not the grotesque. Such affect can be understood as a continuum of works ranging from the Villa d’Este through the recent Fleshology Studio by Diaz-Alanzo and Pincus (http://www.arch.columbia.edu/Studio/Spring2005/Alonso/). Project featured on the architecture blog Theoremas.


SKETCH MODEL The project was developed concurrently: there are two transitional objects and two trajectories which were ultimately blended into one. The first, as seen below, was an investigation into the literal urban condition. The second, as seen on the following page, was a study into the affect of the intervention as developed through iteration and research.


SKETCH MODEL Shown below is the final affectual sketch. Images on the right show my reseach into the phenomenal transparancy as experienced though layering and aggregation.


URBAN POCHÉ The benefit of using pochÊ as an organizing strategy is that it is scale independent and thus the methodlogy is transferable. Figural poche was initally introduced as a way to understand plan, but has been used since in figural landscapes (Villa d’Este) and now as an urban strategy. The master plan to the left is an extreme: a final derivation would include something to this aesthetic but would restrain its existance to need.


Call Main() Sub Main() Dim Dim Dim Dim Dim

strCopyObject, ArrStrGroups, ArrCurveCentroid, strNewCopyObject ArrBoundingBoxCopyObject, ArrBoundingBoxCurve pt1, pt2, pt3, pt4 i dblDistanceCopyObject, dblDistanceCurve, ScalerRatio tio ti t i

strCopyObject = Rhino.GetObject(“Select object to Copy. y.. y. ..” .”) ArrStrGroups = Rhino.GetObjects(“Select objects to scale ale a al l le e to t .. ..” ”) Dim ArrCenterCopyObject ArrCenterCopyObject = ObjectCentroid(strCopyObject) Call Rhino.EnableRedraw(False) For i=0 To Ubound(ArrStrGroups) ArrCurveCentroid = Rhino.CurveAreaCentroid(ArrStrGroups( ps( p ps s( s (i) i) i)) )) ) strNewCopyObject = Rhino.CopyObject(strCopyObject, ArrCe C nte terC terC rCo C pyO yO Ob bj bje j je ject, ect ct, c t Ar ArrCu rCurv rC rve r ve eCen entro en tr tro t roid d(0)) ArrBoundingBoxCopyObject = Rhino.BoundingBox(s strCop pyObject) ArrBoundingBoxCurve = Rhino.BoundingBox(ArrStr rG Gro r roup ps p s( (i) (i i ) pt1 pt2 pt3 pt4

= = = =

Array(ArrCenterCopyObject(0),ArrCenterCo op py pyO yO y Obje b ct t(1) 1),0) ) Array(ArrBoundingBoxCopyObject(0)(0), Ar rrBo rB r Bo B ou ound un und ndin n nding ing ng n gBo Box B o CopyOb y ject t(0 t (0) (0 )(1 (1),0 (1 ),0) Array(ArrCurveCentroid(0)(0), ArrCurveCe en ntr tr roid id d(0) (0 ( 0) 0 )(1) 1),0 1) ,0) 0) 0 ) Array(ArrBoundingBoxCurve(0)(0), ArrBoun nd din in i ng gB gBo Bo oxC xC xCu Cu urv rv ve e(0) 0) )(1) (1 ,0) ,0)

dblDistanceCopyObject = Rhino.Distance(pt1, pt t2) 2) dblDistanceCurve = Rhino.Distance(pt3, pt4) ScalerRatio = abs(dblDistanceCurve*1.5/dblDist tanceCo opy pyO pyO yObje ec ct t) t) Call ScaleFromCentroid(strNewCopyObject,Scaler rRat at a tio) io i o) o Next Call Rhino.EnableRedraw(True) End Sub Function ObjectCentroid(strCopyObject) Dim Dim Dim Dim Dim Dim Dim

arrBBox arrMinCorner arrMaxCorner minX, minY, minZ maxX, maxY, maxZ midX, midY, midZ strCmd

arrBBox = Rhino.BoundingBox(strCopyObject) If IsArray(arrBBox) Then arrMinCorner = arrBBox(0) minX = arrMinCorner(0) minY = arrMinCorner(1) minZ = arrMinCorner(2) arrMaxCorner = arrBBox(6) maxX = arrMaxCorner(0) maxY = arrMaxCorner(1) maxZ = arrMaxCorner(2) midX = (minX+maxX) / 2 midY = (minY+maxY) / 2 midZ = (minZ+maxZ) / 2 End If ObjectCentroid = Array(midX, midY, midZ) End Function


PERSPECTIVE The project achieves its affectural condition (about the entrance or anywhere) through the technique of aggregation. Such aggregation can be understood as part structure, part ornamentation, and completely affectual. The moment itself, as seen here, is not confined to a mere external condition, but ultimately envades the interiority of the building.


DETAIL RENDERING


PAVILLION SUMMER 2005

An iterative experiment in the development of form - action and reaction starting from a seemingly arbitrary point of departure. Meaning was found when applying logic to outcomes. Because of the structural system has been reduced to a single technique, as experieneced by the subject, a phenomenon in which the edge/floor/ceiling blends into a single surface. The wrapping of the surface about the curved edge further deemphasizes the edge condition in favor a continuous, infinate figural shape. Through the manipulation of lighting, surface, and shadow, silhouettes of the structure are then used to create a system of ornamentation which is in constant flux as a condition of the sun. The landscape, upon connecting with the ground (being of two different things), mimics the figrual plan in a simialar aesthetic. Published in TAMU College of Architecture publication, Archive/BED #03.


PROCESS As certain graphical abstractions were generated, the transitional object was borm of the ‘seemingly arbitrary point of departure.’ It was then through a series of abstractions (right) that the project was then formalized.


ORNAMENTATION The condition at the edge: shadows and thier authors blend to create a single condition, blurring ground, wall, and ceiling.


HAZARD RECOVERY SHELTER COMPETITION SPRING 2009 FIRST PRIZE OVERALL

Produced over a five hour period with the aid of another student, this design produces temporary shelther through surface articualtion and aperature. Considerations also include overhang, cross-ventilation, and the ground to human relationship (assuming inclimate weather).


THINKERING SPACE KIOSK SPRING 2009

With the advent of ‘no child left behind’ and the subsequent loss of creativity in standardized American pedagogy, this project seeks to reacquaint children to the act of creativity by the blending of space and surface to create a topological place for digital play. Each metasphere contains an environment which is constantly engaged not only with the subject, but also with the surrounding environments. Consider an fully emersive Google Earth or Spore paradigm which promostes student to media and media to media interaction. Through the blurring of the two, new conditions emerge. As magician and manipulators, subjects are allowed to negociate digital media through physical interaction with the senispheres, or non-regular touch surfaces.


PRELIMINARIES This project was first developed in sketch. Left is a section showing conceptual sensiphere projector locations with enclosure. A sketch of the desired interior affect is seen on the right.


PROGRAM/SURFACE Here one can witness the Roman Colosseum, a solartarium, a western scence, or a fully topological finger painting extravaganza. The surface is ornamented with aperatures based on morphogenic geometries. Geometry wraps the surface, equating a distance to size ratio value for perforation radii.


Option i Explicit li i ‘Script written by Ryan R. Collier and Jeremy A. Harper ‘Script copyrighted by Texas A&M University ‘Script version Monday, February 09, 2009 9:52:34 PM Call Main() Sub Main() ‘select circles ‘find center of circles ‘select curve ‘fi find fi n sho nd h rt r es e t di d stan st ta an nce e from center circle to curve ‘sc cal le ci circ r le l by y a fa f ct c or o of th he distance times a coefficent Dim arrStrCircles Dim StrCurve Dim CircleCenterPoint Dim Distance Dim i Dim D ClosestPoint, dblCrvParam Dim ScaleMult

‘snag snag sn ag som me ci cir rc cle l es a les an nd a SI SINGLE NGLE NG LE cu ur rve e... multiple curves later... arr rrSt rStrC StrCir St rC Circl ir rc cl les es = rhi hino no.ge etobjects(“select circles”,4) StrCu tr rCu Cu urv rve = r rv rh hin ino. .getobject(“select curves”,4)

Ca all Rhino.EnableRedraw(False) For o i=0 To Ubound(arrStrCircles) ‘F ‘ Fin i d t th h he e ce cent n er e point of the current cirle Circ Circ Ci cle leC Ce ent nter r P oi in nt = R nt Rh hin ino.Ci o.C o. Ci ir rc cleCenterPoint(arrStrCircles(i)) cl C ‘Deter ‘D eter et ermi m in ne e the he par aram a et e e er r for or the he poi oint n on the curve for EvaluateCurve dblC db lCrv Crv rvPa Par ra am = Rh R in i o. o C Cu ur rv v veC eCl eC lo os se e est st s tPo Point t(StrCurve,CircleCenterPoint) If IsNull(dblCrvParam) Then Call l Rh Rhin ino.Me in Mess Me sag age eB Bo Box(“ “So omething is missing here...”) End If ‘R Ret tur rn a 3D D p poi oint oi n based on the parameter above Closes Cl e tP t oi o nt n = Rhi h no n .Eva v lu va uat teCurve(StrCurve,dblCrvParam) ‘D De et te er rmi min ne e the he dis sta anc ce fr rom m the e cen ente t r point of the current circle ‘to ‘t o th he closest point on the curve Di D is st tan ance ance ce = R Rhi h no hi n .D .Dis i ta is anc n e( (Cl los sestPoint, CircleCenterPoint) ‘I fou ‘I un nd d th ha at ci at cir irc rcle es wi ith t cen ente ter te r po p in ints t extremely close to the curve ‘res ‘r esu ul lte ted in n a div vis isio ion io n by som omet et thi hing ng g les ss than 1, making the circles ‘sca ‘s sca c al le e to so some meth thin in ng la arg ger r. Add din ng 1 turned out to be insufficient ‘b bec ecause ause au e t the h s he sca c l ca la ar va valu lue w wa as at a or very near 1. By adding 10, ‘anything anything with a distance less than 1 i LOT is reduced in scale by a LOT. If Distanc ce < 1 Then n Sca c le eMu Mult l = (Distance - 1)/(D Dista ance+10) Else e Sca ale le leMult = (Distance - 1)/Di istance e E d If En f

‘G Go ah ahea ea ad an nd sc cale al le t th he ci circ rcle cle les ba base sed on criteria es e ta tabl lished d above, ‘a and d pro oce eed d to the next ci ircle in the e array. C ll Ca l Rhi ino o.Sca .S Sca cale eOb bje ect t(a arr rrSt St S trC r ir i cl c es e (i ( ),Ci ),C ), Ci irc r le eCe ent ter rPo oin nt, t,Ar Ar rra ay( y ScaleMult,Sc Scale Sc eMul lt,Scal leMult)) Next t Call Rhino. .En nable eRe edraw(True) End Sub b


INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE Note the Colosseum on the left and the solartarium on the right.


EDUCATION AND SENSATION SPRING 2009

Architecture for non-linear pedagogical therory (ie Montessori) derives a system of non-linear methodologies which ultimately shaped the logic of the form. The phenomenon of fluids (ie particulate matter) was employed create topological conditions which connect what would typically be the disparate indexical elements of the building. Each particle is a metaphor for thought - as they crash against one another, new conditions emerge that would otherwise be absent: an interdependent condition. Architecture should then reflect the ideology: more linear, standardized, compartmentalized pedagogical programs are best expressed through disparate parts - parts that seemingly work together at some compositional level but really never truly interact; this creates aesthetic but rejects affect. Because the Montessori method is based more on the drive of the individual and not the overall, top-down design of the typical American education program, a different logic is necessary. This project directly references (fluid) architectural precedents such as the Baroque through figual form and the condition of levitation. Such fluidity is best expressed through the juxtaposition between modern skyscraper boxes and the more figural facade of the school. We can understand modernism then as being representational of the high-renaissance - very calculated, calming, and proportional - while this project addresses a new emerging trend in architecture, one that rejects to the tired aesthetic of modernism in favor of affect. The project is situated in Dallas, suspended between Elm Place and Renaissance Tower. The connectivity to public transportation, the proximity to density, and the reclamation of urban interstitial spaces (such as the Wozoko project by MvRdV), as well as the relative proximity to Thanksgiving Square, the West End, and the proposed Trinity Valley project make the site useful to a developing educational program and a viable addition to the urban fabric. It should be noted that at the base of the tower, at the public drop off, there is a no-car zone, a rareity in a dense, downtown environment. Project featured on the architecture blog Theoremas as Education and Sensation.


INTERIOR PERSPECTIVES Includes the Upper Level education room (above) and the Toddler Area (right).


SOLAR ARTICULATION/ SURFACE AGGREGATION SPRING 2009

For this study, I was asked to design a skyscraper who accommodates a system of panelization in which each panel is to be normal to the sun. One could think of these as either solar shades or PV panels. This condition allows for a level of sustainability about tall, topological projects, while still allowing the architect to control form while keeping the surfaces developable. A number of steps went into solving the problem: 1. Planar surfaces where created from the NURBS surface using LIFT Architects Grasshopper Primer. 2. I then divided each panel into a 2x2 grid using U & V values, which yielded 9 points. I then extracted the corner points (1, 3, 7, and 9) and the middle points (5) into two distinct lists, or arrays. Logic Diagram Scan 3. To create surfaces normal to the sun, I used trigonometry based on the vectors between the sun and the center/corner points of the original diagrid pieces. Because the magnitude (length) of the preexisting vectors are known (both to the corners and to the center) as well as the angle between those vectors, a cosine function can be used to determine planar points along the corner vectors. Basically, as long as all end points of all lines draw a perpendicular vector to the existing central point vector, the surface, by definition, will be planar. 4. Once I had the four new corner points, I used a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;surface from four pointsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; component and baked the geometry into Rhino. Because of the parametrics of grasshopper, one can view all possibilities of each panel, the number of panels, change the solar path relative to the building, etc. To find the solar data I used an excellent excel spreadsheet put out by Greg Pelletier through the Washington State Department of Ecology. Additional geometries can be explored which would do the same technique, in aggregation, which would perhaps give more variation to the work.


RYAN RICHARD COLLIER, LEED AP THEPLIANCYEXPERIMENT.BLOGSPOT.COM

RYAN.R.COLLIER@GMAIL.COM 214.226.4423 00201 N COULTER DR BRYAN, TEXAS 77803

WHAT I’M ALL ABOUT MY PRIMARY FIELD OF INTEREST IN ARCHITECTURE IS WITHIN THE REALM OF AFFECT, PRIMARILY AS UNDERSTOOD THROUGH AGGREGATION, EXTREME GEOMETRY, THE SUBLIME & THE BEAUTIFUL. I STRIVE TO WORK WITHIN THE CONTINUUM OF ARCHITECTURE THROUGH A DIALOG BETWEEN THEORY, HISTORY, ECONOMY, SUSTAINABILITY, AND THE SENSATE. I AM PARTICULARLY INTERESTED IN TECHNIQUE AND THE ADVENT OF THE COMPUTER AS A TOOL FOR GEOMETRY CONTROL AND DIGITAL FABRICAITON METHODOLOGIES.


EDUCATION

PUBLICATIONS

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY (PENDING)

2009

“THE GREEN DESIGN FENCE: A SHORT ANALYSIS OF GREEN DESIGN BENEFITS, OR LACK THERE OF” TAMU AXIOM | MARCH 2007

AB INTRA CONFERENCE (STAFF) MEXICO CITY, MEXICO

2009

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

2007

PAVILLION - TAMU ARCHIVE/BED #03 URBAN INTERVENTION - THEORMEMAS BLOG EDUCATION & SENSATION - THEOREMAS BLOG SWELL - SUCKERPUNCH & THEOREMAS BLOG

LEED ACCREDITED PROFESSIONAL

2006

ARCHITECTURE & SEX (PENDING) THROUGH MIT’S ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE THRESHOLD

EXPERIENCE

AFFILIATIONS

GRADUATE ASSISTANT KEVIN GLOWACKI Graphic reproduction and digital representation

2008-2009

CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. Worked with clients, engineers, and support staff to develop construction documents, rendering, general programming, and building information modeling.

2007-2008

BBK ARCHITECTS, INC. Managed small healthcare projects from conception to Construction Administration.

2004-2005

SPY ARCHITECTS & THE APPARATUS (SAAA) 2009 TAMU EMERGING GREEN BUILDERS GRADUATE ADVISOR

2009

TAMU EMERGING GREEN BUILDINGS PRESIDENT AND COFOUNDER

2007

DISTINCTIONS

SKILLS/INTERESTS RHINOCEROUS 3D GRASSHOPPER 3D PANELING TOOLS

DIGITAL FABRICATION AUTODESK MAYA ADOBE PHOTOSHOP

RHINOSCRIPT AUTODESK REVIT AUTODESK AUTOCAD MICROSOFT OFFICE PHOTOGRAPHY

ADOBE INDESIGN CARPENTRY GOOGLE SKETCHUP RENDERING

KATE & HARWOOD K. SMITH 35’ ENDOWED GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP

2009

KATE & HARWOOD K. SMITH 35’ 2009 ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN ARCHITECTURE HAZARD RECOVERY CENTER COMPETITION COLLEGE WIDE - FIRST PRIZE

2009

DISTINGUISHED HONOR ROLL

2004

EAGLE SCOUT AWARD

2003

REFERENCES REFERENCES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.


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Ryan Collier - Graduate Portfolio