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58 Undergraduate Studios 60 Advanced Landscape Architecture 64 Intermediate Landscape Architecture 68 Introduction to Environmental Design 2 72 Introduction to Environmental Design 1

76 Construction & Materials 78 Construction, Implementation, and Practice

82 Communication 84 Design Communication 85 CAD for Landscape Architects 85 Landscape Drawing

86 History & Theory 88 Master’s Thesis / Project

Contents

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People

Year-end faculty retreat, May 2012. Pictured from left to right: Jean Marie Hartman, Dean Cardasis, Brian Osborn, Wolfram Hoefer, Kate John-Alder, Seiko Goto, Nathan Heavers, Rich Bartolone, David Tulloch, Holly Grace Nelson, Laura Lawson

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Department Chair

Holly Grace Nelson Instructor

Laura Lawson Professor and Department Chair

Brian Osborn Instructor

Faculty and Staff Richard Alomar Assistant Professor Richard Bartolone Instructor

Pam Stewart Administrative Assistant and Bookkeeper David Tulloch Associate Professor

Part-time Lecturers

Dean Cardasis Professor and Graduate Program Director

Philippa Brashear

Bruce Crawford Director of Rutgers Gardens

Bryce Carmichael

Luke Drake Research Assistant Frank Gallagher Instructor Seiko Goto Assistant Professor Jean Marie Hartman Associate Professor Kate Higgins Instructor Wolfram Hoefer Associate Professor and Undergraduate Program Director Nathan Heavers Instructor Tobiah Horton Assistant Professor

Jeremiah Bergstrom

Barry Chalofsky Joseph Cherichello Bruce Davies Joan Furlong Wan Soo Im Steve Kristoph Ari Novy Marci Meixler Geza Schenk

Emeritus Faculty Roy DeBoer Emeritus Faculty Member, Design Professor and ASLA Fellow

Kathleen John-Alder Assistant Professor

Bruce Hamilton Emeritus Faculty Member Director Emeritus of RU Gardens

Marcus Knowlton Staff and Part-time Lecturer

Connie Webster Emeritus Faculty Member

Gail McKenzie Secretarial Assistant III

Steve Webster Emeritus Faculty Member

People

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Before becoming a Landscape Architect, David spent several years as an apprentice to master carpenters and stonemasons in Northern New Jersey; working under Eleanor Pedersen, a protégé of Frank Lloyd Wright and the first licensed, female architect in New Jersey.

David W. Reed, RLA, ASLA Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Design (Landscape Architecture Option), Rutgers University (1972) David W. Reed has been a practicing Landscape Architect in California since 1980, and is the founder and principal of the San Diego based firm David Reed Landscape Architects. In his 32 years of experience, David has successfully designed hundreds of compelling projects—imbuing each with a unique sense of place. As Past-President of the American Society of Landscape Architects, San Diego Chapter, David’s contributions to the profession continue to earn wide acclaim within the San Diego community.

The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Jolla, CA (above right), Conrad Prebys Theatre Centre at the Old Globe, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA (below right)

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David earned the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Design from Rutgers University (1972) where he graduated cum laude and was a George Cook Scholar and a teaching assistant. David rode his bicycle over 5,200 miles across the United States in 1974 and re-located permanently to San Diego in 1975.

His early construction experience gave impetus to his firm’s practical approach and valued insights into construction materials and techniques. This focus is especially evident in The Lodge at Torrey Pines in La Jolla, California—a 5-star, Craftsman Style resort hotel & spa with 170 deluxe rooms and suites overlooking the famous Torrey Pines Golf Course and the Pacific Ocean. The landscape at the Lodge pays homage to the California Craftsman style of the early 1900s and emphasizes the use of local materials, simplicity of form, open spaces, and the highest levels of craft. The project was awarded a Grand Orchid award for Outstanding Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Interior Design, and Lighting Design. More recently, David has contributed to several major improvements to San Diego’s world famous Balboa Park, including the design of Conrad Prebys Theatre Centre at the Old Globe. The plaza was designed to improve the sense of arrival from Balboa Park’s Prado and to increase accessibility. The plaza includes an outdoor dining pavilion with granite paving, interlocking pavers and sand-finished concrete in radiating patterns. The plaza space accommodates 1,500 theatergoers during performance intermissions.

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Alumni Profiles

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creation of the PANYNJ Sustainable Infrastructure Guidelines. Ilonka holds a Master of Landscape Architecture from the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University (1976) and a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Design from the College of Agriculture and Environmental Studies at Rutgers University (1973).

Ilonka Angalet, LLA, PP-NJ, LEED AP BD+C, ASLA Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Design (Landscape Architecture Option), Rutgers University (1973) Ilonka Angalet is a licensed Landscape Architect in both New York and New Jersey, a Professional Planner and a LEED Accredited Professional. For the past eight years she has been the Principal Landscape Architect in the Engineering and Architectural Division of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey where she has designed and collaborated on over 110 acres of intertidal wetland mitigation sites and worked on over 50 Port Authority master plans and studies. Her experience includes airport roadway and landscape redevelopment, design criteria for aviation landscapes, design analysis and criteria for establishing and monitoring intertidal wetlands, and landscape and turf management and maintenance studies. Among her numerous publications and studies, in 2011, Ilonka assisted in the

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Ilonka’s interests encompass nearly all things related to the environment and the sciences. Two manifestations of this passion are the Alley Pond Park Wetland Mitigation and the Newark Liberty International P4 Garage Landscaping and Green Infrastructure projects. Both received NJASLA Merit Awards in 1999 and 2006, respectively. Alley Pond Park also received the National Environmental Protection Agency Award in 2000. She describes both projects as harbingers of change for the landscape staff at PANYNJ that place the agency at the leading edge of wetland enhancement and restoration and green infrastructure practice. These efforts have also catapulted landscape architecture within the Port Authority towards a more active participation in the creation of self-certifying sustainable design guidelines and criteria. Today Ilonka’s work largely deals with managing projects and providing support to both in-house staff and consultants. Through her work, she has educated others about alternative sustainable infrastructure as well as new technology and regulations.

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Alley Pond Park Wetland Mitigation Project, Queens, NY (above), Newark Liberty International Airport P4 Parking Garage Landscaping and Green Infrastructure Project, Newark, NJ (below)

Alumni Profiles

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for more than 15 years in the Rutgers Department of Landscape Architecture. He was a teaching assistant during his junior and senior years at Rutgers and has also taught at the University of Georgia and the New York Botanical Garden. He was recently the chair of the ASLA Campus Planning and Design Professional Practice Network and has participated as a professional juror for the SCUP/ AIA-CAE design awards and the NJASLA design awards. His design work has been recognized by the NJASLA and the NJ Parks and Recreation Association.

Lawrence Porter, LLA, ASLA Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Design (Landscape Architecture Option), Rutgers University (1982) Lawrence Porter is a licensed landscape architect in New Jersey and has been the Senior Landscape Architect with Rutgers Facilities Office of University Planning and Development since 2004. He holds a master’s degree in Landscape Architecture and Historic Preservation from the University of Georgia (2000) and a BS in Environmental Planning and Design from Cook College, Rutgers University (1982).

Rutgers University Livingston Campus Under Construction, Piscataway, NJ (above right) Clothier Quad, College Avenue Campus, New Brunswick, NJ (below right)

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Porter started his career with the New Jersey firm of Melillo and Bauer Associates. He was a summer intern during his junior year at Rutgers and then worked at the firm full-time for 4 years. Threequarters of his 30-year career have been focused on various aspects of public practice including positions with the NJ Highway Authority, the Central Park Conservancy, and the Bergen County Department of Parks and Recreation.

Porter’s current work at Rutgers is divided between large-scale master planning and site specific design. He has been intimately involved with the planning of the new Livingston campus in Piscataway and has worked closely with various consultant teams to help deliver a cohesive campus environment and experience. Much of his site-specific work has focused on reclaiming forgotten spaces on the campuses, such as the Clothier Quad on the College Avenue Campus (pictured below right). He has collaborated with a number of Rutgers alumni over the past 8 years including classmates and former students. Lawrence Porter was the recipient of the Rutgers Department of Landscape Architecture Outstanding Alumni award in 2006.

Porter was a full-time instructor for 4 years and a part-time lecturer

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Alumni Profiles

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that was applicable to the history and the culture here in the U.S.. However, the insight into American culture that this profession has provided me through my studies continues to give me interest and determination. I have always wanted to study abroad and to experience the ways of teaching here. The process has been very rewarding. At Rutgers I have been given access to amazing resources to pursue my own unique interests and values. I have been able to improve my communication skills and have built what I hope are long lasting personal connections.

Wanqing Huang Master of Landscape Architecture (2013) LAYER: What led you to pursue a degree in Landscape Architecture? Was your path direct or circuitous? Wanqing Huang: I majored in statistics at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangdong, China. I made a big shift after working for a while and realizing that I wanted to work more closely with people and places. Landscape architecture seemed like a good way to combine my interests in meaningful environments and in making peoples’ lives more lively and relevant. I first took a landscape design class at the NY Botanical Garden while living in New Jersey. The teacher, who was a Rutgers alumna, suggested that I take additional classes at Rutgers. I took the Landscape Drawing class with Holly Nelson before applying to the MLA program. At first I was hesitant because I didn’t know how far I could go in the profession and I worried whether or not I could effectively activate the liberal arts side of me in order to create work

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LAYER: How have your interests in Landscape Architecture changed since you began your study? What has influenced these changes? WH: When I began the study of landscape architecture, I was primarily interested in small scale spaces. Over time, the diversity and vastness of the profession has excited me. I enjoy working on landscapes at a range of scales with a variety of diverse layers and elements. I also enjoy problem solving at different scales and in different contexts. Each studio that I have taken has had a different approach and way of connecting to the landscape and the profession. Now, in my final year of the MLA program, I am working on my thesis project, “Retrofitting the Everyday Landscape of Transportation Centers in New Jersey”. Related to this project, I have been collaborating with an interdisciplinary group of students, including both planners and landscape architects, to participate in the Ed Bacon Student Design Competition (“Intersect: When Transportation Corridors and Cities Collide”). I had the opportunity to meet this group through mutual friends—school has been a great

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place to meet people. I have also had the chance to travel to places that interest me. Although this was hard for me at first, I consider myself an adaptive person and am not afraid of trying something new. It always pays off through new discoveries! LAYER: Where do you see yourself in 5 years in terms of the profession? What goals and aspirations do you have for your professional future? WH: I’d like to continue to work in different places—different cities and countries, to experience a variety of landscapes and working environments. I think it will be advantageous to open more horizons and then come back to apply those experiences and thoughts and to expand on what I have learned. Observation is extremely important for a designer, and this would be very beneficial to my work. I am open to many possibilities.

LAYER: What led you to pursue a degree in Landscape Architecture? Was your path direct or circuitous? Andrew Opt’Hof: I have always been interested in the intersection of culture and nature. Although I completed my bachelor’s in anthropology, I took classes in biology, ecology, and geology. After graduation I took a job in corporate retail apparel merchandising because it appealed to me both creatively (creating new products), and anthropologically (understanding customer choices). I gained invaluable business acumen, but was not fulfilled. It just didn’t fit. I grew up on my grandfather’s farm, and my father was a draftsman

Student Profiles

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Andrew Opt’Hof Master of Landscape Architecture (2014) for an architect. My grandfather taught me to garden and my father to draw, but it was not until I moved to New York City that I spent significant time in a park. I began to understand the enormous impact that landscape design has on the livability of one’s surroundings, especially in a place as dense and urban as New York City. I decided to pursue my interests by taking classes at the New York Botanical Garden in their Landscape Design Certificate program. After a few classes I was hooked, and ready to take the plunge. I applied to Rutgers, and never looked back! LAYER: How have your interests in Landscape Architecture changed since you began your study? What has influenced these changes? AO’H: It was pretty clear to me from the beginning that Landscape Architecture is a wide field, but I don’t think I realized just quite how wide until I really started getting into my studio work. I

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chose Rutgers because I knew that I was interested in ecology. Since Rutgers’ Landscape Architecture program is within the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences I knew that I could count on a rigor around the ecological aspect of my studies. A little more surprising to me is an interest in materiality that I have found recently. Whether it’s model building, construction lectures, or exploring the more evocative qualities of materials in studio, I find myself very intrigued by the materiality of landscape. I think if I can find a way to combine these interests in my thesis work I’ll be very satisfied. LAYER: Where do you see yourself in 5 years in terms of the profession? What goals and aspirations do you have for your professional future? AO’H: It was my experience of urban public open spaces that drew me into landscape architecture, and if possible I’d really like to work on the design of these spaces in the future. I’m currently a TA for the sophomore environmental design studio, and very much enjoying it. In the distant future I could imagine mixing academic work and practice. In 5 years, though, I hope to be happily at a firm. I really enjoy abstract thought exercises, but I know from my previous career experience that I get a lot of satisfaction from seeing work that I’ve been involved with come to fruition. I think it stems from my genuine hope to have tangible positive impacts on the lives of others, and generally just make the world a better place! It might sound a little hokey, but I think Landscape Architecture is all about possibility.

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LAYER: What led you to pursue a degree in Landscape Architecture? Was your path direct or circuitous? Brian Curry: From an early age, I set my sights on landscape architecture. My dad owns a small design-build company in central New Jersey, and as a child I could see no profession I would rather pursue. Admittedly, though, I did not know landscape architecture until I was immersed in the program at Rutgers. I have always been fascinated by the way people interact with their environment, as well as by the design of the threshold between built and “natural” spaces. The chance to influence and define an experience by shaping the earth is a beautiful concept to me. The ability to do so in a way that enhances the health and performance of an ecosystem is even more astounding. Even after graduating, I continue to find new potential for the profession. While I did not exactly know what I was getting into, I cannot see myself as satisfied as I am now with any other degree. LAYER: How have your interests in Landscape Architecture changed since you began your study? What has influenced these changes? BC: My interests in landscape architecture have changed drastically since the beginning of my studies. When I started classes, I was determined to design residential spaces in ways that satisfied both the client and the environment. Through the Rutgers University Landscape Architecture Program, however, I discovered the educational potential of landscape architecture. Throughout the program, I furthered my passion for ecology, and learned how to approach ecological design at a variety of scales. My most recent interest has been in the

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educational and research potential of integrating web-based mobile technologies into site design. The addition of site-specific “layers” of information to a project can greatly augment the experience one has at a finished work. For example, electronic tags and GPS way points can direct one’s attention to important elements of the design, or interesting ecological information. These “layers” are only visible to those who wish to use them. My shift in thinking is largely due to the constantly evolving world around us. Landscape architecture must be a catalyst for innovation, existing in the threshold between art, technology, and ecology. I seek to further this thought, which requires progressive systems thinking and constant adaptability. LAYER: Where do you see yourself in 5 years in terms of the profession? What goals and aspirations do you have for your professional future? BC: It is always so difficult to see into one’s own future, especially in such difficult times. Ideally, in five years, I will be working through the Landscape Architect Registration Exam and on my way to securing a professional license. I would like to work on projects of varying scales and locations, but can see myself focusing on environmental restoration and educational park design. New pushes to establish greenways throughout states, such as the efforts in New York, New Jersey, and North Carolina are of great interest to me. I would love to work on projects concerning habitat linkage and interconnectivity. In terms of professional goals and aspirations, I would like to play a key role in designing greenways and wildlife corridors that connect not only tracts of natural land, but urban environments through

Student Profiles

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Brian Curry Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Design (Landscape Architecture Option) (2012) University Olmsted Scholar paths and trails. I also hope to design urban parks that introduce children to ecological concepts at early ages and instilling in them an appreciation for the world around them. The integration of technology will be of utmost importance in my designs. For me, I believe it is all about the connections I make, both in life, and in landscape architecture.

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eye-opening and challenging. It is nothing like any other type of college career path. In my first two years at Rutgers, my path was circuitous, and even experimental, however, creating a relationship with the faculty helped me to steer myself into a path that I can be proud of. LAYER: How have your interests in Landscape Architecture changed since you began your study? What has influenced these changes?

Maria Torres Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Design (Landscape Architecture Option) (2013) President, NJASLA Student Chapter LAYER: What led you to pursue a degree in Landscape Architecture? Was your path direct or circuitous? Maria Torres: I have always been interested in art and wished to explore further possibilities in a creative career path. Four years ago I would have never imagined being a senior, not to mention the president of the student chapter, here at the Landscape Architecture program. Prior to my first semester at Rutgers I met with my advisor Jean Marie Hartman. As we toured Blake Hall, she pointed out all of the different types of skills that I would learn. As I admired the work on the walls, my first impression, as might be the case with many freshman, was, how could I ever possibly produce work like this? How could I know then what the walls of Blake Hall had in store for me?! The variety of skills that we learn as second year students is

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MT: As my college career has progressed, I have started to develop an interest in community outreach and large-scale design solutions. Some of the biggest influences in this change were my advisors and professors, who have encouraged me to expand my interests within the discipline. The ASLA Student chapter also gives students the opportunity to travel to the National ASLA conferences, which is a great way to meet professionals and to find new possibilities within the field. As a result of these great influences, I became motivated to take a leadership position within the Student NJASLA Chapter. Through the Chapter, I am proud to have initiated a mentorship program that has helped our first year design students to develop better relationships, at a personal and at a professional level, with faculty and older students within the department. My interests in Landscape Architecture have shifted from a desire to work for a small firm on small-scale projects, to wanting to work on much larger scale projects that involve aspects of community development, outreach, and raising environmental awareness. LAYER: Where do you see yourself in 5 years in terms of the profession? What goals and

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aspirations do you have for your professional future? MT: This past summer a fellow student and I traveled to Rio de Janeiro after receiving the Roy DeBoer Travel Prize, which is awarded to students in the department each year. This trip focused on highlighting the different types of neighborhood patterns and urban settlements within the city. The trip has really changed my outlook on the different types of landscapes and communities outside the U.S.. It was great to see different innovative methods of development being used within different cultures. The experience has inspired me to expand my education through a Masters degree in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. I hope to learn more about their urban design strategies, landscape preservation, and overall cultural context.

Student Profiles

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March….I eventually made my way to graduate school in landscape architecture at the University of Massachusetts where I spent the next three years indoors shackled to my drawing table. That was thirty-five years ago. I have managed to get out some since then. LAYER: What are your interests within the field of Landscape Architecture?

Dean Cardasis, FASLA Graduate Program Director and Professor

LAYER: What led you to the field of Landscape Architecture? Was your path to LA direct or circuitous? Dean Cardasis, FASLA: As is the case with many, my path to Landscape Architecture was indirect. After graduating college with a degree in American Literature I joined the ranks of unemployed English majors until I found a job working in a nursery in Neshanic Station, NJ. No, it wasn’t the plants per se; rather it was the experience of being outdoors almost 24-7 from sunrise to sunset, 365 days a year. (Well. It felt like that anyway!) The truth is, this experience of almost constantly being outdoors awakened in me an awareness of the beauty of simple things in the landscape… the lengthening of shadows North of the barn in November; the sharp slap of wind on white plastic flaps between the polyhouses in January; the swelling of buds on the Magnolias in

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DC: As one whose career has been defined by both professional and academic pursuits, my interests in landscape architecture can best be understood generally as the relationship between theory and practice. My professional work has been recognized with some of the country’s highest and most competitive national design awards, such as the American Society of Landscape Architects’ Honor Award for Design; as well as the ASLA’s Classic Award for rehabilitation of an important modern environment. My design work has been exhibited in national galleries; I have curated international design exhibitions exploring the relationship between “green” design and contemporary aesthetics, as well. My professional work has been reviewed in scores of significant journals and books published in the US, Europe and Asia. For my accomplishments in contemporary landscape design I was elected Fellow in the ASLA in 2000. I have supplemented my exploration of practice with an enquiry into modern and contemporary design history, theory and criticism that has resulted in publications, speaking engagements and a range of professional activities. Today, I am widely acknowledged as the leading authority on James

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Rose, an enigmatic leader of the modern revolution in landscape architecture. I have also published on the work and design theory of diverse modern and contemporary designers, from Innocenti and Webel to Roberto Burle Marx, Dan Kiley and Martha Schwartz. This enquiry into modern and contemporary design history and theory has enriched and grounded my creative works, as my creative works have stimulated my thinking and research. What I have learned in exploring the relationship between theory and practice has stimulated my interest in landscape architecture pedagogy. How students learn the essential characteristics of our field remains one of my central interests as a teacher of landscape architecture. Faculty Profiles

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LAYER: What excites you most when you consider the future of Landscape Architecture? DC: The rise of computer technology and the rise in awareness of environmental and social issues through the concept of “sustainability� are creating a revolution in the theory and practice of landscape architecture. In the past, when such powerful cultural shifts have occurred, the design professions changed profoundly. I am eager to witness and participate in the changes already beginning to come to landscape architecture as a result of these major contemporary shifts. In particular I am interested in the aesthetic implications of a sustainable design sensibility.

Suburbia Transformed: Exploring the Aesthetics of Landscape Experience in the Age of Sustainability, International Competition Catalogue Cover, 2012. (Above)

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appreciate landscape in Oregon and in former West-Berlin. That observation led me to reflect on my own ideals and my own design work. This was also the impulse to begin exploring the role of cultural ideas on nature and landscape in the design process in more depth through my doctoral work at Technische Universität München. LAYER: What are your interests within the field of Landscape Architecture?

Wolfram Hoefer, Dr.-Ing. Undergraduate Program Director and Associate Professor LAYER: What led you to the field of Landscape Architecture? Was your path to LA direct or circuitous? Wolfram Hoefer, Dr.-Ing.: You may say my path was rather curvy, although the overall direction was clear for me already in high school. The fascination with gardens, how things grow and shape a space as well as an interest in environmental issues motivated me to start a two-year apprenticeship with a landscaping firm as preparation for an academic degree. When I joined the Landscape Planning program at Technische Universität Berlin, my focus had already shifted to, “I want to save the world”. In the mid-1980s we were very much concerned about the political dimension of the environmental question in the context of a capitalistic economy. Spending a Fulbright year at the University of Oregon opened my mind for the cultural and aesthetic dimension of the field. I observed a significant difference of how people

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WH: Landscapes are meaningful places. I am interested in how these meanings reflect the cultural values of a society, while influencing design approaches within the profession. At the same time, I am interested in how built works of landscape architecture alter public perception of land. The ongoing transformation of Brownfields in New Jersey into post-industrial landscapes provides a large array of examples for my research as well as for my own design work. I am most grateful for the public outreach opportunities here at Rutgers that allow me to test my theoretical thoughts on landscape perception through first hand exposure to the general public while pursuing exciting design explorations with my students. LAYER: What excites you most when you consider the future of Landscape Architecture? WH: There is so much work to do! I am most excited that the relevance of our field is growing. We are at the forefront of mastering the ever-increasing environmental challenges through creative solutions that have an impact even in unexpected places. Each well designed residential garden that is, for example, integrating innovative concepts of stormwater

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management, is improving the built environment. Obvious is the positive impact of the adaptive reuse of abandoned industrial sites that are transformed, through creative design and active community participation, into healthy and meaningful places for neighborhoods that also provide economic benefits.

important elements of the American narrative is enriched through many newcomers in this country, like myself. This will provide ongoing inspiration for creating meaningful urban open spaces and exciting landscapes that will give structure and orientation to suburban sprawl. Landscape Architects are ready to take the lead.

A regional approach, although it is beyond my personal focus, is another major field for the involvement of landscape architects. Environmental planning that directs economic development and land-use in a more sustainable fashion will be of growing importance for the US. Additional exciting challenges are the changing demographics in America. They will have an impact on the perception of landscape by the public at large and will force our field to rethink our traditional ways. The cultural heritage of landscape and nature as

Faculty Profiles

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Voorhees Environmental Park, Voorhees NJ. Transformation of a capped landfill into a 37 acre park including a solar array. (Above)

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Praxis Studios

Students from the ‘Parks for People’ praxis studio present their design ideas to members of the Van Alen Institute and the National Park Service.

During the spring semester of the second year of the MLA curriculum, and the junior and senior years of the undergraduate program, students have the opportunity to select and participate in a Praxis Studio based on their own interest areas and the offerings provided by the faculty.

‘Parks for the People’ was a student competition presented by the Van Alen Institute in partnership with the U.S. National Park Service to reimagine America’s greatest natural and cultural treasures—its national parks. Rutgers Landscape Architecture received one of two Awards of Excellence for their work in the competition.

Praxis Studios focus on project design at various scales, utilizing problems of a wide range of complexity and subject matter. Often, the offerings align with faculty research areas, funded projects, or timely concerns. The offerings are intended to be distinct and are labeled according to broad categories - open space design, service-learning, urban

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design, design/construction – with an openness that allows new categories to emerge in the future. Praxis Studios are vertically integrated; allowing undergraduate and graduate students to work together and to gain from the sharing of a wide range of experiences and skill sets.

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OS SL UD Open Space Studio

Service Learning Studio

Urban Design Studio

Parks for People

Cherry Grove Farm

The Town Gown

Hopewell Furnace National Park

Agricultural Literacy Trail

Easton Avenue Redevelopment

Kate John Alder, studio instructor

Holly Grace Nelson, studio instructor

Jim Constantine & Wolfram Hoefer, studio instructors

DC Design / Construction Rutgers Gardens Pedestrian Bridge Rich Bartolone, studio instructor

Praxis Studios

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A

Open Space Studio Parks for People Hopewell Furnace National Park Kate John Alder, studio instructor

James Bykowski, Kimberly Nuccio, Wanqing Huang, Mukta Jadhav, Denisse Ortiz, Roxanna Demel, Lisa Dieye, Meghna Mirali, Ibrahim Bouzine, Derrek Cowell, Joshua Didriksen, Benjamin Granovsky, Daniel Rounds, Frances Turner A Derrek Cowell B Kim Nuccio C Kim Nuccio, Derrek Cowell with contributions by all students D Mukta Jadhav E Ben Granovsky F Ibrahim Bouzine G,H Shane Umbach, Andrew Opt’Hof H Denisse Ortiz, Daniel Rounds and Josh Didriksen, with contributions by all students I

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Participants in the Open Space Focus Studio earned top honors for their design of the Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site. The work was the result of a nationwide competition administered by the Van Alen Institute and the U.S. National Park Service to re-imagine America’s national parks. Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site is a remarkable historic landscape. With a uniquely preserved Revolutionary War-era iron-making village at its core, the site is set within the stunning Hopewell Big Woods, one of two globally significant forests in the northeastern United States. Hopewell’s challenge was to explore the meaning of this deep forest landscape, and seamlessly connect it to the site’s iron-andsteel history. At the same time, Hopewell sought to expand its

reach in urban population centers beyond park boundaries, sparking excitement for both the site’s ironmaking past as well as what the site can be as part of an integrated ecosystem network today. The landscape designs that comprised the Rutgers proposal invited social interaction and participation by all age groups. The proposal began with an extensive trail system that more fully integrated the site with French Creek State Park and the surrounding Hopewell Big Woods Eco-Preserve. This framework allowed for the immediate development of specific venues, yet remained flexible enough for change. Thus, it enabled the components of the design to be phased over time. The new venues along this route arose from an informed decision-making process that responded to the site’s rich natural, social and cultural history. As such, each intervention worked with present circumstances in order to preserve the past and redefine the future.

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B

C

D

Praxis Studios

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E

F

G, H

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I

Praxis Studios

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little attention to social spaces beyond the homestead and most visual amenities were inadvertent consequences of the fitting of landform to cultivation. Now, agricultural landscapes are used by the public with new intensity in old and new formats including: roadside stands; farm retail markets; CSAs; farm educational facilities; agritourism; etc. Public events/festivals draw people to buy directly from the farmer while more directly connecting the public to their food production source. Two broad roles for landscape architects become clear: spatial design of farm spaces for public interaction and improved agricultural literacy; and design for ecosystems services. How we farm matters. Cherry Grove Farm is a 400-acre sustainable farm that has been in the Hamill family for over 300 years. It is part of 1,000 acre tract of contiguous sustainable farmland, part of which is leased to Cherry Grove Farm CSA and to Z Farm, both of which sell at local regional farmers markets and farm stands.

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550:432 Rutgers University Landscape Architecture: Praxis Studio

The Farm Studio integrates Service Learning Studio Cherry Grove Farm: Agricultural Literacy Trail Trailhead Designstudents from the Rutgers Cherry Grove Farm Science Learning Program and

Agricultural Literacy Trail Holly Grace Nelson, studio instructor

Alexandra Bolinder-Gibsand A,B Christopher Jurgensen C,D,E Justin Acal, Joe Cherichelo, Brian Curry, Alexandra BolinderGibsand, Johnny Ireland, Christopher Jurgensen, Nick Patiro, Chris Perry, Russel Sewekow, Janine St. Jacques, Danny Su F

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What roles can Landscape Architects and science educators play in farm design? How can Landscape Architecture help to facilitate agricultural literacy? The New Jersey agricultural landscape reflects patterns for cultivating and harvesting, as well as ownership patterns, economic realities, and traditions. Traditional patterns reflected

the Landscape Architecture Department to jointly create an educational farm trail system that is incorporated into the public school system’s agriculture curriculum. Students learned about farming by attending the NOFA (Northeast Organic Farming Association) Winter Conference, discussing selected readings (including Dana and Laura Jackson’s The Farm as Natural Habitat) and engaging in guest lectures from Entomology, Environmental Science, and the NJ Agricultural Experiment Station.

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CHERRY GROVE

FARM GROWS

O! MOOO

Farmer Oliver and his crew do not grow many vegetables and do not use a lot of heavy machinery. By relying on energy from the sun instead, he grows pastures where grass fed cows graze the land and produce milk used to make some of the most delicious cheese in the tri-state area. Undoubtedly his unique and low impact style of farming, the care for his animals, and the attention to soil fertility is evident in the high quality product created from proper care of his natural resources.

-Charles Eames

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ese...

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AGRICUL TU RA L

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“Eventually everything connects- people, ideas, objects. The quality of the connections is the key to quality”

The proposal for the ecological farm trailhead is similar in this mentality; it pays attention to local resources and community. The trailhead highlights benefits and limitations while creating an innovative, highly sustainable, and creative design. The community is encouraged to participate and learn by actively engaging in a set of activities to contribute to the farm’s productivity. As visitors approach the farm they are instantly greeted by a permaculture garden and a recycled pallet structure; a view that is only a hint of what is to come upon entering the farm.

CO

The permaculture garden is an instant contrast between industrial agriculture and practices driven by natural and self-sustaining ecosystems. The trailhead design and activities send visitors around the farm and into the woods to gain agricultural and ecological literacy while collecting sticks and materials to weave into the fence.

ITY UN MM

The trailhead provides ample room for groups of all sizes and encourages interaction and agroforestry education by presenting a shared, tactile experience of what it means to be resourceful.

“D “Design is a response to sociall change.” h ”

meet farmer Oliver

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B 550:432 Rutgers University Landscape Architecture: Praxis Studio

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-George Nelson

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Cherry Grove Farm: Agricultural Literacy Trail Trailhead Design

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Cherry Grove Farm: Agricultural Literacy Trail Trailhead Design

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PICNIC AREA

SHADE STRUCTURE

PALLET STRUCTURE

SHADE STRUCTURE

PALLET STRUCTURE

PICNIC AREA

COW BARN PALLET STRUCTURE

PALLET STRUCTURE

TRELLIS

PALLET STRUCTURE

TRAILHEAD

PALLET STRUCTURE

TRELLIS

PALLET STRUCTURE

TRAILHEAD

COW BARN PALLET STRUCTURE

COW BARN PALLET STRUCTURE

SHADE AND PALLET STRUCTURE

550:432 Rutgers University Landscape Architecture: Praxis Studio

PALLET STRUCTURE

Cherry Grove Farm: Agricultural Literacy Trail Trailhead Design

5

COW BARN PALLET STRUCTURE

SHADE AND PALLET STRUCTURE

PALLET STRUCTURE

D 550:432 Rutgers University Landscape Architecture: Praxis Studio

Cherry Grove Farm: Agricultural Literacy Trail Trailhead Design

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A

Urban Design Studio The Town Gown Easton Avenue Redevelopment Strategies Jim Constantine & Wolfram Hoefer, studio instructors

Easton Avenue is a diverse corridor that serves as a major gateway to the City of New Brunswick, Rutgers University, several hospitals, the train station, and the downtown. The street life includes all the attributes of a successful public space: restaurants, shops, and public transportation. So, why is it not a vibrant connector between the City and the University; a place where students, faculty, and the New Brunswick community interact on a daily basis? Instead, Easton Avenue is known for loud bars, cheap food, and rowdy students, and is widely avoided by New Brunswick residents.

Evan Ralph A Baewon Suh B,C Student Name D,F Patrick Lubin E Student Name G,H,I,J

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Lead by a desire to improve the town-gown relationship, the Mayor of New Brunswick and the President of Rutgers University initiated this joint urban design studio engaging both the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy and the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. Students and faculty from the Departments of Urban Planning

and Landscape Architecture developed visions for improving the Town-Gown relationship through redevelopment strategies for Easton Avenue. The study area included a threequarter mile corridor from Wall Street, at the north side of the railroad underpass, to the southern tip of Buccleuch Park at Huntington Street. The scope of the studio was divided into three sequential sections: Discovery, Concepts, and Implementation Plans. Discovery consisted of background research, two and three-dimensional analysis of existing conditions, and stakeholder interviews. Concepts range from large-scale urban design frameworks and transect zones to block level design plans illustrating rehabilitation, infill, and redevelopment. Implementation Plans included strategies for both short term improvements and long term visions showing Urban Design Plans and Design Guidelines for Easton Avenue.

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availability, budget constraints, and project scheduling. Students worked alongside professional contractors who offered guidance in material selection and construction methods and assisted students through the production of Landscape Construction Plans and Details. The schedule for the course was as follows: Week One: Presentation of the problem, program development, evaluation of the site and budget constraints, base map preparation, site inventory and analysis, and presentation of the project opportunities and constraints to the client.

A

Design/Construction Studio Rutgers Gardens Pedestrian Bridge Rich Bartolone, studio instructor

The process of taking a design idea and developing it, documenting it for construction, and constructing it is a truly enriching and rewarding experience. This hands-on, designto-construction course provided an opportunity for Landscape Architecture and Landscape Industry students to approach a real-life project from the initial client meeting through implementation and beyond—including a postconstruction performance evaluation.

Rebecca Cook, Alexandra Duro, Peter Ellis, Ryan Goodstein, Audrey Li, Joseph Lipinski, Christopher Marshall, Suhee Park Jung, Zachary Rohde, Helena Romanowicz, Ari Salant, Frances Turner A, B, C, D, E, F

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This 6-week summer session provided students with an understanding of the relationship between design intent and design realization. Students explored design possibilities through the opportunities and limitations offered by material performance and

Week Two: Preparation of alternate design solutions, presentation of refined designs to the client, selection of preferred design solution, and development of a site master plan. Week Three: Development of construction plans and details for structures, site work, grading, drainage and planting, completion of project timeline and material scheduling, and commencement of in-field site preparation. Week Four: Evaluation of project constructability, cost, and material availability, in-field site clearing, and construction of primary grading and drainage structures. Week Five: Assessment and refinement of the design through value engineering. Week Six: Project construction completed and post construction evaluation and assessment of fulfillment of project goals/budgets conducted.

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Graduate Studios

Students from the Ecological Design Studio walk a project site with experts in Ecology, Hydrology, Entomology and Pest Management. They went on to develop integrated concepts for open space and commercial use at the Voorhees Environmental Park.

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535 534 533 Housing and Open Space Studio

Design of the landscapes in which we reside across multiple scales of community including: private gardens, social gathering spaces, and neighborhoods. Applications include residential site design and community layout.

Regional Design Studio

Ecological Design Studio

Spatial analysis through Geographic Information Systems, visual representation techniques, projections and forecasts, alternative land use scenario construction, and evaluation of land use impacts at multiple scales.

Investigation of ecological principles critical to landscape design and the application of environmental processes as the basis for landscape design.

532 531 Urban / Suburban Design Studio

Landscape Design Fundamentals Studio

Landscape design applied to the design/rehabilitation of the urban/ suburban landscape including: an emphasis on social theory and practice, the role of policy and regulation, and the nature of urban/suburban ecology in making specific design proposals for multipurpose land uses.

Foundational design issues in landscape architecture including: space, form and meaning, context, media, principles of landscape composition, theories of landscape design and examples of recent work. Applications include the design of small-scale public open spaces.

Graduate Studios

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A

Ecological Design Studio Voorhees Environmental Park Wolfram Hoefer, studio instructor

The objective of this studio was to develop an integrated concept for open space, commercial use (solar panels) and storm water management that generates innovative solutions with regard to the existing social, economic, ecological situation and active input by the public and major stakeholders.

Design Process A David Hanrahan B,C James Bykowski B,D James Taranto B,E Kim Nuccio F Denisse Ortiz F,G,I Alisa Stanislaw F,H,J Kevin Perry K,M Kristopher Kemper L,M Baewon Suh M

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The closed landfill on Centennial Boulevard is being transformed into an Environmental Park through a collaboration established between the Township of Voorhees, VECEF, and the Rutgers Center for Urban Environmental Sustainability (CUES). Voorhees Township is working to find a creative solution for funding this new public space and designating a substantial portion of the site to install a solar power array. The financial incentives from the array will support building and maintaining the park. All designs must respect the cap of the closed landfill; it is not considered feasible to disturb the existing cap and grade

changes were only considered possible through the addition of fill. Solar panels and park uses are juxtaposed next to each other. A solar panel array is usually placed in a fenced light industrial area that is not suited for public access. A public park, on the other hand, allows free movement for everybody, providing open spaces for play, social interaction and enjoyment of nature. Developing a meaningful relationship between solar energy production and a public park was a unique challenge for the Rutgers Landscape Architecture graduate students developing conceptual designs for Voorhees Environmental Park. The students formed four groups, each developing a unique design concept. Based on these concepts, each group member developed an individual site design. These designs tested ideas about the conversion of this former brownfield site into publicly usable open space.

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Sp12

Prototypes for Library Open Space

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Prototypes for Library Open Space

Urban/Suburban Design Studio 8 Prototypes for Library Open Space Brian Osborn, studio instructor

Course Poster A Gwen Heerschap B,C,D,E Arianna de Vries F,G,H,I Andrew Opt’Hof J,K,L,M

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In a time when information can be obtained instantaneously and from anywhere, the public library has been made to reinvent itself— less as the physical repository for printed information and more as a center for community interaction. The book, as a physical artifact, remains, and new books arrive at the library daily. However, the primary concern of many librarians has shifted away from the collection of these artifacts and more toward the provision of public programming geared to promote interaction amongst library users. In new library buildings, the thick walls and arching ceilings, once sought-out to protect precious reference collections and to assert the health of the civic institution, have been traded for the warm and inviting atmosphere found in your local Barnes and Noble. In existing libraries, however,

librarians struggle to provide contemporary library services from within their outmoded structures, and the communities that depend on these essential public facilities remain under served. Fortunately, many public libraries, including those in densely populated, highly urban, environments, include small un-or under-used exterior spaces adjacent to the existing structures. This studio will explore the potential for the library to better serve its community through an activation of these exterior spaces. C

12:15 PM

The aim of this studio was to explore the potential of the Public Library to offer broad communityscale benefits through the development and programming of its open spaces (un-or underused exterior spaces owned by the public library).

8prototypes_jacket copy.pdf

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The Newark Public Library provided an opportunity to explore these potentials through a focused look at two of its branch libraries: The Main Branch at 5 Washington Street and the Springfield Branch at 50 Hayes Street. Each of these library branches include exterior spaces, each with unique relationships to the surrounding context and corresponding opportunities for affecting their surrounding communities. Students prepared prototypical strategies for the development of Library Open Space and tested their ideas through an application of these prototypes at each location.

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0. Basic Corridor Condition Of The 0. Basic Corridor Condition Of The 0. Basic Corridor Condition Of The 0. Basic Corridor Condition Of The 0. Basic Corridor Condition Of The

1. Re Routed Corridor By Re weaving through the spa 1. Routedpeople Corridor them to experience the courtyard in By weaving people through the spa them experience the courtyard in 1. Re to Routed Corridor 1. Re Routedpeople Corridor By weaving through the spa By Re weaving people through the spa them to experience the courtyard in 1. Routed Corridor them to experience the courtyard in By weaving people through the spa them to experience the courtyard in

2. Insertion Of Art Collections Due to the weaving circulation thro 2. Insertion Of Art Collections the visitor stop and observe som Due to the to weaving circulation thro possessions. the visitor to stop and observe som 2. Insertion Of Art Collections possessions. 2. Insertion Of Art Collections Due to the weaving circulation thro Due to the to weaving circulation thro the visitor observe som 2. Insertion Ofstop Art and Collections the visitor stop and observe som possessions. Due to the to weaving circulation thro possessions. the visitor to stop and observe som possessions.

C C

B B

C C C

B B B

A A

3. Program Placement Changing circualtion and inser 3. Programthe Placement areas for gathering. Changing the circualtion and inser A: Foyer areas for gathering. 3. Program Placement B: Readingthe Area A: Foyer 3. Program Placement Changing circualtion and inser C: Common Gathering B: Reading Area Changing the circualtionSpace and inser areas for gathering. 3. Program Placement C: Common Gathering Space areas for gathering. A: Foyer Changing the circualtion and inser A: Foyer B: Reading Area areas for gathering. B: Foyer Reading C: CommonArea Gathering Space A: C: Reading CommonArea Gathering Space B: C: Common Gathering Space 4. Planting Beds Planting areas are established from 4. Planting Beds collections, andareprogram. Planting areas established from collections, and 4. Planting Beds program. 4. Planting Beds Planting areas are established from Planting areas established from collections, andareprogram. 4. Planting Beds collections, andareprogram. Planting areas established from collections, and program.

A A A

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2 1 1. Foyer 2. Reading Space 3. Common Gathering Area

Newark Public Library Open Space Exploded Axonometric

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Gwen Heerschap Studio 2 Spring 2012 Brian Osborn

Section A-A

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Section A-A, Looking toward the Main Branch Library

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Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

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3/4” Drain Rock beneath 6” wide Concrete Ftg.

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2”x2” Polished Steel Post; 4”x1” Steel Cuff set with 2”x4” Wooden Rail

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4” Gravel Bed, 2” Sand Bed, Dry-Laid 2”x2’x2’ Basalt Pavers

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Constructed Earthen “Play Hill”, reinforced with Geotextile and planted with turf to control erosion

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Stone Dust

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Climbing Boulders set into hill

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4”x4” Polished Steel Column; Steel I-Beam (4”W x 8”H, 1/2” Web);

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6”H Concrete Edging

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5 1/2” Joists laid with 2”x6” Reclaimed Decking

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Detail Sections of Deck Construction and “Play Hill” Scale: 1/2” = 1’ -0”

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Section B-B, Looking toward Essex Street at the Main Branch

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Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0” 1

WASHINGTON STREET

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Fourth Floor

0%

Percent of Total Space

Thesis: 100%

Figure and Field

A retail approach to spacial layouts starts with a prototypical form and revieces field input to alter it. Starting with a baseline layout figure derived from observational analysis and manipulating it into it’s final nodal form based on field data creates both method and form for a final design.

Operational Diagrams: Book Stacks

Reading Rooms

Periodicals

Gallery

Community Computer Social

Step 2: 0%

Percent of Total Users

100%

rid Analysis

3)

Step 3:

s and percentage out the spacial allocation.

Step 4:

use of each programmed space.

ogram needs to bring it back up to the average

2)

Programatic Needs: Reading Rooms, Light Reading,/Periodicals Computers Social Space

mation outside the bounds of the analysis.

needs and wants to the programmable space.

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Programatic Requests: Event Space Cafe/Lunch Space 4)

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Landscape Design Fundamentals Studio Dean Cardasis, studio instructor

“Space is the constant In all three dimensional design…” -James Rose

Matthew Sudberg A Arianna de Vries B,C,E Andrew Opt’Hof D,E,F

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The goal of Landscape Design Fundamentals is to provide students a framework within which subsequent explorations of landscape design theory and practice can be fruitfully engaged. It is centered upon an examination and exploration of landscape spatial experience. The modes of space and the relationships between pictoral, sculptural, architectural and landscape spatial experiences were examined in relevant readings and discussion in a seminar component. Here, each student researched a particular aspect of landscape space from theorists like Rose, Goldfinger, Volpe, Condon and Heidegger, among others; as well as led a discussion among his or her peers. In design, the nature of landscape space was explored through a systematic series of four physical models in which each of the landscape media—land/ water, plants and structures—was

individually, then collectively, used to shape landscape spatial experience. This was followed by the design of a real, small-scale, campus landscape space. Beginning with modeling land, each student discovered the nature of each landscape spatial medium; its possibilities and limitations. Each model was executed in a particular form (rectilinear, biomorphic, circular or geomorphic) and responded to a given context that was either supportive, unsupportive or a combination. In the course of modeling all the media, each student examined all these forms and contexts; in so doing, they engaged issues of composition, spatial anatomy, scale and proportion, among others. Gradually, diagramming and crosssectional elevations were bridged to model explorations. In the design of the campus space basic issues of site reconnaissance and analysis were engaged, and both crosssections and diagrams, as well as models, were used to develop the spatial experience.

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Undergraduate Studios

Students from Introduction to Environmental Design 1 relax after having completed their first design projects of the semester

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431 331 232 Advanced Landscape Architecture Studio

Intermediate Landscape Architecture Studio

Introduction to Environmental Design 2

Advanced Landscape Architecture theory with application to problems of increasing scope and complexity in social and cultural contexts and with an emphasis on site design for housing and community design.

Analysis and interpretation of the physical environment with an emphasis on methodologies such as GIS, suitability mapping, and visual resource management as applied to land planning, design, and management.

Refinement of design processes and graphic skills through problems including site planning, principles of auto and pedestrian circulation, behavioral aspects of design, and basic landform manipulation.

231

Introduction to Environmental Design 1 Design fundamentals and creativity through design processes including: small-site scale design, graphic skills and techniques, and the impact of environmental design on people and nature.

Undergraduate Studios

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- Complete Assunpink Greenway - Establish recreation fields in green spaces - Build skatepark near new development - Build new commercial/office complex

DEVELOPMENT PHASE THREE

DEVELOPMENT PHASE ONE

10-20 YEAR PERIOD

DEVELOPMENT PHASE ONE

- Begin to establish the green way along Assunpink Creek - Reroute Raul Walenberg Ave. - Remove buildings to make room for new development - Build train station extension for light rail - Turn warehouse into residential loft apartments - Turn East State St. into green street - Establish farmers market in vacant lot

1-5 YEAR PERIOD

- Continue to grow the green way along Assunpink Creek - Build new transit village near train station - Complete promenade with connection to the greenway - Connect green way into existing neighborhoods

DEVELOPMENT PHASE TWO 5-10 YEAR PERIOD

1-5 YEAR PERIOD

- Begin to establish the green way along Assunpink Creek - Reroute Raul Walenberg Ave. - Remove buildings to make room for new development - Build train station extension for light rail - Turn warehouse into residential loft apartments - Turn East State St. into green street - Establish farmers market in vacant lot

- Complete Assunpink Greenway - Establish recreation fields in green spaces - Build skatepark near new development - Build new commercial/office complex

DEVELOPMENT PHASE THREE 10-20 YEAR PERIOD

Advanced Landscape Architecture Studio Transforming Trenton

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New Neighborhoods Center around Trenton Transit Nathan Heavers, studio instructor

- Complete Assunpink Greenway - Establish recreation fields in green spaces - Build skatepark near new development - Build new commercial/office complex

DEVELOPMENT PHASE THREE 10-20 YEAR PERIOD

- Continue to grow the green way along Assunpink Creek - Build new transit village near train station - Complete promenade with connection to the greenway - Connect green way into existing neighborhoods

DEVELOPMENT PHASE TWO 5-10 YEAR PERIOD

Matthew Draheim A,B,C,D,E Brian Curry F,G,H,I,J,K,L

PARKING/ALLEY

section through new development, creek and greenspace

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Like many cities in the United States, Trenton’s manufacturing and industrial jobs declined in PARKING/ALLEY the 1960s and 1970s, creek creating an section through new development, and greenspace economic void. In the middle of these decades, the assassination of Martin Luther King added to the social unrest. These issues and others led to a steady decline in population from a high of 128,000 in 1950 to 85,000 in 2010. Vacancy has become the norm in Trenton, where many residents still face economic difficulties and many homes are uninhabitable. FARMERS MARKET

Trenton is seat of the New Jersey Legislature and the state is the section through farmers market, retail and loft apartments largest employer in the city. Within the downtown Capital District, where the legislature resides, is the Trenton Transit Center, a major area transportation hub on the Northeast Corridor Line. The Trenton Transit Center serves commuters to and from the Capitol District, but it is surrounded by vacant land and not tied to the surrounding NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT communities.

This studio focused on connecting the Trenton Transit Center to the surrounding neighborhoods to NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT PHASE TWO create a center that is more than a commuter hub. The students were asked to design a new network of parks and pedestrian ways for the district and to propose a mix of development that might transform this sleepy area into a thriving neighborhood. The responses were varied and ranged from designs for mid-rise commercial development to intimate low-rise neighborhoods linked to the Assunpink Creek. All PARKING/ALLEY of section the proposals soughtcreek to connect through new development, and greenspace to the Assunpink Greenway, which is adjacent to the Transit Center, and all strove to work with the existing infrastructure as they designed a vibrant new center for the City of Trenton.

- Continue to grow the green way along Assunpink Creek - Build new transit village near train station - Complete promenade with connection to the greenway - Connect green way into existing neighborhoods

PROMENADE

5-10 YEAR PERIOD

0

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COMMERCIAL RET

FARMERS MARKET PROMENADE

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GREENSPACE

section through farmers market, retail and loft apartments

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T PHASE ONE

ENGAGING THE CREEK designer: matthew draheim

‘C-C’ RADIAL DISTANCE FROM TRAIN STATION

ENGAGING THE CREEK designer: matthew draheim

‘C-C’ 1/4 Mile 5-10 Minute Walk 1/2 Mile 10-20 Minute Walk

‘B-B’

RADIAL DISTANCE FROM TRAIN STATION

The focus for the city to redevelop is in the area directly surrounding the train station. This part of the city is one that has been most affected by the recent downturn in the city. The area has many vacant lots and parking lots that make this section of the city ideal for the development of a new transit community. The train station is a highly used portion of the city that sees many people come to work every day and many people leave to go to the cities along the train corridor. The design focuses on creating new development that is easily accessible to the train station, while at the same time providing amenities and leisure to the people that live in and around this area. This area has a unique geologic feature that runs through the area of focus and that is the Assunpink creek. This river corridor will be the feature that ties all of the new development together. Mostly office complexes, industrial buildings, parking lots and residential housing, currently dominate the area surrounding the train station. The new development would focus on creating new mixed-use buildings that would incorporate commercial businesses, offices, and residential close to the train station and more residential farther from the train station. The area will be pedestrian friendly, forgoing the vast amounts of parking lots that dominate the area, for wide tree lined sidewalks and ample amounts of green space. The new transit community will attract young professionals and families and will help to jump-start the economy of Trenton by bringing in new businesses, and new residents that will take advantage of the unique location of Trenton. The once thriving city will slowly begin to be revived and in doing so will create a healthy and interactive community. The focus to the redevelopment of the area is to first establish the green space network; this will be done by implementing a greenway along the Assunpink Creek. The road, Raul Walenberg Ave, that runs along the creek now will be removed and rerouted. The new road will be a tree lined one way street with on street parking that will run in between the existing office complexes and the new mixed-use development. A new mixed-use development will be put in the area where the parking lots and parking deck are currently located. These buildings will be three to four stories with businesses occupying the bottom floor and residential apartments on the remaining floors. This development will be anchored by a grocery that will serve the new development and the surrounding community. On the interior of this development will be an open space that connects to the promenade that runs parallel to the creek. The promenade will have three different levels, a tree lined walk, an open walk and a walk down next to the creek. The promenade will end at East State Street, which will be narrowed and have the sidewalks widened. This will be bordered by the mixed-use to one side and a marketplace, and entrance to the greenway on the other. The green way will run along the creek and connect into the current residential homes in the next two blocks. The new community design area will end in the location where the Miller high-rise buildings once stood, will have a new community of residential area developed. The new community will be three story homes that sit on a fixed lot size, the home must occupy 60% of the lot and 40% must be open lot, but the configuration of the home is completely up to the homeowner. The homes are situated for maximum walkability and located directly adjacent to the greenway. This portion of the greenway will be a designed wetland that will mediate downstream flooding. This part will have both active and passive recreation areas. The design is centered around the green space; all of the new development has a direct connection to the green space and is within walking distance of the transit center. The new community will bring residents closer together by having them use the streets and interact with one another in a healthy environment.

NEW DEVELOPMENT AND GREEN SPACE

‘B-B’

new development green space

‘A-A’

vehicular circulation pedestrian circulation northeast corridor rail line us highway 1

HUMAN CIRCULATION PATTERNS

NEW DEVELOPMENT AND GREEN SPACE

‘A-A’

0

B

0

100

200

100

200

300

300

- Begin to establish the green way along Assunpink Creek - Reroute Raul Walenberg Ave. - Remove buildings to make room for new development - Build train station extension for light rail - Turn warehouse into residential loft apartments - Turn East State St. into green street - Establish farmers market in vacant lot

DEVELOPMENT PHASE ONE 1-5 YEAR PERIOD

maximum flood height

C

section through plaza and promenade to creek

GROCCERY STORE/MIXED USE

section through plaza and promenade to creek

PLAZA

CAFE AND GREEN ROOF

GROCCERY STORE/MIXED USE

PLAZA

GREEN SPACE

PROMENADE

CREEK WALK

CAFE AND GREEN ROOF

ASSUNPINK CREEK

RAIL WAY RIGHT OF WAY

GREEN SPACE

PROMENADE

CREEK WALK

- Complete Assunpink Greenway - Establish recreation fields in green spaces - Build skatepark near new development - Build new commercial/office complex

DEVELOPMENT PHASE THREE 10-20 YEAR PERIOD

- Begin to establish the green way along Assunpink Creek - Reroute Raul Walenberg Ave. - Remove buildings to make room for new development - Build train station extension for light rail - Turn warehouse into residential loft apartments - Turn East State St. into green street - Establish farmers market in vacant lot

0

30

- Continue to grow the green way along Assunpink Creek - Build new transit village near train station - Complete promenade with connection to the greenway - Connect green way into existing neighborhoods

D,E

DEVELOPMENT PHASE TWO 5-10 YEAR PERIOD

Undergraduate Studios

61

- Complete Assunpink Greenway - Establish recreation fields in green spaces - Build skatepark near new development - Build new commercial/office complex

T PHASE THREE

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NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

PROMENADE

GREENSPACE

60

90


mate ely--not from pportu-

LEAP.

rvived it.

THE FUTURE IS IN THE FAMILY.

TRANSPORTATION CORRIDORS

COMMERCIAL, HIGHER INCOME

RESIDENTIAL, LOW INCOME, HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT

CONTEXT DIAGRAMS

EXISTING GREENWAY ALONG THE ASSUNPINK

B-B

A-A

C-C

F

SITE OF PROJECT FOCUS

SITE PLAN 1”=30’

SITE IN RELATION TO EXISTING BUILDINGS AND GREENSPACE N

AUTUMN MEADOW PERSPECTIVE

SITE SELECTION AND PHASING DIAGRAMS

G,H

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RESIDENTIAL STREETSCAPE

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LEAP. LEAP.

THE FUTURE IS IN THE FAMILY. THE FUTURE IS IN THE FAMILY.

I

J

Fine Fescue “Lawn” Space

Planting Beds

Fine Fescue “Lawn” Space

Planting Beds

Crushed Stone Path

Community Garden Plot

Crushed Stone Path

Community Garden Plot

SECTION C-C AUTUMN MEADOW PERSPECTIVE 0

8

16

32’

0

8

16

32’

8

16

32’

8

16

32’

Fine Fescue “Lawn” Space

Stairs

Fine Fescue “Lawn” Space

0 0

LEAP.

Stairs

SECTION A-A AMPHITHEATER SECTION A-A AMPHITHEATER

THE FUTURE IS IN THE FAMILY.

Successional Log Study and Discovery Zone

Crushed Stone Path

Successional Log Study and Discovery Zone

Crushed Stone Path

Soccer Field

Assumpink Creek

RESIDENTIAL

K

Fine Fescue “Lawn” Space

L

Undergraduate Studios

SECTION B-B STREETSCAPE 32’ FOREST PATHS SECTION B-B Soccer Field

0

8

16

0

8

16

32’

FOREST PATHS

0

8

16

32’

SECTION C-C STREETSCAPE

Assumpink Creek

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STREETSCAPE SECTION C-C STREETSCAPE

Planting Beds

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The Middlesex Network

The Middlesex Network

A,B

Intermediate Landscape Architecture Studio Middlesex County Greenways Visions for Improved County-wide Open Space and Greenway Networks David Tulloch, studio instructor

In the Fall of 2011, the Intermediate Landscape Architecture Studio explored walking and physical activity as part of creating healthier communities. The first project quickly explored site-specific solutions for improving walkability and food access throughout the City of New Brunswick, NJ. Design interventions included new uses like community gardens and farmers markets, but also featured improved pedestrian access for existing and new food outlets with an eye toward improving both diets and personal fitness. The students employed Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology and data to inform their design processes and design solutions. Justin Acal, John Ireland, Matt Pugliese, Russell Sewekow, Janine St. Jacques A,B,C,D,E Derrek Cowell, Ben Granovsky, Chantae Moore, Nick Patiro, Crystal Vega F,G,H,I Josh Didriksen, Chris Marshall, Danny Rounds, Maria Torres, Frances Turner J,K,L,M

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The second, and larger, project expanded on the lessons from the first, by developing visions for improved county-wide open space and greenway networks. As Middlesex County moves towards initiating an update to its Open Space Master Plan, the students

undertook some initial analyses of existing countywide patterns and developed three alternative visions for the future. Using GIS, countywide studies of physical and cultural features were combined to guide strategic decisions about key locations. The class also used sophisticated routing algorithms to identify potential corridors for new greenway paths. Working in small groups, the approaches varied from one built on greenway connections to every public school in Middlesex County, to another that built a network of cultural and historic heritage sites, to a third that seized on environmental conditions and opportunities as an organizing mechanism for the greenways. At the conclusion of the semester, the students presented their final materials at a public presentation at the Middlesex County Planning office in New Brunswick. Additional student work is online at: http:// jrstudio.rutgers.edu/MidCo2011/

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The Middlesex Network

Route 18 • Bring several Communities together • Secondary Paths bring you to a Primary Path that acts as a Town Center • Future Tertiary Paths available once the Raritan River’s wetlands are revitalized

The Middlesex Network

Cheesequake State Park C,D

E

Undergraduate Studios

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F

G

H,I

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Historic Prop

J,K

L,M

Undergraduate Studios

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A,B, C

D,E, F

Introduction to Environmental Design 2 Dean Cardasis and Pippa Brashear, studio instructors

“A garden is not a barbeque or a fiberglass screen; it is not pebbles or brick paving; it is not plants or flowers of any kind...It is an experience. It is the experience of being within something while still out of doors. That is the substance of it for until you have that you do not have a garden at all.” -James Rose

Alexandra Duro A Jack Peters B,J,K Ryan Goodstein C,F,G,I,N Jesse Woods D,M Michael Ticker E,L Michelle Hartmann H,O

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Introduction to Environmental Design 2 was carried out over two distinct phases. In the first half, students were introduced to the phenomenal, spatial nature of landscape design through the creation of four physical models in which each of the landscape spatial media—land/water, plants and structures—was individually, then collectively, used to shape landscape spatial experience. With each model, students were charged with responding to a particular context (supportive, non-supportive or a combination of these) and a particular form (rectilinear, circular, geomorphic,

or biomorphic); thus exploring how landscape media, form and context can be manipulated to create particular landscape experiences. Over the second half of the studio, students engaged the realities of two small scale design problems: a private residential landscape and a public campus plaza. In so doing they went beyond the foundational considerations of the nature and composition of landscape media, form and context to consider how issues of specific site conditions and program influence the shaping of landscape spatial experience. Students researched and presented case studies in each genre, illuminating issues peculiar to each; as well as how experienced landscape architects have addressed them in the recent past. Particular Interest was paid to the relationship between indoor and outdoor space and the nature of entering and leaving a designed landscape.

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G,H

I,J

K

Undergraduate Studios

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L

M

70

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N

O

Undergraduate Studios

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A

Introduction to Environmental Design 1 Brian Osborn, Rich Bartolone, and Pippa Brashear, studio instructors

Introduction to Environmental Design 1 was carried out over 5 projects of increasing complexity through which students were introduced to design as a process of iterative exploration and revision. Projects and associated assignments were intended to engage students in an investigation of form and proportion related to the human body and its activities (program), the generation of purposeful form, exercises in material articulation, and the communication of design intent and 3-dimensional form through both physical modeling and drawing techniques. Project One, 6X6X6 CUBE, familiarized students with the creation of form through the arrangement of geometry in space. A physical model was constructed and then refined as a series of drawings were produced to analyze the spaces created within the model.

Michelle Hartmann A Samantha Saydak B,G Ryan Goodstein C,F Andrew Blackburn D Alexandra Duro E Nathan Kelly H

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Project Two, AVATAR, asked students to design a container for the body. The project was approached through two lines of questioning; first, a thorough graphic analysis through which the students become cognizant of the form and proportion of their own body. Second, a material

exploration asking students to articulate the qualities found within selected postures through a given material. Project Three, TRANSECT, continued the material exploration started in the AVATAR project. Students worked to identify a System of Assembly and to develop that system toward the accommodation of basic landscape programs including: a space for quiet reflection, a space for the close interaction between members of the student body, a space for the productive meeting of a student organization, and a space for student activism and/or communication. Project Four, WORKING WITH TIME, was a quick assignment introducing students to designing with natural processes. Students worked at Rutgers Gardens to construct full-scale sculptures from found materials and to document the changes that those sculptures endured due to natural processes over a period of time. Project Five completed the semester with a SITE DESIGN problem introducing students to principles of site analysis, programming, design development and design communication.

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B

C

D

Undergraduate Studios

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E

F

74

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G

H

Undergraduate Studios

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Construction & Materials

Students work in the Landscape Fabrication Lab, completed in the spring of 2012

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441 342 341 Construction, Implementation, and Practice

Introduction to construction implementation, development of technical competence, integration of design principles, communication through technical documentation, and topics related to professional practice.

Methods and Materials

Introduction to the properties of construction materials, structural principles, and methods of construction.

Grading, Drainage and Earthwork Site engineering principles including: grading, drainage, earthwork, and road alignment, and the incorporation of these practices in landscape architectural design.

340 322 234 Planting Design

Introduction to plants as design elements affecting function, comfort, energy efficiency, and aesthetic quality. Selection and specification of plants to serve functional and aesthetic purposes.

Landscape Measurement and Mapping Principles of surveying and mapping including the measurement of distances, angles, and direction, use of tripod levels, transit, compass, and plane table.

Landscape Plants 2

Identification, environmental requirements, and landscape assets and liabilities of ornamental plants with a focus on broadleaf and narrow-leaf evergreens and the spring aspects of deciduous trees and shrubs.

233 Landscape Plants 1

Identification, environmental requirements, and landscape assets and liabilities of ornamental plants with a focus on fall aspects of deciduous trees and shrubs.

Construction & Materials

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A

Construction, Implementation, and Practice Brian Osborn, instructor

Construction, Implementation and Practice is the capstone to the Construction Technology sequence. It combines a studio-based design setting with a seminar in construction implementation and documentation as well as an introduction to professional practice through the completion of a comprehensive landscape architectural project. Students are asked to apply their accumulated learned subjects (research, critical thinking, design, representation, construction methods and materials, grading and drainage, planting design, and CAD) toward a focused design project. The project is developed from design conception through construction documentation in a simulated office environment. Brian Curry, Meredith knesevitch A Alex Kozar, Evan Ralph B,C,D,E Alexandra Bolinder-Gibsand, Erin Greenwood F,G Rebecca Thierman,Shane Umbach H,I

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outdoor exhibition on food. The exhibition was to be shown at the Liberty Science Center in Newark, New Jersey, before traveling to additional venues around the world. Through a consideration of material strategies and site assembly methods, students developed demonstration spaces that promoted an awareness about food quality, accessibility, production and waste.

In the fall of 2011, and in collaboration with the Liberty Science Center, the Construction, Implementation, and Practice course took on the design of an

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B,C

ARRIVAL:

WORK STATION:

LOOKING SOUTHEAST

2 1

12

ARRIVAL:

LOOKING SOUTH

1 - CHEF’S WORK STATION 2 - MOVEABLE SEATING 3 - BENCH 4 - DIGESTOR 5 - WASTE DEPOSITORY 6 - SWITCHGRASS Panicum virgatum 7 - STANDARD PALLET WITH MODULAR ATTACHMENT 8 - DIGESTATE STORAGE 9 - STANDARD PALLET WITH GAS COMPONENT 10 - GAS STORAGE TANK 11 - LITTLE LEAF LINDEN Tilia cordata 12 - DOMESTIC APPLES MALUS domestica 13 - PERMANENT DECK 14 - EXISTING GREEN ROOF 15 - SCREWJACK, CASSON, GRAVEL PALLET SUPPORT SYSTEM

10

8

11 3

0

4’

4

6

5

LOOKING SOUTHEAST

7

9

8’

D

WORKSTATION 03 L3.3

PLANTER 03 L3.5

ACRYLIC RAILING

H-10

Construction & Materials

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2

1

02 L3.6

I-10

E

5

G-10

F-10

E-10

D-10

C-10

2

LANDSCAPE SECTION B

1

EXISTING BUILDING

2

GREENROOF

3

CULINARY THEATRE SEATING

4

CHEF PERFORMANCE SPACE

5

BIOGAS DIGESTOR

1

SECTION NOTES

1" = 8'

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F 1

BLACK LOCUST BENCH

2 CART SHELTER

6

7

10

2 L5.2

RETRACTABLE SEATING

9

3 L5.2

PERFORMANCE AREA

CHICKEN COOP SOIL STATION KIT BIRD FEEDERS

6

SEED STATION KIT

7

INSTRUCTOR: BRIAN OSBORN

4

WATER STATION KIT

9

DESIGNERS: ALEXANDRA BOLINDER-GIBSAND ERIN GRACE GREENWOOD

8 RAISED VEGETABLE BED, SEE DETAIL SHEET L 5.1 AND PLANTING PLANS SHEETS L 4.0 - L 4.2 COMPACTED GRAVEL SURFACE

10 EATING AREA 11 VINE STRUCTURE

2

3 16"=

SECTION B-B

BLACK LOCUST DECK

4 L5.1

CONCRETE TRACK FOOTING

11

10

3 L5.0

CONCRETE SEATING

1'-0"

8

PROJECT:

1 L5.0

LIBERTY SCIENCE CENTER PAVILION

DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY

12 WATER MISTER KIT

COURSE TITLE: COMPREHENSIVE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PROJECT 11:550:441

2

5

150 FARM ROAD JERSEY CITY, NJ 09910

3 4

BAR = 1" AT FULL SCALE DRAWN BY: CHECKED: ABG

BO

INSTRUCTOR: BRIAN OSBORN DATE:

12/20/2011

SHEET TITLE: LANDSCAPE SECTIONS SHEET NUMBER:

1

G

SECTION A-A

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SCALE:

3 16"=

1'-0"

NOTES: PLASTIC 'KIT' FABRICATOR SHALL PROVIDE SHOP DRAWINGS FOR APPROVAL PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION.

L 2.0

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H

I

Construction & Materials

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Communication

Students from the Urban / Suburban Design Studio present their work to members of the Newark Public Library staff and landscape architecture faculty

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337 250 237 Design Communication Presentation and communication techniques applicable to landscape architecture including visualization skills, hand drawing and computer applications.

CAD for Landscape Architects

An introduction to the application of computers to design including CAD, word processing and data management.

Landscape Drawing

An introduction to landscape architectural perception and representation using pencil, ink and charcoal. Both freehand sketching and hard-line drafting techniques are explored.

232 Fundamentals of Environmental Geomatics

Introduction to new technologies used to manage geospatial data for environmental and natural resource analysis and management. Basic concepts, definitions, and examples of potential applications used in an environmental planning and management context.

Communication

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A

B

C

Design Communication Kate Higgins, instructor

Ryan Goodstein A Alexandra Duro B Jesse Woods C

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Design Communication introduces students to digital software applications useful to the profession of Landscape Architecture, including: Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Students were introduced

to concepts of composition and layout as well as illustrative plan and section rendering, and perspective rendering. Students also engaged in a yearly competition to produce a poster for the Spring Lecture Series.

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A,B

CAD for Landscape Architects Kate Higgins, instructor

CAD for Landscape Architects introduced the use of ComputerAided Drafting (CAD) as a tool in the profession of landscape architecture. The course emphasized techniques and products appropriate for final

construction document sets and site engineering as well design development and communication. Students were introduced to Autodesk AutoCAD 2D drafting and McNeel Rhinoceros 3D modeling applications.

Russell Sewekow A,B

in a variety of two-dimensional technical drawing formats including plan, section, elevation, and axonometric. Students are also introduced to perspective drawing through a variety of media including india ink and charcoal.

Student Author Unknown A Jesse Woods B

A,B

Landscape Drawing Holly Nelson and Kate Higgins, instructors

A drawing is not just a personal expression but also a tool for observing the world, developing design ideas, and exploring spatial issues. Students of Landscape Drawing learn to depict threedimensional objects and spaces

Communication

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History & Theory

Students from the Design Fundamentals Studio discuss their conceptual ideas in an interim pin-up.

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582 553 430 Research Methods for Landscape Architecture

Theories of Landscape Architecture

Advanced Landscape History Seminar

Introduction to methods of scholarship, research approaches, and theories with application to a variety of research topics.

Survey of ideas and thinking behind the formation of designed landscapes including: conceptions of nature, aesthetics, landscape perception, and ecological / regenerative design.

History of the gardens of Italy, France, England, or the United States from the Renaissance to present with an emphasis on form and meaning of garden design and widespread influence of this genre.

403 330 230 Japanese Garden with Cultural Context

History of Landscape Architecture

Environmental Design Analysis

Investigation of the history of Japanese art and gardens.

Introduction to the history of landscape architecture around the world beginning with the Paradise Gardens in Persia and concluding with the design of public parks in North America.

Analysis of the quality of the physical environment including: perception, awareness, design and planning processes, and governmental controls that affect environmental quality.

101 Landscape Studies

Introduction to the idea of landscape as a cultural phenomenon and the role of the term landscape as a representation of how society views the built world.

History & Theory

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Connecting Hudson County, New Jersey: Re-imagining the Engineered Landscape James Bykowski , MLA candidate 2013 Wolfram Hoefer, thesis chair

The purpose of this design project is to investigate and address the stormwater and accessibility problems in Hudson County, New Jersey. I will attempt to design an open space network that incorporates stormwater infrastructure and the landscape, connecting Hudson County to the waterways surrounding it. The waterfronts of Hudson County have wonderful views of diverse landscapes, from wetlands to the New York skyline and few accessible vantage points from which to enjoy these views. This design project will look at significantly improving the quality of the existing public spaces and creating new ones for better connectivity of Hudson County, potentially through ideas based in Infrastructural Landscapes. These new multi-functional landscapes will improve the pedestrian experience in the county, providing a better urban infrastructure for movement and management.

Towards a New Evaluation and Classification of Public Stormwater Management Projects Adam Cesanek, MLA candidate 2013 Jean Marie Hartman, thesis chair

Attitudes towards stormwater in cities are rapidly changing, Philadelphia presents a unique opportunity to examine and evaluate public rainwater designs. As more cities are being held responsible for non point source pollution of surrounding water bodies and contamination associated with combined sewer overflow events, rain gardens are becoming more widespread throughout the urban landscape. Vacant urban lands, community parks, schools and residential streets are some of the spaces where one may find a stormwater management project. My research asks if the function of stormwater projects is being conveyed to the public in the design? Similarly, are there public amenities that present themselves as unexpected advantages of stormwater systems? Through eco-revelatory design we can generate engaging public spaces where stormwater is treated as a site amenity, instead of something to be funneled elsewhere. This project focuses on fifteen different stormwater sites throughout Philadelphia, PA and Wilmington, DE. A thorough evaluation of public amenities was derived from Eliza Pennypacker and Stuart Echols’ article “Artful Rainwater Design.” Functionality made up a separate evaluation category and sites were evaluated on BMPs listed in the Sustainable Sites Initiative. Data collection occurred throughout the Summer of 2012 based on a Likert Scale evaluation. Analysis of collected data will work to understand trade-offs in designing a stormwater systems to achieve specific goals. Similarly, by expanding upon Pennypacker and Echols categories this thesis will work towards a broader understanding of stormwater management projects in cities.

Master’s Thesis / Project

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Figure 3.17:  Succession and Space Site Plan, Node 2.     

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The Ecological Design of a Trail System through a Brownfield Redevelopment at Liberty State Park Joseph Cherichello, MLA 2012 Jean Marie Hartman, thesis chair

In this post-industrial age, many opportunities present themselves to convert urban brownfields into open green space. In doing so, as with any other land development, landscape architects rely on the principles of ecological design. Ecological principles unique to this brownfield pertaining to soil and plant relationships were tested on site; the results provide recommendations for the planting design. Ten soil amendment treatments (25% and 50% the recommended fertilizer, 10% and 20% sand by volume, compost, hydrogel, 10% sand + compost, 10% sand + hydrogel, mulch and a control) were compared for their impact on survival and growth of eight native species (Aronia melanocarpa, Myrica pensylvanica, Prunus maritima, Solidago sempervirens, Baptisia tinctoria, Eupatorium coelestinum, Chamaecrista fasciculate, and Lolium multiflorum). Only one statistically significant difference was found for one of three growth measures in one of the eight species tested. This implies that the soil amendments in the full scale planting scheme may not be important. The design of three nodes along a trail (with information and educational opportunities) investigates the blending of ecological design principles with the art of designing an engaging experience through a series of successional plant assemblages. ‘The Trailhead’ (Node 1) provides a shaded gathering space at the start of the trail surrounded by a bioretention swale to collect stormwater runoff. ‘Succession and Space’ (Node 2) engages the user by displaying the spatial significance of emerging from a forested area to an open meadow through various sub-nodes. And finally, ‘The Crossroads’ (Node 3) is the convergence of many trails with information and views of nearby constructed wetlands and also provides experimental opportunities for further research. The designs are evaluated using the 2009 Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks, as prepared by Sustainable Sites Initiative. Each design achieved three stars (out of four) even though the entire design process was completed before in depth study of the Guidelines commenced. It became clear that the evaluation system favors the inclusion of building in the design and, thereby, lowers the potential rating of open space.

The Industrialization of the Landscape in Northern Pennsylvania: Perceptions Among Forest Landowners David Hanrahan, MLA candidate 2013 Wolfram Hoefer, thesis chair

The rural landscape in Northern Pennsylvania continues to undergo rapid industrialization due to natural gas extraction from Marcellus Shale deposits using hydraulic fracturing technologies. Reported impacts at the regional, county, municipal, community, family and individual levels, stemming from the range of increased industrial activity, environmental health concerns, and economic alterations, abound in both the media and local community dialogue. Using a series of in-depth interviews and user mapping of special places, this research examines how the rapid changes in land-use, from rural to industrial, impact perceptions of and relationships with the landscape among forest landowners in Northern Pennsylvania. Detailed GIS maps spatially analyzes the physical changes of the forest environment in relation to the influx of well drilling and permits, pipeline construction, waste disposal and other infrastructure used to extract natural gas.

Master’s Thesis / Project

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ISSUE EXPLORATORY DESIGN IDEA

SNOWSCAPES AS INFRASTRUCTURES MUKTA JADHAV MASTER’S PROJECT

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Retrofitting the Everyday Landscape of Transportation Centers in New Jersey Wanqing Huang, MLA candidate 2013 Holly Grace Nelson, thesis chair

By examining the current use and operation of rail transportation centers in New Jersey, I intend to explore possible uses of areas adjacent to stations, and how that could enhance connectivity and mobility between the transit network and the local area as well as improve the commuter experience. Opportunities and challenges can be revealed in order to create more vibrant communities that better serves train riders and other local residents, through activity observation, survey of users’ preferences. Everyday landscape like pedestrian paths, parking lots, and waiting areas can be significant public places, contributing to communities as much as parks and plazas, both functionally and environmentally.

Snowscapes as Infrastructures Mukta Jadhav, MLA candidate 2013 Kate John-Alder, thesis chair

For my graduate project, I propose to explore a design strategy for seasonal snow storms and water management that builds upon the ideologies of landscape urbanism, ecological urbanism and resilient landscapes. The analysis will touch upon themes of historical adaptation, ecological management and recreation, as well as more pragmatic issues of urban street maintenance. My objective is to broaden the range of projects that fall under the rubric of landscape urbanism, by re – designing an existing landscape. Cadwalader Park in Trenton is the only park design by Olmsted in New Jersey and has a rich history. I aim to position this park as my site for exploration and redesign. Taking into account the historic park fabric, its urban demographics, recreation, storm water management and park management, I aim to envision a new prototype infrastructural design that will enable snow to be used as a source of water by the neighborhood. Proximity to the Delaware and Raritan Canal will prove to be an asset and will complement the design. My graduate project will address the on-going discussions about designing landscapes that function above and beyond the traditional programming, while also being adaptive to the changing environments. The current scenario of volatile changing conditions necessitates re-designing the landscapes to match the unpredictable seasonal changes. My graduate project will be a small contribution towards addressing the bigger question of how this can be done. While new landscape projects reflect upon these factors and are designed with conscious minds catering to such critical aspects, the existing landscapes being a part of the future environment need to be redesigned and modified to exist in the same plane.

Master’s Thesis / Project

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TRANSFORMING A FORMER AIRFIELD FOR GRASSLAND BIRD CONSERVATION Kristopher Kemper

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Transforming a Former Airfield for Grassland Bird Conservation Kristopher Kemper, MLA candidate 2013 Jean Marie Hartman, thesis chair

Due to loss of habitat from development and changes in agricultural practices, populations of grassland bird species are on the decline. As a result, many grassland birds are seeking refuge in “artificial’ grasslands created by human influence on the landscape, such as cattle ranches, reclaimed strip mines, airports and capped landfills. While these grasslands are important for providing habitat, if proper management techniques are not set in place, maintenance such as mowing can destroy nests and actually lead to further decline of the species. The purpose of this project will be to conduct comparative case studies of airfields, operational and closed, which have implemented some form of grassland management for bird species. Knowledge gained from the case study will then be applied to a site design focusing on a closed airfield in Marlboro, New Jersey. The purpose of the design will be to create a managed meadow which will offer suitable habitat for threatened species but also provide educational opportunities for visitors to learn about the birds, the meadow and why conservation is important. The needs of the bird will foremost dictate the design programming on the site, since the main purpose is to provide habitat for conservation purposes followed by educational and recreational purposes.

Connecting People To Place: Application of landscape architecture principles to Transform Public Waterway Access in Brielle, New Jersey Kim Nuccio, MLA candidate 2013 Rich Bartolone, thesis chair

This project is about public waterway access points, the conflict that exists between them and private development and the application of landscape architecture principles to transform these points into designed spaces as a means to provide continued access, alleviate the conflict and to encourage stewardship of the waterfront. As a resident of Brielle, I intend to show that a problem exists in this small community. To some extent, river access is obscured and this research will demonstrate that residents and private riverfront landowners would benefit from transforming some, if not all of our eleven waterfront access points into welcoming and well designed public spaces.

Master’s Thesis / Project

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The Multi-cultural Landscape Meaning and Interpretation of Uses

A A CASE CASE STUDY STUDY OF OF PUBLIC PUBLIC OPEN SPACE IN LATINO COMMUNITIES IN NEW YORK CITY COMMUNITIES

DENISSE ORTIZ MLA CANDIDATE 2013 SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMETAL & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY

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The Cross-Cultural Landscape Meaning & Interpretation of Uses: A Case Study Of Public Open Spaces In Latino Communities In New York City Denisse Ortiz, MLA candidate 2013 Richard Alomar, thesis chair

Latinos are one of the largest and fastest-growing social groups in the United States and their increased presence is profoundly shaping the character of many U.S. cities. This research will investigate how public open spaces might convey cultural meaning and interpretation in a more trans-cultural context through design. The lack of open space designed to suite trans-cultural needs have put in question design and planning practices. In NYC, where Latino population continues to rise and space is very limited, their presence is highly noticeable. As Angotti states “Latinos in New York are still struggling for their right to the city and its public space. One result of a long history of Latino struggles for the right to the city is that Latinos identity has become embedded in New York City’s public spaces and neighborhoods even while they are being contested” (Angotti 2010). The goal of this research is to gain insight and a better understanding of this issue by, first, exploring how Latino culture and behavior in public open spaces is relevant in the design process as a response to issues in uses and multi-cultural interactions. Second, I wish to study and comprehend how we can convey design with “layering and separation” (Cooper & Francis 1990) to allocate multi-cultural interactions in public open spaces. And, lastly, I seek to establish how everyday urbanism approaches can help carry cultural and social meaning in everyday life.

Space is for People Kevin Perry, MLA candidate 2013 David Tulloch, thesis chair

The human body is an agent of space. In one sense, the body occupies space. It is an object within space. It is plastic. In another sense, the body creates space. Around the body exists the space of the individual. Around a collection of individuals exists the space of the group. Around a collection of groups exists a relationship among groups, and within a group exists a relationship among individuals. The body, furthermore, is capable of providing a spatial edge, a clear delineation of volume, in its role both as individual and as group member. How, therefore, can the body, within space and defining space, in movement and in stillness, in singularity and in assemblage, guide the design of space? This question serves as both a general design inquiry and as a contextual design process response to a specific site deemed necessary for intervention: the approach to and exterior space of Walters Hall on the Douglass Campus of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the building which houses the Theater Department of the Mason Gross School of the Arts. Denizens of Walters Hall will engage in the design process of their building exterior through a series of charrette exercises that ask them not to sketch their desires for the space outside their building, but to perform them. These performances will be video recorded, analyzed against existing usage patterns, and employed as the basis for a physical, spatial landscape design. The goal of this process is to emphasize human form, movement, and arrangement as agents of spatial composition and key informants in the design of outdoor space.

Master’s Thesis / Project

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Revitalization of Open Space of High Rise Apartment Complex Graduate Project Proposal Department of Landscape Architecture Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Baewon Suh

Recently, open spaces of high rise apartment complex more than 20years old are under-utilized, especially, in Samsung-Dong district. Many different aspects of high rise residential complex have to be interconnected to a variety of human needs and group processes. For these reason, almost every open spaces are not using and losing their purpose. Through this graduate project proposal, I will examine real problem of this site by case study of Singapore and I will approach the typical residents’ needs by questionnaire. Primary purpose of this project is to implement revitalization of these open spaces that are currently under-utilized, so that those open spaces can attract more users and promote them spend more time in there. Final product will include result of questionnaire analysis and physical model of the site improvement http://www.dramasrok.com

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A Planting Design in Flux: Handling Soil, Water and Vegetation On Site At Liberty State Park Alisa Stanislaw, MLA candidate 2013 Kate John-Alder, thesis chair

Vegetation and soil have a symbiotic relationship, and to fulfill a successful planting scheme, the designer must address their intricacies to water, wildlife and people. In certain situations, a transitory planting design will be implemented before the next development on a particular site. This project addresses the southwestern end of Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey, where 67,000 cubic yards of soil will be brought from the park interior by the culmination of 2012, and in the possible future 780,000 cubic yards. Developing a topographic connection to the many surrounding views are essential for the human experience. These views include the cement factory and tower on site, Jersey City, the New Jersey Turnpike, the New York Harbor and the Manhattan skyline to name a few. In addition, landforms are sculpted to support water infiltration and capture runoff on site to the best ability. Plant selection also aides in stormwater infiltration, offers habitat for different forms of wildlife such as birds and other pollinators, and provides spaces for a place of relaxation that connects visitors into the park interior. Meadow species are selected for their scale, color, texture and seasonality while providing the benefits mentioned above. The purpose of this project is to explore the temporality of planting design and its relationship to incoming soil, topography and water while still providing spaces for wildlife to thrive and people to experience Liberty State Park.

Revitalization of Open Space of High Rise Apartment Complex Baewon Suh, MLA candidate 2013 Wolfram Hoefer, thesis chair

Recently, open spaces of high rise apartment complex more than 20 years old are under-utilized, especially, in Samsung-Dong district. Many different aspects of high rise residential complex have to be interconnected to a variety of human needs and group processes. For these reason, almost every open spaces are not using and losing their purpose. Through this graduate project proposal, I will examine real problem of this site by case study of Singapore and I will approach the typical residents’ needs by questionnaire. Primary purpose of this project is to implement revitalization of these open spaces that are currently under-utilized, so that those open spaces can attract more users and promote them spend more time in there. Final product will include result of questionnaire analysis and physical model of the site improvement.

Master’s Thesis / Project

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(cover image) “Honeycomb�, a temporary structure built by students in the Material Tectonics class in the spring of 2011

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Rutgers Layer 2012  

View Layer - Our end-of-year faculty and student work.

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