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How to Get Your Manuscript Finished By Rowdy Rhodes

The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


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Writers, generally speaking and including myself, are procrastinators. Any form of diversion, whether it be online chat, games, solving crosswords, reading books, tending to the garden, you name it and a lot of the time we'll be there. It comes with the territory of being the type of person who has thousands of story snippets and sometimes little direction on what to do with those ideas. Consequently not much gets done at all without proper planning and a lot of determination. This paper is here to help you resolve the issues of watching more Oprah or listening to all of Britney Spear's albums instead of sitting down and writing. If you'll follow the advice offered below I can pretty much guarantee, barring earthquakes, natural disasters and death that you'll be able to get your manuscript or writing project completed. The lovely thing about writing is that it allows your imagination and passion to explode on to the page if you'll let them. On a blank palette you'll create a portrait of words that can be astounding if you'll give yourself time and space to build your own writing. Sometimes, if you decide to share those writings, you will generate the same passions and emotions that are churning through you on to the page to be transferred to the reader. This transference is called "suspending the reader's reality." In effect your reality, which is actually your imagination if you're writing fiction, becomes their reality while they read your book. Those types of books are called page-turners. Extremely well written prose will always produce a page-turner. You just have to make it happen, with a little help from some other individuals. In order to achieve publication though you first have to have a finished manuscript. I won't fill your head with ideas that writing a completely finished manuscript is as easy as cutting a pie. It's not. It's tough work to create a really good story. You have to have a thick skin for when your work is being assessed, edited, proof read - nothing is personal when you start to receive constructive critiques - it's all business, and it's a tough business. Faint of heart need not apply. You have to be persistent and persevere your way through numerous barriers to reach the final draft. To achieve that you need a number of extremely important and often overlooked items in place to help support your project to completion. On the following few pages are the bare bones of what you will require to complete and perfect your writing project, making the assumption that you already know how to write. If you haven't studied writing, now is the time to stop by the bookstore and pick up a few of the basic books that will give you the building blocks you need to construct your story. I'll list some of my favourites at the end of this paper, but they are by no means the end all of how-to-write books nor are they meant to supersede actual writing courses. I'll provide a few online one courses from a distance writing school that I know are very good at teaching. Now let's get on with the bare bones of writing your manuscript. Using some common sense it's only logical that you have such items as a writing pad, pens, dictionary and a comfortable place to work in peace and quiet. The later item is of extreme importance as you will learn soon enough. If you want to go full tilt and dive in writing then I would recommend an actual writing software package. The software has the ability to create time lines, store character outlines, plots, thoughts, ideas and much more. The only one that I use is called Write It Now and in my humble opinion is the best you could possibly invest your money into if you're serious about getting your project started fast. Write It Now offers you the flexibility to write anything from a one page article or press release to a full novel. You'll find a link below if you would like to check it out, plus it is very inexpensive for the benefits and functionality the software provides. The following advice deals with writing a manuscript for a novel or book however all of it can be applied to most genres of writing. Let's get started: The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


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1) Set A Self-Imposed Deadline:

Mark the day on a calendar you will hold your finished manuscript in your hands to create a deadline.

Many writers work better with a deadline. Most people in fact, if they know there is a deadline looming over anything they are attempting to accomplish will do their best to meet that date and complete the task at hand.

Take your taxes for example. You have to complete them by a specific date. To blow that deadline can have dire consequences on your personal financial stability. In the case of writing a manuscript and missing your deadline you'll simply never get that book published. If you're not going to set and live by your deadline, if you think completing a manuscript can be accomplished when you feel like it, then you can stop reading this now. I can't help you. However, if you think you can write 50,000 words in let's say 60 days, stay directed on your project, and are willing to sweat it out to the end then read on. First, mark on a calendar the day you will hold your finished, polished manuscript in your hands and remind yourself daily about that deadline. You must believe that you cannot miss that deadline. How you convince yourself of that is completely up to you. Personally, what I do with deadlines is estimate the total number of words for the project and then divide by the number of days I have to complete the task at hand. If you want to write 50,000 words in sixty days then you have to average 833 words per day or about four 8 1/2" by 11" pages, with double spaced typing. Manuscripts are always written in double space to give plenty of room for pencil editing later. By achieving your deadline, then the manuscript you hold in your hands is one you'll know is ready to present to an agent, publisher or even self-publish after it has been edited, proof read and re-written (we'll get to those items later.) If you set your deadline date to coincide with a life event such as a birthday that's even better and easier to remember. The idea of having a deadline is to keep you motivated and on track, writing every day to ensure that the creative momentum continues and the tangible goal of a manuscript is truly within your grasp. Deadlines are serious business and should be treated with the greatest of respect, much like a wedding anniversary. Better not miss that! 2) Daily Scheduling:

Look for time in your lifestyle that you can free up for your writing by making choices.

Each and every job in the world has a schedule that needs to be adhered too otherwise a person can end up being fired from their employment. Writing has a schedule to ensure that what you want to create gets created. Some job schedules are 9-5pm, some are afternoons, and some employment could be night or split shifts. As a writer you pretty much get to pick your own scheduled time to write, but you have to stick to the schedule. What you should do is look for the time(s) that best suit your existing lifestyle thereby allowing the highest productivity you can achieve in the amount of time you have to write.

As an example, it is impossible to write if you have to tend to children, paint a bedroom, complete your banking and perform all the other daily activities needed to maintain your lifestyle. After all you do have to eat, right? So what you have to do is set aside time for your writing. It also means your family and friends have to provide you with the support so that you have the time. With that said though let's look at two general items in most people's lives: 1. When are the quiet times in your home? After the kids are off to school? Before anyone else is awake? After everyone has gone to sleep? See if any of those times correspond with your urge to write and jot the times down for future reference. Also jot down when you have the urge to write. For some writers it's early morning, others are nighthawks and enjoy starting up their writing at 2am.

The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


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2. Look for time you can free up for your writing by making choices. Examples, not watching a certain one-hour television show you usually watch using that time for writing, getting someone else to wash the dishes and take out the garbage is another time saver you can use to write. How about that next door neighbour who always "pops by"? Get her / him to stop until your manuscript is finished or at least cut down on the visits. You'll be amazed at the number of time killers you'll discover in your life. Another time waster is social chatting on the telephone. Socialize later and use that time to write now. Make sure though that you explain to family and friends that you need to find time to write and that it's nothing personal. You will be back once you have completed your project. If they are good friends and family they should be understanding and supportive in your desire to write your manuscript. And remember you can always catch up on your television shows, neighbour gossip and chats after you have reached your deadline and completed your manuscript. So schedule the best times by killing some of the time killers. One of my best times to write is when I'm washing clothes at the local laundromat. An hour in the washer and 45 minutes in the dryer gives me another chunk of time to write that I wouldn't normally waste doing something else. I might complete a crossword or read a book, but if I'm in the writing mood then the laundromat offers an excellent place to write undisturbed. Once you have created your list of times here and there throughout the day you'll find that on the average you should be able to come up with an extra few hours that you never had before. Those are going to be your writing hours. So look to get rid of the time wasters and write out a daily schedule for yourself. It takes a while to get used to used to the schedule, much like the first few weeks at a new job, however once you settle into the routine you'll find a lot of words being generated on the page. Don't forget that when scheduling your deadline it may take a month or more for you to establish your writing schedule, to have your friends and family become accustomed to your new way of life, and then implement your plan. It will also take a few weeks for you to get settled into the schedule so make sure to add that into the calendar time for when you are going to start your new writing job. 3) Time Blocking:

Be prepared to block out portions of your life to ensure you have the time to write.

This is another very important aspect of writing and creating a writing life, whether part-time or full-time hours. There are two sets of dates you need marked on a wall calendar:

The first of course is your start day and your deadline. The others are going to be the writing times that you established above in your daily schedule. Block those dates and times on a calendar that everyone can see in your family, even make it available to your friends through email so they know what's happened to you. This tells the world that you don't want to be disturbed, you're doing ok, and you haven't fallen off the face of the planet! You just want then to know that you will be writing and God help those who interrupt you with minor life issues. If you are writing away from your home, such as in a coffee shop or library, then interruption is not normally a problem unless you know everyone at these locations. In that case go to a different coffee shop or library to obtain the much-needed writing solitude. However, if you write at home then your family, and most importantly yourself, need to respect and enforce those times on the calendar when you will be writing your manuscript. This helps support you in achieving your deadline and keeps you directed without minor distractions getting in the way of your writing. Of course if there is a major disruption in your home then you have no choice but to tend to it, if you happen to be home, but generally speaking your writing schedule and daily routine is written in stone. Make sure your family and friends know that you're very serious about that. Eventually you and your family will become accustomed to the blocks of time you will be using for your writing. The time blocks will just become part of everyone's regular daily routine, much like having dinner. It just takes a month or so to sink in that you're earnest about keeping to your schedule and completing The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


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your manuscript by deadline. The sooner everyone realizes this the faster you will be able to get work done. And remember: Writing is a job. Who disrupts some at work because the trash wasn't put to the curb? Not anyone of sound mind as far as I'm concerned. 4) Accountability:

A time accountant will help keep you on track and motivated to meet your deadline.

Even though the vast majority of your writing work will be solitary you will need someone to hold you accountable to the deadline you have set. Someone who will occasionally check on your progress and offer encouragement when needed to keep you on track. As the saying goes "The best-laid plans ..." so find someone you trust who will be kind enough to watch over you and your schedule.

This of course could be a family member, friend, or a fellow writer, anyone who will gently but firmly remind you about your deadline and productivity numbers. After all you will end up with a minimum number of words per hour that you need to write to stay on schedule and come hell or high water you have to stay determined to make that deadline. You do not want someone though who is going to brow beat you to write. They have to understand that there are times when you have blocked time on your calendar to write but you are not keeping up with your schedule. Usually a firm, gentle nudge will get you going again. This person, this time accountant if you want to call them, will remind you of your end goal. They will talk about what it will feel like to hold that manuscript in your hands, that it will become published, they will ask what seems to be holding back your writing - in other words they will cheer you on, encouraging you from the sidelines while watching the clock. This approach goes further toward motivating you than someone telling you that you are behind time and must catch up on your writing. So be careful whom you choose to make you accountable to yourself, your project and your goals. If you really think about it, you are doing this selfishly for yourself because you have to get that story told. So stay the course and buckle down as best as you can to the schedule you created and write! 5) Lost Muse:

Your muse may become lost but don't worry, as your inspiration will return if you take a break.

There are some days you just plain don't feel like writing, or maybe story seems to have hit a roadblock in your consciousness. This happens to most writers, so don't freak out. Go with the flow, but be honest with yourself. Have you really, really tried to get around that roadblock? If so and you're banging your head against the wall - stop!

It happens to writers that our muse, our inspiration gets tired and needs a break. Since you already have the time blocked out to write use it instead to go do something fun. Get your mind off the manuscript and story for that block of time. There's nothing wrong with taking the occasional break and giving yourself a chance to recharge your writing batteries. As a matter of fact it can do wonders for yourself and your story. Just don't make it a habit. Remember your deadline and your accountant checking up on you! The one thing to do when your inspiration appears to have left you is to not panic. Your muse will return if deep in your gut you really need to get that story written and the manuscript finished. Sometimes you just need the opportunity to take a break, much like any other job, so bear that in mind when setting your deadline. You will have downtime where your writing will falter. Taking a break also allows your subconscious to work out a way around the block and put you back on track. You'll be amazed at what a little fresh air, a walk, even a quick chat on the phone can do to bring you out of that slump and swing you back into the writing saddle again.

The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


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6) Editing:

Editing is when the real work begins and you'll need help to finish your manuscript.

When you feel you that you have completed what you set out to write put it aside for a week or ten days to germinate and return to your normal lifestyle routine. Make sure though that after week or so you have set up a second schedule and deadline, letting friends and family know that you are now going into the editing stage of the project.

Self-editing is a tough chore because you already know what you've written. It is very easy to miss out on certain types of mistakes. So the first time you go through the manuscript you will find the glaring mistakes but you won't find them all and you certainly won't find most of the minor ones. It's virtually impossible, nay I say it's literally impossible, to find all of your mistakes on your first edit. Yes, you'll be editing your manuscript more than once. Since this is your first time through the editing process I would recommend before you start that you do a little research on the Internet about how to self-edit. It has its own tricks and tips that will save you plenty of time and develop a better manuscript in a much shorter period of time. As an example: The use of the word "and" is heavily overused in first draft writing because your brain is spitting out so many ideas. That's ok though. There's a trick to catching them all so you can take a look at how you might be able to edit the sentence to make the paragraph stronger. The less "ands" the tighter your story will read. Using your word processor you need to locate the Search and Replace function in the software. In Word it is under "Edit", "Replace". This will present you with a box of what you want to find and what you want to replace it with. In the Find What box place the word "and" (without the quotes.) In the Replace With box place the same word "and" (without the quotes.) Then click on the option in the bottom right corner that reads "More". Then click on "Format", "Font", and then "Color". Choose Red and the software will then search and replace all the "ands" in your manuscript, highlighting them in Red. This makes it extremely easy to see where they all are and how you're using them. Now you can study the sentence structure to see if you can cut some of those "ands" out by re-writing what it is that you have written. If the best structure is leaving the word "and" in the sentence then move on to the next one, and then the one after that until you come to the end of your manuscript. Once done, just perform the same function described above for search and replace except change the colour back to black. You've now tightened your manuscript up quite a bit. This is just one self-editing tip. You can do the same thing for the word "but", "it", etc. There are hundreds of self-editing tips out there but I recommend that you purchase the book below on self-editing or get it on loan from your library. The Internet also has a vast collection of tips so don't forget to check there as well. Once you've made your editing marks and/or actual changes hand it over to someone you trust to give you constructive criticism on the overall story as well as help catch any mistakes you may have missed on the first edit. Once you have finished this draft you will need another trustworthy person for proof reading. Yup! There's more to do. You're not done quite just yet. This is all part and parcel of the editing process.

The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


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7) Proof Reading:

Vital to your success is a good proof reader who is proficient and well read in your genre.

A proof reader, preferably, needs to know very little about the subject matter you have written about unless of course you have written scientific or technical content. Proof reading is somewhat akin to a customer who has picking up your book in a store and only knows the synopsis of the story by reading the back jacket. That's the type of proof reader you want to find, however they also have to be very well read, literate and someone you trust to give a constructive critique.

A proof reader should also provide an opinion about the story, as well as point out story flow errors, location, tense, structure, and date errors, etc. Hence the reason for the person to be very well read, preferably in your genre of writing, and have the knowledge needed to see beyond the printed word and study flow, structure, etc. You can also use more than one proof reader to get additional critique and different opinions. A book reading group of trusted friends for example will provide you with a lot of different ideas, as well as opinions about your story. You need a thick skin though. Be prepared for the person who doesn't like what you've written. Bill Cosby said it best when asked what was his secret to success? I paraphrase his answer: "There is one sure fire way to failure and that's attempting to please everyone." The proof reader will offer a further set of eyes looking for common errors that may have been missed by both writer and editor (if you used a third party and didn't self-edit) in the first draft. A proof reader can also be a fountain of additional ideas adding further substance and extra depth to your story by pointing out areas where there is not enough detail or too much detail, such as in character development, setting details, historical references, etc. When the proof reader is done ‌ back to writing you go! 8) Re-Write:

Making changes to what you have already written is paramount to cleaning up your writing.

When you have both the editing performed and the proof reader's ideas on how to polish the manuscript you have to start to make some decisions. First correct any obvious errors the proof reader has pointed out to you such as grammar, spelling, character description errors (in one place you said the character's eyes were blue and in another brown.) Then, more importantly, begin to decide which characters, plot(s), settings, etc. need to be changed to create a better manuscript reading experience.

This is where your in-depth knowledge of the story comes into play. There may be specific reasons why you have created a shallow character or didn't provide full details of the setting because that's what you believe reads best. Maybe you have plans for a future manuscript for book two that will fill in those details at a later point in time. Whatever the case may be you must take into serious consideration the comments and suggestions put forth by your proof reader (assuming you trust their judgement) and make decisions based upon their opinion, quite possibly filling in details or changes because parts of the story are simply poorly written. Assuming you decide that their comments and suggestions bear merit you will then begin the re-write process. This can be very difficult when changing, as a simple example, your main character's eye colour from brown to blue. You have to search through the manuscript to ensure there are no other references to the character's eye colour. Don't forget your search and replace function to assist you in finding the changes. More difficult changes can occur when it is decided that, as an example that is a complicated re-write, the setting would be better off in Paris, France rather than London, England. A change of this magnitude will manifest myriad problems that need to be dealt with such as change in dialogue accents, character name change, even the types of food eaten, hotels used and names of roads travelled upon. The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


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As you can see, getting the first draft written is actually somewhat the easier part of writing. You just let the words flow, provide dedication, time and have the desire to tell the story. I believe it was Ernest Hemmingway who said, "When I write a first draft it's like vomiting words on to a page. Then I have to clean it up. But first I put it aside for a few days, then come back to the story so that I have a fresh perspective." Don't let changes overwhelm you. Take your time, relax and contemplate the best alternatives you can find to better your manuscript. I forget who said the following and I probably don't have it written exactly word for word, however if you: "Use the perfect word, the perfect verb, the perfect adjective and spend your time making the perfect sentences you will create the perfect paragraph. If every paragraph in your writing is perfect you will hold in your hands the perfect manuscript." That's quite a high standard to try and achieve, but it's one that I wanted to mention so that you sit back to try and find those perfect words and sentences. Even if you perfect half your manuscript it will be much better than when you originally started out writing. It is also quite normal for a manuscript to go through numerous edits, proof reads and re-writes until you finally achieve the goal that you set out to accomplish. Just don't let it all intimidate you. Many writers falter at this stage in the game. Don't be one of them. Persistence and perseverance will pay off.

Presentation, simply put, is you selling your story to an agent or a publisher so that you end up with a book.

9) Presentation: Creating a polished manuscript ready for an agent or publisher to review as a possible saleable book is a completely other type of job. You don't send the whole manuscript at first. You send a synopsis or at most the first chapter, plus a cover letter. The document you are reading is not the place for explaining all of the steps and requirements to perform a proper manuscript presentation. This document is aimed at helping you first finish your manuscript. 10) Moving Into The Wrap:

You'll need third-party people to start wrapping up your project and moving it toward the stores.

Find yourself an Intellectual Property Rights Lawyer to represent you in all matters concerning contractual agreements between you and/or agents and publishers. Even if you are going to self-publish your book it is a good idea to spend the time and possibly a little money getting consultation from this type of lawyer who will help protect your work. You may not use this person right away since you haven't presented your manuscript to anyone, however you will need this contact in the future and it has to be someone you are comfortable doing business with.

Now, even after you have performed all of the above, let's assume story is accepted by a publisher however their editor and proof reader decide that further changes are required before it is ready for the publisher to print the book. If that happens the stakes have just gone up a few notches. You now have a publisher willing to publish the book or an agent ready to present it to a publisher(s) however what happens if you're advised that the setting would be better off in New York and not London? What do you do? The decision you have to make is either change it all to a New York setting in order to be published / represented or turn down their offer then look for another publisher and/or agent. Ultimately only you can make this decision. You still have full creative license and the right to do what you want with the manuscript, however you actually need third party advice. The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


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You need someone outside of the whole project that is knowledgeable and can give an objective opinion on what you should consider; hence your lawyer is one person who comes into play. Ask him / her for their advice and take it into consideration. Also go to a few of the larger writing forums available on the Internet and ask there. You're not the first, and you won't be the last writer who has faced this type of issue. I will warn you to take everything with a grain of salt (i.e. don't believe every word or opinion voiced) before making your decision. 11) Completion:

It's time to celebrate! Throw a book launch party, assemble your friends, your work's complete!

A writer is hit with conflicting emotions when the manuscript has finally been completed, accepted and about to be published, or actually is published. Usually the two emotions are one of depression and one of celebration.

The depression is caused by the fact that "your baby" has grown up and left the nest. It's on its own now in the great big world of publishing and book selling. Once your book is printed and promoted it will either die on the bookshelves, generate mediocre sales or become a big hit. Little of this you will have control over. You will more than likely perform book tours, readings, promote the book, but ultimately the consumer will decide whether to buy it or not. The best way to drag yourself out of the doldrums is to celebrate the fact that you have actually finished what you set out to do. You've written a finished, polished manuscript that has been printed! Make your celebration a big event, inviting all the people you didn't have time for or who sacrificed their time to help you while you were writing to participate in the joyful experience of having a book published. After all, especially if this is your first book, it is probably one of the highest accomplishments of your life! Many writers throw a launch party. They will read passages from the book and give all of their guests copies of the book, assuming it has already been published. Even if your book hasn't been published you can usually get advance copies for your personal use from your publisher for you to give away. With or without an actual printed book, throw a party, paint the town red as the expression goes, let your hair down, get loose and enjoy. It is not every day, if your manuscript has been printed, that you become a published author - however for the rest of your life you will always know yourself as an author and a writer. After the party is over it's time to sit down and start writing your next manuscript. Don't rest on your laurels. If you want to be a "one-hit wonder" then fine, but if you want to be known as an established author it's time to get back to work on your next big idea for a story. Established authors almost always have multiple books and manuscripts on the go at the same time. I wish you the best of luck in your project. Recommended Books: Natalie Goldberg: Writing Down the Bones http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=ms_83 Jerry Cleaver: Immediate Fiction: Complete Course http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=astore13 James Scott Bell: Plot & Structure http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=solo35 Renni Browne: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=astore22 Chris Baty: No Plot? No Problem! http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=solo32 Alexander Steele, ED.: Writing Fiction http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=wsc35 The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.


This Resource Has Been Supplied Free Of Charge By The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l. http://www.fwointl.com/ This File May Be Freely Distributed As Long As The Complete Content, Footer And Header Are Left Intact And Not Modified. The Instant Writing Resources Tool Bar - 1000s Of Free Resources. http://www.fwointl.com/instant_writing_resources_tb.html Writer's Banner Exchange. Exchange Traffic With Writers, Agents, And Publishers. http://www.writerstrafficexchange.com/

Robert Lee Brewer: Writer's Markets http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=markets_wm Alice Pope: Novel & Short Story Writer's Markets http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=markets_nss Robert Lee Brewer: Poet's Markets http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=markets_pm Caroline Taggart: UK Writer's Markets http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=markets_uk Recommended Courses: Gotham Writers' Workshops: Article Writing http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=Goth_AR How To Freelance http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=Goth_HF Novel Writing http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=Goth_NV Nonfiction Writing http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=Goth_NF Romance Writing http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=Goth_RM Screenwriting http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=Goth_SC See All The Courses http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=Goth_All Software: Write It Now: http://fwointl.com/LMPmail/link.php?id=win

The Freelance Writing Organization - Int'l http://www.fwointl.com its associates and owners do not take responsibility for your use of this file nor the contents within. The following information is to be used to expand your knowledge of writing however use of the provided information is not intended to guarantee employment nor income. We are not liable in any way whatsoever by your use of the suggestions and content you are about to read.

How to Get Your Manuscript Finished  

This is a nuts and bolts document about how to write a finished manuscript. The content deals mostly with book writing however can be used t...

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