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COVER STORY-“MUST KNOW PROVISIONS” ..page 7 Salient Points of: R.A. 9994- “AN ACT GRANTING ADDITIONAL BENEFITS AND PRIVILEGES TO SENIOR CITIZENS, FURTHER AMENDING REPUBLIC ACT NO. 7432, AS AMENDED, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS “AN ACT TO MAXIMIZE THE CONTRIBUTION OF SENIOR CITIZENS TO NATION BUILDING, GRANT BENEFITS AND SPECIAL PRIVILEGES FOR OTHER PURPOSES” PAGE 8- SENIORS IN THE USA A glimpse of the statues and status of the senior citizens in a developed country. By : RBeeDee

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PAGE 32-WHAT SUCCESS IS ALL ABOUT (Back to back) Two officers and gentlemen on their prime ears still part of the nation building. By : gVanD

PAGE 11-SNIPPETS Short, informative & true to life story encountered by the writer, a senior citizen. By : May Pen

PAGE 34-BRAIN CHALLENGES Get your pen and let us start an exercise for the brain. By : gVanD

PAGE 15– AGING AND DEMENTIA A ‘must” read article written by a registered Nurse based in Australia. By : Julie M. Penano, RN

PAGE 36- PLACES, EVENT & MILETONES

PAGE 22- LGU ON THE SPOT Tackles facts, issues, information, suggest and recommends appropriate actions for better service . By: EBDiocares

PAGE 34- HATS OFF Face to face with a senior at the helm of a of a city, south of Manila of the office of the

PAGE 30 INSTEAD OF TAKING THE BACK SEAT The choices between resting & relaxing, work & earn, time is clicking fast.- By : Ghio Angelo Ong

PAGE 38- WHEN I TURNED 60 True feelings, apprehensions and more upon reaching age 60. By: Julie MP

Share your momentous event. This is section is open to everyone from around the globe.

Senior Citizens Affairs (OSCA)


Dear Editor: Thank you so much for having a reading material that focuses on the subject about senior citizens. Are all your writers seniors? I am not yet a senior, but I want also to write also for the magazine. How can I reach you? Digna T. Salvacion, Sta. Mesa, Manila We appreciate your interest to contribute for the magazine. We have writers who are 4th year students of the Polytechnic University of the Philippines. You can submit your articles to the Editorial office for consideration or call the office at (02) 3543110.-ED. I’m proud to say that I’m one of those who benefited from your magazine. Through your magazine, my request for the inclusion of my name -qualified and entitled to the Social Pension which had long been filed was approved and will receive the pension starting this year 2103. Thank you so much to the people who conceptualized this reading material. Remedios L. Pajimulla, Leo St. Sampaloc, Manila Thank you so much for the kind words. We will feature in this magazine issues and causes that are dear to seniors and we will try to assist in other ways whenever we can. This magazine will be the “voice of the seniors.”- ED. Unique magazine! I am 68 years old and this is the first time I saw an all-senior magazine. I like your section: “Profile of a senior.” Do you select personalities to feature in that section? Rey M. Salazar, 10th Avenue, Caloocan City Yes, we will feature seniors, regardless of status in life, who continue to be productive and successful in his/her field of work despite the age. You can call us at Telephone No. (02) 354-3110, if you know somebody who you think deserves to be recognized.-ED Editorial Board EVANGELINE B. DIOCARES, Managing Editor International Editors: JULIE M. PENANO, RN-Australia ROSE B. DIOCARES, CPA, MBA- USA Contributing writers: TERESITA D. VENTURA, MD; JESS FERRERA, GHIO ANGELO ONG Editorial Assistant : JOY S. DIOCARES; ZENAIDA B. DIOCARES Editorial Consultant: EDNA T. BERNABE, DEM

The SENIORS magazine is an independent reading material, published by BARBDIO Philippines Inc. with SEC Registration No. CS20125996. Reproduction in any form is not allowed without the written permission from the publisher. We reserve the right to reject or edit articles that are submitted. All materials submitted will be treated as assigned for publication without any condition. For feedback or comments, you can call the Editorial Office at telephone No. (02) 354-3110 or mail at: 769 Leo St. District IV Sampaloc, Manila


Our theme for this issue is about the laws that care for and provide benefits and privileges for the seniors. The Philippine senior population according to the US Census Bureau’s International data base is at 6.4 million for over 60 years or 6.6% of total population of 9.9 million at year 2010 while the United States senior population is at 57 million or 18.5% out of 308.7 million. This number is expected to grow dramatically as the baby boomer generation gaps. In this maiden issue, we feature the salient provisions of the Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010 (RA9994) with bullet points listing of benefits for seniors, who are defined as 60 and over. We have a regular feature about Seniors Citizens in the U.S. In this issue, we traced the historical evolution of the various U.S. statues that have been enacted in the course of the country’s history for the benefit and care of its senior population. We feature local government unit (LGU) and what they are doing for their senior population. For this issue, we are featuring City of Manila, Municipality of Sampaloc, District IV, Barangay 569. In line with President Aquino’s “Daang Matuwid” program, we hope our magazine can contribute in making the LGU’s transparent and accountable to its constituents through the featured article. We honor President Aquino, his leadership of the country and his commitment to the cause of the senior population. We have a regular feature wherein we tell stories of outstanding personalities, known and not soknown who are successful and continue to be part of the nation building. We celebrate their success by featuring them in the magazine. In this issue, we profile two gentlemen in their 80’s, still continuously striving in their field of undertakings. “Chase your dream”, is a true-to-life story,

to be a nurse someday and her sheer determination paid off, she finally finished her nursing degree at the age of 58 years old and presently works as a nurse and based in Australia. On the subject, “Living, loving and learning”, the author expresses her inner thoughts and sensitiveness on a day to day event as it happens. “Snippets”, a short and informative story a must be read in maintaining healthy and good body condition. An article written by a doctor, “The Doctor is in”, tackles about the experiences that any doctor would encounter on her daily practice of the profession and discuss about the common ailments of a senior citizen. “Aging and Dementia-”, - a thought provoking and well-researched article deserving of and worthy of our time to read. We are open to consider for publication articles on topic of interest and about seniors from those with the flair for writing regardless of your age. We receive contents from pool of writers from Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP) starting from the Dean and some of her 4th students at the College of Communication. We envisioned the Seniors Magazine to be the “voice of the seniors” for information dissemination and enlightenment. We dedicate this 1st issue to our dear mother, Bienvinida B. Diocares, our inspiration for this magazine. We hope you enjoy reading this magazine.


Ed. Note: In this section, we published the “MUST� read provisions of the RA 9994-Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010.

As amended Section 4: Privileges for the Senior Citizens- The senior citizens shall be entitled to the following: The grant of twenty percent (20%) discount and exemption from the value-added tax (VAT), if applicable, on the sale of the following goods and services from all establishments, for the exclusive use and enjoyment or availment of senior citizens: On the purchase of medicines, including the purchase of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, and such other essential medical supplies, accessories and equipment to be determined by the Department of Health. The DOH shall establish guidelines and mechanisms of compu8lsory rebates in the sharing of the burden of discounts among retailers, manufacturers and distributors, taking into consideration their respective margins; On the professional fees of attending physician/s in all private hospitals, medical facilities, outpatient clinics and home health care services; On the professional fees of licensed professional health workers providing home health care services as endorsed by private hospitals or employed through home health care employment agencies; On medical and dental services, diagnostic and laboratory fees in all private hospitals, medical facilities, outpatient clinics, and home health care services, in accordance with the rules and regulations to be issued by the DOH, in coordination with the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PHILHEALTH); In actual fare for land transportation travel in public utility buses (PUBs),

public utilities jeepneys (PUJs), taxis, Asian Utility Vehicles (AUVs), shuttle services and public railways, Light Railway Transit (LRT), including Light Rail Transit (LRT), Mass Rail Transit (MRRT) and the Philippine National Railways (PNR); In actual transportation fare for domestic air transport services and sea shipping vessels and the like, based on the actual fare and advanced booking; On the utilization of services in hotels and similar lodging establishments, restaurants and recreation centers; On admission fees charged by theaters, cinema houses and concert halls, circuses, carnivals, and other similar places of culture, leisure and amusement; and On funeral and burial services for the death of senior citizens; (b) Exemption from the payment of individual income taxes of senior citizens who are considered to be minimum wage earners in accordance with Republic Act No. 9504; (c) The grant of a minimum of five percent (5%) discount relative to the monthly utilization of water and electricity supplied by public utilities; Provided, That the individual meters for the foregoing utilities are registered in the name of the senior citizen residing therein; Provided further, That the monthly consumption does not exceed one hundred kilowatt hours (100Wh) of electricity and thirty cubic meters (30m3) of water; a, furthermore, That the privilege is granted per household regardless of the number of senior citizens residing therein; It is also noteworthy to mention that as per Sec.4, letter ( l) states that : death benefit assistance of a minimum of two thousand pesos (Php 2,000.00) shall be given to the nearest surviving relative of a deceased senior citizen which amount shall be subject to adjustable due to inflation in accordance with the guidelines by the DSWD.


POPULATION- The elderly population in the U.S.

age 60 and over has increased remarkably according to the most recent survey conducted by the U. S. Census Bureau in 2010. The percentage went from 6.4% in 1900 to 18.4% in 2010 and projected to be at 25.5% in 2050. After the end of World War 2, the Bureau of Census reported an explosion of live births. This generation who were born between the years 1946 -1964 came to be known as the baby boomers. The first year baby boomers turned 65 in 2011. The aging of this population explains generally the dramatic increases that are happening to the older population statistics. The chart below was compiled by the U.S. Administration on Aging using data and tables of report prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau.

1935- The Social Security Act provides for Old Age Assistance and Old Age Survivors Insurance

1937-The Railroad Retirement Act that provided pensions for retired railroad employee and spouses . 1962-Established an independent and permanent Commission on Aging

The LAWS that care: Below are some of the more important statues enacted by the U. S. government to care for its elderly population. The photo of the president who signed them is below it. . 1920-The Civil Service Retirement Act provided for many governmental employees.


. 1965-The Older Americans Act signed into law on July 14, 1965; authorizes grants to 56 state agencies on aging, area ;

.

2003-The Medicare Prescription Program, Improvement and Modernization Act ; provides for prescription benefits; 

1965- The Social Security Act expanded to include Medicare, health insurance for the elderly;

2006- The Lifespan Respite Care Act; bring together Federal, state and local resources and funding streams to help support, expand and streamline the delivery of plan and emergency respite services;

. 2010- The Affordable Care Act that provides choices of insurance carriers for consumers; hold insurance companies accountable; for 65 and over, it strengthens Medicare and provides access to preventive services and prescription drug discounts. Sources: http://www.aoa.gov http://www. Whitehouse.gov http://www. U.S.Census Bureau

Medicare Health insurance for the fol-

. 1990-Age Discrimination in Employ- lowing: ment Act made it illegal, in most cir. People 65 or older cumstances, for companies to discrim. People under 65 inate against older workers in employwith certain disaee benefits accredited service providbilities ers and tribal organizations for the de. People of any age livery of social and nutrition services with End-of to older individuals and their caregivers Stage-Renal Disease 

2000 - Amendments to the older American Act that established the New Family Caregiver Support Program

4 - Different Parts: Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) Helps cover inpatient care in hospitals Helps cover skilled nursing facility, hospice and home health care


Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) Helps cover doctors’ and other health care providers services, outpatient care, durable equipment and home health care Helps cover some preventive services to help maintain your health and to keep certain illness from getting worse

Medicare Part C (also known as Medicare Advantage) Health plan options run by Medicare approved private insurance companies

Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Coverage Helps pay for cost of prescription drugs approved by the FDA and sold in the United States Run by Medicare-approved private insurance companies Source: http://www.medicare.gov

Benefits to retired military veterans and their families The U. S. government provides veteran's benefits programs to certain World War 11 veterans who served in the active U.S. military from September 16, 1940 through July 24, 1947 as well as veterans of the U. S. Armed Forces living in the Philippines. This also includes Filipino veterans who served in the organized military of the Philippines from July 26, 1941-December 301946, that were in the service of the U.S. Armed Forces. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) administers veteran’s claims. It operates a Regional Office (RO) and a new $30 million state-of the-art Outpatient Clinic (OPC) hospital facility located

at the Seafront Compound, 1501 Roxas Boulevard in Pasay City. The RO process veterans’ claims for Compensation and Pension Benefits. VA pension for veterans is paid to wartime veterans who have limited or no income and are 65 or older and for those under 65 who are permanently and totally disabled. Congress sets the maximum annual pension rate and pension is determined by the number of dependents, other income and net worth. Prior to using their VA medical care benefits at VA hospital, veterans are rated for their service connected disability and are assigned priority. Rehabilitation and Employment Services. SSS processes benefits claims for: a) Retirement, b) Disability, c) Survivors, d) Supplemental Security Income, and e) Medicare. Retirement benefits must be claimed based on SSS age schedule. Veterans wishing to retire in the Philippines can bring with them their Social Security Pension. Special veterans benefits are available from SSA for those who are: 1) 65 years old or older as of December 14, 1999, 2) World War 11 veterans as described in 1st paragraph; 3) be eligible for SSI for December 1999; 4) be eligible for the month the veteran apply; and 5) have other benefit income that is less than 75 percent of the current SSS benefit rate (For 2012 $2,000 for individual and $3,000 for couple.) SSI benefit for 2012 is $698 per person and $1,098 per couple. Tricare, a medical insurance available to U.S. active service members, veterans and their families is accepted and can be used in most accredited Philippinebased hospitals and health care centers. Sources:http://www.socialsecurity.gov http://ww2.va.gov For inquiries about this article Contact: rosebd@seniormagPhI.com


Ed. Note: This is a true to life encounter by the author, a successful registered nurse based in Australia. Yesterday amongst the mail waiting for me was a notice saying I’m due for a mammogram. To all ladies out there, you’d know what I’m talking about. Now, I don’t want to put anyone off getting a mammogram, because they are life savers, but I hope that one day there will be a better way of checking a breast for tumors than squashing it flat enough to slide under a door. When I had mine the first time, eight years ago, the lady said “the procedure will be a bit uncomfortable.” I remember no sooner had my robe to the floor then the mammographer between two flat steel plates, which she squeezed tighter with every touch of her foot pedal. Two huge tears fell involuntarily from my eyes because of the pain. She had tiny hands that used to twist and turn my breast trying to fit them between the steel plates. Did she not see it was still attached to my body and that was just the way I liked it? My goodness! When she was satisfied, she flicked the camera or whatever it was and “took pictures.” The relief I felt when my breasts sprang free was memorable.

In spite of the “unpleasantness”, got to love those mammograms though. Undoubtedly, mammogram could save our lives.


Ed Note: The writer of this article is presently based in Australia.

We adults spend endless hours

analysing everything in life (at least I do), and sometimes we get too scared to make those big decisions. Three years ago, I finally embarked on the path to a lifelong dream: I finally decided to pursue my career in nursing. When I was younger I never stopped to think about anything and loved anything more than to take a risk, much to my parents’ consternation (bless their souls). Like eloping and flying miles and miles to be with the man who became my husband. What we all know deep down is that the most exciting things in life are usually those that fill us with the most fear. The ones that make us sweat. Like starting a new job, meeting a new friend, moving to a different city, migrating to another country, saying "I do", having a baby, buying a house or going back to school. The prospect of studying again is terrifying but without a doubt the most exciting. I feel alive again. I'm glad I had the courage to go and applied for a place at a university. When I got an offer for a Bachelor of Nursing degree and sent my acceptance, I came away feeling informed and empowered.

The three years and a half it took me to finish my degree were stressful because I was working full time while studying part time. I remember, in October 2011, the last day of finals has come and gone, and four weeks of that month was the last four-week clinical practice for the semester. What begun was the impatient checking on my university’s student page waiting to see the grades. Not that I was worried, I was fairly confident that I will pull off all Credits and Distinctions. Overall those years definitely had good semesters. I met a lot of good people in my clinical practice and learned a lot of useful things, though it certainly did have some downs, the stress and assessments were both exercises in half comatose clock watching combined with frantic last minute cramming and working evening shifts. Doing my nursing degree, mental health was a required subject, therefore a necessary one which is now done with. I had high hopes for that subject in the beginning of the semester, as I already work in a mental health facility. Sadly, the subject material was a mix of things I already knew, obscure details about protocols that I don’t really care about, and random study cases that the lecturer seemed to cram into everything she could. Nursing interventions and rehabilitation is great and all, but when you spend entire lectures sitting around talking about renal failure, electrolytes, and PR bleeding, you end up feeling that unless you’re writing your own diagnosis and care plan,


you really don’t need to memorize all the details as long as you understand the concepts. It didn’t help that the lecturer was rather boring to listen to. And so another semester comes to an end. Because I did my degree by distance, I was required to be in the campus for a week or so every semester for the Compulsory Residential School. During those times in campus, it was nice to see familiar faces and meet some new ones. I attempted to socialize a bit more every time and ended up meeting a lot of people in the process, getting to know some of them a bit better. I spend time with either killing time between lectures or sitting in the IT Lab in the library touching base with friends through email. I love this time away from work and home because I have time to write. Without my education to get in the way of my learning, the side projects and possibilities are endless.

Ronnie and Emma, that I still touch base with in spite of the distance. Ronnie wrote: “hi juls, congrats, ds is no ordinary accomplishment, and i knew ds day will come coz u r one marvelous woman, u've given ur kids n their kids an inspiration more concrete than what they cud get from books. i'll tell my kid ur story.” Emma’s message is: “Know what? I've been telling everyone about your hunger for learning. And this is a concrete evidence. Congrats Julie.” This achievement fulfilled my childhood dream. As what the guest speaker said that morning during the ceremony, there are three C's in nursing: CARING, COMPASSION and COMMITMENT. But in practicing these, she added, we should never forget to look after ourselves. Otherwise we get burnt out. So during the busy-ness of taking care of my patients, I take a moment to admire the blue sky, feel the falling rain and smell the flowers. And most of all, I always thank God for everything. In celebration of this occasion, I hosted a dinner party at a restaurant and invited everyone who has watched me throughout my nursing career.

Finally, on 17 December 2011, I walked up the stage, received my Bachelor of Nursing diploma and was regisFor all of you out there, never tered to practice my profession as a be afraid to take that risk, ask that nurse. question or push yourself a bit furIn the morning of my graduation, ther because as I learnt over the I received from relatives, friends and years, everything is possible. workmates congratulatory messages. It was very touching that these people reThere is no telling how many miles you will have to run while membered me on this momentous day chasing a dream. of my life. Two of the messages stood out which I’d like to include here. They ~Author Unknown were from my two best friends in high school,


by affecting intellectual daily living. Editor's note: The writer is a Registered Nurse with Australian Health Practitioner Agency (APHRA) since 2011, currently employed by Sydney West Area Health Service in a psychiatric facility. The article was originally submitted as a term paper, modified for publication, for her subject Health Optimization 1, Gerontic Nursing Care, while completing her Bachelor of Nursing at Charles Sturt University."

Ageing is an essential, natural process of life and is unavoidable and irreparable. Following is the story of Josefina, a 78 year old person who has dementia and how the physiological effects of the ageing process affect her activities of daily living. The story will chronicle the health promotion, health education strategies, suggested interventions and care for this older person. Josefina is in great shape for her age, outgoing. An active Catholic she goes to Mass every day, do her 30 minute walk after Mass, attends church group activities and works once a week as a volunteer in a public hospital. Her son had moved away with study and work and had married and settled in another part of town. Her eldest daughter also married and settled some distance from where Josefina lives. She visited regularly, as much as her job and family commitments allowed. No one thought that Josefina had any problems until after her 78th birthday. Her daughter saw changes in her mother’s behavior and routine that puzzled and worried her. She noticed that her mother started to get information confused, she would forget names of items and people, she had had cooker gas taps left on, lost keys and a few incidences of being lost after her daily walk, but she thought it was just minor stuff. As far as her daughter was aware Josefina continued to

that was not the case. Josefina started Dementia may involve to deteriorate in her ability to organize disturbances in memory, herself and she appeared to lost inter- language use, perception and motor skills and may est in doing things. interrupt the ability to Her daughter attributed this to signs learn necessary skills, of senile dementia and the result of solve problems, think bereavement related to the death of abstractly and make her father two years before her moth- judgment. As we grow er’s 78th birthday. The daughter en- older, a number of physicouraged her mother to be as active ological and physical as possible. Josefina struggled with changes occur. These the encouragement but slowly she changes include sensory seemed to changes; bones, muscles retire within and joint changes; heart herself. This and circulation changes; went on for respiratory changes; remonths until nal changes and brain the daughter and nervous system received a changes. call from a neighbor who Sensory Changes was concerned when Josefina was Being 78 years old, Josefound wondering outside unable to fina’s eardrum and the find her way home. When taken to bones of the middle ear her doctor, she was referred for spe- and other structures decialist assessment. In the clinic, teriorate. This can result Josefina was not able to understand in Josefina having diffiwhat was being said to her. The doc- culty maintaining her tor explained the diagnosis of Alzhei- balance. Josefina’s hearmer’s disease, the symptoms, the ing is impaired. She has treatments so that her daughter can problem hearing higher help her mother live well with the dis- pitched tones. She is not able to make out sounds ease. or words when there is Alzheimer’s function and other cogni- background noise and tive skills, eventually resulting in a has difficulty hearing person’s inability to perform activities conversations especially of disease is the most common cause if the speaker has a high of dementia in older people. Demen- voice. tia is a group of symptoms that interfere with a person’s daily life by


The flexibility of her eye is also decreased and it takes Josefina more time to accommodate to changes in light. She gets She cannot tolerate glare, frustrated or and have difficulty adapting to darkembarrassed ness or bright light. when she is unable to This is due to decreased size understand what is being said. when she of her pupil. Josefina’s eyes are dry is unable to understand what is being due to less production of tears. She said. cannot tolerate glare, and have difficulty adapting to darkness or bright light. She sometimes asks people to This is due to decreased size of her repeat themselves during conversations. pupil. Josefina’s eyes are dry due to Josefina’s eye has sunk back into her eye less production of tears. To find relief, socket because the fat pads supporting she uses eye drops regularly. the eyes decrease with age. She wears prescription glasses because of changes Josefina made some adaptain her vision caused by degeneration of tions to cope with her vision changes. eye muscles and clouding of the lens. She She gave up driving at night. But with loves to read the daily paper and solve the her dementia, she has lost the ability crossword puzzle. She now struggles with to drive a car. Her son in law placed her reading because of dementia. more lights evenly around her house so that the entire house is lit. Because As people aged, the lens turns red light produces fewer glares than a yellow. Hence, Josefina’s ability to see As regular incandescent bulb, red lights people aged, the lens turns yellow. are kept on in darkened areas such as Hence, Josefina’s ability to see colors is the hallway and bathroom to help affected. She can identify easily the colors Josefina see. Josefina has a reyellow, red and orange than blue and duced sense of taste and smell caused green. To help her with these changes by her decreased taste buds and loss and tell where things are and make it easiof nerve endings in her nose. Salty er for her to perform her daily activities, and sweet tastes are lost first. This is her house was repainted with warm conwhy Josefina uses excess trasting colors of yellow, orange, and red. sugar and salt in her food. The same warmer shades fabrics were The loss of smell and taste used for her bed linen and clothes. is important in Josefina’s Josefina’s peripheral vision is safety as she might not reduced which makes her turn her head to know danger things such as see to the sides. The reduced peripheral spoiled food, noxious gases vision sometimes results in spilt food and and smoke. drinks.

In the areas of her body, the normal ageing changes are thinning of Josefina’s dermis and epidermis, reduction in subcutaneous tissue, a decrease in and thickening of blood vessels, and a decrease in the number of melanocytes, Langerhans cells and Merkel cells. This results in less padding and thinner skin causing Josefina’s difficulty differentiating between cool and cold. As a result, Josefina always wears a cardigan. Josefina moisturizes her skin regularly because her skin is dry, rough, scaly and itchy. Josefina’s sensitivity to pain is reduced as well as her ability to detect vibration, touch, and pressure. This increases the risk of pressure sores ulcers. As a prevention, the community nurse should educate the daughter to encourage Josefina to move from room to room during the day within reason, rather than bringing everything to her in one place; for example, morning tea in the kitchen, lunch in the dining room, sleep in the bedroom.


Bones, Muscles and Joint Changes Josefina is vulnerable to broken bones because her bones have become brittle. This is caused by muscle atrophy and loss of menopause calcium and other minerals in her in her bones. Josefina’s height has decreased caused by her shortened trunk and spine. However, the long bones long bones of her arms and legs do not change length which makes her arms and legs look longer compared with her shortened trunk.

Josefina should be encour- It is a common belief that all aged to be out of bed as much as elderly people become senile. possible. Many people blame Renal Changes increased confusion due to getJosefina develops ting old when in reality, it may urinary tract infection every be caused by an illness, such now and then. This is due as Alzheimer’s disto weakening of the muscle strength, decreased tone ease.confusion and weakened bladder resulting in the bladder not emptying completely when urinating. Another effect of these changes is the reduced time span between the need to urinate and the action of urinating causing urinary incontinence. A decline in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and reduced regulation of renal function is another change caused by the ageing process. The reduction in GFR will make Josefina more prone to the harmful effects of nephrotoxic drugs like the radiographic contrast compounds.

A significant change in the respiratory system for many older people like Josefina is that the airways close more readily. When collapse an older person breathes shallowly or in bed for a longer time, the airways tend to collapse. This Brain and Nervous System Changes increases the risk of developing pneumoThe brain and nervous sysnia or other lung problems. tem go through natural changes as Because of her daily walks and people age. The brain and spinal cord active life before her diagnosis of Alzhei- decrease in size and transmission of mer’s disease, Josefina only suffers minor messages by nerve cells begin to stiffness from the breakdown of her joint slow down. The breakdown of nerve structures due to ageing process. But her cells can result in the collection of posture is slightly bent caused by the loss waste products in the brain tissue of bone density and thinning of bone tis- causing abnormal structures called sue. Her walking pattern is slower and plaques and tangles to form. A fatty shorter due to the deterioration of muscle brown pigment called lipofuscinfunctions especially in the lower limb. lipofuscin can also build up in nerve tissue. A significant change in the respiratory system for many older people like JoseSlowing of thought, memory, fina is that the airways close more readily. and thinking are seen as normal part When collapse an older person breathes of ageing. shallowly or in bed for a longer time, the airways tend to collapse. This increases the risk of developing pneumonia or other lung problems.

Josefina and Dementia With dementia, Josefina’s feeling of control, competence, and well being gradually replaces with a sense of distress and fear. When she is taken out of the house for an hour or so, she gets anxious and disoriented. She cannot remember that she already had a cup of her favorite Milo, resulting in consumption of ten cups of Milo a day. She forgets her children's and grandchildren's visits, asking when they are coming to visit. Josefina’s , Despite the assaults of Alzheimer’s, other parts of Josefina’s brain appeared to retain more appropriate functioning. There were periods when she appeared lucid and thoughtful, one time curtly giving advice to her daughter on how to relate to her husband and 21 year old daughter. One time she told her daughter to be seated and not get up until she learned respect.


But on other times, she is a stranger, not recognizing her daughter or son. She gets irritated when she can not manage things that she has done all of her life, like carrying out the simple task of getting dressed. Sensory aides that will aid cognition and alert Josefina for safety were put in place. Josefina cannot find the toilet in the house; so her daughter removed the toilet door. To find her way around in the dark, a sensor light was put in the hall. Dangerous items such as power tools were removed. Appliances were replaced with ones that have automatic shut off feature. Her room is reasonably bright and sensory stimuli such as radio, television and night light were installed to help Josefina remain oriented and focused. The community nurse encouraged frequent visits by family and familiar people to ensure continuing interaction and to support Josefina to remain social.

The community nurse encouraged frequent visits by family and familiar people to ensure continuing interaction and to support Josefina to remain social. The community nurse can help by administering Josefina’s medication or arrange a blister pack and educate the daughter on how to dispense the drugs. Regular visits by the community nurse need to be carried out to monitor the effectiveness and potential side effects of medications.

To improve cognitive function or delay cognitive decline, the community nurse suggested appropriate cognitive enhancement techniques and social engagement. Supporting Josefina to engage in significant and focused activities will promote self esteem and help keep the skills that she still has as well as offer an opportunity for enjoyment, pleasure and social The community nurse can help by contact. To ensure that they remain administering Josefina’s medication or arrange meaningful, the activities undertaken a blister pack and educate the daughter on need to be person centered. how to dispense the drugs. Regular visits by the community nurse need to be carried out to Caring for Josefina in a holismonitor the effectiveness and potential side tic way involves acknowledging her effects of medications. unique qualities and identifying her Environmental cues or sensory aides personal and social needs. In waking that will aid cognition and alert Josefina for her up, a greeting of a gentle good safety were put in place. Josefina can not find morning and a cup of tea placed by the the toilet in the house; so her daughter re- bed is saying you are happy to see her moved the toilet door. To find her way around and make her feel valued . in the dark, a sensor light was put in the hall. Josefina is unable to bath or Dangerous items such as power tools were shower independently. In assisting her, removed. Appliances were replaced with ones she should be given a choice of bath that have automatic shut off feature. or shower and a choice of time of day Her room is reasonably to establish regularity. Making it a bright and sensory stimuli such as radio, televi- leisurely bath can make a difference sion and night light were installed to help Jose- and not just simply a place to get clean. It can be an opportunity to share fina remain oriented and focused. deeper conversation between mother and daughter.

Aromatherapy, hair dressing, massage, nail care, foot care, all these help to make Josefina feel valued and good about herself. Let Josefina choose what to wear. If she has always worn jewelry, she still might want to wear it. With regard to food, Josefina might still continue with her likes and dislikes. Consider the joy that she will experience through sharing meals with family or friends, participating in conversation or celebrating special occasions. Despite the difficulties associated with her cognitive impairment, the emphasis should always be on what she can achieve, rather than what she cannot. People with dementia still need to participate in life. They need a sense of community and belonging, the need to be needed, to continue to see meaning and purpose in life and not to feel useless. Josefina is still able to lay the table, clear away the crockery, help wash up, sort and fold the laundry. Allow her to perform these activities. These simple tasks will encourage conversation, help to maintain her manual skills, and create a feeling of satisfaction in a work well done.


But most important of all, these activities will give a continuing sense of role and purpose.

Also, even though there are many challenges of ageing, these can often be addressed through simple steps that improve communication and make the environment safer and easier for the older person to navigate. These steps may also help to make it easier for the older person to live independently for as long as possible.

DOI:10.1080/0264 0411003642098

Ditroiloa, M., Forteb, R., Benellia, P., Gambararaa, Religion is an important part of Josefina’s D. & De vitoc, G. (2010). life and still continues to be. She should be given Effects of age and time for worship and prayer. The repetitive religious limb dominance on upper ceremony gives familiarity and consistency and and lower limb muscle also allows for companionship and a sense of befunction in healthy males longing. and females aged 40-80 References years. Journal of Sports Consider Josefina’s bedtime rituals. She Sciences. 28(6), pp. 667might like a drink of her favorite Milo or music to Alzheimer Australia. (2009, De- 677. help her settle down to sleep. cember 21). Alzheimer’s disease Farley, A., McLafferty, E. [Fact Sheet]. & Hendry, C. (2006). The Establish opportunities for laughter Retrieved from: physiological effects of through videos or karaoke singing. Joking and http://www.alzheimers.org.au/ ageing on the activities of teasingand singing can still be enjoyable. If in a day content.cfm?infopageid=439 living. Nursing Standard. 20 Josefina will have enough joyful moments she will (45), 46-52, 54, 56. have had a good day at the end. Birkeland, A. & Natvig, G. K. (2009). Coping with ageing and Retrieved from Ageing is a normal physiological process failing health: a http://web.ebscohost.com/ that is not identical with disease and frailty. While qualitative study among ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer? losing body cells and body functions are part of the elderly living alone. In- vid=14&hid=13&sid=bf1c01 normal ageing process, older adults continue to ternational Journal of da-2b64-4f30-ac33lead a full and active life. The loss of function and Nursing Practice. 15(4), 33adf2905e68% age related changes in the body do not have to 257-264. 40sessionmgr10 impinge on their approach to life and their usual DOI: 10.1111/j.1440daily activities. However, when the older adult be172X.2009.01754.x Fletcher, K. (2008). Decomes unwell the loss has to be taken into account mentia nursing standard of and it should be acknowledged that the recovery Cohen-Mansfield, J. & Parpura- practice protocol: recogniprocess will be slower because of the normal age- Gill, A. (2007). Bathing: a frame- tion and management of ing process. It is therefore important that families work for intervention dementia. Hartford Institute have a good understanding of the normal physiofocusing on psychoso- for Geriatric Nursing. logical changes related with ageing and use this cial, architectural and human knowledge when taking care of the older person, factors considerations. Retrieved from so that they receive the quality care they are worArchives of Gerontology http://consultgerirn.org/ thy of. and Geriatrics. 45(2), 121-135. topics/dementia/ doi:10.1016/ want_to_know_more Josefina will need holistic attention that j.archger.2006.09.001 will give due respect to her physical, mental and Haak, M., Fange, emotional needs but also to her spiritual needs. Department of Veterans’ Affairs. A., Iwarsson, S. & Ivanoff, She may have lost a lot due to dementia, but she is (2006). Living with dementia. S.D. (2007). Home as a still herself inside and must be treated and valued ACT: Commonwealth of Aus- signification of independfor who she is. It is important to recognize that peo- tralia ence and autonomy: expeple age differently, so what is presented here may riences among very old DOI:10.1080/0264041100 Swedish people. not be exactly what you or your loved one experi3642098 ence.


Porth, C. (2007). Essentials of Pathophysiology (2nd ed.). Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/ USA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins pdfviewer?vid=20&hid=13&sid=bf1c01da-2b64-4f30 -ac33-33adf2905e68%40sessionmgr10 Rosedale, M. (2007). Loneliness: an exploration of meaning. Leonard, C. (2010). Treating the person, not demen- Journal American Psychiatric Nurses Association. 13(14), 201-209. tia. Working with Older People. DOI: 10.1177/1078390307306617 14(1), 16-18. Smith, S. & Gove, J. E. (2005, August). Physical Changes of Aging [Fact Sheet] 2005 Department of Family, Youth and Community SciMiller-Keane (2003). Ageing process. In M. T. ences, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, InstiO’Toole (Ed.), Encyclopedia and dictionary of meditute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of cine, nursing and allied health (p. 1038). Florida. Philadelphia: Elsevier Doi: 10.5042/wwop.2010.0073

National Institute of Health. (2008). Aging changes in the heart and blood vessels. Retrieved from: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/ article/004006.htm National Institute of Health. (2008). Aging changes Retrieved from: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/ article/004010.htm

Retrieved from: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu Stokes, G. (2010). Explaining about...day-to-day living with dementia. Working with Older People. 14(1), 5-7. Doi: 10.5042/wwop.2010.0070 World Health Organization. (1998). Growing older - staying well: ageing and physical Activity in everyday life.

Retrieved from: http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/1998/ National Institute of Aging. (2010, February 19). WHO_HPR_AHE_98.1.pdf Alzheimer's Disease [Fact Sheet]. Retrieved from: http://www.nia.nih.gov/Alzheimers/ Publications/adfact.htm Ott, C.H., Kelber, S.T. & Blaylock, M. (2010). Easing the way for spouse caregivers of individuals with dementia: a pilot feasibility study of a grief intervention. Research in Gerontological Nursing. 3(2), 89-99. Psychology, Health & Medicine. 11(4), 470-482. DOI: 10.1080/13548500600726633

"Those with dementia are still

people and they still have stories and they still have character and they're all individuals and they're all unique. And they just need to be interacted with on a human level." -Carey Mulligan-


If you have any of these symptoms, you must get to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. In my practice of medicine for the longest time, often times, I encounter stroke patients. Stroke, indeed is dangerous and in my personal view, individual who suffers stroke basically emanated from lack of love and attention from their love ones.

Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is happening by quickly dissolving the blood clot or by stopping the bleeding. Post-stroke rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment for stroke.� Source: NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

To further understand what stroke is ..fr. page 38 When I turned 60 all about, printed below is an article lifted however attired (my inner mirror tells me I look swell). from the National InI dare to wear funky baseball hats, skinny jeans, and stitute of Neurological hug whoever I want. I lie on a rock with the sun in my Disorders and Stroke face. Such freedom to be who I want and do what I wish! A developing independence is sensed, a natural “A stroke is a evolution toward the inevitable period when only one medical emergency. remains. Which I hope and pray won’t happen yet. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain And so dear friends, as you scurry along, stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. struggling to keep pace with the high-tech world, There are two kinds of stroke. The more compause to smell the rose...to hug a child. Forget hairmon kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood spray and enjoy the wind in your hair. Walk in the rain vessel in the brain. The other kind, called and smell the day. Listen to the clouds. Be kind. Keep hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood going through the pain, sorrow and disappointments, vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. and preserve, with love, your spirit; for shame, is sure"Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks ly a waste. I assure you, summer's growth will bring an (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the autumn harvest of freedom, and joy in the fruits of past brain is briefly interrupted. labor. Be not afraid to reach the pinnacle. The vista is Symptoms of stroke are: so very grand: to see where you've been, how far A) Sudden numbness or weakness of the you've come and to be confident of your position in the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of world. the body) Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or under- Do not anticipate trouble or worry about standing speech what may never happen. Keep in the B) Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes sunlight. Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination ~Benjamin FranklinSudden severe headache with no known cause.


As mandated by the law, 1% of the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) of each Barangay is allotted for the This section features on the LGU-its program, plans projects and program for the and projects for implementation to advance the cause of its senior population . We will include what seniors residing in the area.

There is also a wait list of applicants with unclear priority dates for admission to the program. For example, a recent applicant who is believe are issues and our recommendation. For this 88 years old bypassed a FACT issue, we are featuring the City of Manila. 77 years old with an Cities and municipalities earlier application date. have their own approach The City of Manila and implementation of the RECOMMENDATION: allotment of the seniors. 1) We recommend The city of Mathat the city There are cities that allot nila has a total populapurge the list of more than the amount deceased pertion of 1,652,171 acsons and those cording to the National Statistics Of- stated in the law. One exwho have relocatfice (NSO) 2010 census of population ample is the City of Maed out of the city. Up-dating of the and housing. It is located on land ar- kati, and in fact has become a model city in list should be ea of 38.55 square kilometer or a done every six terms of caring for the population density of 42,858. It has months. That the city issues clear 14 municipalities with 896 barangay seniors, from birthdays, guidelines about chairmen & its council members. Ba- hospitalization to burials. eligibility on the They have a wellrangay is the lowest form of governmonthly pension program, the rement that has direct contact with the established program that quirements for is fully coordinated and an people. The graph below only pernew applicants updated list of the seniors tains to the over-all population and and the priority schedules. number of barangay by municipality. in the city is electronically We are unable to find senior related fed in their data base at data from the NSO website that are the Office of the Senior 2) That the Barangay should be Affairs-Makati relevant to this regular feature. We Citizens required to subwish that NSO as the official data (OSCA). mit an updated gathering warehouse includes more ISSUE: list of all the resisenior related data. The city of Manila is not at dents of the area par and shortcomings with ISSUE: their counterparts in nearThe implementation of by cities when it comes to implementing senior pro- the birthday gift programs. The city keeps a gram for the seniors of manual listing of indigent the city is not clear. senior provided with the RECOMMENDATION: monthly pension of P500; For a systematic way it appears that the listing implementation, is outdated. The listing of appears to be static, that we recommend that The Expanded Senior Citiis, no new pensioner the city should issue zens Act provides that an Office of could be added unless guidelines about the Senior Citizens Affairs be estabanother pensioner dies. program and dislished for city government. OSCA is The listing also contains seminate it among tasked to be the vehicle that will denames of seniors who liver the various government proIts officials and the have been deceased. grams for the elderly. head of the people’s


LGU organization/non-government organization duly accredited and recognized by the city. A periodic audit must be conducted and reported to the head of the OSCA, who in turn is responsible to submit such report to the Mayor for analysis and for improvement. ISSUE

Disjointed implementation of plans and program for the seniors, as it appears that there is no solid organization/people’s organization that handles the senior informed or the information not disseminated accordingly. RECOMMENDATION That each Barangay should have its own people’s organization/ non-government organization to represent its senior residents to the District level and in turn all the heads of the organizations shall elect among them one head to represent the District. So, if there are six (6) Districts in Manila, there should be six (6) representatives. From the six (6) representatives, there should be one over- all head Barangay 569 Barangay 569 with population of 1,981 and 175 Barangay falls under the municipality of Sampaloc. The municipality has a total population of 341,461, the second most populous in the city of Manila. It is located on an area 7.90 km2 for a density of 43,223 per square km. To put this into perspective, according to the World Bank Report 2010 Population Density Report

published in 2012, in per square km, the Philippines has 312.78 and the top three of the world’s most populous countries 1) China with a total population of 1,344 million has 143.43, 2) India with population of 1,241.49 million at 393.8 and the 3) United States with a population of 311.59 million at 33.82. General Assembly/Giftgiving project 2011

for donations to be able reach all the recipients of the Barangay. The first ever held Assembly of the Senior Citizens of Barangay 569 and launched the gift-giving project for the Holiday Season was held last December 28, 2011 In order to possess the juridical personality, the organization was registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) the following year,2012.

Series of meetings followed suit to formulate plans and program for implementation. General Assembly/GiftIt was in mid year of giving project 2012 2012, when a raffle extravaganza was held It was December to be able to raise funds 2011 under the newly to support the various elected Barangay Chairprojects for implementaman that the 1% senior tion. It was a great succitizens allotment share cess and the earnings from the total annual Interwas allotted to the first nal Revenue Allotment of project– Refurbishing of the Barangay of 1.3 milthe San Roque Chapel– lion was implemented that a common place that coincided with the launchserve not only for reliing of the organization of gious rites, but also as a the senior citizens in the place for vigil either for community. There are those who are financial149 senior citizens in the ly incapable to rent a barangay and with limited private chapel for the budget, the association dead or for those tapped private companies


LGU whose place of residence is too small to accommodate such event. This will be the first time that the chapel will undergo refurbishing particularly installing floor tiles that used to be just the ordinary cement for several decades since it was constructed. The installation of the floor tiles was completed before the yearly town fiesta every August. To foster unity and harmony amongst the community members, the association, sponsored several projects such as: 1) March 2012- “Pabasa ng Passion”- in observance of the Holy Week

May 2012– Flores De Mayo

2)

Coordination with the leaders of the Barangay is regularly done to see to it that the privileges and other matters concerning the welfare of the senior citizens are addressed. However, the following issues were noted: 1) There is no updated list of senior citizens. 2) That there is no particular council member in charge of the senior citizens affairs and normally results to confusion in coordination. 3) Lacks in the area of the implementation of some of the provisions the Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010 particularly the health care. 4) That there is no particular council member in charge of the senior citizens affairs and normally results to confusion in coordination. 5) Lacks in the area of the implementation of some of the provisions the Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010 particularly the health care. Meetings were held with the Barangay Chairman and the following were recommended: 1) That there should be one council member that should handle the senior citizens, so coordination with the Barangay is easy and convenient. Any senior citizen would exactly know whom to approach for assistance. 2) To update the list of the senior citizens at least every six months. 3) The availability of one health worker to check the health care of the senior citizens. 4) That the issues on seniors citizens affairs must be included in the agenda during the Barangay Assembly be

CONCLUSION May 2012– Flores de Mayo- To be able to achieve the goal of forming a participa-

participated by children and young

adults 3) August 16, 2012- hosted and sponsored the yearly town fiesta particularly the 9-days Novena and the mass on the date of the feast. -Donated cash as prizes for the games on the feast day. 4) December 30, 2012- Hosted the Senior Citizens Assembly/Gift giving project.

tory community, all actions must be geared towards the common good. Hidden agenda in any situation must be avoided. Barangay leaders should strive to maintain a unified and harmonious working relationship among its others so they can deliver the services their constituents deserve. When citizens are actively interested with what their government is doing, elected officials are on notice to do their job. If they don’t, informed electorates could throw these undeserving officials out of office. At press time, in the National Capital Region, we have identified Makati City with the best practice in implementing the mandate of the Senior Citizens Expanded Act.


MY PIECE OF WORK FOR A THEATRICAL TREASUREDR. RUSTICA C. CARPIO TALE OF A THEATRICAL TREASURE By: DR. EDNA T. BERNABE, Dean- College of Communication-Polytechnic University of the Philippines.

(Who says that at her age of 82, she can no longer work, professionally in the fields where she is an icon- the education and the arts? This piece is dedicated to the grand lady of theater and the arts- the country’s theatrical treasureDR. RUSTICA C. CARPIO)

It was raining heavily that dawn of August 9 in 1930 when a healthy baby girl was born in Paombong, Bulacan. Little did the couple know that they were blessed with a child who will soon become a treasure--- and that lovely baby, who was born in their “bahay kubo” through a “komadrona” was Rustica Cruz Carpio, one of the Dr. Rustica C. Carpio, or Rustie to her friends, is the eldest among the four children of Leon Jose Carpio of Hagonoy, Bulcan and Ma. Sol Cruz Carpio of Paombong, Bulacan. She has a brother, Teofilo, who now lives in Bulacan, and two sisters, Generosa who is now in Vancouver, Canada and Florencia, the youngest who now lives in Quezon city. Her father was widower with a son from his departed wife when he met her mother. Dr. Carpio narrated that she had a wonderful childhood.

Her father was a farmer and her mother was a teacher. They seemed to belong to different worlds, but they both had passion and love for culture and the arts. Her parents were both artists, as they would play violin and piano while she and her siblings would sing their favorites tunes, a family bonding that they enjoyed doing. Dr. Carpio also recalled that her parents would always bring her to theatrical plays, much so in dramas in Hagonoy. “Parehong artista sa dram a a n g nanay at tat a y k o ” , s h e happily r e called. She said they lived a happy and simple life, and a happy blend between her

finished Associate in Commercial Science with honors. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree, Major in English from Manuel L. Quezon, Magna Cum Laude. She did not stop there. She went to the United States as a Fullbright grantee and an International House Scholar where she earned her M.A. degree in education., Major in Speech education in 1956. She was conferred with the degree Doctor of Philosophy major in Literature merritissimus by the University of St. Tomas in 1979. Her excellence led her to higher aspirations in life. She excelled in all her accomplishments. In her younger years, she led the academic communities of different universities to a higher stature. She was dean of three different educational institutions- Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila, PUP College of Languages and the Mass Communication, and the PUP Graduate School.

Dr. Carpio is an achiever since her younger years. Her academic record Dr. Carpio was the is a glaring manifestation of first Chairperson of PUP’s this claim. She is alumna of Department of Mass Comthe former Philippine munication in 1987 and the first dean of PUP’s College College of Com- of Languages and the Mass merce (PCC) now the Pol- Communication in 1986. ytechnic University of the She founded the PUP’s Philippines where she


Claro M. Recto and conceptualized the establishment of the Mass Communication Center, which now stands at the College of Communication campus as the PUP Theater. Dr. Carpio’s dedication and commitment to this university. In fact, with this unrelenting service to the university, the PUP through its President Dr. Dante G. Guevarra has recently paid tribute to Dr. Rustica Carpio at the Manila Room of PUP Hasmin Hostel in Manila. Dr. Guevarra conceptualized the said event as he believes that Dr. Carpio deserves such recognition, having served the university devotedly in her most productive years. She is also author of several reference books in communications and literature which were pub-

lished here and abroad. She has penned several plays, short stories, poems, scripts, literary criticisms and plays, all if which were shared to and enjoyed by the public. She has translated a number of works which include Ang Salakot na Ginto from Jose Lardizabal’s Golden Salakot. Other works were with her best friend Dr. Anacleta Encarnacion, such as Isang Gabi sa Tighati ng Gabi from William Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, Nang Maningil si Teban from the Boor by Anton Chekov, and Francis of Assissi from Liwayway Arceo’s Francisco ng Assissi. Dr. Carpio had even spread her wings as literary critic, consultant and researcher, which had brought her to other countries like India, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Japan, China, Korea, Russia, Germany, Canada and the United States of America.

She has also created her own history as the youngest Filipino who became a member of the First Filipino Entertainment Troupe sent by the Philippine government to Korea in 1951. She performed as a singer and actress of the Philippine

Expedition Forces to Korea (PEFTOK) that brought Christmas cheers amidst the war-torn nation. This patriotism and bravery has marked a milestone in her career when the Korean government named a hill after her called Rustie Hillnow a park with wall implements. Her being a theatrical treasure is undoubtedly manifested in her accomplishment as a powerful and enigmatic patron of the arts. Aside from being a writer, a critic and a judge that obviously show off her literary prowess. Dr. Carpio is also a multi-awarded film and television actress, having won several awards not only in her own country but in other parts of the world. She has recently added in her collection of acting awards her Best Actress trophy for the Film Lola from at least ten local and international award-giving bodies- Urian, Philippine Movie Press Club, Entertainment Press Society, Young Critics Circle, International Federation Film Society, the Ecumenical Jury Award, The Don Quijote Award, Miami International Film Festival, Spain’s Las Palmas De Gran Canaria International Film Festival, Fribourg International Film Festival and the Iran International Film Festival. Summing up, this treasure has authored and co-authored over 20 books; has portrayed roles in at least 50 films, has acted in at least 300 stage productions; and has received over 70 national and international awards. Some of her noted films include, Nunal Sa Tubig (which incidentally was her first film), The New Yorker in Tondo, Tondo-Girl, Nang Bumuka ang Sampaguita, and the latest, Lola. Her noted plays which either she plays or directed include New Yorker in Tondo, Sino Ba Kayo?, Calamba: 1888, Sisa,


….JSD Wanted: A Chaperon, Shadows and Solitude, Solo Entre Las Sombras, the Love of Leonor Rivera, Salakot na Ginto, The Dear Departed, The World is an Apple, Nang Maningil si Teban, Candada and many others.

Among her numerous contributions in Philippine Arts and culture, Dr. Carpio considers her award The Outstanding Filipino (TOFIL) in Culture which was awarded by the JCI Senate Philippines in December 2009 as her most treasured recognitions. After all, this award summarizes her achievements and illustrates her seemingly untiring devotion to her first love- the arts, and to her long time commitment- the academe. And so the tale continues; to date, Dr. Carpio has been writing books, has been shooting films on the helm, has been teaching tertiary students and has been travelling in and out of the country for more lectures and speaking engagements. The tale once foretold will continue to recite wonderful memories and stories that will picture the grand ladyDr. Rustica C. Carpio, in her totali-

Editor’s Note: The author of this article is based in Australia, in her 60’s, and a successful nurse.

Often in our lives, we plunged ahead when we ought to have stopped to see if it was okay to proceed. And more than anything, I found myself thinking of the times I had done the wrong thing because I failed to stop and think. What I learned in life is that regardless of our background, education and life experience, how to live our lives sets the context of everything else we do. Embracing all things around us would fundamentally be the opposite of someone’s upbringing. If you do not choose, you are basically letting others dictate your life. Being selective is much better that being judgmental. For being selective, I say, is softer, more reasonable, less disturbing and more realistic. We can breathe our way through this time on earth, listening to our hearts, speaking honestly and compassionately and sharing what we feel with each other. In fact, I think that is why we are here: to make something loving out of what seems to be falling apart around us. No matter how bad things are right now, one has the ability to grow through them and to come out in a better position in the future. If one starts thinking along this line, it will be enough to allow a person to cope. That is living.


Aside from the financial needs he has to address, there is something more that he has to give attention to and that is more individualistic….more for him, whatever he meant of that statement is his right and nobody has any right to ask any further. Heavy rains continue to pour, and as we advance walking, heading to nowhere, we met Tatay Edward, an 80-year old cigarette vendor for over 15 years seated in a corner of a crowded main road. By the just mere looking, anybody would surmise that he is in his 80’s because of his physical appearance. He looks so serious and in fact frowning at that time. I want to believe that he has every reason to do so. That is: not only for the financial needs of the family and could be other reason that compels him to do the daily vending of cigarettes. During the encounter, he proudly bragged about his two daughters who are both college graduates through his selling of cigarettes with the help of his wife who sells vegetables at the nearby market, as we call it

And certainly, he can stay comfortably at home and just wait for the 15th a nd 30th pay ED. Note: This is a regular feature of the magazine and days of his daughters. the author of this article is a 4th year student of the Comparing with Tatay College of Communication– Polytechnic University of Guillermo that he has to the Philippines (PUP). work for the financial needs of his family and Three different stories…Three different for his other “personal choices. Almost a year ago, I had the chance to reason”, Tatay Edward work as a segment producer for a still works “because I just short documentary in a long-time running cathsimply want it” and olic-run radio program. We had several subwhen “ I tried to stay at jects that we can work with like children, envihome and just sit ronment, women, and the elderly. For some around, live like a king, I reasons, I was really excited to get sick. My body is just pick out the last one. Maybe it accustomed to daily rouis because I am really close tine and if I don’t it, eveto my grandparents and rything is incomplete.” have a soft heart for the Those were two older people. different words I heard With my fellow team from Tatay Guillermo mates, we proceeded and this time from Tatay looking for the subjects. Lo Edward. They work, not and behold, we had the chance to talk to three because of the financial people with different sources of income whose gain only but because ages range from 75 to 85. working becomes someWith rains pouring heavily on the day thing like a recreation of our search and after almost an hour, finally, for them or a routine we were able to come across with our first subthat they cannot ignore. ject: Tatay Guillermo, a 75-year old pedicab And for the two subdriver soaked with the rain and busy ferrying jects: it is more of perpassengers. We started asking the basic quessonal choices. tions: his name, his family and the most imNightfall is portant answer to our question: why at his age setting in, but the idealhe still has to do a tough job? Fine, his answer ism and enthusiasm to to the question as anybody probably would get more subjects drove answer is for the financial needs of his family. us to search for more One striking reply to my query though was subjects. And as the when he said: “If I stop from working and stay team was resting under at home, it’s like my body becomes weaker and a small bakery’s shed, I get sick.” I was stunned and left wondering! we noticed an old man Then I asked myself, “Isn’t it that elderly people are supposed to be at home with their kids “talipapa.” Both are still came near to the large resting and spending their limited existence in unmarried and are em- trashcan in front of the Amazing and surcomfort?” But apparently, that’s not the case ployed. prising to have done this. for Tatay Guillermo.


Fr. Page 29

bakery and started digging up for sellable junks. As our instinct would dictate to do, this man is a good subject and could be the last subject before we call it a day. But before, we can approach our subject; he rapidly walked away and went towards the highway. Frail and of the small built fellow and looks like in his 70’s. He runs fast, but finally when one of the members of the team caught him up, we started befriending him. We call him Tatay Eduardo and found him a nice person and fun to talk with. He does not have his own family and stays with his married sister with her own family with no altercation whatsoever. That he used to work at the Engineering Department of Manila and that, he lost his job after the downfall of the Marcos Regime. Tatay Eduardo was the most attentive and most cooperative subject whom we interviewed that day. In spite of having no problem staying with his sister and her family, it was his personal choice to do this kind of work all day to support himself. He said, “I don’t want to be a burden to anyone.”

Living with them is enough of an extra baggage. I want to work and to

somehow give something back to them.” Indeed, a very strong conviction. His daily routine is walking from Cubao to Pasig then back home to Tondo. He said, “I am aging alone. I don’t have a wife and a child to support me. Aside from the little help from my sister, all I have is I. I don’t have time to rest and feel bad for myself. The world spins and will not be going to wait for me. So every day, wherever there is “kalakal”, I will walk and work.” Very touching words indeed! Its nightfall and as we say the world continues to spin, Tatay Eduardo unwittingly said goodbye. Till we meet again for more stories. He has to continue walking because time does not stop when he stops walking, it continues to tick, so he has to go on and reach home. Old age can be a great excuse for someone to just stop and wait for time. But that is not the case for Tatay Guillermo, Tatay Eduard and Tatay Eduardo. They proved that it does not stop when youth leaves someone. They welcomed it. They are dealing with it and making the most out of what still have and this is what momentous growing means

ED. Note: the author of this article is a graduating student of the Polytechnic University of the Philippines-College of Communication

Most of our senior citizens enjoy their lives sitting back and relaxing. Their age bracket and retirement from years of services somehow remind them of their need to rest and taking pleasures in the so many privileges they receive. But some of them are not yet ready to rest and give up their passions, but instead chose to work on and pursue them up to the very present. Who can forget the men who showcased their excellence in

Senate President Ponce Enrile, 88 and lead defense counsel former Justice Serafin Cuevas, 83, a l m o s t waged word wars at every proceeding as they both exhibited the best of their knowledge about Law, often ending up lectures. Most Filipinos, from the senate to the law students and even down to ordinary citizens, admire these octogenarians’ profound and indomitable expertise and wisdom, and earned such overwhelming respect as lawyers.


Fr. Page 30>>>

Cuevas reportedly had to create his Twitter account and a Facebook page just to accommodate his newfound fans. Also, some of our seniors proved that their old age is a not a speck of dust for them to stop learning, whether pre- or post-graduate studies. We have seen and heard some of them even pursuing their college, high school, or even elementary studies, and actually completing them. They even had bright visions of a better country. For Atty. Rodolfo Aquino, 64 and who For Atty. Rodolfo Aquino, 64 and who ranked 10th in the last year’s Bar exams, being a sexagenarian like him did not hinder him from fulfilling his long-sought dream of becoming a lawyer. “Kahit na matanda na tayo ay makakatulong pa rin sa bayan,” he said.In a promotional ad created by a tonic food drink brand for the upcoming marathon it organized, Mang Felix, 87, can oppose to the misguided notion that once one reaches such old age, he must be taking a back seat- literally. In fact, he even managed to outrun his opponents in the last 31 years he joined the said annual event, earning medals and even making his way to the top 10. Running obviously keeps him in good shape, and he has been free from sickness for the longest time. “Kaya ko pang tumakbo ng 20K(ilometers) ng dalawang oras mahigit,” he confidently said during the interview. A blogger once remarked, “In a world obsessed with youth, most people would dismiss someone of old age is irrelevant.” These seniors have proved that growing old never stops them from doing what they loved. Each year passed gives them every opportunity to be productive. They keep the passion ignited in them, and it produced significant results. Indeed, they serve as inspiration for the youth to go for their passion and keep their lives going. As Samuel Ullman said, “Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul.”

Time is the wisest counselor of all. ~Pericles


A young gentleman from a family with business interest in Sugar, Agricultural and Livestock, brokerage born with “silver spoon” so to speak, and undoubtedly has more than enough, yet had chosen to be in the military service and from his words “in Negros, when you are in the military service, people tend to look down on you.” However, they were proven wrong, the gentleman and the officer stood his ground and rose from the ranks, from being a US Air Borne soldier, further pursuing his studies and presently still energetic and productive doing what he love most-hard work and service to his fellow veterans. Col. Emmanuel V. De Ocampo (Ret.), a graduate of Mechanical Engineering at the Mapua Institute of Technology, further pursuing Banking and Finance, has remained at the helm of two (2) successful entities- the Veterans Federation of the Philippines (VFP) - actively caring and fighting for the rights and privileges of the veterans serving as its President since 1985 without any compensation and the Veterans Bank as the Chairman of Board and presently re-elected handling the same title. When asked the reason of him being re-elected, his reply was “they don’t want me to go.” Believable indeed! From a bankrupt entity to one of the top banks in the Philippines and still aiming for a higher position in the banking industry

He spearheaded the rehabilitation of the Veterans Bank and with the help of Sen. Alberto Romulo and Cong. Pilapil, Gen Ernesto Gidaya, Undersecretary Quisumbing and Atty. Romeo Roxas who made the legal study and even accepted a “no cure, no pay” arrangement. The strong and powerful forces and resistance from some of the members of the committee in the Executive Department did not discourage his determination to pursue the mission to rehabilitate a “bankrupt” bank, until finally in January 2, 1992, President Cory Aquino signed into law the much awaited Republic Act 7169- AN ACT TO REHABILITATE THE PHILIPPINE VETERANS BANK CREATED UNDER REPUBLIC ACT NO. 3518. PROVIDING THE MECHANISMS THEREFORE, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES A successful businessman, banker, broker and a well- respected leader of the Philippine Veterans rolled into one. With humility, he mentioned that he was an instrument in establishing a broker company of what is now known as Delgado Bros. Certainly he could have rested on his laurels, but, all these achievements made him crave for more. At the age of over 80 years old, you can still see him up and about working hard and shall continue to do so in the fulfillment of his dream to give the respect and the rightful compensation to the “now” veterans both here and of their claims from the United States.


Fr. Page 32>>>

“I SERVE BECAUSE I WANT TO”- words of wisdom

His stay at the Philippine Military Academy, as a teacher for a year inspired him much that he keeps on coming back to the academy this time bringing with him the officers and members of Veterans Federation of the Philippines. This has become his yearly activity for the past 16 years.

from COL. FRANCISCO T. SAN MIGUEL, (Ret) the Executive Vice President of the Veterans The veterans are Federation of the Philippines get and one of the Directors of the grouped into regions and the chance to spend a day with Veterans Bank. the cadets likewise grouped accordingly. Indeed, the good officer knows where he’s coming It is fun from. He hails from Morong, Rizal and filled day activity– at a young age served as a courier of ‘bringing back the goodies and other basic needs of the gueold days” with the rillas during WWII and precisely influboodle fight enced him to attend schooling at the (military type of eatPhilippine Military Academy after the ing together). As war. He graduated, but not contented, the good Col. Bepursued further studies and finished Inlieves , someday after the many dustrial Management. years serving the country, the At the time that he was in the military ser- cadets will also be one of them.

vice, as if destiny would dictate, Col. San Miguel spent most his time in the office particularly in the Personnel Department and never had the opportunity to be working in the field. After his military service, he worked with the National Electrification Administration (NEA), a government agency. His desire to continually learn new things not only to hone his skills likewise, an avenue to meet new friends and to establish contacts for future reference, he attends various seminars. This attitude was carried through and opens the doors to his subordinates who likewise were sent to seminars/trainings here and abroad. When he left NEA for advancement so to speak, his subordinates followed suit while some opted to join other companies,. Those who approached him for recommendation for-

Two professionals in their prime years, equipped with sheer determination and drive to continuously contribute to nation building.


Instruction: Use numbers 1-9 in each box of 9. There are 3 boxes of 9 each horizontally and 3 boxes of 9 vertically. Each box of 9 (shaded in different color), sum to 45 horizontally and 45 vertically. The number is to appear only once in a box, horizontally and vertically. For example, for column 1, numbers 1,2 and 3 are given. These three numbers can no longer be used vertically. Only the remaining numbers of 4,5,6,7,8 and 9 can be used in a box on column 1. In column 2, the number 2 cannot be used for column 2 because it is already used in column 1. The same is true with the number 3.

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QUIZ 4 Filipiniana

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1. How many islands in the Philippines? ________________________ 2. Capital of the Philippines ________________________ 3. Independence Day ______________________ 4. National Hero ____________________________ 5. President of the 1st Philippine Independence_________________________

6. tkamia 6. Sublime Paralytic and brains of the Revolution___________________________ 7. rmsaa

7. 1st President of the Philippine Commonwealth________________________

8. uogbai 9. Ypsaa

8. Last President of the Philippine Common wealth______________________________ 9. National Flower

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__________________________________ 10. Philippine Anthem


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ANSWERS Quiz Jumble Words 1. 7,100 1. Luneta 2. Manila 2. Rizal 3. June 12 3. Manila 4. Jose Rizal 4. Bulacan 5. Emilio Aguinaldo 5. Luzon 6. Apolinario Mabini 6. Makati 7. Manuel L. Quezon 7. Samar 8. Manuel Roxas 8. Baguio 9. Sampaguita 9. Pasay

Next Issue.. 2nd quarter, 2013 Cover Story…BACK to BASICS: Passion and Compassion for the ELDERLY HOUSING HEALTH

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“QUOTABLE” BRAIN

QUOTES:

The brain is a wonderful organ. It starts working the moment you get up in the morning and does not stop until you get into the office". - Robert Frost "Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking". - by Albert Einstein "If I had to live my life again I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once a week; for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied could thus have been kept active through use". - by Charles Darwin "You know you've got to exercise your brain just

like your muscles". - by Will Rogers


Ed Note: This section is open to anyone who wishes to tell their stories, be it in the Philippines and around the globe. It’s a celebration.

After the 10 AM mass on August 5, 2012 but before final blessing, Father Ulysses D’Aquilla called on Henry and Lucy Navarro, long-time parishioners at Our Lady of Mt Carmel church in Redwood City. The pastor and parishioners blessed and applauded the couple for their 60 years of marriage, a fitting recognition for a rare event at this time and age. Henry & Lucy Navarro were married on August 2, 1952. They have 7 children- Henry, Ginny, Charlie, Joe, Manuel, Rachel and Arthur. They are grandparents to 21 children. Lucy and Henry were born during the Great Depression in the United States, when life was hard and jobs were scarce. Both came from Mexican families. The Navarros have lived in the same house in Redwood City for 40 years. What used to be a quiet neighborhood surrounded by farms had been transformed. Big homes replaced the farms.

Big homes replaced the farms. It is now a neighborhood of million dollar homes. But they miss the tranquil place. They had challenges and painful times, like when their son Charlie died. They overcame them all because they are united. Their secrets for their successful marriage are having similar taste and liking the same things. Sundays are Lucy and Henry’s date days. After mass, they use the gift cards from their children, to eat at restaurants. Afterwards, it is driving around to various places to see and enjoy. The couple loves the PJ nights with grandkids, gardening and solving puzzle. Lucy’s oil paintings that she learned while grieving the loss of her son adorn the walls of their homes After 60 years of marriage, Henry at 84, and Lucy at 81, remains a happy couple. Their love for each other remains strong. Henry and Lucy we wish you many more anniversaries to come!

Henry & Lucy


Filipinos in blood will always be Filipinos, regardless of their present status and nationality. The photograph spread in the center is a group of Filipino women who grouped together and formed FILIPINO WOMEN’S CURSILLIO #765 at the Holy Redeemer Center, Oakland, California. How busy they maybe, but take their time out to meet yearly to welcome new members and profess their faith to serve the Lord.

The Head of the Office of the Seniors Affairs stories going around Makati City as to the im(OSCA), Mr. Osportance accorded the seniors of the city are not fiction, but facts. As it is known, Makati car Guarin as City is called the financial district of the Phil- amiable and accommodating as ippines and could expect he is, just continued to answer all the questions being asked and did not even showed any discomforts or felt irritated.

HATS OFF….. By: E.BDiocares

I had the rare opportunity to visit the head of the Office of the Seniors Affairs- City of Makati few days after calling his office the appointment. As stated on my appointment slip, I have to be at his office at 08:00 o’clock in the morning or I will be left behind for his next appointment. Indeed, he was busy that particular day...as they say “busy as a bee” I could recall the telephone calls in between our talks, but still kept track on the issues and topics that we were discussing. Indeed, now I realized that the

that being so; the seniors will be just the “second rate “citizens of the city. But, the answer is “A BIG NO”. In fact, even during the tenure of the Vice President of the Philippines when he was the still the Mayor of the City, the seniors have been given the pedestal and are called the “Señoritas and the Señoritos” of the City. Birthdays and celebrations are given the utmost importance. Treatment of the seniors in terms of Medical, Healthcare & Wellness, Enjoyment and other perks are far more than what are stated in the law. To top it all, the total numbers of the seniors residing in the city are all accounted for. Expenses for hospitalization, surgery…no problem...you can have a good rest while recuperating and not worry with your hospital bill. The city pay the bills regardless of the amount and the patient will just donate a minimal amount of P200.00

Mr. Oscar Guarin used to be an academe before he joined the government service. But intimated that up to the present he still teaches which according to him is his life and love. That after his retirement as the Dean at the Makati city College, he planned to join as a candidate for councilor. However, it was Vice President Jejomar Binay who convinced him to head the office Senior Citizens Affairs ( OSCA) of Makati City.


>>>>Fr. Page 37

Aside from OSCA, he is also the head of the Veterans Affairs of the city. He loves writing and e v e n bragged that he was writing a book and he would have launched it at press time. Much as I still like to stay longer, but time forbids me to do so, thus, I have to say “BYE...SEÑORITO OSCAR” I’ll see you soon.

It was August of 2012, when I turned 60. However much I want to stop the clock and stop my birthday coming, it had to happen. It happens t o a lot of people. Why should I be any different? Why should I like it any better (or less) than they do? What is this big event? In a matter of 40 days just gone, one was added to my fifty nine. That's right, the big six zero. As I recall, turning what some have termed "the big four-oh" was not very traumatic for me - kind of like "I’ve made it this far and I don't feel any different." Turning "over the hill", fifty, was so and so, no big deal. But turning 60 was another story though. I began to discover some newfound wisdom. I found myself thinking "been there, done that" a lot more than in the past.

I decided to focus on the bright side of being 60, the most obvious being - I am still here. After 6 decades, this girl is still kicking, and that's an accomplishment in itself. (My late mother lived until 48 only.) Not wanting to succumb to negative feelings that I had, indeed been around a long time, I decided to focus on the bright side of being 60, the most obvious being - I am still here. After 6 decades, this girl is still kicking, and that's an accomplishment in itself. So now that it happened, I'm confronted with what it means. Being 60 carry with it some responsibilities. You can't sit life out in your rocker, as old people say. I have begun to realize that I am the matriarch of the family, the leader of the tribe, the spokeswoman of our clan and the upbeat one that those in the succeeding generation will hopefully seek out for advice. These new responsibilities are exciting and even a bit intimidating. I love this senior year of my life. I can come and go pretty much as I wish. On my days off work, I can jump into our 4 wheel drive and go wherever I want to. Without interruption, I can sit on the mountain or laze on the shore. I can dig in my garden, or spend hours in the library. Oh sure, sometimes the spine and joints aren't always in agreement. The waist is a bit thicker, and my face is pruning a bit, but I am so grateful for the gifts of my autumn-opportunities to experience simple pleasures that, in times past, scurried by unnoticed in the maelstrom of raising children. Leisure time can be shared: a moment to smile or to warmly thank the salesclerk. Time to be involved. Time to savor the moments with grandchildren, moments occasionally and regretfully ignored by some. Like autumn fruit, I've mellowed and thrown off old inhibitions to say what I mean...with a smile or do what I want...on a whim. Now, I'm free to dash out to the mall, or

supermarket, —————————— “One starts to get young at the age of sixty and then it is too late.” ————Pablo Picasso



The Seniors' Magazine