Page 1

#evanschurchill

#rooseveltrow

ROOSEVELT ROW: ARTISTS’ DISTRICT Creative Placemaking in Downtown Phoenix

A PROJECT OF THE ROOSEVELT ROW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPOR ATION

#garfield

#dtphx


ROOSEVELT ROW: ARTISTS’ DISTRICT Creative Placemaking in Downtown Phoenix

A PROJECT OF THE ROOSEVELT ROW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION


Creative Commons Copyright 2013 Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

Roosevelt Row Community Development Corporation 922 North Fifth Street Phoenix, AZ 85004 create@rooseveltrow.org www.rooseveltrow.org CREATE. CONNECT. CULTIVATE. Produced with major support from

For ease of collaboration and open source sharing, text is set in Georgia, which is available on all computers. Display type is Edmond Sans designed by James T. Edmondson. It is available for a fair price of your choosing on LostType.com. Book design, editing & content development by


Contents Creating Our Place

5

What is Roosevelt Row?

9

Where is Roosevelt Row? M A P : A 1 0 - M I N U T E W A L K F R O M L I G H T R A I L 11 M A P : B U S I N E S S D I S T R I C T D E T A I L 13

Investment Impact

15

Who is Investing in Roosevelt Row?

17

Feast on the Street

19

Expanding the Adaptive Reuse of Temporary Space Program (A.R.T.S.)

21

Community Input & Engagement

26

Teddy’s To Do List

33

Guiding Principles

37

Walking is a Revolutionary Act in Phoenix

39

Acknowledgements

41


Creating Our Place Through the leadership of visionary advocates including Rocco Landesman, former Director of the National Endowment for the Arts, and Carol Coletta, former Director of ArtPlace, creative placemaking has become a new national field of professional practice and a focus for building better and healthier communities through concentrated investment in arts and culture. Creative placemaking is fueling the revitalization of urban and rural areas, creating jobs, and increasing economic Art exhibitions and performances on Roosevelt Row, like this event at Jobot Coffee, draw public audiences and fellow artists into the heart of downtown. PHOTO BY LINDSAY KINKADE

competitiveness by supporting the work of artists that are deeply connected to their communities.

7


8

‘Getting to know the city’s art scene has been as important as finding a decent cup of coffee.’ –CATHARINE ROSSI, ON WHY THINKING LOCALLY WORKS WELL, CRAFT

Candy Jimenez, Liliana Gomez & Dulce Dance Co at the Phoenix Center for the Arts, featured in the TruPhx photo series by Hector Primero. PHOTO BY HECTOR PRIMERO & BRENDA DAVIS


In 2012, Roosevelt Row Community Development Corporation received funding from both ArtPlace and the National Endowment for the Arts to build upon creative placemaking in downtown Phoenix. This support has allowed Roosevelt Row CDC to actively engage significantly more community members. Outcomes include a community engagement process, expansion of vacant lot activation, business incubation, and production of Feast on the Street, an artist-driven collaboration that brought a half-mile long dining table to the heart of downtown Phoenix. Roosevelt Row CDC is developing an “Artists’ District” rather than the more traditional model of an “Arts District.” An “Arts District” is typically comprised primarily of commercial art galleries. An “Artists’ District,” is focused on a complete community; a dense, diverse and walkable area that includes all of the amenities needed for daily life within an easy walk. Walking is a revolutionary act in a city largely defined by the automobile. You can live in Roosevelt Row without a car. Situated within the one half-mile Transit Oriented District (TOD) around the Arts District Light Rail Station, Roosevelt Row Arts District offers a viable alternative for pedestrians, bicycles, and public transportation as primary means of navigating the city. It is a key place where diverse individuals and ideas come together, where innovation and creativity are fueled.

9


Pie Social 10

Valley of the Sunflowers

MAGAZINE PHOTOS BY CHRIS HINKLE

The June 2013 edition of Sunset Magazine featured new and longestablished restaurants, galleries, and other local businesses. PHOTOS BY ANDREW PIELAGE AND LINDSAY KINKADE

Restaurants & Bars


What is Roosevelt Row? Roosevelt Row is both place and idea, a gathering of people invested in a more vibrant and more livable urban community.

Chile Pepper Festival

Art Galleries

Feast on the Street

First Fridays

Performance

Food Truck Festival

Roosevelt Row Community Development Corporation (CDC) is a 501(c)3 non-profit service organization established to further the unique cultural character and creative assets of the Roosevelt Row Arts District, to advocate for the continuing presence and role of the arts, particularly individual artists and small businesses, in the revitalization and vibrancy of downtown Phoenix, and to foster a dense, diverse, walkable and sustainable urban community. Roosevelt Row CDC is guided by a volunteer Board of Directors.

11


Phoenix Museum of Art

Willetta St

Moreland St

Portland St

DETAILED MAP OF BUSINESSES P.12–13

Fair Trade Coffee

2

5m inu te w alk

monOrchid

1

3 Village Market

Roosevelt Point

Revolver Records

A.R.T.S. Village Pocket Park

4 Garfield St

Kitchen ASU Art Museum FilmBar Sink Studios International Artist Phoenix Residency Public MOIRA Market Sushi Bar & Kitchen

Pierce St

Glamazon Curvy Clothing Exchange

ROOSEVELT ST A.R.T.S.

Bike Share

2nd St

McKinley St

DeSoto Building being preserved for reuse

C E N TR AL AV E

2nd Ave

3rd Ave

4th Ave

New City Studio

Roosevelt Arts District Light Rail Station

1st Ave

Phoenix Chorale

ROO SEVELT ST

VOX Curvy Boutique

The Nash Mamma Toledo’s The Pie Hole Sit...Stay Sausage Hot Dog Eatery Golden Rule Tattoo Carly’s Bistro

5 Biomedical Campus

Valley of Sunflowe 2011–2012

Bioscience High School Pierce St

6th St

Irish Cultural Center

Moreland St

4th St

Latham St

Feast on the Street

3rd St

Japanese Friendship Garden

3rd St

M argar et T . H anc e P a r k

te

Phoenix Center for the Arts

inu

Burton Barr Central Library

Phoenix Trolley Museum

m

Jewish Historical Society and Museum

Culver St

Dog park

Arizona School for the Arts

10

3rd Ave

Willetta St

CEN T RA L AVE

Lynwood St


Carefree

Cave Creek

ua

Where is Roosevelt Row?

ria

F

Ag

Ne w

Riv

er

15

Sun City West

mi

ek

Cre

Sun City

nut

51

101 17

ew

ew

Paradise Valley

Glendale

alk

alk

PAPAGO FW Y (I -1 0 )

nk

Sku

10

PHOENIX

Scottsdale

202

Roosevelt Row

from

Tempe Salt River

Guadalupe

ligh

Gil

PHOENIX SOUTH MOUNTAIN PARK

aR

ive r

Ahwatukee

Chandler

l t rai

Gila River Indian Community

Portland St

g

A.R.T.S. Village Orchard Project

On Roosevelt Row 6

Arts & Culture Space R O O S EV ELT ST Adaptive Reuse 1

of Temporary Space (A.R.T.S.) Program site

Growhouse Community Garden & GROWop boutique

Coffee/ Restaurant/ Bar Retail & Services Education/ Public

9th St

7TH ST

McKinley St

10th St

f the ers

Parks & Gardens

MAP BY LINDSAY KINKADE/DESIGN REPUBLIC Shared with Creative Commons license. Non-commercial use with credit. Share-alike. Please share your map openly too as we build common cultural resources to cultivate our creative ecosystem.

The Roosevelt Row Arts District includes the one-half mile radius around the Arts District Light Rail Station at Central Avenue and Roosevelt. This 10-minute walk circumference connects and overlays existing historic and mixed-used neighborhoods including F.Q. Story, Oakland University Park, Historic Roosevelt, Evans Churchill, Townsend Park and Garfield. It is situated between and connects other districts including Grand Avenue on the west, Calle 16 on the east, the Midtown Museum District on the north and the urban core to the south. It is also the physical place where arts, culture, science and education come together between the downtown ASU campus, the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix Biomedical Campus and topperforming area high schools. Learn more at www.rooseveltrow.org

13


St 3rd RO2 The Lot: What Should Go Here?

2

A.R.T.S. Village Bike Share

Pallets Food and Bar

monOrchid & The Bokeh Gallery Songbird Coffee and Tea House

R O OSE VE L T S T

greenHAUS boutique+gallery

14

4th St

wa

Coffee/ Restaurant/ Bar

t ra il

Adaptive Reuse of Temporary Space (A.R.T.S.) Program site

ligh

1

lk f rom

Art & Culture Space

3rd St

On Roosevelt Row

New housing at Roosevelt Point

te

Retail & Services

5m inu

Education/ Public Parks & Gardens 100 feet MAP BY LINDSAY KINKADE/DESIGN REPUBLIC Shared with Creative Commons license. Non-commercial use with credit. Share-alike. Please share your map openly too as we build common cultural resources

Garfi eld St

to cultivate our creative ecosystem.

Kitchen Sink Studios

ASU Art Museum International Artist Residency

Combine Studios Roosevelt Point


A.R.T.S. Village Market Home of Food Truck events Chile Pepper Festival and performances

Law Office of Joel F. Friedman

Bodega 420

Bubba Phatz BBQ

EBS Printing

Bilbo Baggs Sportswear

RooPho Realty Nostra Style House

R O O S E V E LT S T

Private residence

BLISS/ ReBAR

Drive-Thru Think! Gallery Graphics + 1spot Printing Gallery Solutions

5th St

Draperies by Muriel

Five15Arts

MADE Art Boutique

JOBOT coffee

Tammie Coe Cakes & MJ Bread

Studio 6 Galleria Celtica 5th Row Dance Studio

Eye Lounge modifiedarts

Coolin Out Lifestyle Brand

15

B&B

The Roose Parlour and Spa

6th St

stage

Lost Leaf Bar and Gallery

Private residence

Private residence

Melt.

Private residence

Private residence

Ultraviolet Salon

Lawn Gnome Publishing + Bookstore

Black N Blue Vintage Private residence

Annie Boomer Vintage Cellar Door Vintage Growhouse Community Garden & GROWop boutique

10 m inu

Aside of Heart

te w alk o f ligh t rail

Container galleries

Roosevelt Row Arts District Businesses

hin

Garfield St

Phoenix Biomedical Campus

5

Valley of the Sunflowers 2011–2012

wit

3


386 Artists* live

In the Roosevelt Row Arts District 16

648 Artists exhibit

Work or sell their art in the District annually

27 Art Galleries 8 Music Venues In the Roosevelt Row Arts District

PEOPLE ATTRACT PEOPLE The increasing number of people coming to Roosevelt Row to experience the arts have helped to fuel new businesses and jobs, new housing, public and private investment, and more excitement about the area. In addition, light rail, higher education, and increasing density are driving a revitalization of public spaces downtown. It is critical that these changes continue to include the arts as a meaningful component of growth. Gathering spaces, whether a coffee shop or bar, pop-up pocket park or a weekly or monthly event like Third Fridays, provide the places for people to interact and engage with one another, to share ideas, and to ultimately fuel innovation through interaction and exchange. Planning is a process and not a product. This document reflects a significant benchmark in our process of creative placemaking. It is neither beginning nor end. Rather, it is an acknowledgement that community input and engagement, participation and creative placemaking never ends. Instead, it builds upon a

25,000+ Visitors Each month attend Roosevelt Row Arts District events and programming * American Community Survey, 2007-2011

growing foundation of investment within a dynamically changing urban context.

Many businesses report that much of their monthly income is derived from First Fridays. PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE


Investment Impact With significant local and national investment from ArtPlace, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Steele Foundation, Roosevelt Row CDC and other partners have leveraged and accomplished a tremendous amount over the past year to advance creative placemaking in downtown Phoenix. These outcomes include: A COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROCESS and survey to establish

priorities, new projects, and guidelines for future development in the Roosevelt Row area. PRODUCTION OF FEAST ON THE STREET

in partnership with the ASU Art Museum and artists Clare Patey (London) and Matthew Moore (Phoenix). IMPLEMENTATION OF THE A.R.T.S. PROGRAM , a model of incremental

urbanism to activate vacant land at four locations in the district.

$150,000 Invested in 2013 in Roosevelt Row Arts District through the ArtPlace grant

$54 million Invested in the Roosevelt Point housing development at Third Street and Roosevelt

17


Cole Reed greenHaus galler y + b o u t i q u e,

1 year on Roosevelt Row greenHAUS gallery + boutique is proud to be a part of the Roosevelt Row Arts 18

District in Phoenix, Arizona. The gallery showcases a different artist each month drawing from Arizona talent as well as from across the United States. In addition to the art, greenHAUS is a boutique offering one of a kind furniture creations by Cole Reed, artisan crafts, vintage items, jewelry and accessories. WHEN DID YOUR BUSINES S OPEN?

We opened to the public in February 2012, but we started remodeling in September 2011. WHY DID YOU OPEN IN ROOSEVE LT ROW?

Roosevelt Row, to us, is the hub of the Phoenix art experience. WHAT AT TR ACTED YOU TO THIS AREA?

We were attracted to the artistic momentum, robust culture, historical charm, and the overall possibilities. WHAT IS YOUR VISION FOR THE FUTURE O F ROOSEVE LT ROW? We would simply like

to have MORE of what we already have...AND to be a thriving, walking district that showcases the heart + soul of our beautiful city.

PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE


Who Is Investing in Roosevelt Row? Aaron Hopkins-Johnson  LAWN

GN O M E

1 year on Roosevelt Row

owned grocery store. We have a selection of local

publishing house dedicated

products including

to showcasing the work of

Crow’s Dairy goat milk

first-time authors and

19

and cheeses, Udder

talented local up-and-

Delights Ice Cream,

comers. We remember the

Peanut Butter Americano

magic in finding an author

and Santa Cruz Chili

to spin language as it

Powders and Sauces. We

seemed never had been of wonder at stumbling as

4 20, 1 year on Roosevelt Row

Bodega 420 is a locally-

Lawn Gnome is a boutique

done before, and the sense

Adrian & Mona Fontes  B O D EG A

also carry fresh produce PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE

and have a weekly CSA basket available.

if by accident across a

WHAT AT TR ACTED YOU TO

much-loved classic.

THIS AREA? Roosevelt Row

WHEN DID YOUR

has all of the advantages

BUSINES S OPEN? We

of metropolitan cities

opened on May 1, 2012.

Olivia, Adrianna, Adrian, Mona and Isabella Fontes.

WHY DID YOU OPEN IN

WHAT AT TR ACTED YOU TO

WHAT IS YOUR VISION

ROOSEVE LT ROW?

THIS AREA? What

FOR THE FUTURE O F

Roosevelt Row is the

attracted us was the

ROOSEVE LT ROW? We

most unique and

genuine nature of the

hope Roosevelt Row

dynamic neighborhood

people. The artists,

maintains its very strong

in the metro Phoenix

musicians and poets all

local identity. There are

area. While our concept

worked together so well

not too many absentee

WHAT IS YOUR VISION FOR

might have worked in

that they just make

business owners in our

THE FUTURE O F ROOSEVE LT

other areas as well, we

everyone feel welcome.

neighborhood. We work

ROW? We hope that

knew this neighborhood

Plus, we knew we were

together well. I hope to

Roosevelt Row continues to

was on the verge of

working in food, so

keep this positive feeling

progress through

some real growth, and

getting a chance to help

and even make it

integration of Arizona State

we wanted to be part of

work on the Valley’s very

stronger in the future.

University, local artists and

it.

serious food desert

WHEN DID YOUR BUSINES S OPEN? We have been

printing and distributing ‘zines as “Lawn Gnome” since 2004. Our first bookstore opened in February 2012. WHY DID YOU OPEN IN ROOSEVE LT ROW? After

learning about hard work, community building, and creativity from John Sagasta at Jobot Coffee Shop and living at the Firehouse Gallery, we had to open in Roosevelt Row.

combined with all of the pleasantries of living in a tight-knit small town! Need a cup of sugar? Borrow it from your neighbor! Need to fill the potholes in the road? Work with the city!

craftsman and residents.

PHOTO BY GREG ESSER

problem was a great opportunity.


–GABRIEL RADLEY, DOWNTOWN DEVIL

PHOTO BY BOB RINK

Half-mile long dining table along First Street.

PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE

20

‘Today was the first time that we as a community saw the true power of a massive and cohesive partnership between the people of downtown and ASU. This event could not have happened without joining forces, and it serves as just one example of how combining…entities helps to rejuvenate downtown.’


FEAST ON THE STREET Feast on the Street brought together more than 9,000 new and old friends around a half-mile long dining table in downtown Phoenix, transforming First Street

9,000 visitors

into a pedestrian promenade in celebration of food and

over seven hours.

art in the desert. This free public event was a

350+ volunteers

community project initiated by the ASU Art Museum, Roosevelt Row CDC and artists Clare Patey and Matthew Moore. The event would not have happened without incredible community partnerships across the Valley and without the generous support of our major funders: ArtPlace, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Steele Foundation. The event brought diverse cross-sections of our community together around the table. The table itself emphasized the connection between the downtown ASU campus, student housing, Phoenix Public Market, and Margaret T. Hance Park within the Evans Churchill neighborhood. Community organizations that hosted tables during the event included Hance Park Conservancy, Tonatierra, Garfield Organization,

worked 1,500 volunteer hours on the day of the event.

70+ restaurants within ¼-mile of the event site, most of which reported above average sales.

20 food trucks most of which sold out of food.

Roosevelt Action Association, and Evans Churchill Community Association among others.

Roosevelt Row is listed as one of the ‘10 best neighborhoods that tourists haven’t found yet.’ USA TODAY, ON THE MORNING OF FEAST ON THE STREET, WITH SPECIFIC REFERENCE TO THE FEAST EVENT

Video online at vimeo.com/66861598

21


BEFORE  ROOSEVELT AT 2ND STREET

22

1 A.R.T.S. VILLAGE POCKET PARK & PAVILION FIRST STREET AND GARFIELD  FALL 2013 by Phoenix Urban Collaborative, formed by Nanogram Studio (C. Michael Lu and Stephen Azarik)

2 AFTER  RO2 THE LOT: WHAT SHOULD GO HERE? POCKET PARK by Urban Initiatives (Dorina Bustamante and Mike Davis)


EXPANDING THE A.R.T.S. PROGRAM To address the abundant blight of vacant and underutilized land in the area, Roosevelt Row CDC established a program called Adaptive Reuse of Temporary Space (A.R.T.S.)

23

to provide temporary programming that activates vacant lots and turns these liabilities into assets. This approach toward temporary use affirms the value of incremental change over time as an essential element of urban neighborhoods. A.R.T.S. programming has

included the Valley of the Sunflowers, GrowHouse Community Garden, and

Four sites were selected to implement shipping container projects. Each project provides a foundation that will continue to evolve and expand into the future, creating new arts opportunities.    SEE MAP PAGE 11

A.R.T.S. Market, an

on-going venue for artists, food trucks, performance and art. With National Endowment for the Arts “Our Town” funding and in partnership with City of Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture and the ASU Art Museum, 2 A.R.T.S. VILLAGE BIKE SHARE SECOND STREET AND ROOSEVELT  FALL 2013 Ro2 Bike Share, Urban Initiatives (Dorina Bustamante and Mike Davis), Edge Industries (Kirby Hoyt), and Caruso Turley Scott

Roosevelt Row CDC is also focusing on art performances, projections, and temporary public art installations to further activate these vacant sites.


3 A.R.T.S. VILLAGE MARKET ART GALLERY, YOGA STUDIO, AND MUSHROOM FARM FIFTH STREET AND ROOSEVELT  SINCE 2012 Christina Noble, AIA; Ethan Lay-Sleeper; Benjamin Hall; and Bodega 420.

4 GROW HOUSE 2011 Kenny Barrett


BEFORE GARFIELD AT 6TH STREET

25

5 AFTER VALLEY OF THE SUNFLOWERS ART & SCIENCE LABORATORY

PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE

A Bioscience High School student draws at the Valley of the Sunflowers.


ArtPlace funding has supported a new iteration of this mobile incremental urbanism: A.R.T.S. Village. A national Call for Ideas was issued in December, 2012 to solicit concepts to activate vacant land through shipping containers and to provide arts incubation opportunities. 26

‘The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The next best time is today.’ –CHINESE PROVERB

5 NINTH STREET AND ROOSEVELT, A.R.T.S. VILLAGE ORCHARD PROJECT  FALL 2013 Christoph Kaiser, Todd Briggs, Kevin Rille, Mary Stephens, Phoenix Youth Hostel and Cultural Center.


BEFORE ROOSEVELT AT 9TH STREET

27

5 COMING SOON A.R.T.S. VILLAGE ORCHARD PROJECT

RENDERINGS BY CHRISTOPH KAISER


COMMUNITY INPUT & ENGAGEMENT Gallup and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation interviewed 43,000 people in 26 different communities over a three-year period to determine 28

what attaches people to their community and to determine if communities are better when people are attached. Attachment, as determined by this “Soul of the Community� study, is driven by the social offerings, aesthetics, and openness of an area. This finding is consistent with the responses received from the Roosevelt Row survey. What is valued by many residents, workers, and visitors to downtown Phoenix are the coffee shops and restaurants, social offerings, parks and gardens, quality and distinctive architecture, cultural centers, including artist studios, galleries, museums, and openness to diversity. Even with existing parks and gardens, one of the top needs stated by residents is additional open space and pocket parks, a network of green spaces within easy walking distance from one another and residential housing options. Preserving and expanding the sense of attachment to the area offers many benefits, including a direct link to local economic growth.

ASSETS Phoenix is a relatively new and rapidly growing urban community in the context of the Sonoran Desert in the

PHOTOS BY LINDSAY KINKADE

In public meetings, community members collaborated on mapping projects for the future of Roosevelt Row.

Participation Rates by Neighborhood F.Q. STORY 14.1%

ROOSEVELT 30.2%

OAKLAND UNIVERSITY PARK 12.0%

EVANS CHURCHILL 15.1%

GARFIELD 28.6%


American Southwest. Phoenix enjoys ample sunshine and an active outdoor lifestyle. A desert climate with extensive multi-use trail systems, canals, and connectivity through public transportation including a growing light rail system are key features of the city. Phoenix is characterized by clean streets, sound municipal government, nationally-recognized public art and an increasingly sophisticated workforce. Other assets of the city include Central Avenue; Sky Harbor International Airport; urban parks connected by light rail including Steele Indian School Park, Margaret T. Hance Park, Civic Space Park and Heritage and Science Park; mountain preserves including Papago Park, South Mountain, North Mountain, and Camelback Mountain; Rio Salado and the Audubon Center; an extensive open canal system with more miles of canals than Venice, Italy; and the Matthew Henson Hope VI public housing project, among many others. NEIGHBORHOODS

Roosevelt Row has become one of the nationally-

A LME R I A R D

M CDO W E LL RD

3rd St

C ENTRAL AVE

3rd Ave

5th Ave

9th Ave

F.Q. STORY

recognized attractions of Phoenix for both visitors and

Lynwood St

Lynwood St

Willetta St

ROOSEVELT

Willeta St

the local community alike. Roosevelt Row is physically

C U LV E R S T

Culver St

PAPAGO FWY (I-10)

Moreland St

P A P A GO FWY (I -10)

Portland St

RO O S E VE LT S T Garfield St

Pierce St

9th St

McKinley St 6th St

3 RD S T

4th St

EVANS CHURCHILL

McKinley St Pierce St

GARFIELD 10th St

RO O S E VE LT S T

Pierce St

FILLM O RE S T C EN TR A L A V E

Taylor St Taylor St

where the arts and culture intersect with cutting-edge scientific research in medicine and the biosciences, higher education, and innovation fueled by crossdisciplinary engagement in informal public gathering spaces and events.

Polk St 5th St

3rd St

VAN BU RE N S T

Monroe St

General character assets of the area include history,

9TH ST

Monroe St

authenticity, locally-owned businesses, diverse housing

WA S H I N GTON S T

J EFFERSON ST

JE FFE R S ON S T

1 0T H ST

E

2nd St

V

FILLM O RE S T

1st St

A

MA D I S ON S T

JA C K S ON S T

JA C K S ON S T 1ST AVE

D

2nd Ave

N

3rd Ave

A

4th Ave

R

5th Ave

G

6th Ave

Taylor St

7th Ave

9th Ave

OAKLAND UNIVERSITY PARK

1 6 TH ST

Portland St

7 T H ST

7 T H AV E

Latham St

J ACKSON ST

29


options, multi-modal transportation access, and

workshops to launch an initial planning process for the

proximity. Specific assets identified by survey

Roosevelt Row Arts District. These workshops,

respondents include Garfield neighborhood’s Alwun

facilitated in partnership with ASU Master of Urban

House, recipient of a 2012 Governor’s Award for

Design students working with Kevin Kellogg, AIA LEED

Excellence in the Arts, the Japanese Friendship

AP, set the major themes for the next steps in the

Garden, the Irish Cultural Center, the Phoenix Public

planning process. The workshops also identified

Market and Food Truck Fridays, and First and Third

missing or needed fine-grain elements to add to the

Fridays.

urban fabric of the area. One of the major themes participants reinforced was connectivity and defining a

First Fridays, an event that has occurred monthly for

sense of place.

more than twenty years, is now one of the doorhanger_roro_outlined.pdf

most well-attended events of its kind in

1

3/26/13

2:10 AM

implementation of the planning process,

First Fridays as a primary reason for

Roosevelt Row CDC convened a steering

opening in the Roosevelt Row Arts

committee of representatives of adjacent

District. While sales tax collection data is

and adjoining neighborhoods, the Mayor’s

not reportable on a per-day basis, anecdotally many business owners interviewed indicated that First Fridays sales cover a significant portion of their

Office, and City Council representatives. Feedback from this group informed and

C

M

Y

shaped the process, form and content of

CM

MY

CY

CMY

the community survey that was deployed in

K

monthly operating costs.

early 2013. Artist and urban planner James Rojas

IF THERE WAS ONE THING

facilitated five workshops in different

YO U WO ULD IMPROVE IN Community visioning workshops with designer James Rojas were held both indoors and outside on vacant lots that neighbors are interested in activating. PHOTO BY GREG ESSER

To further guide the development and

the nation. Many businesses have cited

locations in the area, the Phoenix Public

YO UR NEIG H BO R H O O D, W H AT WO ULD I T BE? Our process began with asset mapping and assessing the “hidden gems” and distinctive qualities in Roosevelt Row. In April 2012, Roosevelt Row CDC hosted two open

Market, First Studio, a vacant lot on 9th DESIGN BY SAFWAT SALEEM

Neighbors sent their thoughts written on the tear-off return mail portion of this door hanger.

Street and Roosevelt, and MonOrchid Studios. These sessions touched people from a variety of neighborhoods. Overall, the majority of attendees were more active residents in the downtown community.

31


39% of survey respondents live within the area boundaries 32

37% live in adjacent neighborhoods, including Central City South, Midtown and Uptown

24% visit from outlying Phoenix neighborhoods and other cities within metropolitan Phoenix

Ideas for the future of the neighborhood and for new

district was also identified as a high priority.

improvements were fairly consistent. Prominent

Walkability, connectivity and effective shade strategies

themes from the workshops included more amenities,

were recurring themes for survey respondents. This is

shade, walkability, connections to neighborhoods, and

an area where great public spaces and great public

innovative programming that create and sustain

streets are highly desired.

opportunities for neighborhood and community residents to come together and interact informally.

SU RV E Y R ESU LT S

RESPONDENT DEMOGRAPHIC Input on the Roosevelt Row survey came from a variety of respondents who spend time in the area. Roughly

One of the highest priorities of survey respondents was

half of the respondents rent or own property in the

an increase in urban grocery and market options. The

area, while the other half comprise frequent visitors. A

ability to walk for fresh produce, a gallon of milk, fresh

mix of both residents and self-identified visitors also

flowers or other daily necessities is a highly desired

work in the area.

addition to the amenities of urban living in downtown Phoenix. A range of options identified in survey responses indicates that numerous strategies and projects will be needed to address this in the neighborhoods along the Roosevelt Street corridor. Affordability was another key element for urban options identified. An increase in affordable and mixed-income housing was also a high priority, with an explicit concern against concentrating a single type or monoculture of housing in one area, such as placing only low-income housing in the south Roosevelt neighborhood. All housing developments in the area should include a mix of market rate and affordable or below market rate housing. Live/work housing specifically to create options for artists to live and create new work in the

Of those respondents who live in the area, over 30% live in the historic Roosevelt neighborhood, and almost 29% live in the Garfield neighborhood. The remainder of respondents are comprised of a relatively equal mix of Evans Churchill, F.Q. Story and Oakland University Park residents. Half of the respondents also invest their time volunteering in the area, with almost 5% contributing more than ten hours of volunteer service per week. Roosevelt Row CDC and other downtown Phoenix organizations are working within the context of highly-engaged, motivated, passionate stakeholder groups and individuals who care deeply about the success and future of our community.


ArtCharacter Artistic  Artsy

Businesses  Charm 

Coffee shops

Community  Creativity   Historic Buildings  History  Light rail 

Feeling

Live Makes Mix Murals 

Old buildings Parks  Variety

Neighborhood

Residents

Vibe culture THINGS COMMUNITY MEMBERS

WOULDN’T CHANGE ABOUT THE AREA

FUTURE VISION Building on the foundation of the area’s existing strengths, respondents envision the area in five years as defined by its arts and culture, with a strong sense of community and a bustling business environment, inhabited by many more residents. Ten years from now, respondents envision the area with diminished vacant lots, new in-fill housing, district public parking and more complete streetscapes with shade trees, bike lanes, ample lighting for pedestrians, way-finding and navigable sidewalks. With a strong sense of place, the area will be a thriving urban destination for the arts, markets and events, interlaced with distinct and distinctive neighborhoods full of diverse housing options. Walkability is also reflected in the long term vision that respondents have for the area. To bring Roosevelt Street to the level of the great and iconic streets in San Francisco, Washington DC, New Orleans and Barcelona, it needs to be pedestrian-friendly to bring life to the street and connect people with distinctive architecture, local eateries and shops, and great people-watching. If there is one area in the city of Phoenix that deserves a world-class pedestrian corridor, it is Roosevelt Street.

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[ ✔ ] ENGAGE MORE THAN 1,000 VOLUNTEERS TO IMPROVE THE AREA.

[ ✔ ] PLANT MORE THAN 100 NEW SHADE TREES.

[ ✔ ] CREATE BILLBOARD MAP of the area for way-finding.

[ ✔ ] PRODUCE A WEBSITE AND WEEKLY EMAIL NEWSLETTER .


TEDDY’S TO DO LIST In honor of our namesake, Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt, Teddy’s “TO DO LIST” is a tool to track the accomplishment of short-term, mid-term and

long-term priorities for the area. Survey respondents and stakeholders have identified a range of projects for implementation that will require resources, time and partnerships to achieve. Roosevelt Row CDC has already accomplished a significant amount in a 05.

short period of time with extremely limited resources. Recent accomplishments, checked off on “Teddy’s TO DO List” include: [ ✔ ] PRODUCE A NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS DIRECTORY. [ ✔ ] CREATE BILLBOARD MAP of the area for way-finding. < TEDDY’S <

todo r LIST r

TEDDY ROOSEVELT PHOTO/ LIBRARY OF CONGRESS LOGO DESIGN/ SAFWAT SALEEM

[ ✔ ] PRODUCE A WEBSITE AND WEEKLY EMAIL NEWSLETTER . [ ✔ ] PLANT MORE THAN 100 NEW SHADE TREES. [ ✔ ] ENGAGE MORE THAN 1,000 VOLUNTEERS TO IMPROVE THE AREA. [ ✔ ] PRODUCE OVER 100 EVENTS that have attracted and served more than

1.5 million visitors in the district. [ ✔ ] DEVELOP AND ENCOURAGE TEMPORARY USES to activate the area’s

“missing teeth” (vacant lots). [ ✔ ] DEVELOP INDIVIDUAL AND PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP PROGRAM. [ ✔ ] REVISIT AND REVISE THE MASTER PLAN FOR MARGARET T. HANCE PARK

to improve public amenities, programming, visibility, and usage by residents, students, and visitors.

To view the current list of projects visit www. rooseveltrow.org/todo

[

] ESTABLISH CONSISTENT DISTRICT DESIGN STANDARDS for all public right-

of-way improvements that are consistent with and reinforce the character of each historic and mixed-use neighborhood along the Roosevelt Street corridor including Garfield, Evans Churchill, Roosevelt, F.Q. Story and

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Oakland University Park. [

] ENSURE OPEN AND TRANSPARENT

COORDINATION AMONG PLANNING AND DESIGN OF IMPROVEMENTS AND PROJECTS . [ 36

] UNDERGROUND ALL OVERHEAD UTILITIES

within the district, including the 69kv powerlines along East Roosevelt Street. [

] IMPLEMENT A COMPREHENSIVE PARKING

MANAGEMENT STRATEGY for each

neighborhood in the corridor. [

] DEVELOP, ADOPT AND IMPLEMENT A PLAN

FOR DISTRICT PUBLIC PARKING to support the

growing number of businesses that serve the area. [

] INSTALL WAY-FINDING AND SIGNAGE .

[

] IMPLEMENT A PROPERTY TAX INCENTIVE

similar to that established for historic owner-occupied properties to allow for a temporary long-term freeze on owneroccupied arts uses within the district. [

] EXEMPT SALES OF ORIGINAL ONE-OF-A-KIND

ART sold in the district from city, county and

state sales tax. [

] ENCOURAGE ADAPTIVE REUSE AND

HISTORIC PRESERVATION of existing historic,

vintage and otherwise distinctive existing building stock.

PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE

[ ✔ ] COMMISSION, HELP INSTALL, AND SUPPORT TOURS OF MURALS.


[

] ENCOURAGE BUILD OUT TO THE HIGHEST

CURRENTLY ZONED DENSITY in the Evans Churchill

neighborhood. [

] PROMOTE FRIDAYS IN PHOENIX to build upon

the initial success of First and Third Fridays. [

] CONVERT 333 EAST PORTLAND STREET INTO A

COMMUNITY THEATER AND EVENT SPACE. [

] DEVELOP SPECIAL CHARACTER DISTRICT around

the last two contiguous blocks of the original 1888 Churchill Addition, the two blocks between Roosevelt Street and Garfield and Fourth Street and Sixth Street. [

] ESTABLISH A BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT.

[

] ESTABLISH A FINANCING/MICRO-LOAN PROGRAM

for arts-related projects and uses.

To contribute a suggestion for Teddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s To Do List, to learn about ways to participate, or to support the work of Roosevelt Row CDC, please send an email to create@rooseveltrow.org. MICHAEL McDEARMON/ ASU

This rendering, looking east down Roosevelt from the lightrail station at Roosevelt and Central, shows vacant land in the area. Since the rendering was created, the Roosevelt Point apartments have been built filling up 1.5 blocks.

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PHOTO BY LINDSAY KINKADE

Bicycling events including the PreFeast Bike Fest on the morning of the Feast on the Street are drawing cyclists of many backgrouds. At the Fest, participants planted bike gardens and bike bouquets to decorate for their ride at the Feast.


GUIDING PRINCIPLES An additional document establishing design guidelines for the Roosevelt Row District has been adopted to provide guidance for future development of the area. These are principles which express the collectively developed and adopted aspirations of the diverse community stakeholders in the district. Two key points are worth highlighting.

has a distinct and distinctive character and different priorities for future development. First and foremost, any and all private and public development should respect, complement and conform to the existing fabric of these neighborhoods with the neighborhood playing a meaningful role in decisions that affect or guide any new development.

public right-of-way improvements lead to a greater sense of neighborhood identity. A community petition with more than 500 signatures was required to include bike lanes on East Roosevelt Street in the

planning documents for the Downtown Code. These explicitly expressed priorities can be achieved through a variety of means over time, but a productive public/ private/non-profit partnership holds the most promise for successful implementation and for the health, vitality and economic success of the area and its

2) MIXED USE. MIXED INCOME. MIXED DENSITY.

Each neighborhood along the Roosevelt Street corridor

streetscape and other

the fact that bike lanes were part of the adopted

residents, businesses and visitors.

1) FIRST, DO NO HARM.

It is critical to ensure that

plans for the upcoming streetscape project, in spite of

Just as a mono-culture of street trees is subject to disease that can eliminate shade from an entire area, monotony in the built environment is dull and disorienting. The endless acres of detached singlestory, single-family stucco and red-tile roof homes with two-car garages that comprise much of suburban Phoenix development is inappropriate in a more densely-populated urban transit-oriented corridor with mixed density. Segregation

Emerging downtown bicycle advocates New in the past two years: Pedal Craft poster show, Phoenix Spokes People, PHX Bike Lab, Pre-Feast Bike Fest

of uses is also not desirable in an area where shopping, dining and entertainment are desired within easy walking distance of a range of housing options. Housing should meet the needs of all income levels within the same community within Pedal Craft poster by Adam Mann.

integrated housing options.

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ADDI T IONAL OUTCOMES Numerous additional outcomes and accomplishments have evolved from the process of bringing people together to discuss the future and priorities for the area. Among these additional outcomes are a comprehensive 40

9,100 hours volunteered downtown

map of downtown organizations and calendar of regular

each year by survey respondents

neighborhood. Additional specific new policy tools are

For additional background and information For the text of the full report, â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Pass-Through to Pedestrian-Friendly: Building the Infrastructure for Innovation,â&#x20AC;? visit www.rooseveltrow. org/outcomes.

meetings, inclusion of certain allowable uses of vacant land by right in the Downtown Code, and development of a comprehensive parking management plan for on-street parking throughout the Evans Churchill also recommended including a property tax freeze modeled after historic properties for artist owneroccupied properties with an arts use, a sales tax exemption for original one-of-a-kind works of art sold in the district, implementation of a Business Improvement District and a micro-financing/loan program to support arts uses in the district. The impact of these current and future investments will be regularly assessed and evaluated at least every five years, with a sunset provision included in new policy tools.

PHOTO BY LINDSAY KINKADE

At left, the Peritoneum public art sculpture at Ro2: The Lot: What Should Go Here? On the right, the new Roosevelt Point apartments show how quickly an empty lot can become infill housing.


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Walking is a revolutionary act in Phoenix. ‘In our experience, people want to live in apartment communities with an active arts scene, friendly neighbors and vibrant retail. Roosevelt Point has all of those things which made the decision to invest and build here very easy for us.’ –JOSHUA WILSON, EdR, MAJORITY OWNER, ROOSEVELT POINT

In 2012, downtown Phoenix appeared one of the top results on a Google search for Arizona ghost towns. At the same time, Roosevelt Row CDC received significant funding from two national sources to support, validate, and extend work in creative placemaking for the benefit of downtown. A great city is built and grows upon a foundation of strong neighborhoods. It is the goal of Roosevelt Row CDC to cultivate and support the best urban historic and mixed-use neighborhoods in Arizona; to serve as a model for collaboration between residents, businesses and the public sector to enhance quality of life and economic opportunity; and to be an attractive and desirable place to live, work and visit. The area has evolved from a pass-through egress out of downtown to a pedestrianfriendly corridor that is home to the first new infill urban housing in downtown since


the most recent economic implosion of the real estate market. Equity partner EdR acknowledged the significance of the arts in their decision to invest in the area at the groundbreaking for Roosevelt Point in 2011. The arts have become an unquestionable asset in the 42

revitalization of downtown Phoenix. Between 2000 and 2010, reported rates of crime have decreased in the Roosevelt Row corridor by more than fifty percent. There is an increasing body of scholarship that examines and analyzes the tremendous contributions of the arts, in particular informal arts, to community vibrancy, health and civic engagement. The Roosevelt Row Arts District has, over the past decade, undergone a dramatic transformation. Today, the community’s vision for the future of Roosevelt Row looks very much like the vision expressed more than two decades ago by residents in the same area. It echoes the desires documented in the official “Arts District” plan adopted by the Phoenix City Council in 1986. Even as this report is being completed, Roosevelt Row CDC is moving into the next phases of new work and

projects to enhance the district, an effort that will bear many outcomes but no final conclusion. Please join us on this journey and celebration of the arts and culture in downtown Phoenix. create@rooseveltrow.org

PHOTOS BY LINDSAY KINKADE

ArtPlace funding was used to purchase shipping containers for artists’ proposed projects. Roosevelt Row CDC also acquired the vintage Bill Johnson trailer, in top photo, for studio space. Greg Esser is shown priming the shipping containers for temporary murals and signage.


MANY THANKS TO OUR PARTNERS Working Group Andrew James Benson (RRCDC Board) Greg Ensell (RRCDC Board) Alison Rainey (RRCDC Board) Greg Esser (RRCDC Board) Braden Kay (RRCDC Board) Kenny Barrett (RRCDC Staff) Facilitator Leslie Lindo Translator Casandra Hernandez Designers Lindsay Kinkade, Design RePublic, book design Safwat Saleem, environmental graphics & community engagement materials Roosevelt Row District Steering Committee Mayor Greg Stanton Brendan Mahoney, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Mayor Greg Stanton City Councilman Michael Nowakowski, Dist. 7 Caitlyn Mitchell, City Council Dist. 7 City Councilman Michael Johnson, Dist. 8 City Councilman Tom Simplot, Dist. 4 Kendra Cea, APS J. Charles Coughlin, HighGround, Inc. John Couleur, Roosevelt Action Assoc. Bob Croft, F.Q. Story Dana Johnson, Garfield Organization and Alwun House Jim McPherson, Downtown Voices Coalition Hugo Medina, Calle 16 Kim Moody, Garfield Organization and Alwun House Diana Perez Ramirez, Puente Vermon Pierre, Roosevelt Community Church Kevin Rille, Evans Churchill Community Assoc. Megan Schmidt Tim Sprague, Grand Avenue Merchants Assoc. Louisa Stark, Oakland University Park

Mary Stephens, Phoenix International Hostel & Cultural Center Teen Advisory Committee Faculty Leaders Julie Hampton, Arizona School for the Arts Colin Kunzweiler, Bioscience High School Sarah Martinez, Metro Arts Lynn Palacios, Bioscience High School Lisa Starry, Metro Arts Amanda Yocum, ASU Preparatory Academy Stakeholder Interviews Kim Moody, Dana Johnson, Sam Greene, Eric Brown, Tupac Enrique, Margaret Gabaldon, Dr. Eugene Grigsby, Michael Elliot, Norman Fox, Kimber Lanning, Carla Wade, Matt Poole, John Sagasta, Eric Dahl, Georgie Freeman, Tammie Coe, Ange Pappas, Joseph Benesh, Wayne Rainey, Beatrice Moore, Tom Carmody, Laurie Carmody, Allan Gutkin, Nancy Hill, Michelle Goings, Katie Hess, Jim McPherson, Sean Sweat, Dorina Bustamante, Stacey Champion, Shannon Scutari, Feliciano Vera. A.R.T.S. Village Selection Panel Jon Kitchell, Kitchell Perez Lorenzo Perez, Venue Projects Leslie Lindo, Ikoloji Andrew Benson, Randy Murray Productions Feast on the Street Planning Committee Clare Patey, lead artist, Feast on the Bridge, London Matthew Moore, lead artist, Urban Plough and Digital Farm Collective Colin Tetreault, Master of Ceremonies, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Mayor Greg Stanton Mandi Wimmer, AJW Productions, Event Manager Jo Ellen Alberhasky, Program Coordinator, University Sustainability Practices, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability Sara Anderson, Downtown Phoenix Partnership Bryan Barker, Manager of Web

Communications and Marketing, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability Joan Baron, artist Kenny Barrett, Programs Manager, Roosevelt Row CDC Kris Baxter Andrew Benson, Randy Murray Productions and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Mel Bergman, artist Margaree Bigler, Local First and Devour! Nicholas Brown, Director of University Sustainability Practices, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability Kendra Cea, APS and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Anna Consie J. Charles Couglin, HighGround and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Cindy Dach, Changing Hands Bookstore and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Jennifer Delgado, Delgado Law Group, PLC and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Gregory Ensell, COX Communications and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Greg Esser, ASU Art Museum and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Lesley Forst, Event Coordinator, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability Shannon Fose, Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Kevin Grapes, Solid Waste Supervisor, City of Phoenix Doug Hanchett Szu-Han Ho, University of New Mexico Wendy Hultsman, PhD., ASU College of Public Programs Samantha Jackson, Downtown Phoenix Partnership Braden Kay, ASU Global Institute of Sustainability and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Jacqueline Keidel Brian Kissinger, Desert Botanical Gardens Dan Klocke, Downtown Phoenix Partnership CDC and Phoenix Public Market Gordon Knox, Director, ASU Art Museum

Alma Kraemer Lauren Kuby, Manager of Events & Community Engagement, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability Kim Larkin, Digital Farm Collective and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Alana Levine, Program Manager, Grounds Services, Facilities Management Heather Lineberry, Senior Curator and Associate Director, ASU Art Museum Betty Lombardo, Sustainability Program Manager, University Sustainability Practices, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability Jean Makin, Print Curator, ASU Art Museum Lora Martens, Martino and Associates Lisa Perez, Global Green Integrators Vermon Pierre, Roosevelt Community Church and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Andrea Polli, University of New Mexico Brandi Porter, Roosevelt Row Social Media Intern Alison Rainey, Shepley Bulfinch and Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors Saretha Ramakrishna, School of Sustainability student and ASU Art Museum intern Rebecca Rothman, Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture Gregory Sale, ASU School of Art Matthew and Maria Salenger, coLAB Theresa Sarna, Whole Foods Market Kelly Saunders, ASU Rob and Melani Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives Peter Shikany, ASU Art Museum Creative Impact Board Chair and PS Studios Lawrence Shrout Jess Simpson Eileen Spitalny, Fairy Tale Brownies and ASU Art Museum Creative Impact Board Deborah Sussman, ASU Art Musuem Chelsi Tryon, Administrative Assistant, ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability Carla Wade Logan, Roosevelt Row CDC Board of Directors and Carly’s Bistro Laura Zabel, Executive Director, Springboard for the Arts in Saint Paul

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MANY THANKS TO OUR COMMUNI T Y PARTNERS A broad range of partnerships has been instrumental to the 44

success of Roosevelt Row. The impact of the growing network of partnerships mirrors the tremendous energy and synergy generated by the visual arts community coming together to develop mutually beneficial opportunities in the urban core. Our partners include, among many others, the following: Arizona Commission on the Arts Arizona Home Grown Solutions Arizona State University ASU Art Museum Global Institute of Sustainability Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts APS

Artlink, Inc. Bliss/ReBar Blue Media Calle 16 Chow Bella City of Phoenix Mayor and City Council City Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office Community and Economic Development Department Fire Department Office of Arts and Culture Police Department South Mountain Precinct Downtown Operations Unit Public Works Department

coLAB Studios, llc Co+Hoots Concord Eastridge Discovery Triangle Downtown Phoenix, Inc. Downtown Phoenix Journal Downtown Phoenix Partnership Downtown Voices F.Q. Story EBS Printing Edible Phoenix Eeko Studios Evans Churchill Community Assoc. Garfield Organization Grand Avenue Merchants Assoc. HandsOn Greater Phoenix Hansel Phelps Hardison Downey Intel Corporation Intel Foundation IWS

Jackalope Ranch Kenilworth Elementary School Local First Maricopa County Adult Probation Midtown Museum District Modified Arts MonOrchid Studios Nina Scholars Program Northern Arizona University Oakland University Park Parenti Partners Phoenix Center for the Arts Phoenix Community Alliance Phoenix Street Food Coalition Phoenix New Times Phoenix Union Bioscience High School PS Studios Puente Roosevelt Action Assoc. Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center Tonatierra Think! University of Arizona Valley METRO Valley Permaculture Alliance

Major Donors, Sponsors and Financial Supporters ArtPlace National Endowment for the Arts APS

Action Wines Chipotle Concord Eastridge Cox Communications Diageo (Don Julio Tequila) Four Peaks Georgia McGraw Lumberyard PS Studios Ranch Market


ABOUT ARTPLACE ArtPlace America is a collaboration of 13 leading national and regional foundations and six of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest banks. ArtPlace America also seeks advice and counsel from close working relationships with various federal agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts, the departments of Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services, Agriculture, Education, and Transportation, along with leadership from the White House Office of Management and Budget and the Domestic Policy Council. Learn more at www.artplaceamerica.org/about

ABO UT TH E NAT IO NAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS The National Endowment for the Arts was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE

Dancers at the Feast on the Street enjoy the music of The Haymarket Squares, a local punkgrass band.

other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector. Learn more at www.nea.gov

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PHOTO BY ANDREW PIELAGE

Our community Salad Toss kicked off the Feast on the Street.


#g ra nd av en

Over the next 5, 10, 15 years– What will we create together?

ROOSEVELT ROW: Artists’ District

ue

#rooseveltrow

Roosevelt Row Artists' District: Creative Placemaking in Downtown Phoenix  
Roosevelt Row Artists' District: Creative Placemaking in Downtown Phoenix  

In this review of recent projects on Roosevelt Row, the hard work of many creative leaders over many years is explored, explained, and celeb...

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