CITY November 2022

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NEWS. ARTS. LIFE. | NOVEMBER 2022| FREE | SINCE 1971 TRADITIONS

PUBLIC LIVES

MUSIC

ROCHESTER CHEFS SHARE THEIR FAMILY’S TURKEY DAY DISHES

SIMEON BANISTER MAKES HIS MARK

SARAH SHOOK COMES ‘HOME’

Thanksgiving

in ny Susan B. Antho Square


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IN THIS ISSUE OPENING SHOT

Models walk the runway at Fashion Week Rochester. The three-day affair in October supports Center for Youth services. See more on page 34. PHOTO BY MIKE MARTINEZ

NEWS

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EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

IS ‘PERCENT-FOR-ART’ READY FOR BLAST OFF?

Rochester at long last appears to be serious about funding the arts. But will its plan leave the launch pad? BY DAVID ANDREATTA

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ARTS

LIFE

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30

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A new city plan looks to get healthy food into corner stores.

A ‘NO PARTY’ SHIFT

For the first time, independent voters outnumber enrolled Republicans. But national polls show Americans trending toward the GOP. BY DAVID ANDREATTA AND BRIAN SHARP

POETRY AND PISTOLS

Is the pen mightier than the gun? Poet Matt Donovan explores America’s fascination with firearms in ‘The Dug-up Gun Museum.’

DINING

MY FAMILY’S THANKSGIVING

We asked Rochester chefs to share the Turkey Day recipes that had them asking for seconds at the kids’ table. BY DARIO JOSEPH

BY JEFF SPEVAK

MOVE OVER, CHEF BOYARDEE

POLITICS

SARAH SHOOK COMES ‘HOME’

After a life of ups and down, a singer-songwriter from Lima takes her act back to where it all began.

BY GINO FANELLI

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MUSIC SPOTLIGHT

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CITY VISITS

FASHION WEEK

We talked to models, and they did their little turns on the catwalk. BY MIKE MARTINEZ AND LEAH STACY

BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

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HARDCORE HEAVEN

The one-day Upstate Unity Festival brings together the best of hardcore punk from Rochester, Buffalo, and Syracuse. Wait, are we “upstate”? BY GINO FANELLI

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PUBLIC LIVES

SIMEON BANISTER: MAKING HIS MARK

The new leader of the Rochester Area Community Foundation’s focuses on equity. BY JEREMY MOULE

roccitynews.com

CITY 3


EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK

‘Percent-for-Art’ is ready for blast off — again. Will it leave the launch pad this time? BY DAVID ANDREATTA

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@DAVID_ANDREATTA

ochester officials, who fondly refer to our city as “a city of the arts,” and for good reason, appear to finally be getting serious about funding the arts. But will their plan leave the launch pad this time? American cities that care about being more fun and interesting places to live have for decades invested a small portion of their budgets for certain municipal construction projects in public artworks. These percent-for-art ordinances, as they are known, typically require 1 percent of construction costs be set aside for the purchase of works of art to either complement the site or be placed elsewhere in the city. Philadelphia was the first city in the United States to adopt such a law in 1959. Scores of cities, counties, and states have since followed, and they have been remarkably successful at coughing up the money. Then there is Rochester, which has next to nothing to show for a percent-for-art policy it enacted 15 years ago. Now, Mayor Malik Evans’s administration is trying to, as the manager of city planning put it at a recent City Council committee meeting, “jump-start the initiative.” It is about time. Rochester was already a latecomer to the percent-for-arts movement when the administration of Mayor Robert Duffy and the City Council enacted our law in 2007. The ordinance required the city to designate to art 1 percent of the cost of construction projects in which the city spent at least $1 million. The city had a couple of years to prepare. Under the law, it was supposed to start setting the money aside in 2009. But just when the money was to start flowing, the Duffy administration was scratching its

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head over basic details of just how this whole percent-for-art thing that other cities had been implementing successfully for decades should work.

ILLUSTRATION BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

Some of the administration’s questions and comments submitted into the City Council record that year included: “How is the city share for a project calculated?” “How is the 1 percent tracked over the several years of a project and when is it determined that the commitment has been met?” “Tying the art funding to a specific project adds a significant amount of up-front time and work.” In the end, the City Council amended the law slightly at Duffy’s request to allow the city to pay for its commitment to art using a variety of revenue streams at its disposal, and to give the city more flexibility in choosing where the art would go. From there, though, the law was all but abandoned. In 10 of the years since, the city has neglected to set aside or spend money tied to the percentfor-art law, according to the Evans administration. “It didn’t really get the backing that it needed to become fully

implemented,” said Dana Miller, the city’s commissioner of neighborhood and business development, who was on the City Council at the time. “That’s really the bottom line,” he said. “In any process, you can get everything ready, but until you hit that launch button, it just sits there on the pad.” Former Mayor Lovely Warren resuscitated the percent-forart law late in her term when she referenced it in her administration’s “Rochester 2034 Plan,” a blueprint for the future of the city, and assembled the Arts and Creative Community Committee, an advisory panel of people in the community with stakes in a variety of art forms. Last month, the City Council kept up the CPR when it amended the law again. This time, the changes codified, among other things, that a minimum of 25 percent of the percent-forart fund be spent on art annually, and established a new option for supporting “non-capital art,” such as temporary art exhibitions, performance art, and arts education programs. The Evans administration has set aside $236,000 to start spending now, with $100,000 dedicated to murals and another $100,000 to fund a “public art installation program.” Both of those initiatives have been put out to bid. The remaining $36,000 is to help fund the development of an arts and culture plan for Rochester. In simple terms, that means the creation of a legitimate arts commission that can shepherd projects and advise the city on funding. Every community in the country that is serious about public art has one. Rochester should, too. To facilitate that, the administration has assembled a team of city workers from several departments to advance art-related


NEWS. ARTS. LIFE. November, 2022 Vol 51 No 3

efforts and collaborate with the advisory committee. Annette Ramos, of the Rochester Latino Theatre Company and one of 14 community arts leaders on the committee, said conversations with the city have been “meaningful and in-depth,” and expressed optimism that percent-for-art would finally get off the ground. “Any city that thinks only the government can lead arts is really cutting their nose off to spite their face,” Ramos said. “It is not a budget person, it is not a communications person. It’s truly the arts sector leaders and advocates that can assure and instill a sense of value. I’m positive we’ve never been this far along.” Percent-for-art won’t be a windfall for public art. The Evans administration figures there only are a half-dozen or so capital construction projects a year that exceed $1 million, and estimates that will translate to anywhere from $150,000 to $270,000 going to art annually. But it could be a steady revenue stream — if the city has the political will to put the money aside. City Councilmember Mitch Gruber questioned the administration’s stomach for following through when the legislation amending the percent-forart law went through the council’s Finance Committee. The answer he got from Budget Director Michael Burns was underwhelming. “Is there some kind of reporting mechanism that we can develop to really make sure that what we’re doing here is what’s done, so 14 years from now whoever replaces . . . us don’t have to have the same conversation?” Gruber asked. “Yeah, so, I think we can give that some thought and come up with an appropriate way to bring the full light of day to what we’re doing,” Burns replied. Until that happens, percent-forart waits to blast off.

On the cover: Illustration by Laura Homsey Petit Paper Stories 280 State Street Rochester, New York 14614 feedback@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 roccitynews.com PUBLISHER Rochester Area Media Partners LLC, Norm Silverstein, chairman FOUNDERS Bill and Mary Anna Towler EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT themail@rochester-citynews.com Editor: David Andreatta Deputy editor: Jeremy Moule Staff writer: Gino Fanelli Arts editor: Daniel J. Kushner Life editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributors: Jim Catalano, Geary Ann Lewin, Patrick Hosken, Dario Joseph, Mike Martinez, Max Schulte, Mona Seghatolaslami, Brian Sharp, Jeff Spevak, Leah Stacy, David Streever CREATIVE DEPARTMENT artdept@rochester-citynews.com Director, Strategy: Ryan Williamson Art director: Jacob Walsh ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales manager: Alison Zero Jones Advertising consultant/ Project manager: David White OPERATIONS/CIRCULATION Operations manager: Ryan Williamson Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis kstathis@rochester-citynews.com CITY is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased by calling 585-784-3503. CITY may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of CITY, take more than one copy of each monthly issue. CITY (ISSN 1551-3262) is published monthly 12 times per year by Rochester Area Media Partners, a subsidiary of WXXI Public Broadcasting. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: CITY, 280 State Street, Rochester, NY 14614. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia and the New York Press Association. Copyright by Rochester Area Media Partners LLC, 2021 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner. WXXI Members may inquire about free home delivery of CITY including monthly TV listings by calling 585-258-0200.

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NEWS

GROCERY MONEY

Move over, Chef Boyardee

Owners of corner store will soon have access to a $5 million funding pool to help them put healthy food on their shelves. PHOTO BY MAX SCHULTE

A new city plan looks to get healthy food into corner stores. BY GINO FANELLI

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@GINOFANELLI

alk into any corner store in any given neighborhood of the city and you’ll likely find the same assortment of fare — potato chips, sugary sodas, freeze-dried noodles, cans of Chef Boyardee, and plenty of beer and cigarettes. A new city plan aims to change that. The Rochester City Council voted in October to funnel $5 million in federal COVID relief dollars into a pot accessible to shop owners and entrepreneurs with fresh ideas on how to get good quality food into the mouths of Rochester residents.

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The possibilities of the so-called “Healthy Food Loan and Grant Program” are wide. It could, for example, help a corner bodega stock fresh fish, or give an app designer the start-up cash to launch a local grocery delivery service. “We wouldn’t expect every corner store to want to be a part of this,” said Dana Miller, commissioner of the city’s Department of Neighborhood and Business Development. “But, we would expect that some of the corner stores that are perhaps looking at this more broadly, and saying, ‘You know, there’s money in these items we’re

selling now, but we really do feel a need to try and provide more service to the community.’” For many neighborhoods, particularly those of low-income that have been largely abandoned by the region’s chain supermarkets, corner stores are a key source of food. They’re easily accessible by foot and typically stocked with low-preparation meals and snacks. But you’d be hard-pressed to find decent produce or quality meat at most of these shops. Miller acknowledged that it is cost effective for corner stores to peddle pre-packaged foods, beer, and

cigarettes. The displays are usually free from the supplier and the products seldom go bad. Likewise, a growing body of research suggests that dietary patterns in neighborhoods bereft of healthy food options are not necessarily linked to what’s on the corner store shelf. For example, a 2014 study, supported by the National Institutes of Health, that focused on two low-income, predominantly Black neighborhoods in Pittsburgh, found that access to a fullservice supermarket may not be as large of a factor in dietary choices as food marketing.


“(T)hat marketing may be critically important to understanding the food environment, perhaps more so than access, may be particularly true for residents of food deserts, who are largely low-income individuals,” the study reads. The goal of the Food Access Loan and Grant Program is to not just introduce quality food to underserved neighborhoods, but to do so in a way that people will actually want to buy it. The program will be overseen by Rosa Luciano, the chair of the city’s Food Policy Council, a new citycreated function tasked with addressing the city’s food access issues. “I think one of the important things is us not defining what healthy food is, but really listening to our neighbors,” Luciano said. “Every neighborhood has different needs.” Luciano emphasized the importance of tailoring efforts to specific neighborhoods. For instance, in a neighborhood like Edgerton, where a large number of Nepali refugees have settled, that might look like making sure corner stores carry fenugreek, a hard-to-find spice that is a staple of Nepalese cuisine. “It’s not just about food, it’s about listening to those voices,” Luciano said. The program is aiming for a three-pronged approach to healthy food access — investing in existing businesses, attracting new healthy food businesses to underserved areas, and “alternative models” for food distribution. City Councilmember Mitch Gruber is the chief policy officer at Foodlink, putting him at the intersection of city policy and the region’s food access efforts. He was largely responsible for drafting the loan and grant legislation. Gruber sees opportunity in what he calls the “alternative food retail models” portion of the legislation. He sees potential in things like “click and collect” programs, which allow customers to order food online and pick them up at a store, subsidized farm sharing programs, and mobile markets, like Foodlink’s curbside market. Foodlink currently has no role in the loan and grant program. “Most cities, at the end of the day,

Shoppers and vendors at the Rochester Public Market. PHOTOS BY MAX SCHULTE

have tried to focus on incentivizing big boxes to come,” Gruber said. “Look at Constantino’s, it didn’t work.” The Ohio-based grocer Constantino’s opened to great fanfare in 2015 in College Town, the shopping district surrounding the University of Rochester. Backed by $750,000 in federal grants, the store lasted less than a year. There are numerous examples of grocery stores across the country that entered low-income marketplaces with the assistance of government subsidies or employing alternative models and failing. In the South Side of

Chicago, a section of the city notorious for its pockets of crime, a Whole Foods bolstered by $10.7 million in municipal grants in 2014 shuttered earlier this year. In 2018, the Salvation Army opened its first grocery store in Baltimore. Dubbed DMG Foods, short for Doing the Most Good, the grocery store was heralded as a model for nonprofit grocery stores. It lasted less than three years. Gruber sees opportunity not in pushing for more traditional, or nonprofit grocery stores, but rather by thinking outside of the box. He points

to services like DoorDash, Instacart, or the meal delivery service Blue Apron as having potential. The hurdle is making them accessible to needy residents. “One of the ways we actually see innovation in food access is by creating funds for entrepreneurial investment,” Gruber said. “…We have a lot of entrepreneurs in this city that, given the time and space, can do something different.”

roccitynews.com

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NEWS

TWO PARTY TWO-STEP

A “no party” shift Independent voters now outnumber Republicans in Monroe County. But polls shows Americans trending toward the GOP. BY DAVID ANDREATTA AND BRIAN SHARP

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ver had a conversation about politics with someone who says something like, “I can’t stand either party,” and claims to be an independent voter? Of course you have. Shunning the main political parties, or refusing to openly affiliate with one of them, is representative of how many Americans identify politically nowadays. The share of voters who call themselves “independent” has been steadily climbing for years, according to Gallup’s quarterly party affiliation data. In Monroe County, the trend has reached an inflection point: For the first time, Republicans are not one of the two largest voting blocs. Voters registering with “no party” now outnumber enrolled Republicans, according to the latest party enrollment statistics released by the county Board of Elections. While the county continues to lean strongly Democratic, enrollment in that party also dipped after years of growth, according to the latest data. Unaffiliated Monroe County voters outnumbered enrolled Republicans by nearly 1,000 in the latest report, and account for 26 percent of the electorate. Democrats account for 42 percent, records show. The number of enrolled Republicans fell 4,544 to 125,010 between October 2020 and October 2022. Democrats lost 846 voters over the same period and now number 205,314. Meanwhile, the number of voters unaffiliated with either party climbed by 5,644 to 125,977. “It’s absolutely been happening over the last several years, where the largest growing party is ‘blank,’” said Jackie Ortiz, the county’s Democratic

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elections commissioner. That growth has been particularly notable in the past couple of months, she said, and officials expect the trend to continue. Independents are often cast as being less dogmatic and more middle-of-the-road in their political views than partisans. But Gallup party affiliation polls suggest that most independents still lean toward one party or another. In other words, while many Americans are disenchanted with the major parties to the point that they refuse to openly identify with them, they still consistently back one of them. That shift has consequences — namely that fewer people are exerting influence on what the parties look and sound like. “As it relates to primaries, it is a huge concern,” said David Dunning, chairman of Monroe County Republicans. For better or worse, parties remain the foundation of the political system. But as more and more voters decline to affiliate with a party, the platforms and persona of the parties

are increasingly shaped by more stringent partisans. It plays out in the primary process, particularly in election districts where one party has a lopsided advantage over the other. In those pockets, primaries effectively decide the general election. Former Gov. Andrew Cuomo likely contributed to the “no party” shift with his push in 2020 to restrict third-party ballot lines. But limited voter participation early in the election process makes it hard to gauge what messages are resonating with voters. “It does create, for us, some uncertainty on where people are, and where their political views lie,” Dunning said. “And I think this is happening largely because people have just become disenfranchised with the political scene altogether.” Joseph Robach, the Democratturned-Republican former state senator from Greece, who now often functions as a spokesperson for the local GOP and its candidates, said the shift was of little concern for him. “I don’t think it should be so

much about party, so it doesn’t upset me,” he said. Robach said he was convinced that the general public is more aligned with Republican policies today — which he added would be more clearly defined when presented in contrast to Democrats’ one-party rule in Albany. If that were the case locally, it would mirror a national trend. For decades, more Americans have tended to lean toward Democrats than Republicans, even if that gap has sometimes been small. But recent Gallup party affiliation polls have found that Republicans have taken that lead. Since September 2021, more voters have reported “leaning” Republican than Democratic. On average, 45 percent identified as Republican or gravitating toward the GOP, while 44 percent leaned toward the Democratic Party. The percentage favoring Republicans reached a high of 48 in September. But it is worth noting that party identification is volatile. A month earlier, in August, the percentage favoring Republicans dipped to 39 percent after months of hovering around 45. “Pendulums swing back and forth,” Robach said. “Would I like it if more people were registered Republican?” he asked. “Sure. But if independent people are able to establish that they will vote for the policies they like best, what it really comes down to, to me, is outcome. “And clearly,” he continued, “New York state is at a crossroads.”


roccitynews.com

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ARTS

MUSIC SPOTLIGHT

Sarah Shook’s journey from rebellious Christian kid in upstate New York to accomplished North Carolina country musician comes full circle when they play Abilene Bar & Lounge in November. PHOTO BY JEFF SPEVAK

SARAH SHOOK COMES ‘HOME’ After a life of ups and down, a songwriter from Lima takes their act back to where it all began. BY JEFF SPEVAK

@JEFFSPEVAK1

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ll too often, an artist’s pain is our entertainment. Sarah Shook describes their life as a young girl as being seemingly drawn from a Flannery O’Connor novel. They grew up in Lima — “one stop light and three liquor stores,” as they put it — where their parents worked to “shelter us from an evil world” by home schooling and raising them in a fundamentalist evangelical church. “Very literal interpretations of The Bible,” they say of those days. “Speaking in tongues, and casting out 10 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

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demons, all that stuff.” As in all the best literature, rebellion was inevitable. Shook moved on from their parents’ religion, and is now an atheist. They pursued non-binary relationships, and use the personal pronouns they/them. Home today is North Carolina. “I was very disenchanted with the church experience, and the idea of this very patriarchal, you know, ‘the men are the leaders of the church,’” Shook says. “There was so much that did not make sense,

and every time I raised questions I was met with, ‘Well, you just have to have faith.’ I was like, ‘That’s not good enough for me. I want answers.’” Emerging from the uncertainty and chaos of their early life, Shook, 37, has found some answers in music, which they bring back to Rochester at 8 p.m. Nov. 8, when Sarah Shook & the Disarmers play Abilene Bar & Lounge. Their sound is described by some as Americana. Country, even. But if so, there’s an edgy eggshell of an

exterior, even surging into punk and grunge territory through three albums, including “Nightroamers,” released in February. Shook defends their parents as “good people.” “They’ve really come a long way,” they say. “They really got caught up in conservative talk radio. When that was, like, exploding, it impacted the way that they raised us. “I don’t think people realize how extreme some of these views can be,” CONTINUED ON PAGE 12


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Shook says. “My parents taught me, that, because I was a girl, I existed to only get married and have children and run a household. And not only that, I wasn’t allowed to choose my husband, my dad would choose my husband.” Getting out of the house, Shook began seeing another world. A job at Wegmans. A dance scholarship from Rochester’s PUSH Physical Theatre, and working with its youth program, PUSH Pins. That’s where Shook first experienced touring. And liked it. But in 2001, Shook’s parents moved the family to North Carolina. Depression and self-destructive behavior tagged along. Shook was 17 then, having been writing songs since the age of 9, although there didn’t seem to be a future in it. “It was a tool to use to talk about my emotions, which I was really bad about talking about,” they say. “So it was catharsis for me.” Through music, the answers Shook had been seeking began to appear, although the path was a little twisty. “I got married, I got divorced, I was a single mom at 21,” they say. Shook worked three jobs to make ends meet, four days a week, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. And took the other three days to spend with their son. “I started drinking pretty heavily after my ex-husband and I split, just as a coping mechanism,” Shook says. “I didn’t know how else to deal with all of a sudden going from being home schooled, having never lived on my own, having never had a boyfriend, to being a divorced single mom out in the world on my own.” This all was a downward spiral that had to be reversed. And the songs kept coming. Enough good ones to play in front of people, form a band and hit the road. “Almost every song is from things I have lived through and experienced,” Shook says. “Or observed personally.” Shook points to “Nightroamers” and one song in particular, “It Doesn’t Change Anything.” Shook quotes some lyrics: God is dead and heaven’s silent, death has lost its sting And it doesn’t change anything 12 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

Shook points out this line: And there’s no one comin’ to overturn the tables “It Doesn’t Change Anything” is a song about personal turmoil. No one’s coming to your aid. Where “the devil on your shoulder is your only friend.” Audiences embraced Shook’s pain. Pre-pandemic, Shook was playing 150 dates a year. On the way to a tour date in Denver, Sarah Shook & the Disarmers’ drummer were taking turns driving the band van, the equipment trailer following. Definitely a metaphor, for those who believe in such things, for all that personal baggage you can’t leave behind. They stopped for the night in Hayes, Kansas. “I was trying pretty hard to quit drinking at the time,” Shook says. “I was also, had been drinking so much, I was worried about going into withdrawals. So I had, like, a bottle of whiskey in my backpack. We got to the hotel and I was, like, ‘I need to put physical distance between myself and this bottle.’” It was almost midnight, in the middle of July, and a lot had to be sorted out besides their drinking. Relationships. Shook was seeing someone in Ohio, and had “a sweetheart in Sweden.” “Things were going south, not in any kind of awful, dramatic way, but in this kind of sad, ‘There’s just no way to make this work,’” Shook says. “And I realized the dichotomy of touring is like constantly meeting wonderful new people. Making new friends, finding new love interests. But you have to leave. You can’t stay. “It’s really isolating. “Which can be OK. I feel like the last couple years I’ve really learned how to be OK with being alone.” Things change. Lima has a few more stop lights. Shook has acquired a few of their own, their self-destructiveness has abated. It’s all green: Shook is “over the moon” at the thought of making the short walk to Java’s Coffee on Gibbs Street after a sound check at Abilene. “Java’s is, in my teenage years, when I drifted into rebellion, Java’s was a safe place,” they say. “It was a home away from home, I have so many fond memories of Gibbs Street.”


Sarah Shook & the Disarmers. PHOTO PROVIDED

Memories of those Eastman School of Music students toting their cello cases down the sidewalk. “The energy,” Shook says, “it feels like everyone is doing something creative.” What Shook calls the “undealtwith religious trauma” has been broken. The break happened after reading The Bible, cover to cover, one last time. But this time, reading it with a different set of eyes. It was time to, as Shook says, “wrap it up.” “And everything that I have encountered in the past, that I have made an excuse for, or given God a pass for, or said there must be some explanation I just didn’t understand, I’m not going to give him an out this time,” Shook says. “He’s not getting an out. And when you read the Bible that way, it’s a lot different. “And I’ll never forget it, it was terrifying, because this is all I’ve known. Like this religion, this set of beliefs and principles, and moral rigidity, is all I’ve known. And I sat on my porch, and it was a beautiful spring day, and I’m going to take this step and let all of this go and see

what’s on the other side. “It was really scary. It was absolutely worth it.” Shook released their first solo album in October on the Kill Rock Stars label. It’s called “Mightmare,” as in drawing strength from a bad dream. So as the 19th-century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche said — and the 21st-century songwriter Kelly Clarkson reaffirmed — what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. It just might take a few years. Shook’s son is now 15. He’s just had his first driver’s education class. He seems to have known for a while now, his mother says, how to “invest in his own observations.” “I think he was 6 or 7, and just eating his tomato soup at the table,” Shook says. “And he’s like, ‘Mom, that’s the thing about bad guys, they’re not bad guys. They just didn’t have the opportunities that other guys have.’” That’s kind of early to start working on world peace. Speaking from experience, Shook says, “I’m like, ‘You need to slow your roll, dude.’” roccitynews.com CITY 13


NEW MUSIC REVIEWS an ‘inside self,’” he writes in the album’s liner notes.

but had been born in the late-’90s in New York City, where Faergolzia and fellow former SUNY Purchase students helped to build a strange but endlessly creative music scene that included Regina Spektor and The Moldy Peaches in its ranks.

To help pull off such a balance, Young recruited members of Boston band The Push Stars, including producer-engineer Dan McLoughlin, drummer Ryan MacMillan, and vocalist Chris Trapper, among others. Rhett Miller, the singer of alt-country mainstays Old 97’s, even adds harmonies to one cut. Young idolized both groups growing up, along with groups like R.E.M., whose “Driver 8” gets namechecked during a pivotal moment in “Can’t Make Me Go Back.”

“CROW GOT DRUNK” BY NICK CORY YOUNG

After years in the game, it’s fitting that Young gets to play with his heroes.

Many longtime professional musicians dream of performing on a national television show. Rochester’s Nick Cory Young has been recording and releasing crisp Americana for the past 15 years, but he views the pursuit differently. “If you ever see me on a TV screen, I still won’t be happy,” he sings on his new album, “Crow Got Drunk.”

He sounds most potent, though, solo in the solace of the acoustic closer “Florence Virginia.” Inspired by the final days of his grandmother, the tender ode resists the urge to dip into the mawkish. Instead, Young opts for sly turns of phrase that reflect her dying on her own terms: “Though my heart’s racing for what lies in store,” he sings in her voice, “I lost the battle, but I won the war.”

Perhaps his indifference to stereotypical glory stems from the interior life he’s built. Since his previous album came out in 2013, he became a stayat-home dad of two and has slogged through the pandemic. Young paints these experiences into a dozen gems on his latest album, lamenting the slow march to obsolescence on The Wallflowers-esque “Grown Ups,” falling into bad habits on the alt-country “Backwards,” and singing about staying “exactly where I’ll always be” over a mournful Appalachian fiddle. But that’s only half of it. “Crow Got Drunk,” named for a favorite story told by his late grandfather, pairs its spinningwheel lyrics with bright arrangements that bring positive energy to Young’s tales of woe. He calls the divide between his major-key twang and melancholic lyrics just part of his personality. “I suppose it’s a reflection of who I am as a person and of how we all have an ‘outside self’ and

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At subsequent Rochester shows, I would join Dufus on background vocals for select songs, and eventually was part of another Faergolzia band — 23 Psaegz — for several years.

Even with the variety of genres heard on “Time to Terry,” the album has some similarities to the music of Robert Glasper. But Bogart’s music has its own juice, having reached No. 10 on the Billboard contemporary jazz chart. “A Time to Terry” can be heard on major streaming platforms. — BY GEARY ANN LEWIN

Faergolzia’s music has always been and continues to be eccentric, as with 23 Psaegz and his current quartet Multibird. But there’s something specifically anarchic about the music of Dufus that’s captured on “The Second Phone.” Lyrically, Faergolzia comes off mainly as nonsensical, but what sounds like stream-of-consciousness consistently yields ecstatic emotions: joy, frustration, wonder, and anger. If you’re looking for deep meaning, it may be difficult to find it in the words.

Young doesn’t have to hit the late-night circuit to bring a song like that to those who need to hear it. — BY PATRICK HOSKEN

“A TIME TO TERRY” BY TERRY BOGART Pianist-producer Terry Bogart’s “A Time to Terry,” released on Sept. 9, is more than just smooth jazz. There are bits of pop, salsa, acid jazz, and even subtle hints of hip-hop. For example, on “Carnival Nights,” playful keys and a catchy melody intentionally deliver a festive feel that gives way to jazz and hip-hop through the use of claps, snaps, and drums. Bogart achieves the transition artfully while fully embracing his own style and staying true to the conventions of contemporary jazz. You can also hear heavy gospel influences with modern classical piano appeal on the album, most prominently on the song “Eternal.”

Fast forward to today, and the nowdefunct Dufus would have been 25 years old. In honor of this passage of time, on Oct. 31 Faergolzia released “The Second Phone,” a haphazard collection of songs, sounds, and experiments from deep within the Dufus vault.

The music, however, sounds like one bizarre revelation after another, a vivid array of sounds characterized by bursts of melodies, frantic rhythms, madcap dissonances, and vagabond group vocals.

“THE SECOND PHONE, VOLUMES 1 AND 2” BY DUFUS My first time hearing Seth Faergolzia’s freak folk band Dufus perform live was in the mid-2000s, at a small gallery called the AV Space. It was an eye-opening show: The band was weird, communal, and, most importantly, brimming with freeflowing ideas. Dufus was based in Ithaca at the time,

Piano and percussion especially shine on “The Chevitz,” which sounds like a punk-rocker getting a crash course in experimental chamber music. Improvisation comes and goes throughout loose song structures, as in the strangely mesmerizing “Go Donkey Hair.” But the jarring sounds and unpredictable musical architecture belie the skill of musicians such as guitarist Rick Snell, keyboardist Grahm Dion, bassist Phil Timbakis, and Faergolzia.


These same characteristics of the band also accentuate the silliness. There’s no better example than the live favorite “Fun Wearing Underwear,” which features a call-and-response between what appears to be warring factions: We’re wearing underwear (We’re wearing underwear, too)/ We think you’re all real bad (We think the same of you, too)/ We just want to have fun (Us, too). Vol. 1 is a chaotic smorgasbord of live recordings, but Vol. 2 is a more measured collection of studio cuts. The second set includes a previously unreleased version of “Giving In” (originally released as “Giving Inn” on the album “King Walnut”) that sounds decidedly spacier, and with plenty of space between the notes. The arrangement allows the listener to hear the individual instruments more clearly and separates the composition from the ramshackle sound of Dufus live, which often consisted of between 10 and 20 different musicians on stage. “Sick and Tired,” also from “King Walnut,” feels more introspective, more heartbreaking on “The Second Phone,” especially with the blue tone of a saxophone and the lonesome reverb on Faergolzia’s voice. Dufus completists will love this collection for rare gems such as an extended eight-minute version of the song “Dufus” — originally a blistering three minutes on the band’s brilliant but abrasive 2003 album “1:3:1.” There’s also an alternate version of the punk-funk fusion on the title track to end Vol. 2, as a bookend to a live rendition of the song toward the beginning of Vol. 1. Here’s the bottom line: If you like your music odd —and I mean Captain Beefheart-meets-Daniel Johnston levels of odd — you’ll love this retrospective of Dufus’s music, as mastered by Nate Richardson at Ithaca’s REP Studio. These are raw recordings, but they exude magic, energy, and individuality. This New York City band may have been too experimental for its own good, but without it, Rochester may not have become home to Faergolzia, a prodigious songwriter who may always be underappreciated for his inventiveness. If enough people hear “The Second Phone” ringing out, that could change. Two additional Dufus compilations, called “Weirld” and “The Noo Yoo Maschine,” are due out soon. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

“RIBBONS OF LIGHT” EP BY AUTUMN IN HALIFAX “Ribbons of Light,” the latest EP from Autumn in Halifax, aka Rochesterian David Merulla, definitely sounds like a throwback — but perhaps not in the way Merulla envisioned. The singer and multi-instrumentalist cites R.E.M.’s first five albums, released in the early and mid-’80s, as inspiration. But the EP’s actual influences sound as if they came a decade or two later. While Michael Stipe’s sense of introspection is present on “Ribbons of Light,” Merulla’s voice sounds more like that of Elliott Smith or Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy. Maybe it’s the earnestness of the singing, the isolation inherent in the limited instrumentation, or the quiet melancholy in the lyrics. Whatever Merulla is doing, he should keep it up. Joined only by Dirk Doucette as his rhythm section, backing vocalist, and sometime-synth player, Merulla plays music that is sad and comforting at the same time. At its heart, Autumn in Halifax’s sound is a deconstruction of the 2000s indie folk revival that saw the rise of acts such as Iron & Wine and Bon Iver. Merulla’s singing has that same signature softness and vulnerability, but the words are always discernible, rather than melted in the instrumentation as just another layer. The acoustic guitar is used merely as a vehicle for simple chord progressions, rather than as a charming backwoods affectation. The use of synths adds a touch of warm psychedelia that wards off any potential monotony. “Ribbons of Light” is understated, but that’s precisely why it works. Straightforward melodies, chords, and structures make for a concise and sophisticated approach to songwriting that strips away the excesses of modern folk music. That music sounded as if it were trying too hard to seduce the listener. Not so with Autumn in Halifax. What’s left here is honest, and essential. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

roccitynews.com CITY 15


ARTS

ROUNDUP

YOGA TEACHER ANDERSON ALLEN BLENDS MOVEMENT WITH WRITING AT ‘SCRIBE AND MOVE’ Anderson Allen, a yoga teacher and poet, stands with his heels grounded to the floor and arms stretched toward the sky, as if reaching for the sun. The “extended mountain pose” inspires him to connect his physical being to his creative spirit. Worlds collide. “‘What is it that I want to give back? What is it that I’m reaching for? What is it that I want to welcome into my space?’” he asks. “It starts to mean something different each and every time I do it.” Allen leads a free weekly class at the Avenue Blackbox Theatre called “Scribe and Move” that blends a yoga session with a writing session. The idea behind the 90-minute class, Allen says, is that physical movement enables participants to achieve a “deeper level of inquiry.”

16 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

“Writing, it’s me observing the mental, emotional, spiritual faculties of my person,” Allen says. “And the movement allows me to really just come into inquiry about that.” Allen took his first yoga class in 2019, at the Avenue Blackbox Theatre, as part of the theater’s Wellness Wednesday events. “Scribe and Move” isn’t your typical yoga class. Yoga is taught during the first half of the class, while the remainder of the time is reserved for reflective writing and sharing. The class is presented by both the Avenue and Yoga 4 a Good Hood, which offers yoga classes for BIPOC communities and offers yoga teacher training. For more details on “Scribe and Move,” go to avenueblackbox. eventbrite.com. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Poet and yoga instructor Anderson Allen leads participants during a “Scribe and Move” session. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH


POETRY AND PISTOLS “The Dug-Up Gun Museum” is not your typical poetry book peppered with reflections of the past and personal loves and losses. The collection by author Matt Donovan — to be published by the Rochester press BOA Editions on Nov. 8 — questions America’s collective preoccupation with guns and the cycle of gun violence that dominates national headlines. Donovan’s concern crystallizes in the poem “Green Literally Means a Thousand things or More”: …Here we are again, inevitable as the click’s tick, looking in on a place that now will never be young again. Is there a way to say it — There’s been a shooting — that will allow it to be heard, remembered & heard, without the easy glide of our past tense? That will stop us from wanting to turn to anything under the wide starry sky that is not the green fire burning in the minds of those men or the green of a blanket America provides & provides without change? Peter Conners, BOA’s publisher and executive director, said he was drawn to the rare subject matter. “I’ve never seen someone do a book about America’s obsession with guns in poetry before,” Conners said. The project didn’t start out as poetry, however. Donovan initially envisioned a book of journalistic prose. When that idea fell through, he was left with a surplus of interviews and images he couldn’t shake from his mind, and poems emerged instead. It might be tempting to cast his work as anti-gun. But that’s not how Donovan sees his book.

“I see this book as a portrait of America through the lens of guns much more than an anti-gun book,” Donovan said. To paint his portrait, Donovan traveled across the country interviewing a wide range of people, from gun shop owners to parents whose children were killed in shootings. He participated in a war simulation using Airsoft guns at Fort Hood, and worked as an “embedded reporter” in a paintball gun D-Day reenactment. “In a time of incredible polarization, and when we tend to get our information in an echo chamber and just hear those like us, it’s almost a bold statement just to go out into the world and engage in conversation with people who hold different views from you,” Conners said. Donovan was inspired in part by the work of author Erika Meitner, whose poetry book “Holy Moly Carry Me” addresses gun culture in the context of a Jewish family living in an Evangelical community in Appalachia. She referred to the pieces in “The Dug-up Gun Museum” as “documentary poems.” In “The Dug-up Gun Museum,” Donovan offers no solutions to combat gun violence. But empathy for his subjects is woven throughout the work. “I think it’s easier for people who don’t own guns and might be politically on the left side of things to vilify gun owners,” Donovan said. “And to my mind, that is worse than a non-starter in terms of engaging with the issue, and that just contributes to more misgivings and failures to communicate.” Writers & Books presents a free online event via Zoom on Nov. 7, featuring a conversation between Matt Donovan and Peter Conners. Go to wab.org for more information. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

roccitynews.com CITY 17


ARTS

ROUNDUP

FRIDA KAHLO: THE MAKING OF AN ART ICON Mexican painter Frida Kahlo died nearly 70 years ago, but her iconic image lives on — arguably more than her artwork itself — with her distinctive unibrowed visage adorning everything from coffee mugs and pins to tote bags and t-shirts. “Frida Kahlo: Through the Lens of Nickolas Muray,” on display at the Rockwell Museum in Corning through Jan. 22, explores the origins of that image through a series of photos shot by Muray, a Hungarian immigrant who came to the U.S. in 1913 and helped to popularize color photography in publishing and advertising in the 1930s. “We were engaged by the idea that Nickolas Muray had played such a strong role in crafting the iconography of Frida Kahlo,” said Kirsty Buchanan, the Rockwell’s curator of collections and exhibitions. “Without him being a pioneer in color photography, we would not have seen this vivid, brilliant, colorful Kahlo. Unlike a lot of other visual artists, what we know of her, and her iconography, is grounded in her as a person rather than her artwork.” From 1931 to 1941, Muray and Kahlo had an affair that overlapped her two marriages to Mexican muralist Diego Rivera, and the ebbing and flowing of their relationship is reflected in Muray’s photos. Kahlo faced many physical hardships in her life, including a bout with polio at 6, and a severe bus accident at 18 that left her bedridden for two years and in chronic pain thereafter. But she persevered while cultivating an image by adopting the colorful clothing and flowered hairstyles of the Tehuana, a matriarchal culture based in Oaxaca — both as a political statement (reflecting her Mexican-Indigenous roots), and for practical reasons (the flowing skirts helped to hide her metal body braces). Muray and Kahlo remained friends until her death in 1954. He last photographed her in 1948, capping the series of portraits that captured one of the more memorable 18 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

“Frida on White Bench New York,” by Nickolas Muray, 1939. PHOTO PROVIDED

artists of the 20th century — one who still resonates today. “Frida Kahlo is still so relevant,” Buchanan said. “We are fascinated with her as a person and as an artist, as well as the artwork that she created. We keep coming back to it and re-evaluating it because it keeps having modern relevant content and messaging for us to consider. And for us to be able to apply to our own lives the sense of specifically and intentionally crafting your image, and owning what you are presenting of yourself and editing your image — that’s social media, that’s politics, that’s performance art. “She definitely was aware of that and was able to harness it to communicate additional information and meaning about herself at a time when her country was not putting women and matriarchal ideas forward.” “Frida Kahlo: Through the Lens of Nickolas Muray” runs through Jan. 22, 2023, at The Rockwell Museum, 111 Cedar St. in Corning. The museum is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m daily; $11.50 for adults 18 to 61, $10.50 for seniors, military members and veterans, and AAA members, $5.50 for local residents and students. Children 17 and under are free. rockwellmuseum.org. — BY JIM CATALANO


Rochester hardcore punk band Who Decides, pictured above, is one of nine bands performing at Upstate Unity Fest. PHOTO PROVIDED

UPSTATE UNITY FEST: HARDCORE HEAVEN Despite their geographic proximity and know-nothing outsiders lumping them together as “upstate,” Rochester, Buffalo, and Syracuse are unique ecosystems. To wit, try ordering a halfway decent garbage plate outside of the Flower City, or anything but a Sahlen’s hot dog in Buffalo. For better or worse, we do our own things. So, too, is this true in our hardcore punk scenes. The genre has historically been hyperlocalized, with each city bringing something distinct to the table. “I think in Rochester you get this distinctly punk influence, and you could probably attribute that to the Rotcore scene, and the bands that were in that scene,” said Skylar Sarkis, vocalist and guitarist for local hardcore band Who Decides. “Buffalo definitely has a little more heavy sound, of the Terror or Hatebreed variety.” Sarkis is the organizer of the Upstate Unity Fest, a one-day event on Nov. 12 at the Bug Jar featuring nine hardcore acts, with three each from Rochester, Buffalo, and Syracuse. The sounds and influences run the gamut, from the full-bore hardcore of Syracuse’s Deal With God to the psychedelia-tinged and phase shifter-heavy tones of Buffalo’s Spaced. Rory Van Grol, owner of Ugly Duck Coffee, will be playing the event with his band, Coming Down, a fast-paced hardcore quartet with a hefty dose of skate punk vibes à la Agent Orange.

“(This show) is a culmination of where punk and hardcore is at right now in Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester, which always has been kind of an outlier,” Van Grol said. Van Grol sees Rochester’s hardcore scene as being more directly influenced by bands that came out of Washington, D.C., in the 1980s, such as Minor Threat, whereas the sounds of New York City bands such as Born Against and Agnostic Front filtered into Buffalo and Syracuse. It’s all up to interpretation, of course, and genre die-hards will always be waiting on the sidelines to dish the real story behind each city’s sound. To that end, hit me up, sideliners. What’s fun for Van Grol is the lineup’s mix of younger bands, such as Rochester’s Coalition or Syracuse’s All 4 All, playing with seasoned musicians. “Age-wise, I’m not as entrenched in (the hardcore scene) as I once was,” Van Grol said. “I more appreciate it from a standing room viewpoint, and that’s mainly because I have other responsibilities. I will say that hardcore punk will, and always should be, a youth movement.” Sarkis concurred. He was disappointed that the show has to be for an 18-plus audience due to being hosted at a bar. He was adamant that next time, all ages will be welcome. Tickets for Upstate Unity Fest are $10 in advance, $15 at the door. For more info, go to bugjar.com.

order online: getcakedroc.com or call: (585) 319-4314

this is your sign to eat more pie.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS PUZZLE ON PAGE 42. NO PEEKING! 1

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— BY GINO FANELLI roccitynews.com CITY 19


30+ MUSIC, ARTS AND LIFE EVENTS TO CHECK OUT THIS MONTH

DAILY Full calendar of events online at roccitynews.com TUESDAY, NOV. 1 ART

“Re-discovering the ROC” Fort Hill Performing Arts Center, suzie-quinn-studio.com Suzie Quinn’s oil paintings are designed to evoke a deep sense of nostalgia for Rochester and the Finger Lakes region, and they do so again in this show, which runs throughout the month at the gallery at Fort Hill Performing Arts Center in Canandaigua. Each work looks like a painted snapshot of popular local landmarks, such as High Falls, the Genesee Brewhouse, the Times Square Building, and the Jack Rabbit roller coaster at Seabreeze Amusement Park. Quinn’s color palette is appealing, with plenty of warm pinks, sunsoaked greens, and cool blues. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. DANIEL J. KUSHNER

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2 LITERATURE

Rochester Reads! “Hell of a Book” Various Locations, wab.org Saying that “Hell of a Book” lives up to its title would be echoing the glib description that plagues this metanovel’s central character as he tours the country promoting his book of the same title. It’s a twisty, engaging story that confronts the personal and political cost of racism and the dilemmas of life, love, art, and family. “Hell of a Book” author Jason Mott will be in Rochester for a series of readings, book signings, and Q&As as part of the “Rochester Reads!” program presented by Writers and Books. You can hear from him today during a free event at the Rochester Public Library’s Kate Gleason Auditorium from noon to 1 p.m. 20 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

todo

and at 7:30 p.m. in St. John Fisher’s Cleary Family Auditorium in a paywhat-you-will reading and discussion, which will also be streamed online.

For up-to-date information on protocols, vaccination and mask requirements, and performance cancellations, consult the websites of individual venues.

— roughly 9 inches by 11 inches. Small works of art, so intimate in scope, deserve far more attention than they get. They beg for the viewer to look closely at the textures, details, and forms. Lumiere is resurrecting its small works show this year and if it holds true to past iterations, there will plenty of great local art to take in and even buy. Tonight is the opening, which goes from 6 to 9 p.m.

crafts show is one of the biggest in the area. Looking for photos, paintings, or prints? Handmade jewelry, drinkware, or soaps? Knitted things? Hand forged cutlery? Adorably phallic cat toys? You’ll find it all and more. The show runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and on Sunday. JM

JEREMY MOULE

Astronomicon 13

MONA SEGHATOLESLAMI

THURSDAY, NOV. 3

INK

Flower City Tattoo Convention FILM

Anomaly Film Festival The Little Theatre, anomalyfilmfest.com Anomaly is Rochester’s annual celebration of the pulpy, unnerving, and off-the-wall world of so-called “genre films.” Expect an eclectic mix of the macabre and outlandish. Among this year’s lineup are a documentary on the endurance of the “Child’s Play” franchise, “Living with Chucky,” and “Huesera,” the debut feature film from Mexican director Michelle Garza Cervera. The latter stands to offer a body-horror take on pregnancy heavily influenced by Mexican folk tales. I don’t know what the hell is happening in the trailer but it piqued my interest. Anomaly runs through Nov. 6. GINO FANELLI

The Roc Dome Arena, facebook.com/ flowercitytattooconvention Anyone who has tattoos knows that getting one is an addictive proposition. No sooner has the artist put down the tattoo machine than you’re thinking about what your next one might be. And now, ink lovers don’t have to wait for the annual Roc City Tattoo Expo in the spring to get their fix. The first annual Flower City Tattoo Convention opens today and runs through Nov. 6 at the ROC Dome Arena. There will be tattoo competitions, opportunities for celebrity meet-and-greets, and of course, a full lineup of top tattoo artists with whom to work. A one-day pass runs $30. A pass for the weekend costs $57. DK SATURDAY, NOV. 5

SCI-FI

RIT Inn & Conference Center, astronomicon.info Since 1991, Rochester has celebrated science fiction and fantasy at the Astronomicon sci-fi convention. The three-day event has authors and other sci-fi luminaries for signings and panels — including editor/publisher Neil Clarke and the husband/wife cocreators of Elfquest. Other activities range from a grand masquerade to anime screenings. Early bird registration is closed, but tickets are available at the door with varying rates. DAVID STREEVER SUNDAY, NOV. 6 THEATER

“Barbecue” Blackfriars Theatre, blackfriars.org Robert O’Hara’s unconventional and hilarious play turns the formula for the American domestic comedy upside down and forces audiences to rethink their presumptions about poverty, race, and social class in dysfunctional families. Set in a nameless public park, the play crosscuts between two versions of the fractious O’Mallery family — one white, one Black — as the clan attempts to wrestle one of their own into rehab. Produced in partnership with The Bronze Collective, which promotes Black theater, and directed by David Shakes, this show is a thinking person’s comedy. The production closes today with 2 p.m. matinee. Tickets range from $30 to $40. DAVID ANDREATTA

ART FRIDAY, NOV. 4 ART

small show 2022 Lumiere Photo, lumierephoto.com When I finally got to see Salvador Dali’s painting “The Persistence of Memory,” my first thought was how small it was

Mayday! Underground Crafts & Art Village Gate, maydaycraft.com The giving season has arrived and the Mayday! folks are here to lend a hand. The group’s annual indie arts and

CONTINUED ON PAGE 27


INSIDE WXXI PUBLIC MEDIA | WXXI-TV PBS WXXI NEWS/NPR | WXXI CLASSICAL WRUR-FM 88.5 | THE LITTLE THEATRE

AMERICAN MASTERS

Buffy Sainte-Marie: Carry It On Tuesday, November 22 at 9 p.m. on WXXI-TV Over a career spanning six decades, Cree musician, artist, and activist Buffy Sainte-Marie has used her platform to campaign for Indigenous and women’s rights and inspired multiple generations of musicians, artists, and activists. Experience the story of this Oscar-winning Indigenous artist from her rise to prominence in New York’s Greenwich Village folk music scene through her groundbreaking career. Photo credit: Courtesy of Matt Barnes

5 1.

facts

about Buffy Sainte-Marie:

She is the first, and remains the only, Indigenous person to have won an Oscar.

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During her five-year stint on Sesame Street, she helped create segments based on her experiences as an Indigenous woman in North America.

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During a 1977 episode of Sesame Street, she breastfed her first son, Dakota “Cody,” which is believed to be the first representation of breastfeeding ever aired on television.

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She launched a scholarship program for Indigenous youth in her early 20s.

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She is the author of three children’s books, which are available in both English and Cree.

roccitynews.com CITY 21



WXXI TV • THIS MONTH

Women and The Vote

NOVA: Crypto Decoded

Monday, November 7 at 9 p.m. on WXXI-TV This recent New York State Emmy-Award-winning film documents visitors at suffragists’ gravesites to mark the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment on Election Day 2020. Spearheaded by Rochester-based filmmaker Linda Moroney of Low to the Ground Productions, Women and The Vote is a mosaic-style documentary on the past 100 years of women’s political equality, the present moment, and the possibilities for the future.

Wednesday, November 9 at 9 p.m. on WXXI-TV From Bitcoin to NFTs, cryptocurrencies are making headlines and claiming a growing slice of global financial activity. But what exactly are they, and how do they work? Experts go beyond the hype to unravel the social and technological underpinnings of “crypto”– exploring the possibility that this new technology may change much more than just money.

VOTE 2022: Election Night Special

Great Performances: Josh Groban’s Great Big Radio City Show

Tuesday, November 8 at 8 p.m. on WXXI-TV With the control of the House and Senate hanging in the balance, PBS NewsHour’s Judy Woodruff leads live coverage of the results as they come in. Credit: Courtesy of PBS NewsHour

Credit: Courtesy of © Coyz0/Shutterstock (top image) © xalien/Shutterstock (bottom image)

Friday, November 25 at 9 p.m. on WXXI-TV Experience the world-renowned baritone performing songs from many musical genres alongside several special guest stars including Cyndi Lauper, Denee Benton, New York City Ballet principal dancer Tiler Peck, and more. Credit: Courtesy of Andrew Eccles


TURN TO WXXI CLASSICAL FOR MUSIC PERFECTLY TUNED TO YOUR DAY Live from Hochstein Wednesdays at 12:10 p.m. on WXXI Classical Join WXXI Classical at the Hochstein School for this free noontime concert series, or tune in to WXXI Classical to hear it live every Wednesday through December 7th. This month, enjoy: 11/2: Then and Now Tinkering with Mozart Featuring pianist Yi-Wen Chang. 11/9: Salaff Quartet: In the Light of November Featuring Thomas Rodgers, violin; Molly Werts McDonald, violin; Aika Ito, viola; and Benjamin Krug, cello. (Pictured) 11/16: Semplice Duo Night Surrendering to Dawn Featuring flutist Cristina Ballatori and pianist Kevin T. Chance. 11/23: David Hochstein Recital Competition Winners Recital Featuring Michael Ortiz, clarinet; Elizabeth Norris, cello; and Maxwell Sun, piano. 11/30: Holiday for Horns Featuring the Eastman Horn Choir who heralds the holidays under the direction of W. Peter Kurau. The program repeats on WXXI Classical at 10 p.m. that same day. For the complete schedule, visit WXXIClassical.org.

3

Thanksgiving Specials to enjoy on WXXI Classical

Giving Thanks: A Celebration of Fall, Food & Gratitude Thursday, November 24 at 8 a.m. John Birge hosts a contemporary celebration of gratitude with classical music and stories of Thanksgiving. Special guest Ada Limon (new US Poet Laureate) joins the table to read her poems and talk about how poetry amplifies gratitude.

Echoes Acoustic Thanksgiving Friday, November 25 at 10 p.m. This warm and inviting soundscape for Thanksgiving presents acoustic instrumental and vocal music by special guests.

Every Good Thing Thursday, November 24 at 6 p.m. Andrea Blain (pictured) hosts a visit with classical music fans around the country as they give thanks and celebrate one of life’s most meaningful gifts: an hour of stories and music to celebrate Thanksgiving.


WXXI NEWS/NPR + WRUR-FM 88.5, DIFFERENT RADIO Splendid Table’s Turkey Confidential

Standing in Two Worlds: Native American College Diaries Sunday, November 6 at 9 p.m. on WXXI News/NPR U.S government boarding schools were once used to erase Indigenous culture and force assimilation. But in the 21st century, education opens opportunities. In this documentary, students take the microphone to share their stories as they strive to use a college education to support themselves, and their communities, without losing sight of who they are.

Thanksgiving Day, November 24 at 12 p.m. on WXXI News/NPR Splendid Table host and food editor Francis Liam hosts this annual holiday special, where he’s joined by special guests to share their knowledge and experience in making the best Thanksgiving dinner. This year’s guests include: • Claire Saffitz, YouTube star and author of “Dessert Person: Recipes and Guidance for Baking with Confidence: A Baking Book” • Rick Martinez co-host of the “Borderline Salty” podcast and author of “Mi Cocina, Recipes and Rapture from My Kitchen in Mexico” • Jesse Sparks, host of “The One Recipe” and Senior Editor at “Eater”

It’s Been A Minute Saturdays at 11 a.m. on WRUR-FM 88.5 This weekly series that takes a timely and topical look back at the week’s news, with pop culture features and interviews has a new host! Brittany Luse (pictured) took over as the host in October. “Over the past five years, It’s Been a Minute has become a mainstay for listeners trying to make sense of an increasingly unpredictable cultural landscape,” said Luse. “I’m honored to join such a dedicated team as host, and excited to learn and grow alongside It’s Been a Minute’s devoted and responsive listeners.” Credit: Sarah Jacobs

Three questions we asked WXXI News Director Randy Gorbman about Election Night Coverage 1. What information does your news team provide on Election Day to keep the public informed without implying or leading audiences to a conclusion about which candidate to choose? The stories we air and do online prior to the polls being closed (at 9:00 p.m.) focus on things like turnout (we get information from the county boards of election); and we report any anomalies, such as problems with technology, staffing at polling places, etc. We have a general policy of not doing any extensive reporting on candidate campaign statements on election day (in terms of any new statements that they may make), until after the polls close.. 2. What are some preparations your reporters take to ensure a smooth election quarter? The months prior to elections are spent on writing and producing stories to give our listeners/ readers/viewers as much relevant information as possible about candidates in major races, as well as planning any debates we want to do in the fall. Our partners at CITY Magazine do an excellent Voter Guide, which they just published in the October issue. That guide includes interviews with candidates and information on key issues in the November elections. 3. What are you looking forward to about covering the election? This is a big year for both Congress and the New York State Legislature. Whenever we have a race for governor, it’s an election that usually brings more people out to the polls (although not as much in a presidential year). But there is a lot of attention on this year’s gubernatorial race because of all the turmoil involving the change in governors last year.


240 East Ave thelittle.org

D A R K C I T Y ALL THAT BREATHES D I R E C T O R ’ S

C U T

In one of the world’s most populated cities, two brothers — Nadeem and Saud — devote their lives to the quixotic effort of protecting the black kite, a majestic bird of prey essential to the ecosystem of New Delhi that has been falling from the sky at alarming rates. Amid environmental toxicity and social unrest, the ‘kite brothers’ spend day and night caring for the creatures in their makeshift avian basement hospital. Director Shaunak Sen (Cities of Sleep) explores the connection between the kites and the Muslim brothers who help them return to the skies, offering a mesmerizing chronicle of inter-species coexistence.

7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17 and 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20

Monday, November 14 7:15PM John Murdoch (Rufus Sewell) awakens alone in a strange hotel to find that he is wanted for a series of murders. The problem is that he can’t remember whether he committed the crimes or not. For one brief moment, he is convinced that he has gone completely mad. Murdoch seeks to unravel the twisted riddle of his identity. As he edges closer to solving the mystery, he stumbles upon a fiendish underworld controlled by a group of ominous beings collectively known as the Strangers. Kiefer Sutherland and Jennifer Connelly also star. Picked by: Shannon, Box Office For fans of: The Matrix, Blade Runner, Total Recall, 12 Monkeys

The Fabelmans Scheduled to open November 23 (Release dates subject to change)

“Movies are dreams that you never forget.” The Little’s Staff Pick series is a grab bag of the mysterious, the fun, and the purely awesome. Each staff member has selected a movie to recommend — no genre or era is off limits. This series is the modern equivalent of stepping into your favorite video rental store, and seeking a film you’ll swoon over.

A deeply personal portrait of 20th Century American childhood, Steven Spielberg’s The Fabelmans is a coming-of-age story about a young man’s discovery of a shattering family secret and an exploration of the power of movies to help us see the truth about each other and ourselves. Also playing in November: Tár, Till, Armageddon Time, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever


MONDAY, NOV. 7

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 9

FRIDAY, NOV. 11

SATURDAY, NOV. 12

FILM

MUSIC

MUSIC

“Tár”

Sarah De Valliere

Lee Fields

The Little, thelittle.org Cate Blanchett takes on the role of (fictional) imperious conductorcomposer Lydia Tár in this new psychological drama by Todd Field, his first completed movie in more than a decade. Early reviews have critics buzzing about the artistry of the filmmaking and the performances, while also considering the issues of power and abuse, the latitude given to “genius” artists, and what it means to have a woman in this role. Today’s special showing starts at 6:30 p.m. and includes a post-screening discussion with conductors Rachel Waddell, Nancy P. Strelau, and Evan Meccarello, hosted by CITY’s Daniel Kushner. MS

Record Archive, recordarchive.com A classically trained pianist with a swinging rock style and a gorgeous voice that can evoke vulnerability and empowerment, De Valliere brandishes a flair for dramatic storytelling in her intimate shows. She spent much of her early and professional life on the road, but settled in Rochester in 2018 after being hired to play a private house concert in Webster and being taken by the view of Lake Ontario from her grand piano. You’ll be taken by her if you stop in for her happy hour set from 6 to 8 p.m. DA

Photo City Music Hall, photocitymusichall.com What do J. Cole, Travis Scott, Rick Ross, and A$AP Rocky have in common, besides being household names in hiphop? They’ve all sampled songs by highlyregarded soul singer Lee Fields, who just released his 21st record, “Sentimental Fool.” Fields has been touring and performing since 1969, a career during which he’s worked with a who’s who of blues and soul artists, including B.B. King and other stalwarts such as Kool and the Gang. In a short 2009 article, an NPR music reviewer called Fields “retrosoul royalty, with a voice that recalls the heyday of Otis Redding and James Brown.” Tickets are $23.50. Doors open at 8 p.m. JM

TUESDAY, NOV. 8

DRINK

Make Your Own Kombucha Katboocha Booch Bar, katboocha.com The fermented “tea of immortality,” as kombucha has been called, has come a long way from its roots in China more than 2,000 years ago. Today, “Booch” is reportedly close to a $500 million industry in the United States and can get pricey. So, why not save a few bucks and brew your own? Kombucha is made by brewing a concoction of sugar, black or green tea, liquid from a previous batch and the Scoby, short for symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast. Mmmmm… bacteria and yeast. Tickets are $35 and for that price you get a starter kit and liquid farmed from Katboocha. Class runs from 6:30 to 8 p.m. DA

MUSIC

Billy Strings Blue Cross Arena, bluecrossarena.com Last month at the 2022 International Bluegrass Music Awards, 30-year old Billy Strings picked up the entertainer of the year honor for the second year in a row. The 2021 Grammy winner also was awarded song of the year for his tune “Red Daisy.” Strings has shared the stage with country musicians like Dierks Bentley and jam bands such as the String Cheese Incident, and Rolling Stone has said he’s poised for crossover success. Strings is coming to Rochester as part of his ongoing tour, which is taking him across the country and then to Europe. Tickets prices vary by seating. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the performance begins at 8 p.m. JM THURSDAY, NOV. 10 THEATER

“Somewhere” Geva Theatre Center, geva.org The title is an unapologetic nod to the plaintive duet in “West Side Story,” which serves as the backdrop for this heartfelt drama by Matthew Lopez. It is 1959, and the singing and dancing Candelaria family of the old San Juan Hill section of Manhattan has a shot at auditioning for the landmark musical. But the city’s plans to raze the Candelarias’ tenement building to make room for a new home for music and dance, Lincoln Center, leaves them searching for “somewhere.” Don’t let the singing and dancing fool you. “Somewhere” is a play, and there is a place for it. The curtain rises today at 7:30 p.m. and the show runs through Nov. 13. DA

ART

“Feeling Land: Soil Paintings by Hayley Dayis” 228 S. Plymouth Ave., hayleydayis.squarespace.com The technique of using soil to create pigments for painting is by no means new, but it isn’t commonly used in Rochester. Local artist Hayley Dayis — who learned the technique from her partner, Alexander Fals — lives part of the year in Popayán, Colombia, and has found inspiration in the land there. The volcanic soil, rich in minerals, yields distinctive shades of pink, red, purple, and brown. In addition to this event — which runs from 5 to 9 p.m. and includes live jazz and a fine wine tasting — the exhibition can be viewed by appointment between noon and 4 p.m. throughout the weekend by emailing the artist at hayleydayis@ yahoo.com. DK MUSIC

Vanessa Collier Abilene, abilenebarandlounge.com Saxophonist Vanessa Collier absolutely rocked the Big Tent at this summer’s Jazz Fest with soul, funk, blues, and jazz. She lays it all out there on the stage — and while weaving through the audience thanks to a wireless mic in her sax. Collier came back to the area not long after the festival for some sold out shows at Fanatics in Lima and you have another chance to experience her dynamic presence and playing at Abilene, with music starting at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 at the door. MS

MUSIC

Driftwood Flour City Station, flourcitystation.com Binghamton’s gift to upstate New York Americana comes back to Rochester in time to get our toes a-tappin’ as the winter weather approaches. Topnotch pop-folk songwriting, pristine vocal harmonies, and homey bluegrass instrumentation have endeared Driftwood to regional music fans for more than 15 years. Geneseo singersongwriter Mike Brown opens the show. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 day-of. The music starts at 9 p.m. and admission is 21 and over. DK SUNDAY, NOV. 13 THEATER

“48-Hour Play Plate-Off” MuCCC, muccc.org Here’s the deal: Just three days before you take your seats for this marathon series of cold readings of plays, the playwrights were given the subjects they were to write about. The ingredients for their scripts were laid out like a Garbage Plate — you know, meat, sides, toppings, and buttered bread — and the playwrights threw them all together. The quality of these shows will vary. But the event, produced by Nickel Flour, is for the true theater nerd who enjoys the development process. Plate plays are served at 10 a.m. Free. DA CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

roccitynews.com CITY 27


30+ MUSIC, ARTS AND LIFE EVENTS TO CHECK OUT THIS MONTH

MONDAY, NOV. 14 FILM

“Dark City” The Little, thelittle.org Four years after making “The Crow,” director Alex Proyas bombed at the box office with this visually striking tech-noir fantasy about a man trying to solve the mystery of his identity and the murders he might have committed. But this dream-like movie from 1998 has found plenty of admirers since, earning it cult classic status. It might be for you if you’re into the aesthetics of “Bladerunner” or “The Matrix” (which came out the year after “Dark City”). Word is that the director’s cut being shown today at 7:15 p.m. is even better than the original release. MS

School of Music students brings an intense level of connection to their performances, along with technical wizardry and beautiful playing. The show is free and you may want to arrive a little early to get in to the 7:30 p.m. performance. MS THURSDAY, NOV. 17

SATURDAY, NOV. 19

Godspeed You! Black Emperor Town Ballroom, townballroom.com Post-rock is an odd genre to pin down. I’ve always thought of it as non-rock music played on rock instruments. While bands such as Mogwai and Explosions in the Sky certainly fit that bill, I was always most impressed with Godspeed You! Black Emperor. Since 1994, the Montreal post-rock band has been making dynamic instrumental music that manages to sound cinematic without falling prey to predictability or cliché. The band excels at creating cathartic sounds you can get lost in. On Nov. 15, Godspeed touches down at Town Ballroom in Buffalo, in support of the 2021 album “G_d’s Pee AT STATE’S END.” $30.

Rose & the Bros

MUSIC

Michael Sarian Bop Shop Records, bopshop.com Jazz trumpeter and composer Michael Sarian won’t necessarily blow you away with his chops in the conventional sense, but he knows how to create a mood. Sarian makes complex arrangements sound like easy listening, weaving through them with serpentine solos that never sound overdone. Sarian will undoubtedly draw heavily from his new album, “Living at the End,” for his performance at the Bop Shop. 8 p.m. Tickets are $20. DK FRIDAY, NOV. 18

DK

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16 MUSIC

Eastman Saxophone Project Kilbourn Hall, esm.rochester.edu It’s been about a decade since the Eastman Saxophone Project’s legendary performance of Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” — more than a half-hour of a complex, dramatic orchestral score, played on a range of saxophones, entirely from memory. This lineup of Eastman 28 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

not atoms” and “when in doubt, throw it out.” He would probably get hives if I told him about this event full of all sorts of weird and wonderful atoms of stuff: sports cards, comics, coins, stamps, figurines, photos, and other objects. On the other hand, if you have the collecting bug or are fascinated with the weird and the wonderful, you might want to take some time wandering this ephemeral wunderkammer that springs up every month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the JCC. Admission is free, though you may find it hard to resist expending a bit of money and space on some treasures that catch your eye. MS

MUSIC

TUESDAY, NOV. 15 MUSIC

Night Live.” That’s SNL’s loss. Redd is a gifted performer with an impeccable sense of timing, whether he’s impersonating Kanye West or rapping alongside fellow former cast member Pete Davidson about dogs or trees — a bit in which Redd has to clarify for Davidson that their verses are about “environmental” trees, not weed. Redd will perform for three days starting Nov. 17 and at various times. He takes the stage tonight at 7 and 9:15 p.m. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased online. JM

Harmony House, facebook.com/HarmonyHouseWebster The Ithaca-based zydeco outfit Rose & the Bros emits a warmth in its music that’s difficult to explain, but you know it when you feel it. From the homespun vocal harmonies to the bubbly bass lines to the winning combination of accordion and fiddle, the band’s sound is one big opportunity to dance. Rose & the Bros’ latest album, “It’s Music,” is a heaping helping of upbeat Americana the group is sure to bring to its live show. Admission is $16.58. DK

Chris Redd Comedy @ the Carlson, carlsoncomedy.com Earlier this fall, Chris Redd announced that, after five seasons, he wouldn’t be returning to “Saturday

MUSIC

Hanna and the Blue Hearts The Little, thelittle.org Singer and pianist Hanna PK fronts this band that channels a variety of blues and swing, old-school folk, and lively boogie woogie. PK pairs effervescent piano melodies with a voice that can shift from smooth to explosive at a moment’s notice. These performances are free and run Mondays through November at 6:30 p.m. DA

MUSIC

The Moho Collective Three Heads Brewing, threeheadsbrewing.com The trio known as The Moho Collective is arguably Rochester’s best instrumental band. Guitarist Kurt Johnson, bassist Justin Rister, and drummer Ryan Barclay bring an in-the-moment, jazz sensibility to their progressive rock compositions. The band returns to a familiar venue, Three Heads Brewing, for a grooveoriented live show that pairs well with a pint. Doors open at 8 p.m. and admission is $10. DK SUNDAY, NOV. 20

COMEDY

MONDAY, NOV. 21

COLLECTIBLES

Collector Fest Monthly JCC Rochester, collectorfestmonthly.com Two of my dad’s mottos are “send bits,

TUESDAY, NOV. 22 MUSIC

Ice Nine Kills Main Street Armory, afterdarkpresents.com Horror movies and heavy metal go together like peanut butter and jelly, and Ice Nine Kills is hip to that. The band’s albums and singles all have artwork that reference different fright film poster art styles, while its music is heavy and at times shockingly melodic. The group’s lyrics read as if they were written by someone living out some sort of terror. Black Veil Brides and Motionless in White round out the ticket playing heavy music in a similar vein, though with less of a direct horror movie motif. Admission to the “Trinity of Terror Tour” costs $49.50 or $55. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. JM


SATURDAY, NOV. 26

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23

MUSIC

MUSIC

Harry Connick Jr. — A Holiday Celebration

Teagan & the Tweeds Thanksgiving Eve Spectacular Three Heads Brewing, threeheadsbrewing.com In what has become an annual tradition, rock-soul mainstays Teagan and the Tweeds take the stage at Three Heads as Rochester natives return home for Thanksgiving. If you need a fun night out before a full day of family, food, and football, this show is an excellent option. Led by the surevoiced Teagan Ward, the Tweeds can bring a country flair and blues-infused panache to any given song. Doors at 8 p.m. Tickets $10. DK THURSDAY, NOV. 24 GOBBLE-GOBBLE GO

Wedge Waddle Abundance, wedgewaddle.com This is a pretty straightforward event. You show up at Abundance Cooperative Market at South and Averill avenues by 10 a.m., then you take to the course at whatever speed you want. Waddle if you like. Meander and saunter if that suits you. Or run like hell. This event is really about bringing neighbors together to have some fun. Along the route there’s a stop for beer tasting and another for cider and donuts. Kids — and strollers — are welcome, as are dogs. Participation costs nothing, but make sure to bring new socks for the donation drive to benefit St. Joe’s House of Hospitality. Organizers note that socks are among the most-needed items in homeless shelters. JM

Webster Turkey Trot Webster Park, yellowjacketracing.com Thanksgiving isn’t just a holiday of gluttony and sloth; it’s also a big day for runners. We’re talking turkey trots, of course, and Webster’s is one of the biggest and oldest locally. The 2022 race marks the trot’s 51st year. There are two courses: One is a 4.4mile race, the other a 2.5-mile fun run. Register online to work off that stuffing before you’re stuffed. JM

FRIDAY, NOV. 25 MUSIC

Alyssa Trahan Iron Smoke Distillery, ironsmokedistillery.com Nashville-based singer-songwriter Alyssa Trahan, a native of East Rochester, returns home with a full band to perform her catchy popcountry anthems. Fresh off the release of the new single, “Promise,” Trahan infuses her music with swagger and a knack for hooks. When it comes to country tunes, these songs are as radio-ready as anything you’ll hear. Cover is $10. DK FILM

“Miracle on 34th Street” Dryden Theatre, eastman.org This 1947 Christmas classic set the stage for generations of Santa Claus movies. When the person hired by Macy’s to play Santa in the Thanksgiving Day Parade shows up drunk, a bearded man named Kris steps into the role. Macy’s ultimately hires him to be Santa in its Christmas display and he wins many hearts. But when the protagonist starts telling people he really is Santa, they respond by trying to institutionalize him. The result, according to the Dryden, is that Kris “finds himself in a legal battle to stay out of the sanitarium and restore the hearts of the children of New York City.” The film starts at 7:30 p.m. and tickets are $5-$11. JM

Auditorium Theatre, rbtl.org There are few musicians with that winning combination of effortless charm and sneaky-good chops, but singer-pianist Harry Connick Jr. is certainly one of them. A modern-day crooner who rivals the likes of Bing Crosby, Connick Jr. has released three different Christmas albums over the course of a recording career spanning more than 40 years. The latest of the trilogy, “What a Night! A Christmas Album,” is a winning jazzpop collection that has more holiday warmth than a cozy fireplace during a snowstorm. Connick performs at 8 p.m. and tickets are $66-$139. DK SUNDAY, NOV. 27 MUSIC

Incite Photo City Music Hall, photocitymusichall.com Incite sounds like someone smashed Sepultura and Pantera together, which makes sense given that the band’s vocalist is Richie Cavalera, stepson of Sepultura founder and former vocalist Max Cavalera. Thrash must be the family business. Like Sepultura, Incite is a very heavy band that shifts from a fast-paced assault right into slow, crushing riffs and syncopated drumming. The melodic guitar leads, however, remind me of tracks on At the Gates’s album “Slaughter of the Soul.” The band avoids falling into the heavy metal paint-by-number trap, making its sound fresh and furious. Admission is $20, then you can bang your head until it falls off. JM MONDAY, NOV. 28 MUSIC

Michael Musillami Trio

reveling in 20 years of existence, is set to play the fest’s final day. Musillami’s music can be abstract, but it never strays too far away from the pocket of a groove. His brand of jazz is also visceral, with timbres and textures you can almost touch. Tickets are $20 or $55 for all four festival shows. DK TUESDAY, NOV. 29 ART

“How I See It: The Photography of Quajay Donnell” St. John Fisher University, sjf.edu Few homegrown photographers have made a name for themselves as chroniclers of Rochester’s public art and street scenes like Quajay Donnell. This exhibit is on display through Dec. 9 in the Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery, located in the Joseph S. Skalny Welcome Center at the university. Donnell’s work has been published in numerous publications, including CITY and The Washington Post, but this is his first solo show. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. DA WEDNESDAY, NOV. 30 MUSIC

Eastman Presents: Marc-André Hamelin Kilbourn Hall, esm.rochester.edu Virtuoso pianist Marc-André Hamelin’s touring schedule this season includes Vienna, San Diego, Toronto, Carnegie Hall, and for one glorious evening, Rochester. Hamelin’s recordings include his sparkling takes on sonatas by Franz Joseph Haydn and music by lesserknown composers for the piano like Charles-Valentin Alkan and Nicolai Medtner. The one time I saw him live (at London’s Wigmore Hall), he played at times with seemingly effortless elegance and at other times with an almost frightening intensity. Tickets are $23-$48 and the performance begins at 7:30 p.m. MS

Bop Shop Records, bopshop.com Bop Shop Records is celebrating 40 years in business by doing one of the things it does best: presenting scintillating jazz concerts as part of a four-day festival. Guitarist Michael Musillami’s trio, which itself is roccitynews.com CITY 29


My family’s

THANKSGIVING

DISH to die for Rochester chefs share the recipes that had them clamoring for more from the kids’ table.

Wilfredo Arguin

CARAMEL FL Hailing from a family of nine, Palermo’s Market Chef Wilfredo Arguinzoni says the traditional Latin dessert “would not last long” when it made an appearance during the holiday. His mother, Cheryl Lynn Arguinzoni, the baker in the family, perfected the caramel flan, and Wilfredo recalls helping her if only “to lick the spoon.” Wilredo has not altered his mother’s recipe aside from adding fresh lemon juice. “On top of the sweet and creaminess, you get a light lemony zest,” he says.

STORY & FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY BY DARIO JOSEPH

INGREDIENTS: Turkey, stuffing, and mashed potatoes are staples of any Thanksgiving feast. But every family has that dish to die for that makes the whole meal sing. We asked Rochester chefs to share the recipes that had them clamoring for more as children at the kids’ table and that they still prepare today — with any updates of their own. Loosen that collar and unbuckle that belt to make room for these Turkey Day treats.

□ 1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk □ 1 (12 fluid ounce) can evaporated milk □ 6 large eggs □ 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened □ ⅓ cup milk □ 1 teaspoon vanilla extract □ 1 cup white sugar

DIRECTIONS: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk, eggs, cream cheese, milk, and vanilla extract in a blender. Blend until smooth. Sprinkle sugar in an even layer in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook until the edges start to brown, about 1 minute. Drag sugar into the center with a spatula. Continue cooking, stirring from time to time, until caramel is an even golden brown, about 4 to 5 minutes. Meanwhile, pour 1 inch boiling water into a large oven-safe pot or baking dish to make a water bath. Pour caramel into a 9-inch flan mold or baking pan. Swirl so that caramel reaches 1 inch up the sides. Pour the condensed milk mixture on top. Set in the water bath. Set the flan and water bath in the preheated oven; bake until a damp table knife inserted into the center comes out clean, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Remove from the oven and let stand for 5 minutes. Chill flan in the refrigerator until firm, about 2 to 3 hours. Invert onto a serving plate so that caramel is on top. 30 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

Chef Wilfredo walks in down mother and s


nzoni’s

Steven Lara’s

LAN THANKSGIVING PILAF

o Arguinzoni (in the stroller) wntown Rochester with his siblings.

Carnegie Cellars Chef Steven Lara remembers smelling his favorite dish as a child because “the beef consommé is potent.” The original recipe, passed down from his grandmother, Phyllis Felicitas, consists of simple ingredients, much of which were store-bought. Lara has “chef’d up” the dish, elevating it while retaining its foundation. For instance, he swaps canned mushrooms for shiitake and uses pecorino Romano instead of cheddar cheese.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE RICE:

INGREDIENTS FOR THE ALMOND PICADA:

□ ½ cup unsalted butter

□ 2 tablespoons olive oil

□ 1 large yellow onion (small dice)

□ 1 slice day old bread (about ½-inch thick), crusts removed

□ ¾ cup pecorino Romano □ 1 ¾ cup long grain wild rice

□ 1 garlic clove, thinly sliced

□ 8oz shiitake mushroom

□ ¼ cup Marcona almonds (crushed)

□ 2 ½ cup beef bone stock

□ ¼ cup chopped parsley

□ 1 garlic clove minced

□ 1 dash Kosher salt, to taste

□ 1 cup dry white wine □ 2 tablespoons olive oil

A young Chef Steven Lara holds his mother’s hand. His brothers are in the foreground.

DIRECTIONS:

DIRECTIONS:

In 5.5 quart sauté pan, add oil and warm over medium high heat, add onion and garlic and cook until translucent. Add rice and butter to pan and continue to cook until rice begins to brown.

In a small skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat. Add the bread and cook until toasted and uniformly golden on both sides. Remove bread from the pan, and transfer to a cutting board. Cut into small cubes.

Deglaze pan with white wine, stir contents of pan until wine has reduced by half. Add stock, shiitake, and pecorino.

Return the skillet to the burner leaving any leftover olive oil from toasting the bread in the pan. Lightly toast the almonds and garlic until lightly golden, stirring frequently, about 3 to 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the burner.

Bring to boil then cover pan and reduce heat to low and let cook covered for 1 hour. Top with almond picada.

Transfer the cubes to a food processor. Add the almonds, garlic, any remaining olive oil from the skillet, and the parsley. Pulse until finely chopped, check seasoning and add salt if necessary roccitynews.com CITY 31


Lizzie Clapp’s

INGREDIENTS FOR THE PASTRY:

BUTTER TARTS Lizzie Clapp, co-owner of Petit Poutinerie, recalls this sweet being at every family event. An heirloom from her Canadian father’s side, the butter tart has, as Clapp puts it, “a classic flaky pastry crust and an interior of ooey-gooey caramely sensation.” Brown sugar, maple syrup and butter (repeat 3x) are the main ingredients. The tarts are unchanged from the original recipe, which Lizzie learned from her aunt, Beulah Brule, save for the addition of a maple leaf to the top as an homage to our northern neighbor.

Chef Lizzie Clapp at the baking table as a young girl.

□ 3 cups flour □ ½ teaspoon baking powder □ ½ teaspoon salt □ ½ cup lard □ ½ cup butter □ 1 egg □ 1 teaspoon vinegar □ Cold water

DIRECTIONS: Using a pastry cutter, cut butter and crisp into flour. Work in flour until crust is incorporated and chill. After at least an hour chill, roll out the dough with a pin until approximately seven 5-inch circles can be cut. Using a 5-inch round, cut out six circles and place in a greased muffin tin. With remaining dough cut out six small maple leaves.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE FILLING:

□ ¾ cup brown sugar □ ⅓ cup butter □ 1 egg □ ½ teaspoon vanilla

□ ½ teaspoon maple syrup

DIRECTIONS: Combine in food processor until smooth. (Add golden raisins if desired, not for us at the Poutinerie.) Fill the tart dough shells that have been rolled out and placed in the muffin tins ¾ of the way full of sugar filling. Bake for 25 minutes at 375 degrees.

Dario Joseph is a freelance food writer for CITY. He co-hosts the podcast “Refined Taste with Dario and Chris” with Chris Thompson, also a freelance food writer for CITY. 32 CITY NOVEMBER 2022


roccitynews.com CITY 33


LIFE

CITY VISITS...

FASHION WEEK ROCHESTER

TEDDY WILLIAMS, 46 ROCHESTER, LIBERIAN COUNTRY CLOTH

BILLIE CARROLL, 28 IRONDEQUOIT, JUSTIN LEBLANC

EDWARD MEDINA-TORRES, 53 BRIGHTON, SELF-CURATED OUTFIT

“This is handmade, it’s absolutely to die for. My ear cuffs are also part of his design. He has cochlear implants, so he bedazzles these cuffs and incorporates them into the outfits.”

“My outfit is inspired by general Victorian steampunk — very gothic, but with edgy, mechanical elements.”

“I just became an American citizen, and I want people to know you can be an American and be from anywhere in the world — Africa, Asia, Europe.”

FELCIA HUNT, 31 PALMYRA, SPIRIT & THREAD CROCHET

FRIDA WANG, 23 RIT STUDENT, APRONS AND PEARLS VINTAGE BOUTIQUE

ELY RIVERA, 20 GREECE, VON MAUR AND PROPER GRAMMER

“I’m an alt-plus size model and representation is really important, especially at runway shows.” 34 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

“I wouldn’t wear a fur coat to class. I’m a fourth year business analytics and statistics student, but I’m here tonight because I wanted to boost my confidence.”

“When I went to the fitting, they handed me a shirt and it was my style, but this just looks better without the shirt. So I said, ‘I’m gonna go shirtless.’”


PHOTOS BY MIKE MARTINEZ

INTERVIEWS BY LEAH STACY

We talked to models, you know what we mean? And they did their little turns on the catwalk. Yeah, on the catwalk.

JENNA CONSIGLIO, 28 ROCHESTER, SPIRIT & THREAD CROCHET

KARIN FRANZ, 50 FAIRPORT, MANSAWEAR

KEITH MORTIMER, 53 BRIGHTON, SELF-CURATED OUTFIT

“My mom and dad blessed me with the natural curls, and Fashion Week just made them even more beautiful and luscious for tonight. Natural hair is very important to rock.”

“I saw this gown in the MansaWear shop on Park Avenue, and it was love at first sight. I didn’t know where I was going to wear it, but I had to buy it.”

“I’m a very big fan of The Borg (from “Star Trek”), which is really just futuristic steampunk. I realized my affinity for steampunk when I started collecting old, antique metal fans.

KORRY O’BRIEN, 27 WEBSTER, SELF-CURATED OUTFIT

LUCY ANGRISANO, 20 BUFFALO, SELF-DESIGNED OUTFIT

SAM MOSKOWITZ, 30 ROCHESTER, SELF-CURATED OUTFIT

“I am the LGBTQ+ specialist at the Center for Youth, and I’m also a model. I want to be that face representing the LGBTQ+ community on the runway and off the runway.”

“I am wearing a sculpture that I made from all recycled materials — things I found in the trash and cut up. Cups, CDs, tinfoil. I spent a long, long time on it.”

“I wanted to look like I just buried my 15th husband.”

roccitynews.com CITY 35


LIFE

Simeon Banister assumed the role of president and chief executive officer of the Rochester Area Community Foundation in October. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

36 CITY NOVEMBER 2022


PUBLIC LIVES BY JEREMY MOULE

@JFMOULE

JMOULE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

SIMEON BANISTER LEAVES HIS MARK The Rochester Area Community Foundation’s new leader is focused on equity.

F

ew people can point to a life-defining moment that happened to them when they were 9 years old. Simeon Banister, the new head of the Rochester Area Community Foundation, is one of the few. It occured on a day that his mother, the well-known Rochester educator Iris Banister, took him downtown during the holiday season. When he saw the mannequins in the Sibley’s department store window, he remarked that they didn’t look like him — he’s Black and the mannequins had light skin tones. He recalled that his mother encouraged him to write the store and the Democrat and Chronicle about his observation. Two weeks later, his mother brought him downtown again and Sibley’s had mannequins with a broader array of skin colors in the windows. The newspaper’s editorial page recognized Banister as the catalyst for that change. “As a 9-year-old, when something like that happens it gives you a real sense of agency and a sense that things can change and they can be made better,” Banister said as he sat in a bright, woodpaneled, bookshelf-lined meeting room inside the Rochester Area Community Foundation’s East Avenue headquarters. That lesson has become particularly relevant as Banister, 40, settles in as the new president and chief executive officer of the Community Foundation. He’s the first Black person to lead the philanthropic organization that had been overseen by Jennifer Leonard for 30 years before her retirement in September. The foundation administers 1,500 funds that collectively hold more than $600 million in assets, and provides grants to nonprofits that are working to address racial equity, poverty, and community vitality across areas such as education, arts and culture, historic preservation, and more recently, environmental justice. Banister started with the foundation five years ago as a senior program officer for equity, a position he pursued at

Simeon Banister, now the president of the Rochester Area Community Foundation, and Mayor Malik Evans embrace last year at the launch of the North Star Coalition. PHOTO BY MAX SCHULTE

the urging of several people, and rose through the ranks. Even before he started at the foundation, however, he’d been making his mark on the Greater Rochester area in ways big and small. He’s the longtime chair of the Greater Rochester Martin Luther King Jr. Commission, which organizes annual Juneteenth and Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemorations. A former Henrietta resident, Banister also served on the Rush-Henrietta school board and was part of a small group that revived the dormant Henrietta Democratic Committee and made it a force in local politics. He now lives in the South Wedge with his wife, Akilah, and their children, Julian, 9, and Olivia, 5. The thread that runs through all of Banister’s work is, in his words, “a deep belief in the fact that Rochester can be strengthened and it can be made even better, and that our best years really are ahead of us.” Former Rochester Mayor Tom Richards, who chairs the Community Foundation’s board, said the board considered a nationwide search for Leonard’s replacement but opted to

promote Banister after compiling a list of qualities the members wanted in the organization’s next leader. They wanted someone with internal management skills, but also someone who could represent the foundation well across several key sectors and serve as a convenor, Richards said. That Banister was known in many circles, both to donors and grant recipients, also worked in his favor. “The idea is to bring people together to convince them of things without lecturing them,” Richards said. “And I think he’s mastered that.” Banister, like many community leaders, refers to Rochester as a city steeped in innovation, starting with the formation of Kodak, Xerox, and Bausch + Lomb. But now, he said, the community needs to innovate around equity and the foundation can play a unique role in bringing different people and groups from across different sectors together to work cooperatively. What does that look like? Banister and the foundation have a template. For example, the organization partners with the Ralph Wilson Foundation on youth sports programs, an area Banister

said is crucial for youth development. He and the foundation also helped launch the North Star Coalition, a group representing philanthropic, business, labor, political, nonprofit, religious, and educational organizations that’s working to ensure that federal pandemic recovery funding makes it into marginalized communities in the Rochester region. In the past, massive federal stimulus programs such as the New Deal left out people of color or ushered in discriminatory programs. “We kind of have done this before, we know this story,” Banister said. “The question is are we going to do it in ways that are truly equitable and inclusive.” He also believes that good data is important to helping Rochester at large become more aware of challenging issues, such as poverty and its far-reaching effects. ACT Rochester, a program of the foundation, releases annual reports on various community indicators which have raised awareness about the extent of problems and what progress, if any, the community has made on them. “Our job isn’t to falsely proclaim things are getting better,” Banister said. “Our job is to identify where there are actual and accurate things that are improving and to highlight those, to point out where there is regression, and call attention to those areas so that we can stamp it out and progress.” Moving forward, ACT Rochester will likely expand beyond reporting data to conduct more research and analysis to try to identify root causes of problems the Rochester region faces and to provide communities with facts they can use to inform their decision making. “I’m keenly aware of what the data is saying and I’m keenly aware of what the research and the analysis says, but I also recognize that there is an inherent ability in human beings to come together and overcome challenging situations,” Banister said. “And that’s really what we want to double down on.”

roccitynews.com CITY 37


We asked, and you answered. Here are the results of the “Best of Rochester” readers’ poll primary ballot.

best of rochester

You have until Nov. 11 to head to the survey link and cast your votes for what you think is the best of the best in our city. We’ll share the results in our January issue, which will be the first ever “all Best Of Rochester” issue. Scan the QR code to get started. Happy voting, and thanks for playing. — CITY Staff

arts & entertainment Best Actor Alex Hunter Che Holloway Esther Winter Penny Sterling

Best Artist

Adam Eaton Michaelangelo Martinez (@ Deadfrens) @Pepperfaced Shawn Dunwoody

Best Band (Cover) Hey Mabel Something Else Seven Wonders Taran

Best Band (Original) The Cool Club & the Lipker Sisters Danielle Ponder Haewa Joywave

Best Blues Artist or Group Joe Beard Danielle Ponder Hanna PK Ryan Johnson

Best Art Gallery

Artisan Works Memorial Art Gallery Rochester Contemporary UUU

Best Arts Event

Clothesline Festival Corn Hill Arts Festival Fringe Festival Rochester International Jazz Festival

Best Club DJ Brian Bartlett DJ Darkcore DJ Darkwave Mighty Mike

Best Comedian/ Comedy Troupe Chris Thompson Dario Joseph Shirelle Kinder Thank You Kiss

Best Country Artist or Group Begging Angels Claudia Hoyser Jake Wren Jeff Riales Zac Brown Tribute Band

Best Dance Company Garth Fagan Dance Push Physical Theater Rochester City Ballet Tournesol Dance

Best Drag Performer DeeDee Dubois Kiki Bananahammock Mrs. Kasha Davis Wednesday Westwood

Best Film Festival

Anomaly Film Festival ImageOut Jewish Film Festival Rochester International Film Festival

Best Folk Artist or Group

Ben Morey Jackson Cavalier The Honey Smugglers Jake Wren

Best Hip-Hop Artist or Group Chi the Realist Ishmael Moses Rockwell Noah Fense

Best Instrumentalist Chris Coon Herb Smith Kinloch Nelson Ryan Johnson

Best Jazz Artist or Group Bill Tiberio Bob Sneider Danielle Ponder Escape Terrain

Best Movie Theater ROC Cinema Dryden Theatre The Little Theatre

Best Live Music Venue (Large) CMAC Eastman Theatre Parcel 5 Water Street Music Hall

Best Live Music Venue (Small) Abilene Bug Jar Photo City Music Hall Record Archive

Best Museum George Eastman Museum Memorial Art Gallery Rochester Museum and Science Center Strong National Museum of Play

Best Mural or Public Art John Lewis Mural (Ephraim Gebre) Her Voice Carries (Sarah Rutherford) Murals at MLK Park (Sarah Rutherford, Justin Suarez, Shawn Dunwoody) Some Things Are Better Left Unseen (Conor Harrington)

Best Music Festival

Fairport Music Festival Lilac Festival Party in the Park Rochester International Jazz Festival

Best Solo Musician Cammy Enaharo Danielle Ponder Ryan Johnson Teagan Ward

Best Photographer Aaron Winters Daqwan Koenig Jim Montanus Julia Hart

Best Place to See Comedy

Boulder Coffee Comedy at the Carlson Del Lago Resort & Casino Focus Theater

Best Published Author Alex Lutzke Gary Craig Justin Murphy Ravi Mangla

Best Published Poet Andrew Conley Chen Chen Lu Highsmith Rachel McKibbens

Best Rock Artist or Group Alien Autopsy Bad Bloom Bellwether Breaks Joywave

Best Theater Company

Blackfriars Theatre Geva Theatre Center OFC Creations Off-Monroe Players

Best Vocalist Danielle Ponder Elyse Coughlin Jes Kirk Sarah Gebbie


primary results recreation Best Biking Trail

Erie Canalway Trail Genesee Valley Greenway Lehigh Valley Trail Tryon Park

Best Bowling Bowl-A-Roll L&M Lanes Radio Social West Main Lanes

Best Camp for Kids Genesee Country Village & Museum Girls Rock Rochester Rochester Museum and Science Center

Best Cross-Country Skiing Cummings Nature Center Durand-Eastman Park Harriet Hollister Spencer State Recreation Area Mendon Ponds Park

Best Day Hike

Chimney Bluffs State Park Corbett’s Glen Nature Park Letchworth State Park Mendon Ponds Park

Best Day Trip with the Kids

Genesee Country Village & Museum Hamlin Beach State Park Letchworth State Park Seabreeze

Best Dog Park

Better Together Dog Park Cobbs Hill Ellison Park Spring Lake

Best FamilyFriendly Attraction Genesee Country Village & Museum Seabreeze Seneca Park Zoo Strong National Museum of Play

Best Foot Race Lilac Run Rochester Marathon Run Like Hell Runnin’ of the Green

Best Guided Tour DeTours at the MAG Genesee Brewery Tour Mt. Hope Cemetery Susan B Anthony House

Best Outdoor Ice Skating

Greece Town Hall Highland Park Manhattan Square Park

Best Outdoor Swimming

Durand Eastman Beach Genesee Valley Park Hamlin Beach State Park Ontario Beach Park

Best Fishing Hole

Irondequoit Bay Genesee River Lower Falls Powder Mills Park Turning Point Park

Best Pick-up Basketball

Best Place to Play Pool

Cobbs Hill Park JCC Merriman Park Perinton Park

Dicky’s Corner Pub Joey’s Lux Lounge Radio Social

Best Place to Go Dancing

Best Public Golf Course

JuiceBox Lux Lounge ROAR Vertex

Durand-Eastman Park Genesee Valley Park Shadow Lake Twin Hills

Best Place to Take a First Date

Best Tennis Courts

Ellison Park The Little Theatre Radio Social Swillburger

Best Place to People Watch

Lux Lounge Park Avenue Rochester Public Market Wegmans

Cobbs Hill Park Genesee Valley Park Midtown Athletic Club Tennis Club of Rochester

Best Public Park Cobbs Hill Park Ellison Park Highland Park Mendon Ponds Park

Best Local Sports Team

Amerks Red Wings Roc City Roller Derby Rochester NY Football Club

Best Stargazing Spot Cobbs Hill Park Mendon Pond Park Durand Eastman Park Webster Park

Best Tobogganing Hill Cobbs Hill Park Ellison Park Highland Park Mendon Ponds Park

Best Weekend Getaway Adirondacks Finger Lakes Ithaca Toronto

food Best Bakery

Leo’s Savoia Pastry Shoppe Scratch Bakeshop Yeah Baby! Bakes

Best Barbecue

Bubby’s BBQ Dinosaur Bar-B-Que Good Smoke BBQ Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint

Best Bread Bakery Amazing Grains Baker Street Bakery Flour City Bakery Village Bakery

Best Breakfast

Highland Diner Jines Restaurant The Mad Hatter Restaurant & Bakery Steve’s Diner

Best Burger

Bill Gray’s The Gate House Restaurant Good Luck Swillburger

Best Calzone

Mark’s Pizzeria Salvatore’s Stromboli’s Restaurant Swiftwater Brewing Company

Best Candy Shop

Andy’s Candies Hedonist Artisan Chocolates Laughing Gull Chocolates Stever’s Candies

Best Caterer

Best Deli Sandwich or Sub Calabresella’s Deli DiBella’s Subs Rubinos Italian Foods Wegmans

Best Ice Cream

Best Outdoor Dining

Best Ribs

Best Pizza

Best Sushi

Best “Plate”

Best Sweets Bakery

Best Restaurant

Best Thai Restaurant

Abbott’s Frozen Custard Hedonist LuGia’s Ice Cream Pittsford Dairy

Bubby’s BBQ Julia K. Caters Madeline’s Catering The Meatball Truck Co. Root Catering

Best Doughnuts

Best Italian Restaurant

Best Chef

Best Farmers Market

Best Late-night Eats

Corey Hamilton Cruz Nieves Margherita Smith (aka The Saucey Chef) Nate Stahl

Best Chinese Restaurant

Chen Garden Han Noodle Bar Hong Wah Restaurant Szechuan Opera

Best Comfort Food Dogtown Le Petit Poutine The Red Fern The Saucey Chef

Best Cooking Class

Rochester Brainery Genesee Country Village & Museum New York Kitchen Peels on Wheel

Ridge Donuts Donuts Delite Schutt’s Apple Mill Duke’s Donuts

Brighton Farmers Market Fairport Farmers Market Rochester Public Market Westside Farmers Market

Best Fish Fry

Bill Gray’s Braddock Bay Inn Captain Jim’s Fish Market Palmer’s Market

Best Food Truck

Effortlessly Healthy Le Petit Poutine The Meatball Truck Co. Neno’s

Best Global Foods Market

Asia Food Market Lee’s Oriental Foods Namaste Cash and Carry Rubino’s Italian Foods

Restaurant Fiorella Rocco The Pasta Villa Vern’s Dogtown Jay’s Diner Mark’s Texas Hots Marshall Street Bar and Grill Spencerport Hots

Best Lunch Spot

Dogtown Jines Restaurant Magnolia’s Deli & Cafe Voula’s Greek Sweets

Best New Restaurant Adelita’s Crisp La Petit Poutinerie Peach Blossom Strangebird

Best Mexican Restaurant

Monte Alban Neno’s Old Pueblo Grill Salena’s Mexican Restaurant

Aladdin’s Genesee Brew House The Owl House Trata Mark’s Pizzeria Peels on Wheels Pizza Stop Pizza Wizard

Charlie Riedel’s Dogtown Jimmy Z's Plates & Shakes Nick Tahou Hots REDD Restaurant Good Luck Strangebird Vern’s

Best Restaurant to Dine Alone Highland Park Diner Roux Strangebird Vern’s

Best Restaurant for Desserts Caramel Bakery and Bar Phillips European The Red Fern White Rabbit Dessert Experience

Bubby’s BBQ Dinosaur Bar-B-Que Good Smoke BBQ Sticky Lips Next Door Plum House Poke Sushi Shema Sushi

Get Caked Bakery Savoia Pastry Shoppe Scratch Bakeshop Yeah Baby! Bakes

The King & I Pattaya Thai Restaurant Seasoning Thai Bistro ThaiYada

Best Vegetarian/ Vegan Restaurant

New Ethic Pizzeria & Cafe The Owl House The Red Fern Voula’s Greek Sweets

Best Wings

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que Jeremiah’s Tavern Strangebird Windjammers Bar & Grill


primary results drink Best Bar

Abilene Bachelor Forum Lux Lounge ROAR

Best Bar to Drink Alone Lux Lounge Nox Cocktail Lounge ROAR Skylark

Best Barista

Angelina Viglione (Fuego) DeeDee Krupkin (Ugly Duck) Devan Colucci (Fuego) Rory Van Grohl (Ugly Duck)

Best Bartender

Donny Clutterbuck (Cure) Joe Bolam (Char Steak & Lounge) Tony Haywad (Lux Lounge) Victor Santiago (Bachelor Forum)

Best Beer Selection (Bar or Restaurant) Rochester Beer Park MacGregor’s Grill & Tap Room Strangebird Three Heads Brewing

Best Beer Selection (Store) AJ’s Beer Warehouse Beers of the World One Stop Brew Shop Wegmans

Best Bloody Mary The Revelry Roam Cafe Titus Tavern Vertex

Best Bouncer

Bear (Lux Lounge) Lori Lippa (ROAR) Oz (Bug Jar, Marshall Street) Patrick “PJ” Cosmano (Abilene)

Best Coffee

Cafe Sasso Finger Lakes Coffee Roasters Fuego Java’s Ugly Duck

Best Cidery

Blue Barn Cidery Schutt’s Apple Mill Seed and Stone Muller’s Cider House

Best Cocktails

Cheshire The Daily Refresher Restaurant Good Luck The Revelry

Best Craft Brewery

Three Heads Brewing Rohrbach Brewing Company Strangebird Swiftwater Brewing Company

Best Distillery

Black Button Iron Smoke Finger Lakes Distilling

Best Dive Bar

Joey’s Lux Lounge Marshall Street Bar and Grill Skylark Lounge

Best Karaoke

The Angry Goat Pub Firehouse Saloon Lux Lounge ROAR

Best LGBTQ Bar Avenue Pub Bachelor Forum Lux Lounge ROAR

Best Pickup Bar Bachelor’s Forum Lux Lounge Restaurant Good Luck ROAR Swan Dive

Best Smoothies/ Juices

A&B Juice Lab Just Juice 4 Life Refresh Cafe & Smoothie Bar Tropical Blendz Cafe & Juice Bar

Best Sports Bar

Best Winery

Casa Larga Vineyards Dr. Konstantin Frank Winery Living Roots Wine & Co. Ravines Wine Cellars

Best Wine Selection (Bar or Restaurant)

The Distillery Hot Shots Jeremiah’s Tavern Marshall Street Bar and Grill

Apogee Wine Bar Flight Wine Bar Living Roots Wine & Co. REDD

Best Tea House

Best Wine Selection (Store)

Happy Earth Tea Happy Gut Sanctuary Mad Hatter Restaurant & Bakery Taichi Bubble Tea

Aldaskellar Wine Co. Century Wine & Liquor Marketview Liquor Pinnacle Wine and Liquor

Best Trivia Night

Game Night Rochester @ Radio Social Old Stone Tavern ROAR Roc Brewing Co.

shopping & services Best Antique Shop/Dealer

Abode Liberty Hollow Antiques Ontario Antique Mall The Shops on West Ridge

Best Bike Shop Full Moon Vista Tom’s Pro Bike Bert’s Bike Shop Towpath

Best Bridal Shop

Heart 2 Heart Bride Scarlett Bridal Boutique Silk Bridal Boutique Stellas Bridal

Best Car Detailing Austin-Spencer Arete Auto Salon Titan Motorworks Warren Buff-It

Best CBD Shop

Glenna’s Hemp Sol CBD Mad Hatter’s Hideaway Phalt

Best Corner Store Bodega Highland Market Nathaniel Square Convenience Store R’s Market

Best Fitness Studio JCC Framewerks Midtown Athletic Club YMCA

Best Florist

Kittelberger Florist & Gifts Arena’s Stacy K Floral Wisteria Flowers & Gifts

Best Garden Center Bristol’s Garden Center Garden Factory Genrich's Wayside

Best Independent Bookseller

Akimbo Bookshop Hippocampo Children’s Books Lift Bridge Book Shop Small World Books

Best Haircut

Jaimie K Hair Gallery Salon Glory Days Barber Co. Swillbarber

Best Hotel

Del Monte Lodge Inn on Broadway The Strathallan Hotel & Spa Woodcliff Hotel & Spa

Best Housewares Store

Best Music Teacher

Abode Cook’s World Historic Houseparts Mayer Paint & Hardware

Ben & Katie Morey @ The Submarine School of Music Bill Tiberio Mike Edwards Stan Martinelli

Best Local Radio Personality

Best Musical Instrument Store

Evan Dawson (WXXI) Breezy (98PXY) Brother Wease (Radio 95.1) Scott Regan (WXXI)

Atlas Music Bernunzio’s Uptown Music House of Guitars Sound Source

Best Local Television Personality

Best Nonprofit Organization

Adam Chodak (WROC 8) Don Alhart (WHAM 13) Doug Emblidge (WHAM 13) Scott Hetsko (WHAM 13)

Best Mechanic Browncroft Garage D&B Auto Spencerport Auto Vesa’s Automotive

Best Media Outlet (Other Than Us, Of Course) The Rochester Beacon RochesterFirst (WROC 8) Democrat and Chronicle 13 WHAM

Foodlink Lollypop Farm Primetime 585 Willow Domestic Violence Center

Best Neighborhood Garden

Best Pet-related Business Bones Dog Bakery Park Ave Pets Pet Supplies Plus Lollypop Farm

Best Record Store Bop Shop Records House of Guitars Needle Drop Records Record Archive

Best Spa

Ape & Canary Del Monte Lodge J Kohl Beauty Relax & Wax

Best Secondhand/ Thrift Store Greenovation Little Shop of Hoarders The Op-Shop Savers

490 Farmers Perinton Community Garden First Market Farm (Taproot Collective) Maplewood Rose Garden

Best Shoe Store

Best Place to Buy Kitsch

Best Social Media Account

Archimage Buffalo Bleached Parkleigh Record Archive

Capacity Fleet Feet Flower City Kicks MedVed Running & Walking

Day Trips Around Rochester @IndustryStandard69 The Innerloop Blog Rochester Red Wings

Best Tattoo Parlor Love Hate Tattoo Pyramid Arts Tattoo Savior Tattoo White Tiger Tattoo

Best Toy Store Archimage Bartertown Hobby House Toys Millenium Games

Best Vintage Clothing Store

Little Shop of Hoarders The Op Shop Panache Vintage & Finer Consignment Record Archive

Best Wedding Venue Arbor at the Port Genesee Country Village & Museum The Highline Pomona at Blue Barn

Best Yoga Studio Breathe Open Sky Yoga Center Tru Yoga Yoga DrishTi


roccitynews.com CITY 41


LIFE

ON REPEAT

Answers to this puzzle can be found on page 19

PUZZLE BY S.J. AUSTIN & J. REYNOLDS ACROSS

1

1. Public affairs television network since 1979

19

6. Tribute 12. Palindromic Swedish pop band

2

3

27

19. Company behind Centipede and Asteroids

31

27. More level 28. List on eBay 29. Rip 30. Inquires

34. Branding device that comes from the Greek for “word”

32

45

10

11

12

46

34

48

47 53

65

70

71 78

55

38. Gel often used as a desiccant

97

98

40. Spirit who might prohibit wishing for more wishes

103

87

93

74

108

101

111

107 112

116

51. Word that follows 57-down or hee

124

125

126

128

129

130

131

132

133

134

135

52. Civil rights leader Medgar who said “Our only hope is to control the vote.” 53. Children’s author who frequently collaborated with illustrator Quentin Blake

118

119

120

121

55. Appropriate acronym for the winter blues

78. “Silly” waterfowl

103. Like hard bread

56. “Volunteers?”

80. Cliffside detritus

58. Material sometimes represented by baking soda and vinegar with red food coloring

81. Non-binary, e.g.

105. Vice President Agnew who resigned in scandal (for a different reason than his President!)

59. Scattered waste

85. Attempt, slangily

61. _____ of Anarchy (FX drama about a biker gang)

88. “Gimme a smooch”

63. Actor McGregor

91. County represented by 113-Down

64. Involuntary quiver 66. Trove 68. “As good _____” 70. Isr. neighbor 71. 16x (Rusted Root, 1994) 75. Backout button

42 CITY NOVEMBER 2022

83. “Pretty Maids All in _____”

90. Speck 93. Top of Scotland?

115

102

48. 47x (Destiny’s Child, 1999)

117

114

96

106 110

113

90

95 100

109

77

82

89

105

76

69

81

94

75

57 63

68

88

99

104

45. Prevent discovery of

86

44

51

62

67 73

43

37

56 61

72

18

42

80

92

42. Explorer da Gama

36

50

66

17

26

41

60

85

16 22

49

54

79

84

15

30

35 40

59

64

14

29

39

58

13

25

33

52

83

9

21

38

91

36. Martini’s winemaking partner

8

28

31. _____ Misérables 32. Big name in British art (or American cookies)

7

24

21. Oz creator

25. Bob Dylan or Tupac Shakur

6 20

20. “I’m a _____, not a divider.”

23. 12x (R.E.M., 1992)

5

23

16. 6-pt. scores

22. Shade

4

106. Revenue minus expenses 108. Title character who (spoiler alert!) never shows up 110. “I would never join a _____ that would accept me as a member” 112. “The hour _____ hand”

122

123

127

122. Soda brand owned by Keurig Dr Pepper 124. Be more offensive? 126. 17x (Technotronic, 1989) 128. “Say no more… please!” 129. Next in line 130. Double platinum Genesis album of 1981 that sounds like a rhyme scheme 131. Get married without a ceremony

95. Fingerprint collectors, in brief

113. Pro sports group for Giants and 49ers

96. Expectorates

116. “_____ All That”

133. P.D.Q.

97. Many a dad joke

118. Source of many propaganda tweets

135. Authority to decide, familiarly

98. 17x (Fatboy Slim, 1999) 101. Contributes to a cause

120. Exam

132. Choose 134. Olympic prizes


DOWN

72. After tax

1. Domesticated ungulate raised for food, textiles, and transport

73. Goof

2. Ward (off) 3. Window parts most likely to break 4. Elvis’s middle name 5. Decade in which grunge and hiphop went mainstream 6. “You don’t say” 7. “Be with you in a jiffy” 8. Silent theatrical technique

74. Sammy Davis Jr.’s “___ Can” 76. Italian for “seven” 77. Unrefined 79. Airport alternative to JFK or LGA 82. Bite playfully 83. Roadies’ loads 84. Runaway victory 86. “Take ___ from me…”

9. Coral formation around a lagoon

87. ABC’s

10. Discipline that might make you say, “Science rocks!”

89. Early PC platform 92. Certain newspaper column

11. Sea eagle

94. Keyboardist Saunders who played with the Grateful Dead

12. Competent 13. Silicon Valley region 14. Small donkey 15. Pierre’s pal 16. 29x (Montell Jordan, 1995) 17. Dawn counterpart 18. Volleyball plays between “bumps” and “spikes” 24. Part of a merry refrain 26. Spanish quarters 29. Athletes Harding and Washington 33. ~ 35. Emeralds, e.g. 37. Animated reindeer whose name literally means “young man” 38. “Beat it!” 39. Indian monastery

96. ___ get stitches 99. Queens neighborhood 100. Company acquired by Google for $1.65 Billion 102. Words after work or museum 104. Profit’s opposite 107. Holy Communion, e.g. 109. Orchestra tuners 111. “Fine, stay angry!” 113. Former New York State Assembly member Bill 114. Parts of airplane wings 115. Brief film appearance 116. M.L.B. star Juan 117. 1-down feature 119. Maryland athlete, for short

41. Prefix with China

121. Pet lover’s org.

43. Town where Jesus is said to have turned water into wine

123. Spanish novelist and Nobelist 125. Part of a dance?

44. Wilson of “Cars 3”

126. Cooking spray brand

45. Irishmen, e.g.

127. “Sesame Street” airer

46. Reproductive organ 47. 37x (En Vogue, 1992) 49. Walker, Munro, and others 50. Therapeutic touch 54. Syllables sung to the same tune as “Baa baa black sheep” and “twinkle twinkle” 57. See 51-across 59. Part of a bedroom suite 60. Culture ___ 62. Opposite of “Yep!” 65. Sweet ending? 67. Physicist Fermi 69. “Science Guy” Bill roccitynews.com CITY 43


44 CITY NOVEMBER 2022