Page 1

EVENTS: UGLY DISCO, DR. SKETCHY “ADVENTURE TIME” 21 FILM: “PHANTOM,” “WEST OF MEMPHIS” 28 RESTAURANT REVIEW: BROOKS LANDING DINER 13 URBAN JOURNAL: THE WRONG ‘SCHOOLS’ FIX

3

CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 39

THE TOSSERS

MICHAEL MUSILLAMI

MARCH 6-12, 2013 Free

BIG LEG EMMA

KINGSLEY FLOOD

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

SEAN FORBES

Vol 42 No 26

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 14

News. Music. Life.

We can’t have the police department eat the city.” NEWS, PAGE 11

Refusing to leave: two young professionals like it here. GUEST COMMENT, PAGE 4

Gay, married, and taxed. NEWS, PAGE 7

Brockport says “Hello, Dali.” ART REVIEW, PAGE 20

Want to put on a show? Applying to Fringe. FEATURE, PAGE 24

COVER STORY | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 8 | PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

A Squirrel that gathers causes On almost any day or evening, the Flying Squirrel Community Space is home to a potpourri of progressive artists, musicians, and social justice activists. The Squirrel is a meeting space. But it’s also an organization with its own members, who often describe it as a collective: a community that’s part of other communities. The Squirrel’s foyer is feathered with pamphlets and flyers about meetings on everything from reproductive rights to anarchy.

Located on Clarissa Street in one of the city’s early African-American communities, the Squirrel’s site was once home to one of the first black Elks clubs in the country. And in the mid-20th century, the building was at the center of Clarissa Street’s jazz scene. The Squirrel still honors the Elks’ tradition of community service and continues to host a robust music lineup of local bands. (Pictured: Rich Riggs and Taima Probst at the Squirrel's Whirly Wednesday dance night.)


Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Minimum wage and poverty

Our January 27 guest commentary, “Partisanship, Poverty, and Paychecks,” on the need for raising the minimum wage, set up a lively reader dialogue on our website. Some excerpts: Not true. Johnson spent over $200 billion on the Vietnam War. Reagan spent hundreds of billions on “ending the Cold War.” We have redistributed wealth upwards for four decades. There are more people living in poverty because the vast majority of economic gains have been in the top 1 percent of the population, who aren’t the “job creators” but are greedy. They are sitting on trillions in unused capital right now that they could be using to create jobs. We have also sent millions of jobs overseas for decades, because people in China and India don’t need health care or retirement plans (that’s sarcasm, by the way). We’ve spent very little fighting the war on poverty and a great deal expanding it. SETH

Exactly; in fact, at the height of the Vietnam War under LBJ, we were spending in three weeks on Vietnam what we were spending in one year on all of the Great Society programs combined. And under Reagan, aid to cities fell 59 percent, but the wealthiest 1 percent got 55 percent of Reagan’s tax cuts. TROLL WHISPERER

One of the biggest problems in this debate is the validity of both sides’ arguments. The 2 CITY

MARCH 6-12, 2013

system is not working to raise anybody out of poverty. And raising the minimum wage isn’t going to lift more than a few people out of poverty, and then not for very long. Continuing to fight a failed “War on Poverty” with the same weapons we’ve been using will result in more failed battles. Who are the impoverished, for the most part? Those without a college education, and frequently without a high school diploma. What jobs are being created here in America under the current “recovery”? High tech and service industry. The service industry isn’t growing fast enough or paying well enough to keep up with the “demand” for employment. High tech will continue to be out of reach of the undereducated. We need more jobs that pay a living wage that are also open to the undereducated. Whether this means we step back from some technologies and build products that can be repaired by people instead of being disposable, or we end incentivizing the off-shoring of jobs, or some other method, until we can employ all the employable, we will not solve this problem using either Democratic or Republican methods. Also, if/when we ever get those jobs back, we need to return to the days of significant unionization of the workforce. I have no idea why conservatives hate unions. They are voluntary assemblages of people working on behalf of their own selfinterest. I know no one who works in a union “shop” who wishes it were otherwise, and know plenty who would appreciate the benefits of having their entire company’s workforce behind them. Given the likelihood of either recommendation ever coming to fruition, I’m quite certain that the arguers over this issue will continue to argue over and past each other, solving nothing. Only big business and bankers benefit – as they always do when the people are getting screwed over. YUGOBOY

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly March 6-12, 2013 Vol 42 No 26 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


Preschool - Grade 6

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Before school and after school care available

What if we’re chasing the wrong ‘schools’ fix? One of the more thought-provoking articles I’ve read recently is Jerry Muller’s “Capitalism and Inequality,” in Foreign Affairs. The subject: the United States’ growing income inequality. Liberals and conservatives alike will find plenty to dislike in what Muller says, but some of his points are hard to argue with. We’re spending enormous amounts of money and energy trying to address the country’s growing inequality, he says, and it’s not doing much to erase the gap. In a capitalist country, says Muller, the problem isn’t equality of opportunity. In fact, he says, expanding opportunity tends to increase inequality, because some people are able to take advantage of the opportunity better than others. And that, he notes, stems both from our innate human potential – what we’re born with – and from how well our family and our community have nurtured that capital. And, he adds, it’s “hard to overstate” the importance of the family: “To use the language of contemporary economics, the family is a workshop in which human capital is produced.” Muller’s article covers a wide range of topics, but the one I kept going back to was education: the inequality of academic achievement among US students, what we’re doing to address it, and the influence of the family on that achievement. We’ve long believed that for the poor, schools offer the best route to a successful future. It’s a jolt, then, to come across Muller’s contention that rather than helping reduce the achievement gap between children, education is likely increasing it. It’s not that Muller thinks education isn’t important. But it is not, he insists, “a panacea.” And so we end up with lots of college students who can’t do college-level work, forcing colleges to offer remedial courses. We focus on boosting the achievement of students while they’re in high school – even though we know that the problem didn’t start there. We focus on elementary school, and on pre-school. And we come up with reforms: more programs, “school choice,” charter schools, “teacher accountability.” We argue about standardized testing. And we spend a lot of money. And not much changes. It’s not that these efforts aren’t important. They are. But they don’t address the core problem: the “capital,” as Muller puts it, that some children start school with and some do not. The most the reform initiatives can do is address the results of that lack of capital. Schools can’t work miracles.

Americans may think that schools can eliminate the achievement gap among children. But maybe it’s just making the gap worse. Bring up the issue of family influence, and you can be accused of blaming the parents. That avoids dealing with the issue. It’s not that inner-city parents don’t care about their children’s education and their future. But we are experiencing multiplegenerational poverty. That is having a real effect, on families, and on neighborhoods, and we can’t ignore that fact. Muller comes close to concluding that there’s not much we can do about inequality in education, that we just need to make sure we provide support for those left behind. In a recent Urban Studies article, Harvard’s William Julius Wilson and James M. Quane point down a better path. There are ways for inner-city children to overcome the negative influences of cities’ concentrated poverty, they write, and society needs to provide those ways: services for families, for children and adolescents, for ex-prisoners; job training and availability; decent wages…. Locally, individual segments of the larger community try to provide some of those things. But money is tight and likely to get tighter. And as a society, we haven’t faced the real problem and its magnitude. It’s easier to focus on easy targets like schools and parents, and blame them. Muller offers a reminder that schools cannot do the job we’re expecting them to do. We can blame parents if we like, but they can’t do the job themselves, either. And the longer we avoid dealing with the roots of our education inequality, the worse it will get.

OPEN HOUSE March 13th • 6:30pm-7:30pm

31 Empire Blvd. at Culver

(585) 288-0580 † www.StJohnNeumannSchool.com

Get Lucky with us! OUR

3rd ANNUAL

St. Patrick’s Celebration!

MARCH 1117 CORNED BEEF SANDWICH CLASSIC SHEPHERD’S PIE CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE LAMB & GUINNESS STEW POTATO & LEEK SOUP

NEW Angus

Hour!

MON-THURS 4-7 PM

$5.00 Martinis, $3.50 Draught $4.00 House Wine

Plus the ANGUS HOUR APPETIZERS MENU served in the lounge

Open 7 Days a Week LUNCH: Mon–Fri. 11-4PM DINNER: Mon-Thurs. 4-10PM Fri & Sat. 4-11PM, Sunday 4-9PM

2126 FIVE MILE LINE RD. at Penfield 4 corners

Call for Reservations

652 PARK AVENUE open everyday 271-1970

585-218-2005

Complimentary Valet Parking Thursday, Friday, Saturday

Did your grocery store close? Feeling lost and confused? Don’t know where to turn to? Turn to:

Proudly since 1964 Join us for a sampling event

ROGERS BEER Fri, March 15 4pm-6pm

The Irish don’t need luck, they need R’s Market!

CORNED BEEF, CABBAGE, BEER & POTATOES

Hand-trimmed meat, Cut to Order OPEN EVERY DAY! Mon-Sat 9am-8pm, Sun 9am-6pm 2294 MONROE AVE. BRIGHTON | 271-8270 | FIND US ON rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


GUEST COMMENTARY | BY MICHAEL BROWN AND ANA LISS

Two brains refuse to drain David Brooks made us mad. He did it in his January 24 New York Times column, “The Great Migration.” He did it by highfiving the demographic group we belong to while dissing the kind of city we call home. Brooks argues that American higher education “sucks up some of the smartest people from across the country and concentrates them in a few privileged places.” Freshmen may arrive at Ivy League dormitories from sleepy second-tier cities or small towns, but by the time they depart with degrees, they have been intellectually and culturally transformed such that only a life in Washington, San Francisco, or Boston is possible for them. “They learn how to behave the way successful people do in [these] highly educated hubs,” says Brooks. “There’s no economic reason to return home, and maybe it’s not even socially possible anymore.” In short, these young folks are ready to take their place among the economic, political, and cultural elite. They may return for Christmas. They may gather at bars to watch the sports team from back home. They may even linger over a vision of retiring to the place they grew up – on particularly hard days in what Brooks calls “the relentless quest for distinction.” But these are visions indeed, for Brooks’ column makes clear that there is only one reality: the inexorable, inevitable, and ultimately desirable tectonic shift whereby ambitious, credentialed, and creative people move to a few large cities while leaving behind communities that are fated to wither and die. Brooks might have saved several thousand keystrokes by simply declaring: “The strong cities will survive, and the weak shall perish – as they must!” For he is at bottom a Social Darwinist of place, whose admiration for this process is palpable. Brooks echoes Charles Tiebout’s theory of municipal sorting, which posits that individuals use their freedom of choice and unique sets of values to move from one place to another until they find the one that maximizes their personal utility. But the Tiebout hypothesis came up against criticism for ignoring the importance of pride of place, of family roots, and of cultural connectedness. These kinds of benefits accrue despite the presumed career booster of choosing a place like San Francisco over Flint, Michigan, for example. Urban theorist Richard Florida responds

to Brooks in a January 30 contribution to The Atlantic’s “Cities” called “More Losers than Winners in America’s New Economic Geography.” He doesn’t contest the account that Brooks offers or that Tiebout might, but he does dwell upon its downside. Florida shows that talent clustering in large metropolitan regions contributes to economic 4 CITY

MARCH 6-12, 2013

inequalities because the benefits of such clusters “flow disproportionately to more highly-skilled […] workers.” The considerably higher cost of living in knowledge-based metros is only offset by the income gains that the most highly paid workers in those areas receive. Less affluent folks are either priced out of the hub cities or are forced to stay there and take the hit in real income. While Florida warns of the costs of the “Great Migration,” Brooks sees it as something akin to Joseph Schumpeter’s “creative destruction.” The lifeblood – in the form of smart kids – from the wayside places must be drained so that it can feed the thumping heart of our biggest cities, which pump out the innovations that power our society. Brooks honors this process as “meritocratic,” one that allows the talented to become part of the “positive ecology” of large cities, where productivity is raised to a fever pitch. Such thinking stood behind Brooks’ appreciation of Mitt Romney, just as it stood behind the work Romney did at Bain Capital. Romney’s business model at Bain was to pick apart smaller companies, salvaging the divisions or assets that held market value while consigning the rest to unemployment statistics and bankruptcy courts. Some defended this practice on the grounds that it made the overall economy a leaner, meaner, productive machine. Now imagine Bain buying a small city instead of a small company. They fly in and extract the top 10 students from each high school, choppering them off to elite colleges and leaving the rest of the inhabitants to ultimately become recipients of the federal government’s redistributive largesse. (A major claim in Brooks’ column is that the Obama administration has embarked upon a fool’s errand to prop up the losers in our society – whether these losers are people or places. As he concludes, “meritocracy is overwhelming the liberal project.”) We read Brooks from a peculiar vantage point. In one sense, we’re the people he’s writing about. We grew up in the suburbs of Rochester, and we were indeed vacuumed up by elite

Michael Brown and Ana Liss: Rochester “gives us the opportunity not just to live in a place, but to work for that place.” PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

universities: Cornell, Penn, and the London School of Economics. We earned postgraduate degrees and we lived in big hub cities. But then we did something that Brooks’ thinking has no capacity to compute: we chose Rochester. There were many reasons to make that

call. We wanted to be with our families and to enjoy them. We wanted to enhance the quality of our lives, even if it cost us in quantity of status or power. We felt that Rochester did indeed have the “positive ecology” that Brooks and Florida envision in only a few key cities: opportunities for creative engagement, cultural ferment, and entrepreneurial innovation. And we thought it had an enriched ecosystem beyond what the hub cities might offer: a blend of compelling history and architecture with the palpable and beautiful presence of the natural environment. It has all of this at a dramatically lower cost of living, a cost of living that allows one to take risks – because you can take a risk and still make rent. Most crucially, we were attracted to Rochester by the presence here of thoughtful, committed people who share a sense that attaching their lives to the fate of their community is not something to be done out of duty; it is something to be done as a means of personal fulfillment. Rochester holds out a set of civic possibilities for us. It gives us the opportunity not just to live in a place, but to work for that place. It’s our hometown, and we’ll be damned if we’re going to let it go extinct. Brooks says that the culture of meritocracy “encourages you to go anywhere

on your quest for self-fulfillment.” We are on a quest too, even a quest for self-fulfillment. But we know that a fully realized life is one that includes a sense of civic participation, one that makes room for commitment to community. We each faced turning points in our lives where we had to decide whether to explore these ideals or abandon them, whether to continue rising in the “relentless quest for distinction” or to become relentless in our determination to forge a different path. We chose the second course, and we believe that there are millions like us who have done the same. What do these millions mean for Brooks’ “Great Migration”? Well, one meaning is obvious: that unlike migratory birds, migratory human beings have a choice. We can allow our lives to conform to the large patterns in our society, until those patterns take on a sense of inevitability, or we can recall that every large pattern is, at bottom, a composite of countless human decisions. If we make different decisions, we have the power to change the pattern. Once we realize that the “Great Migration” is no longer inevitable – and it’s certainly not – then we must ask, is it desirable? We’ve found an answer to that question for ourselves; we hope others will join us. Michael Brown and Ana Liss are the past and current presidents, respectively, of the Monroe County Young Democrats. Brown is earning his PhD. in history at the University of Rochester, studying the place of intellectuals in American political culture. Liss holds an MPA from Penn and works as a researcher for the Greater Rochester Enterprise.


Redhot & Blue of Yale University

BREW & BEANS

presents an afternoon of jazz a cappella

Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 3:00 PM St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church 2000 Highland Avenue Rochester, NY $10 suggested donation redhotandblueofyale.org SPONSORED BY:

CRAFT-ROASTED LOCALLY & ALWAYS FRESH!

Pick up a pound today! 120 Stonewood Ave. (Just off Lake Ave) 585.663.0430 1230 Lehigh Station Rd. (Henrietta) 585.334.5500

200 East Ave • 613-4600

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

City gets land bank approval

es have since changed and are now less generous.

The City of Rochester received state approval to form a land bank. The land bank will acquire vacant, abandoned, and tax-delinquent properties in the city and then turn them over to the Greater Rochester Housing Partnership’s HOME Rochester Program. HOME Rochester will rehab the houses and sell them to first-time homebuyers.

Reilich to seek supervisor seat

State Assembly member and county Republican Party chair Bill Reilich announced that he’s running for Greece supervisor. John Auberger, the current supervisor, can’t seek re-election because of term limits. Reilich has received the backing of the Greece Republican Committee.

Excellus retiree cashes in

Financial filings released by Excellus BlueCross BlueShield showed that former Chief Financial Officer Zeke Duda received $10.9 million after he retired at the end of 2011. The company defended the package, saying that it was based on multi-year employment and performance agreements, said media reports. A company official said compensation practic-

News

Charges against Brockport mayor stand

An Ogden town justice did not dismiss criminal charges against Brockport Mayor Connie Castaneda. Castaneda faces several charges, including official misconduct. She is accused of illegally renting an apartment in her village home and failing to register the apartment with the village, said a Democrat and Chronicle article.

Open supervisor seat in Perinton

Perinton Supervisor James Smith, a Republican, will not seek re-election this year. He has been town supervisor for 26 years. Monroe County Legislator Mike Barker, also a Republican, plans to seek the supervisor seat. Barker has held several elected offices in Perinton and Fairport since 1992.

Dryden reopens

The Dryden Theatre at the George Eastman House reopened with a dinner and a movie screening. The theater had been closed since early January for an extensive remodel that included the installation of new chairs and a new digital projector.

The Town of Chili has several large farms, including the Krenzer farm on Scottsville Road. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Towns focus on farmland the towns are contributing a total of $3,000. The area of Chili south of Black Creek, as well as parts of Wheatland, have fairly wet soils, says Chili Supervisor David Dunning. But they are also rich soils, so they make for productive farmland. In the past, valuable farmland within both towns, as well as in other communities, has been sold for development. “It’s something we need to look at and make sure that as our town grows or spreads out or things happen that we’re protecting that element,” Dunning says.

In Chili, nearly as much land is devoted to agriculture as is used for housing. And Wheatland, Chili’s neighbor to the south, actually has more farmland than residential acreage. Elected officials in the two western Monroe County communities have teamed up and are in the early stages of developing a plan to preserve their farmland. Currently, officials are searching for a consultant to help put the plan together. They’ve received a $50,000 grant from the State Department of Agriculture and Markets to assist with the costs and

376 Jefferson Road in Jefferson Plaza www.TandoorOfIndia.com • 427-7080 Open: Lunch 11:30-3pm • Dinner 5-10pm

the

freshest

ingredients...

yield

world-class

March SPECIAL!

BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE! DINE IN DINNER ENTRÉE ONLY VALID ON SUN, MON, WED & THURS. GOOD THROUGH 3/31/13 ONE COUPON PER TABLE, PLEASE TIP YOUR SERVER 18%.

6 CITY

MARCH 6-12, 2013

results.

207 HIGH POINT DR. V I C TO R warfields.com/highpoint 425-2589

The potential loss of farmland was identified as a priority issue in Chili’s comprehensive plan, which the town completed in late 2011. And the idea to develop a farmland protection plan grew out of that process. Chili and Wheatland officials want the plan to identify land for preservation, Dunning says, and to lay out approaches to do so. Other local towns have used a variety of approaches and incentives, from purchasing development rights to offering tax incentives for conservation easements.


The federal government considers married same-sex couples to be individuals. That means that one of the big financial advantages of marriage — filing joint statements with the federal government — is denied to these couples.

TAXES | BY JEREMY MOULE

LGBT | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Gay, married, and taxed Tax season isn’t something people usually celebrate, but many married same-sex couples are finding it even more of a grind. Married couples in New York State can file jointly or as individuals. They shouldn’t assume that one is better than the other, so preparers will likely review what the return would look like for both scenarios. But the problem for same-sex married couples is with the federal return. Even though New York recognizes same-sex marriage, the federal government does not because of the Defense of Marriage Act. The federal government considers the couple to be individuals. That means that one of the big financial advantages of marriage — filing joint statements with the federal government — is denied to same-sex married couples. “On the federal return, if you have a couple where one person is not working outside the home, the person cannot be filed as a dependent,” says Sheila Cahill, a licensed tax preparer in the Rochester area. Cahill has many LGBT clients and says the federal government fails to recognize that the wife or husband may be staying home to raise children, for example. Another basic difference has to do with tax rates. “A lot depends on the incomes between the couple and on the disparity between the

incomes,” Cahill says. “The first $20,000 of a single person’s income is taxed at about 15 percent, but for a married couple it would be roughly the first $35,000.” Cahill says samesex couples don’t always pay more than opposite-sex couples because there are a lot of variables; it depends on the credits and allowances permitted, she says. But many experts say that same-couple ILLUSTRATION BY couples are likely MATT DETURCK to be at a financial disadvantage in several areas including pensions, the gift tax, and the federal estate tax. Cahill says for simple filings, the commercial software programs are fine and are more up to date with the marriage law in New York. But if the returns have complications, she advises working with a professional tax preparer.

Cuomo vs. the IDA’s

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,178 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,080 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to March 4. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from January 20 to February 22: -- Staff Sgt. Jonathan D. Davis, 34, Kayenta, Ariz. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

The Monroe County Industrial Development Agency, as well as virtually every industrial agency in the state, has come out against Governor Andrew Cuomo’s proposal to restrict agencies’ ability to offer state sales tax exemptions to businesses. | COMIDA has awarded state sales tax exemptions, along with county sales tax exemptions and other tax incentives, to projects including the new ESL headquarters in the city and the Culver Road armory mixed-use development. | Cuomo’s plan would change who can receive the benefits, and neither project mentioned above would have been eligible under the new arrangement. | Cuomo’s 2013 to 2014 budget proposal says that IDA’s currently provide the exemptions without input from the state or regional economic development councils. And he says he wants to limit the industries that can receive exemptions to scientific research and development, software development, agriculture, back office operations, distribution centers, financial services, data centers, and manufacturing. | Cuomo also wants the regional economic development councils to approve the state sales tax exemptions. And companies receiving exemptions would have to pay the sales tax upfront and then seek reimbursement.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


[1] Mary Adams breading fish at a Saturday community dinner. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN [2] The Squirrel's foyer provides a place for community flyers and information. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN [3] The Flying Squirrel sits on a quiet corner of Clarissa Street in Corn Hill. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK [4] A community dinner included several volunteers feeding members of the community. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN 1

2

Zachary Ceru placed his toy hoop over his

head and stepped out on the dance floor. The brightly-colored ring glowed in the dark as it swung from Ceru’s neck with hooping’s familiar twirl. After a minute or two, Ceru let the hoop drop over his torso to his waste, where it rolled around his hips and abdomen with ease. Ceru was one of about 40 hoopers at a recent Whirly Wednesday, one of the Flying Squirrel Community Space’s most popular weekly events. By 9 p.m. most Wednesdays, the Squirrel’s second floor holds a hoard of mostly young hoopers, gyrating in the dark to thumping dance mixes. “I’ve been doing this for about nine months,” Ceru says. “It’s sort of like dancing, but it’s different.” The Flying Squirrel Community Space at 285 Clarissa Street is home to a potpourri of progressive artists, musicians, and social justice activists. If visitors weren’t interested in the carnival whimsy of Whirly Wednesday, for example, they could’ve joined a Take Back the Land meeting under way simultaneously on the Squirrel’s first floor. That night, about 20 Take Back the Land activists discussed how they could help a woman reacquire her northeast-area home of 30 years. The home had been foreclosed upon. The Squirrel is partly a meeting space. But it’s also an organization with its own members, who tend to describe it as a collective: a community that’s part of other communities. There’s a gritty sense of multiplicity about the Squirrel that’s immediately 8 CITY

MARCH 6-12, 2013

evident once you’re inside the front door. The foyer is feathered with pamphlets and flyers about meetings on everything from reproductive rights to anarchy. And most of the building’s rooms serve multiple purposes: a meeting room can be transformed into a dining hall and a dance floor can be converted to a classroom. Rochester Indymedia, the Green Party, and Worker Justice — an activist group for low-wage workers — are some of the groups that meet at the Squirrel. But the groups change and new groups form. Last month, some members began forming the Free School, an information exchange with classes like building a solar oven and permaculture. The Squirrel also hosts a robust music lineup of local bands. Community dinners and neighborhood socials are popular events, too. In some respects, the Squirrel’s roots can be traced to the European salons of

the 17th and 18th centuries, which were sanctuaries for art, philosophy, literature,

central belief; often it was a return to an agrarian lifestyle, simplicity, and a rejection of consumerism. Some of those concerns bare an uncanny resemblance to the Squirrel’s “Principles of Unity,” the doctrine that binds members to the collective. It says community is the pathway to freedom, and that racism, sexism, heterosexism, and especially capitalism, are opposed. Conflicts are resolved, as much as possible, through alternative justice solutions that don’t rely on police intervention. The Squirrel began a few years ago with about nine founding members, says co-founder Dawn Zuppelli. Many of the founders knew each other from the now closed Storefront Antiwar Crisis Center, formerly at 658 Monroe Avenue. The principles are the members’ core values, Zuppelli says, and came about after a lot of discussion.

application forms, but members generally agree to volunteer some of their time each month toward some type of administrative or building maintenance need. What is less fluid, Zuppelli says, is how the Squirrel operates. “It is so horizontally structured,” she says. “All members are created equal.” Members only speak about the Squirrel from their own perspective, but no one speaks on behalf of the Squirrel or its members, Zuppelli says. And no one member makes decisions on behalf of everyone, she says. All decisions are made through reaching a consensus. “It can be more time-consuming, but it’s also more fun and creative,” she says.

T H E S Q U I R R E L T H A T GA T H E R S C A U S E S / /

and political discourse. In other ways, the Squirrel is reminiscent of the collectives of the 1960’s, where hippies and the counter culture were galvanized by a

“They aren’t set in stone,” she says. “The Squirrel is an evolving organization. It depends on who joins the collective.” Membership in the Squirrel is easy, but far from simplistic: come to the meetings and participate. Know the principles and understand that members live by them. There are no membership dues or complicated

BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

“We don’t often get to experience this in the outside world.” Ted Forsyth, another Squirrel co-founder, says methodology is important to the members. “We trade-in expediency and efficiency for a sort of patience and accountability,” he says. “We don’t expect any one person to be a leader. We’re all leaders.”


5

6

7

9

8

10

Before purchasing the building on Clarissa Street, Forsyth says there were a lot of activist groups meeting in Rochester on issues ranging from education to homelessness. Meetings were held everywhere from cafes to shelters. The groups at the Squirrel are autonomous, he says, and their members aren’t necessarily members of the Squirrel. But the Squirrel serves more as a clearinghouse, Forsyth says, and what makes it dynamic is the opportunity to comingle, share ideas, and sometimes work with other activists and artists. “I wouldn’t call it [the Squirrel] a movement,” Forsyth says. “But it’s sort of facilitating movements.” The Squirrel’s location is significant, too,

says longtime member Ricardo Adams, because of Clarissa Street’s rich history as one of the main business and cultural arteries of Rochester’s African-American community. “This was a 99 percent, maybe 100 percent black community,” he says. “And it was a vibrant community. We had

everything from corner grocery stores and clothing stores to barbershops and entertainment. You didn’t really even have to leave Clarissa Street. It all happened right here.” Even the Squirrel’s building is historically significant, Adams says. In 1906, the Elks Lodge No. 91 Flower City Chapter and the Eldorado Temple No. 32 Auxiliary used the site for their meetings. The mostly African-American membership met there after being rejected by the Benevolent Protective Order of the Elks of the World, a largely white organization at the time. When the Squirrel’s founding members purchased the rundown and abandoned building for roughly $35,000, they decided to leave the old Elks bar as a reminder of their work, Adams says. And some of the Elks’ meeting minutes and notes have been archived, he says. “They really did a lot for this community,” he says. “They provided scholarships and they supported the people in a lot of different ways.”

Clarissa Street’s musical legacy is also well-documented. During the mid-20th century, jazz artists from all over the country played at the Pythodd Club, and what is now Clarissa’s night club. The latter is located next door to the Squirrel. These days, Adams and his wife, Rochester school board member Mary Adams, have resumed some of the Elks’ neighborhood work. They coordinate a community dinner at the Squirrel on the last Saturday evening of the month. “We’ve served as many as 70 people here,” Richardo Adams says. “And we do it without help from Wegmans or Foodlink or any of the big organizations. This is just people helping people.” Last month, Mary Adams made fish fry plates for about 30 people. Other volunteers brought Greek salad, rice and beans, and brownies for dessert. “By the last Saturday of the month, food gets low for a lot of families,” she says. “I do this because I believe building our community is the answer to most of our problems.”

I do this because I believe building our community is the answer to most of our problems.” MARY ADAMS

And the Squirrel is contributing to Clarissa Street’s musical legacy, too, says longtime Squirrel member Al Brundage. “When they [Squirrel members] said we need to have a manager on site if we’re going to be a music venue, I said, ‘I’ll do it,’ without giving it a second thought and I love it,” he says. Brundage says the Squirrel is an important music venue in Rochester, especially for younger musicians and band members. The Squirrel doesn’t serve or allow alcohol on the premises, which makes it easier for a band of underage musicians to play there. The policy also makes it easier for younger fans to come hear the bands. Most of the bands play some type of punk, and one band in particular, The Setbacks, got its start playing at the Squirrel, Brundage says. “Now they’re playing Buffalo and Syracuse, and all over the place,” he says. continues on page 10

[5] Scott Brant and Patrick Chase prepare for a Green Party meeting in the Squirrel's front room. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN [6] Ted Forsyth writes notes at a general meeting. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN [7] The Morris Dance Group utilizes the Squirrel's upstairs space. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN [8] Kate Pamell, Conor Case, Dustin Fazio, and Erik at Whirly Wednesday. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK [9] Ricardo Adams expressing his views at a meeting. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN [10] (left to right) Maya Adams, Lakeiya Grimes, and Sarah Adams at the Squirrel's community dinner. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


S QU I R R E L continues from page 9

(left) Patrick Bellucci with his light-up hoop at Whirly Wednesday. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK (right) The graffiti-filled staircase connects the two floors of the Squirrel. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

But the Squirrel has had to clear some hurdles, too. In the Squirrel’s early

days, there were a few complaints from neighbors about the noise from the bands. But the Squirrel’s members have addressed those concerns, Brundage says. Amplified music ends at 10 p.m. and acoustic may go to 11 p.m., he says. Long-term funding was another issue that needed to be addressed. While the Squirrel accepts donations, it doesn’t apply for grants like most nonprofits. The members don’t want to become part of what they call the “nonprofit industrial complex.” Grants create a false sense of security, some members say, and often come with strings attached that dictate not only how the money can be spent, but how the Squirrel needs to operate to be eligible. So members came up with a promotion, “25@25: Keeping the Squirrel Alive.” Participants pay $25 a month for a year in exchange for the ability to hold two free events at the Squirrel, such as a birthday or graduation party. The money is just enough to handle repairs and emergencies,” members say. One of the Squirrel’s most difficult tests came when members decided that a particular activist group could no longer hold its meetings there. Individual

/ /

members of that group are still welcome at the Squirrel, but the group’s tactics and philosophy began to conflict with the Squirrel’s principles of unity, says cofounder Dawn Zuppelli. The decision was an emotionally charged one, she says, because the Squirrel was founded on inclusivity and engagement. “It’s not an exclusive club,” she says. One of the Squirrel’s more interesting challenges has been outreach to the Corn Hill neighborhood. Squirrel members and some of the groups that use the space oppose urban gentrification, but Corn Hill was one of the city’s early neighborhood gentrification successes. But the Squirrel seems to have earned the respect of its neighbors. “When certain neighborhoods become historic and trendy, whether intentional or not, it raises the value of the property and it hurts poor people, particularly people of color,” says Squirrel member Ryan Acuff. “I think you can have revitalization without gentrification.” Still, the Squirrel has gone out of its way to be part of the Clarissa Street and Corn Hill communities, he says. “Many of us are dreamers,” he says. “We’re building relationships around hope.”

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR A SLIDESHOW OF ADDITIONAL PHOTOS

R O C H E S T E R C I T Y N E WS PA P E R . C O M 10 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013


Acanthus

PUBLIC SAFETY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

EVENTS

Paging Officer Friendly

Beer and Wine, Espresso, Daily Lunch Specials, Appetizers, Small-Plate Dinners

Expect to hear the term “community policing” a lot this year in the runup to the September primary and the November general election. The fields for Rochester mayor and City Council are just beginning to gel, but the two challengers who have officially announced — the Green Party’s Alex White for mayor and the Rev. Marlowe Washington, a Democrat, for City Council — have put community policing at the top of their platforms. It’s not like community policing is a new idea for Rochester. For years, the deep divide between the police department and residents of the inner city, blamed for everything from the “no snitching” code on city streets to the police department’s difficulty solving homicide cases, has had elected officials, law enforcement, and others searching for ways to repair that trust. Community policing is often discussed in that context. There is no formal definition for community policing written down anywhere. The closest thing seems to be a paper by Community Oriented Policing Services, part of the US Department of Justice, which calls community policing a philosophy of using community partnerships and other proactive techniques to address conditions that give rise to public safety issues. In Rochester, however, community policing often gets tied up with the controversial reorganization of the police department several years ago; for more than a few people, community policing essentially means going back to the sevensection model. Under former Police Chief Bob Duffy, the RPD reorganized into two sections in a bid to save money, increase flexibility, and improve response times. (A third police section, to be located downtown in the Sibley building, will open this summer.) City Council member Adam McFadden, chair of Council’s Public Safety Committee, is one of the loudest and most consistent voices advocating for a return to the old seven-section model. The reorganization damaged the relationship between the community and the police, he says. “It’s made policing the responsibility of the police department and not of the community and the police department,” McFadden says. “The only time people come in contact with the police is if they’re calling them or having the police called on them.” But Mayor Tom Richards says those advocating for the old model are caught up in nostalgia. The seven-section system is cost-prohibitive, inefficient, and was created for a city that was much different geographically and demographically than it

Tuesdays:

Open Mic Comedy Night

Wednesdays:

Pure Kona Poetry Reading

Thursdays:

Live Open Music

is now, he says. And don’t forget, Richards says, that the highest crime rates in the city’s history happened when Rochester had seven police precincts. “It was not a nirvana, is my point,” he says.

Fridays:

3/8: John Payton Project 3/15: Paxtor with Bogs Opening 3/22: Silverfish 4/5: Moho Collective

John Klofas, professor of criminal justice at Rochester Institute of Technology, says

community policing is like apple pie in a no-one-can-say-it’s-a-bad-thing sort of way. It’s an easy promise for politicians to make because it sounds good, he says, and by itself, doesn’t really mean anything. “I think it’s the ‘chicken in every pot, pot in every tent,’ kind of thing,” Klofas says. “It rolls off the tongue easily, without much specificity. You can only be in favor of this sort of stuff, you know?” At the core of community policing is the idea that police cannot solve public-safety problems alone, says the COPS paper. Law enforcement must form partnerships with other government agencies, nonprofits, private businesses, media, and others. More responsibility for decision-making must be given to front-line officers, the paper says, and the entire structure of the police department must be aligned to support the community policing philosophy. Klofas and Mayor Richards say the RPD is already doing many things that can be considered community policing: more officers are walking beats instead of using their patrol cars; the number of officers stationed in the Neighborhood Service Centers has been bumped up; and Police Chief James Sheppard has engaged in numerous outreach activities, including media appearances. He’s a frequent presence at community meetings, works closely with youth groups, walks city streets in a regular “chief on the street” event, and has been holding weekly Twitter town halls, inviting the public to ask him questions over the social media forum. “Sheppard has done more than anybody in recent years to reach out [to] the community,” Klofas says. “You do have to sort of hand it to him for reaching out in new ways.” But Council member McFadden says that while Sheppard is well-known and well-liked, it doesn’t make up for the overall distrust of the police department.

Saturdays:

Chill music with DJ Tom DeBlase Saturday 3/23: DJ Keven Atoms and Jim Kempkes present Floorwax Guest Bartender Mike Beaudrie City Council member Adam McFadden says the RPD reorganization damaged the relationship between the police and the community. FILE PHOTO

“It’s not the same as when I call somebody and deal with that person,” he says. “The chief is not going to deal with disorderly conduct. The chief is not going to deal with drug dealing on the corner. Do people like the chief? Absolutely. But it has nothing to do with the relationship that we should have with our police department.” McFadden says the seven-section model should be the foundation for community policing in Rochester, not least because it represents a commitment to the public. But Richards says and Klofas agrees that a precinct system isn’t required for community policing. Rochester has more police officers — about 750 — than at any time in its history, Richards says, and the cost of policing the city works out to about $125,000 per person. “We shouldn’t have a situation where we’re already spending $133 million a year on the police department — more than we’re spending on anything else — and make it more expensive and less flexible,” Richards says. “The people proposing this stuff — more police officers, more officers on the street — they have to be specific about what they mean and how they’re going to pay for it. Two police officers equal one rec center. Two police officers equal one library. We can’t have the police department eat the city.”

337 East Avenue • 319-5999 Tues–Wed: 11am-10pm, Thurs: 11am-Midnight, Fri-Sat: 11am-2am, Closed Sunday & Monday

UNTIL WE TWEET AGAIN...

twitter.com /roccitynews rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Solidarity with Greece

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

12 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

The University of Rochester’s Students for a Democratic Society and Rochester Red and Black will hold “They Will Not Pass: Behind the Barricades of Greek Anti-fascism,” a fund-raising event for anti-fascist movements in Greece at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 7. The students will present speakers and activists Sofia Papagiannaki, Thanasis Xirotsopanos, and Vangelis Nanos who will each give their views on the situation in Greece. The event will be held in Goergen Hall. The suggested donation

of $10 will go to help anti-fascist organizers.

Learning with lead poisoning

Neuroscientist Theodore Lidsky will speak at the dinner seminar, “Educating children who have been poisoned by lead.” The event is from 4:15 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 21, at Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Avenue. The seminar is presented by the Rochester Teachers Association and Rochester City School District. Registration: (585) 5462681 or ymontalvo@ rochesterteachers.com

Talk about guns

The Lifetree Café will host the discussion, “Inside the Gun Debate: To hunt? To defend?

To assault?” at 7 p.m. on Sunday, March 10, and Monday, March 11. The event will feature filmed interviews with Tom Mauser, whose son died at Columbine High School, and Michael Lang, a concealed weapon firearms instructor. The event will be held on both evenings at 1301 Vintage Lane, Greece.

Talk on Israel

The Jewish Federation of Greater Rochester will present “Beyond Survival: Re-imagining the Jewish Connection to Israel,” a lecture by Tal Becker, senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 7. The event will be held at Temple Beth El, 139 South Winton Road.


Dining

A beef bulgogi sandwich (left) and pork bi bim bap (right) from Brooks Landing Diner.

PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Off the menu Brooks Landing Diner 904 GENESEE ST. 436-1234, BROOKSLANDINGDINER.COM MONDAY-SATURDAY 7 A.M.-4 P.M., SUNDAY 9 A.M.-2 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Two eggs, home fries with green and red peppers, and pork sausage links, served with a side of kimchi and doused with Korean barbecue sauce. Something very interesting is going on at The Brooks Landing Diner on Genesee Street in the 19th Ward — and it’s been happening slowly and quietly at other diners in the area for a while now. The addition of Asian and Asian-inspired dishes to the American diner canon was in some ways inevitable, a function of the changing ownership patterns in the restaurant business. A few generations back, when immigrant and second-generation Greek families started to move into the restaurant business, Greek-ish food started to appear on diner menus. At the time, I’m sure that gyros and moussaka, Greek

salads, and spinach and feta omelets must have seemed exotic and new. Today, it’s hard to find a diner — Greek or not — that doesn’t at least have the ubiquitous Greek omelet on its menu. In recent years, enterprising Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean restaurant owners have taken over or opened diners in challenging retail locations like the 19th Ward and started putting their version of comfort food on the menu in addition to standard diner fare. At The Brooks Landing Diner, that comfort food is Korean as interpreted by owner and cook Jung Choi, or “Sue” as she prefers to be called — a name she picked up from customers at a restaurant she owned some 20 years ago. Most recently the owner of Mitch’s on East Main Street, Sue is no stranger to a colorful and rough and tumble clientele, but this is the first time that she has put Korean food on the menu. That was done in part to attract students from the University of Rochester taking the footbridge across the river to snag a cup of joe at Boulder Coffee. While she admits she sells very little Korean during the week, when the vast majority of her clientele are interested in breakfast food

and the solid if unexciting lunch fare that Brooks Landing Diner offers, the weekends are a different story. On Saturdays and Sundays, the diner does a brisk business in bi bim bap, pork bulgogi, and sometimes dishes that don’t appear on the menu at all. In all, I visited Brooks Landing Diner three times, and I was glad that I did. The first time I visited the service was erratic, the atmosphere more than a little boisterous, and the bowl of bi bim bap ($11.99) I had tasty but not terribly exciting. All of the ingredients were fresh, the greens had a pretty emerald color, the beef was juicy and nicely seasoned, and the rice well-cooked. But I had to ask for kimchi and barbecue sauce, and my waiter — on that occasion Sue was behind the counter cooking for what quickly became a standing-room-only lunch crowd — seemed perplexed when I asked for them. On my second visit, Sue greeted me like an old friend and suggested that I try her “special” chicken bulgogi ($12.99) — she chops pungent kimchi into it to give the dish a spicy and pleasantly sour kick that nicely rounds out its intrinsic smoky goodness. She also told me

about the occasional special menus that she rolls out for the big groups of students that visit her on weekends. Apparently there’s a sort of informal and very occasional Korean brunch buffet that I long to try someday. On visit No. 3 I stopped in for some breakfast — a couple of eggs over easy, home fries, and sausage links with a cup of coffee ($4.99, plus $1.25 for coffee). I’ll admit that I was just being thorough; with Korean food on the menu a traditional diner breakfast didn’t have a huge amount of immediate appeal. But when Sue herself brought it to the table with a side of kimchi and the squeeze bottle full of barbecue sauce things started to look up. The home fries were some of the best I’ve seen in a while, the cubes of potato small enough to crisp on the outside without leaving the interior crunchy and raw, the onion and peppers sauteed just long enough to soften them rather than cooking them down into goo. The eggs were a tad overcooked, but it’s hard not to slightly overcook an over-easy egg, and there was still some runny yolk to redeem them. The sausage links were tasty but unremarkable. In short, each of the individual elements of my breakfast was a bit ho-hum. However, hack the eggs and sausage up, squirt on the barbecue sauce, mix in the kimchi, and stir, stir, stir them together with the potatoes — the way you would with the rice, veg, and meat in a bowl of bi bim bap — and a normal diner breakfast is transformed into something new and wonderful. It’s a fusion of cuisines akin to the discovery of how good peanut butter and chocolate are together. I was just tucking into my well-doctored

breakfast when Sue appeared at the table with the coffee pot — the coffee at Brooks Landing Diner is pretty good for diner coffee, but will probably still disappoint those who like their joe with a pedigree. She also brought a small plate with two pancake-shaped items on it. At first glance, they looked like some sort of hash browns or a potato pancake studded with scallions. But when I cut into them I discovered that they were actually kimchi pancakes — onion, spicy and pungent pickled cabbage, and scallion mixed with just enough flour and egg to hold them together in a creamy-textured pancake. Good by themselves, they were even better to use in place of the toast that came with my breakfast to mop stray bits of egg yolk and barbecue sauce. Sue told me that she doesn’t make kimchi pancakes all the time, and they aren’t on the menu, but that’s part of the appeal, and just one more reason why a trip into the 19th Ward is worth your while on a Saturday morning.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ COUNTRY ] Country Megaticket Tim McGraw Sunday, May 26 Brad Paisley Friday, July 12 Toby Keith Sunday, July 21 Jason Aldean Saturday, August 17 Rascal Flatts Saturday, September 7 All concerts at Darien Lake Performing Arts Center, Darien Center, NY. Prices and times vary. Combined Mega ticket $150. Visit godarienlake.org for more info.

Music

Michael Musillami Trio WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13 LOVIN’ CUP, 300 PARK POINT DRIVE 9 P.M. | $10-$12 | 292-9940, LOVINCUP.COM [ JAZZ ] Guitarist Michael Musillami came on the scene in the early 1980’s in organ trios led by Richard “Groove” Holmes and others. He expanded his reputation as a sideman with jazz greats like Curtis Fuller, Dewey Redman, and Junior Cook. Now with his own trio, Musillami steps out front with commanding solos reaching from hard bop to avant-garde and covering a lot of the territory in between. No small part of his innovative sound stems from his excellent choice of band-mates: drummer George Schuller and bassist Joe Fonda. — BY RON NETSKY

Mobile Deathcamp TUESDAY, MARCH 12 PINEAPPLE JACK’S, 485 SPENCERPORT ROAD 8 P.M. | $7-$10 | 247-5225 [ THRASH ] After six years drenched in blood and gore as Beefcake The Mighty with GWAR, Todd Evans has showered and stripped the music down to just the thrash. Mobile Deathcamp is a ferocious three-piece group out of Toledo, Ohio. This band is master of the genre and has dominated by not allowing distractions like showbiz schmaltz or crossover compromise to impede its mission. What stands out in particular with this trio is the amount of space and dynamics it exhibits within its relentless barrage. It’s one thing to make it heavy, it’s another to let it breathe.

— BY FRANK DE BLASE

PUT ONE OF THESE EGGS IN YOUR EASTER BASKET • Ready to cook in 10 minutes with no lighter fluid • Ceramic walls retain heat with accurate temperature control and no hot spots • No constant tending • Can use year ‘round

MILEAGE MASTER 14 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

Wines Spirits for PASSOVER

KOSHER

AND

ON SALE NOW!

Tastings Fridays from 4-7pm

“The Grillmaster’s Mecca” LP Gas • Parts • Service

pinnacle

MON-FRI 9AM-5PM, SATURDAY 9AM-4PM 2488 Browncroft Blvd. • 586-1870

New name, but still Jim Yaeger’s Fine Wines and Spirits, in the former White House Liquor location!

wine & liquor

Pinnacle Liquor is proud to be a part of Passover in our community. Stop in today and explore our great Kosher selection, meet our wine experts and enjoy the best in personalized service.

1720 Monroe Ave • 271-4931 Find us on


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Cuisle Mo Chroi. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd. 336-6060. 7 p.m. Registration required: 336-6060. Dave McGrath. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman Guitar Quarter.

Brockport College, 350 New Campus Drive. 12:15 p.m. Free.

The Spring Standards

W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.

Twangtastic

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts w/Nick Kage & Tyga Ty. Club Clarissas, 293

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Water Street Music Hall was hot and steamy for some multi-band, hard-rock hijinks on Wednesday, February 27. I rolled up as The Letter Black took the stage. The band was tight but the combo of female vocals and the band’s hard-rock struck me as a little stiff. Regardless, the audience loved ’em. Love and Death followed, and though nu-metal ain’t always my thing, these guys rocked. Front man (and former Korn guitarist) Brian “Head” Welch howled like a maniac sans the guitar for the most part, and other than the low-down rhythmic grind that chugged beneath the vocals, there wasn’t much in the way of soloing. It was compelling, riveting, and even a little fun when Welch donned a Devo flowerpot hat and tore through a rough and ragged version of “Whip It.” It had teeth. In my ongoing belief that a performer can say anything to an audience and get a positive, collective “Woooo!” Welch gave a shout out to Jesus and the crowd erupted. Thousand Foot Krutch followed with a slick, driving set for an audience that was clearly there for the band. Chants of “T-F-K, T-F-K!” preceded the band’s set.

— BY SUZAN PERO

Soloist Showcase Concert THURSDAY, MARCH 7 SEYMOUR COLLEGE UNION BALLROOM, SUNY BROCKPORT 7:30 P.M. | DONATION | 555-1234, BROCKPORTSYMPHONY.ORG

The Brockport Symphony Orchestra will present a showcase of soloists in its upcoming concert. William Hullfish and the Golden Eagle String Band will perform Celtic dance. Also performing is Peter Ferry,The variety of the evening also includes Cantor/Hazzan Martin Leubitz with members of the Brockport CollegeCommunity Chorus,. Other performers will include Scott Horsington, clarinet; Lydia Allen, french horn; and Meg Walters, bassoon. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

[ CLASSICAL ]

Raise your glass to creativity!

The Perfect Date!

www.issuu.com/roccitynews

DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853

PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ INDIE ] What The Spring Standards loses in not sticking to such easy-to-pinhole things as a genre, it makes up for in pluckiness. Coming by way of Brooklyn, the band swings manically from country to folky Americana to — seriously — almost Springsteen. I would be confused if I weren’t amazed by the versatility, and how well the sounds all clearly harmonize. However, bill-mates Midnight Faces is by far my favorite of this line-up for being more 80’s easy-listening synth-pop than should be logical or necessary, especially coming from D.C. Rochester locals Cottage Jefferson and The Big will be opening.

READ CITY ONLINE EVERY WEEK AT

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Thousand Foot Kruth played Water Street Music Hall on Wednesday, February 27.

SUNDAY, MARCH 10 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 8 P.M. | $7-$9 | 454-2966, BUGJAR.COM

Bring your date and your favorite vino or beer for a unique night out! View our calendar at

WWW.PAINTINGWITHATWIST.COM/FAIRPORT

1276 Fairport Rd. Fairport, NY 267-7002

It was loud and metal but had a lot of its own unique swirl and motion. Best show of the winter alert: The Deadstring Brothers served up an excellent set of honky-tonk barroom boogie Friday night, winding the packed house that Abilene built into a two-step frenzy. The band rocks out the country without losing sight of the actual country. It’s like a more rural, less collegiate Old 97s. The instrumentation was twangstastic and simple as it supported the tunes with their classic themes and lyrical depth. You’re not allowed to simply watch a Cowboy Mouth show. Drummer/singer Fred Leblanc simply won’t let you. The New Orleans band is an eight-armed, eight-legged party with Leblanc leading the charge from behind the kit. The fact that he has any body fat on him is amazing as he does not stop moving, pounding, howling, singing, berating, or cajoling during the band’s set Saturday night at Water Street. The audience was all arms in the air with a rabid response — and I don’t mean that in the stock music-critic parlance. I mean rabies. I saw one dude foaming at the mouth.

Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Gary Chudyk. Prosecco Italian

Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. New Jazz Ensemble. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free. Ryan T. Carey. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 17

THE INNOVATIVE BEAD EXPOS March 9 & 10 RIT Inn & Conference Center

2527 W. Henrietta Rd., West Henrietta, NY 14602 Sat. 10am-5pm • Sun. 11am-4pm Open to Public & Trade NEW

www.IBExpos.com

All the beads you can buy!

LOCATION

Crystals • Gemstones • Glass Lampwork • Pearls • Seed Silver & Gold Beads • Findings Beaded Jewelry • and much, much more...

HOURLY DOOR PRIZES! CITY

For information call: 845-352-9735 Email: Shows@IBexpos.com General Admission $4.00 (Save $1 with this Ad) Children under 12 free • Free Parking No baby strollers permitted • no pet strollers permitted

One Bead Event for Beginners & Advanced Beaders, Jewelry makers, Designers, Hobbyists, Gift Seekers, One show for all!

Find us on

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Music “Someone told me the other day one of the songs reminded them of an old Cars song,” Khuri says. “And I had never heard that song before. It just goes to show you everything reminds somebody of something else.” Besides the outside sources that tug at him, Khuri has an inner universe of songs waiting to be born. “I’ll come up with something, typically in the middle of the night in my bedroom,” he says. “I’ll work it and bring it to the band, and chances are it’ll take on a totally different form. Sometimes I have a vision of some parts, other times I have no vision at all, just a few basic components.” Kinsgley Flood then composes, performs, and wrenches on the music until it feels right. But sometimes “right” is hard to pinpoint. “I don’t think you ever know when it’s done,” says Khuri. “I wasn’t sure this record was done when it was. I could sit there and tweak things until kingdom come, but we’d also drive ourselves crazy doing it that way.”

The band Kingsley Flood could be classified as rock, or as Americana. But perhaps it shouldn’t be classified at all. This weekend the band will make its third stop in Rochester. PHOTO PROVIDED

Americana exile Kingsley Flood W/WHITE WOODS, MULER, AND LAST NOTE FRIDAY, MARCH 8 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $6-$8 | BUGJAR.COM KINGSLEYFLOOD.COM [ REVIEW ] BY SUSIE HUME

Sure, it neatly sums up everything with a beard, a flannel shirt, at least one acoustic instrument, and an allegiance to Johnny Cash. But perhaps when you’re done reading this article you can join me in putting the term “Americana” to bed. Are you with me? Kingsley Flood’s Naseem Khuri is — or at least I think he is. He’s able to let go of the all-encompassing, driven-intothe-dirt tag, but won’t — like countless other contemporary musicians — let go of the all-time over-used, uber-vague “rock ’n’ roll.” Hail, hail to this Boston- and Washington-based band, which despite definitions, creates organically beautiful music that is at home under both used and abused headings. You may not be able to easily categorize its new disc “Battles” (it just dropped in February) but you’ll still enjoy the hell out of it. 16 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

“I don’t know if you can absolutely call it one specific genre,” Khuri says. “We’re not saying we necessarily want to make an Americana album. We just want to play songs that we like and record songs that we like and whatever they sit in, that’s fine. My favorite records are those that are hard to describe. ‘Exile On Main Street,’ ‘London Calling,’ ‘OK Computer’ — these are all the top three on my list. Granted, they’re on everybody’s list.” On the surface, the six-piece Kingsley Flood’s eclectic instrumentation may inspire premature conclusions. But if you dig past the rustic veneer, you get to the real subtlety and bristling joy of a surprisingly contemporary strain swimming in the perceived antiquity. “Yeah, we have a violin and a trumpet, and people look at that and say, ‘That’s Americana,’” says Khuri. “And I think that’s great. What the difference is, is we don’t think Americana means one specific thing; it’s an umbrella. Look at old blues records: that’s Americana. You can look at anything that Stax Records put out — soul and r&b — that’s Americana. We draw from all of those influences. The Kinks were a big influence on this album, The Clash was a big influence on this album. I’m a huge fan of r&b.”

If Americana is an umbrella, then it’s raining a lot around the band. Raining enough to cause, you might say, a Kingsley Flood. With the bombardment of influences all around it, the band maintains its nuanced identity without effort or compromise. Even in a world where, according to Khuri, there’s essentially nothing new. “I don’t know,” he says. “I think there’s very little original anything out there. And what is out there is derivative of something else. But the fact that someone else is doing it, is going to make it original. The fact that we have this kind of instrumentation. I have a specific kind of voice. George Hall plays a specific type of guitar. Jenee Morgan sounds a certain way on her violin… If we tried to duplicate The Clash, we wouldn’t sound like them, we would sound like ourselves. Do I like to think our songs are original sounding? Absolutely. Do I try and make an effort to make them original? Yeah. But I bet if someone sat there and picked them apart they could hear a million different influences.” And of those million points of inspirational light, some seem completely out of left field.

By the time “Battles” dropped, Kingsley Flood had itself, what with two prior releases to its credit (“Dust Windows” in 2010 and “Colder Still” from 2012) to be compared to, as well as others around them. Yet according to Khuri, there were expectations to live up to with the fans the band had already made. New fans were simply fresh ears, a clean slate. “We’ve been plugging away for the last three or four years just trying to build up fan bases in cities like Rochester, Boston, New York, Washington, DC,” he says. “So we definitely wanted to make it for fans that way. We do feel like this is the one time where all of the factors sort of came together well.” As the band forges ahead and adds new cities as home to its fans (including a stop at the prestigious Newport Folk Festival), the band is already in love with Rochester. This will be its third stop here. “Rochester,” Khuri says. “The people there are fantastic, they go nuts. We just love the Rochester crowd.”


Presents: HOUSTON PERSON

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6

The soulful American jazz tenor saxophonist

Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub.

Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free.

Thurs. March 21st 8PM

Radisson Hotel Rochester Riverside 120 East Main Street

Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus,

402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N.

Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 4864937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St. 2439111. 7 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

Amanda Ashley. Cottage Hotel of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Road. 5856241390. first Wednesday of every month, 9:30 p.m. Call for info.

Vertical Ent. Launch Party Ft. Danielle & The Tomorrow People. Vibe Lounge, 302

North Goodman St. 503-4506. 7 p.m. This is an event you do not want to miss! There will be live performances by Danielle & The Tomorrow People, Spoken word by Maisha B. and Special Host Zack Johnson. All guest can expect to enjoy free food, giveaways, raffles, phenomenal music, and much more!. $15.

Tickets: $10

Call now: 585-966-2660 or purchase online at:

www.jazz901.org

(Two drink minimum per person; cash bar.)

CELTIC | THE TOSSERS

Just in time for the most sacred of Irish holidays, take a little trip to the Emerald Isle via a stopover in Chicago with The Tossers, returning to Rochester for the first time in more than five years. More traditional-sounding than its Celtic-rock contemporaries Flogging Molly and the Dropkick Murphys, The Tossers have more in common with The Pogues. The group plays drunken Irish music with the flair, flame, and fury of modern rock and roll, but with all the fiddle, mandolin, and tin whistle you could want. Continental and local Irish rockers 1916 help to start off your St. Patrick’s Day week festivities. The Tossers play Wednesday, March 13, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $12-$15. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY WILLIE CLARK John Dady. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free.

DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe,

The Pickpockets w/MD Woods, Big Brain & The Drug Cartel. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Fundraiser for Cobblestone School ft. DJ Mc Ginnie.

Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.

Rochester Ukulele Support Group. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 4736140. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Natalie B Band. Dinosaur Bar-

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Roc City Pro Jam. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9:30 p.m. Call for info.

Thunder Body Medicine Wednesdays. Skylark Lounge,

B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9 p.m. Free. Nightfall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. 21+. $5.

[ CLASSICAL ]

[ POP/ROCK ]

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. Lacey Lee. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Double King w/Josh Netsky, Burning Snella. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

Lupis w/Limeworks, Entente Cordiale. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Rexx. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. White Woods, Haewa. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 7 p.m. $2, free w/FLCC ID.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

RPO: Conductor Laureate Christopher Seaman. Kodak

Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Saturday: 8 p.m. Christopher Seaman, conductor. William Wolfram, piano. $15-$92. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 18+ Thursdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $3-$10 after. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.

150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 4 p.m. $5. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main

White Swans Asia Caffé

St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

Dave Rivello Ensemble.

Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St. 586-1640. 9 p.m. Free. Deborah Branch . Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 18

BUBBLE TEA - Made with real fresh fruit! FINE ASIAN CUISINE Fresh Baked Sweet & Savory Pastries SERVING DIM SUM All Day, Every Day

798 S. Clinton Ave. 585-319-3249 Sun–Thurs: 10am - 9:30pm, Fri & Sat: 10am – 10:30pm rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


THURSDAY, MARCH 7

[ CLASSICAL ]

Connie Deming. Little Theatre

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Mike Kaupa . Monroe’s

Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

RPO: Conductor Laureate Christopher Seaman. Kodak

Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Saturday: 8 p.m. Christopher Seaman, conductor. William Wolfram, piano. $15-$92.

Northeast Funk w/DJs Jane & Lynch. Tala Vera, 155 State St.

546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Sonny Brown Band. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Free. Todd East. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Brent Persia. SPoT Coffee,

[ OPEN MIC ]

5 Alarm Open Jam. The Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 5853193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co. –

Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 6970235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mike w/Mark Herrmann. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 8 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585613-4600. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Sean Forbes. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 2323221. 8 p.m. $10. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ]

Five Alarm Open Jam.

Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, MARCH 8 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Big Leg Emma w/Clinton’s Ditch. Water Street Music Hall,

204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 9 p.m. $12-$14. Bogs Visionary Orchestra. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 4547140. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Carin’s Pride w/CCE Second Friday Session. McGraw’s Irish

Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5 p.m. Free.

Happy Hour: Under the Eaves w/ The Lonely Ones. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 6 p.m. 21+. Free.

Kingsley Flood Album Release w/White Woods, Muler, and LastNote. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

18 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

JAMBAND | BIG LEG EMMA

HIP HOP | SEAN FORBES

Jamestown jammers Big Leg Emma are the rock ’n’ roll equivalent to a Swiss Army knife. This Western New York band expertly blends elements of country, bluegrass, folk, and straight-ahead rock, along with psychedelic sojourns and salvos. The band’s latest album, “Revival,” was awarded “Best Upstate Album of 2012” by Upstate Live Magazine.

Seeing as how I’ve walked out of more than a couple of shows at the Armory with my hearing temporarily impaired from the volume, it kind of makes sense that the venue has booked deaf hip-hopper Sean Forbes. This 30-year-old artist from Detroit plays quirky upbeat hiphop despite being deaf since birth. Forbes was signed by the Bass Brothers, who also discovered Eminem. In 2006 Forbes co-founded D-PAN —Deaf Professional Arts Network — a nonprofit organization seeking to make music and music culture accessible to the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities.

Big Leg Emma plays Friday, March 8, 9 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $12-$14. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ BLUES ]

Big Blue House. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. The Blue Birds. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Steve Grills & the Roadmasters. Little Theatre

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info.

Brent Persia - One Man Band and DJ. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Road. 750-2980. 9 p.m. Free.

Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. McKenzie’s, 3686 West Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/ Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub &

Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12.

Latino Heat Fridays. Heat

Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. Grotto, 7

Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley

Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Sofrito. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Prime Steakhouse,

42 E Main St. 265-4777. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Vanessa Mangione Quartet. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

The Beale Street Blues Band w/Teagan and Lou. Abilene

Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $4-$7. [ POP/ROCK ] Band Camp. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Sean Forbes plays Thursday, March 7, 8 p.m. at the Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. $10. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE Brian Jones Birthday Bash w/Wild Horses, Infrared Radiation Orchestra. Lovin’

Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Don Montrond. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Jony James. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free.

Lowkey, Dead Mr. Dead, SIC SIN. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Mansfield Ave w/Earthtones.

Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Nile. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $12. Occupanther. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free. Spectra. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. John Flynn w/Bill Welch. Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18.

Johnny Bauer And Great Escape. Nashvilles, 4853 W

Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. $5.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Amanda Lee Peers. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Tim Grimm. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $17-$20. True Blue. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. Call for info.

The Dady Brothers w/Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub,

146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ebb Tide. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info.

Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117

Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250

Pixley Road. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Connie Demming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Hot Sweets ft. Todd East. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $10.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian

Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 2161290. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex

Tullamore Celtic Band St. Paddy’s Party w/Young School of Irish Dance. Holy Trinity

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 Goodman Street North. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ]

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Turnip Stampede. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

Church, 1460 Ridge Rd. 2651616. 6 p.m. $5-$15. Woody Dodge. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$8.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ache. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Acoustic Brew. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Luca Foresta & Electro Kings. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Natalie B Band. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9 p.m. Free.

[ POP/ROCK ] Adam Clark. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Dan Marcus. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info.

The Ginger Faye Bakers w/The Red Lion, New Archery. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8.


AUDIO

The Gowns w/Octane.

STEREO FOR LESS

jellyroot, Fleet Street, EYESALVE. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Me & The Boyz. Pineapple

Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Rock Doll. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Run for the Roses. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 9 p.m. Call for info. That 80’s Hairband. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for info. Virgin Cain. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 323-9310. 9:30 p.m. Call for info.

SUNDAY, MARCH 10 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays: Trace Wilkins. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ CLASSICAL ]

Bach Aria Vespers w/Pablo Bustos, Michael Unger.

The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Avenue. (585) 244-6065. 7 p.m. $10. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Receivers • CD Players • Speakers Turntables • Tuners • Phono Cartridges Repair & Service • Vintage Records & Equipment and lots more!

442-0890

AUDIOSOUNDSOLUTIONS.NET

You’ve heard the faux Egyptian melody — the one that starts with “da na na na na” — but are you aware of Egyptian-themed death-metal band Nile? This American group is led by singer-guitarist Karl Sanders (ranked by Decibel magazine as one of the best death-metal guitarists of all time) and it is bringing its 20th anniversary show on the road. A Nile concert sounds like a perfect nightcap after a long hard day of rendering unto pharaoh. The quartet is prolific with albums including “Those Whom the Gods Detest,” which earned critical kudos en masse, although I’m of an “Annihilation of the Wicked” sort of guy myself. Nile is touring in support of its latest, “At the Gate of Sethu,” out on Nuclear Blast. With Order Of The Dead, Sleep Circadia, Within Creation, and Cthuhlu. Nile plays Friday, March 8, 8 p.m. at Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. $12-$16. frontgatetickets.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

MONDAY, MARCH 11 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

RPO/RPYO: Tchaikovsky and Friends: Side by Side with the RPO. Kodak Hall at Eastman

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. 21+. Free.

Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. David Harman, conductor. RPYO Concerto Competition Winners. $10-$15.

A Salon of Classical Romantic Music. Baptist

Temple, 1101 Clover St. 4733200. 2:30 p.m. $10. [ JAZZ ]

Redhot & Blue. St. Thomas’

Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 585-442-3544. 3 p.m. $10. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Grand Juke! Revival.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Nick Lynch. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Manic Monday Retro Dance: C. Darren, DJ MaryKate. Bug

[ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Watkins & The Rapiers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Behold… The Arctopus w/ BML, Beard Without A Mustache, and Chaos Come To Be. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $10-$12.

Lovin’ Cup Idol: Classic Rock Vs. Top Forty Week. Lovin’

Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. Call for info.

Rockin’ For the Lake Road Residents. Hooligan’s Eastside

TUESDAY, MARCH 12

The Spring Standards w/ Midnight Faces, Cottage Jefferson, and The Big. Bug Jar,

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Johnny Bauer. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Grill, 809 Ridge Rd. 671-7180. 1 p.m. Call for info.

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

402 W. Commercial St. East Rochester

METAL | NILE

Eastman Community Chamber Singers. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 4 p.m. Free.

SOUND

SOLUTIONS

Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 8 p.m. $5.

[ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bob Henley. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Don Christiano-The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free.

Malformed w/Enthauptung, Cosmic Sea, Theatre Nocturne, and Desekrator.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. MG Van Ness. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Mobile Deathcamp. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 8 p.m. 21+. $7-$10.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Art The persistence of “Comedy” “Salvador Dalí: Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy’”

on display at Brockport were prints at all and not, in fact, the original watercolors.

THROUGH MARCH 29 TOWER FINE ARTS GALLERY @ SUNY BROCKPORT, 180 HOLLEY ST., BROCKPORT 395-2805, BROCKPORT.EDU/FINEARTS MONDAY-FRIDAY 10 A.M.-5 P.M., SUNDAY 1-4 P.M. (CLOSED FOR ACADEMIC BREAK MARCH 16-24)

Very few of complete sets of Dalí’s “Divine Comedy” prints remain together today, as images were sold individually throughout the decades. The set shown at Brockport is on loan from the Ewing Gallery at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, and was donated by UT alumnus and businessman Gary Johnson, who wanted the suite to remain together in a university setting, according to provided information. The exhibit is straightforward, with the prints ringing the gallery in perfect order and grouped under titles reflecting the three “books” of the poem: Purgatory, Inferno, and Paradise. There is no interference to the flow of the images other than an introductory essay that provides some background information on Dalí and how the suite of prints came to be. I enjoyed the uninterrupted imagery, but more than once overheard another viewer say that the experience would be enhanced if each image was paired up with its corresponding verses, and I couldn’t help but agree. The unbridled imagination and vision of the Spanish surrealist is well suited to Dante’s beloved, bizarre trip through the allegorical mindscapes of Purgatory, the crucible circles of Hell, and the several spheres of Heaven. Dalí began his tribute to “Divine Comedy” with “Purgatory 1, The Reign of the Penitents,” which has a winged, broken creature absorbed in intense self-examination, expressed here through its peering into drawers that have slid out from folds of flesh. This motif of the living chest of drawers is just one part of the symbolic language found here that is echoed in other works by Dalí. Through his characteristic toying with spatial relationships, grotesque distortion of the body, and incredible imagery, Dalí perfectly conveys the depth of emotional experience as he guides us through Dante’s many encounters and revelations. In pieces such as “Purgatory 20, The Avaricious,” Dalí makes use of the surrealist style he called “paranoiac vision,” in which human features emerge from components of the landscape to leer at the traveling poet and the uneasy audience alike.

[ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Some stories seduce artists throughout the ages. There is a robust tradition of artistic interpretation of Italian writer Dante Alighieri’s epic poem, “Commedia,” known these days as “The Divine Comedy.” The work has been an irresistible subject for such visionaries as Sandro Botticelli, Gustave Doré, William Blake, Franz von Bayros, Tom Phillips, and Robert Rauschenberg. Even Disney and the cartoon “Futurama” have referenced the work, providing testaments to its lasting relevancy as a cross-cultural treasure. Through March 29, you can see a complete set of “Divine Comedy” illustrations created by the iconic surrealist artist, Salvador Dalí, at the Tower Fine Arts Center at SUNY Brockport. In anticipation of the 700th anniversary of Alighieri’s birth, in 1957 the Italian government commissioned Dalí to create a complete set of illustrations, one for each canto of the “Divine Comedy.” But soon after the artist began planning imagery for each of the 100 watercolor paintings, the government withdrew the commission under pressure from Italian citizens who were peeved that the job went to a Spanish artist rather than one of their own. Undeterred, Dalí continued the work, finishing the hundred works in nine years without funding or even a guaranteed publisher, trusting that support would come. Soon after, the images were painstakingly translated into a set of wood engravings by expert engravers overseen by Dalí and Jean Estrade, artistic director of Parisian publisher Les Heures Claires. This task required about 3,500 separate plates to be etched for the 100 prints, with 40 or 50 blocks for some of the more complex and colorful images, according to provided information. The skillful translation was so complete, capturing every brushy stroke and watery wash, that I marveled that the prints 20 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

As with much of the artist’s work,

Dalí offers up surprises in his many interpretations of the tale. His version of the intimidating ferryman seen in “Inferno 3, Charon” is not the mysteriously cloaked

“Fraud,” one of 100 woodcut prints in “Salvador Dalí: Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy,’” currently on view at the Tower Fine Arts Center at SUNY Brockport. PHOTO PROVIDED

wraith we have come to expect, but instead a robust, nude man who bears the souls across the Styx. In “Inferno 6, Cerberus,” the traditionally three-headed, beastly hound that guards the gates of Hell is a rearing, kinetic mass of inky circles that dwarf the poet. Under Dalí’s hand, The Furies are a mere suggestion of electrified streams of light attacking a body, evoking a strangely potent horror nonetheless. The scenes of Paradise are equally bewildering, and showcase Dalí’s skills in storytelling through what is fully formed and in focus, and what is left pointedly vague and thus subtly nagging, difficult to dismiss. No work of art is created in a cultural vacuum, and though these prints were

inspired by the poem that reflects Dante’s time and personal trials, Dalí’s own experiences are symbolically evident as well. The Spanish artist successfully tempted his wife and muse, “Gala” (Elena Ivanovna Diakonova) away from her previous husband and child, so I viewed the particularly graphic nature of the punishment of the subjects in “Inferno 15, The Seducers” with a keen eye. And I was intrigued to notice that elements of Dalí’s “Inferno 27, Lucifer,” bear a startling resemblance to “Saturn Devouring His Son,” a wrenching work by Dalí’s nearcontemporary and fellow Spanish painter, Francisco Goya.


continues on page 22

E.

..

OV

ER

ER

★ . ..

..

M

A P UB F RO

H E RE !

[ CONTINUING ] AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. Reception Dec 16 2-4 p.m. 244-9892. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Precious Metals: New Paintings on Gold, Silver, and Copper” by Beverly Rafferty. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. “Lost Infinity” the works of Brett Maurer and Matthew Tully Dugan. artandvintageonmain.com. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. A Celebration of Youth Art Month. Irondequoit, Penfield, Webster High Schools. Closing reception Mar 23 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. “Local Color” Through Mar 8. Reception Mar 8 6-8 p.m. 237-3517. artswyco.org. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Judd Williams: “Eccentrics.” Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appointment. First Friday 232-6030. axomgallery.com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Within the Wallpaper,” new work by Jolene Beckman. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m, Sat 12-6 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com.

H

ER

[ OPENING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Sproutkeepers” Justyn Iannucci & Margot Hughes. Reception Mar 9, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. “Local Color” Through Mar 8. Reception Mar 8 6-8 p.m. 237-3517. artswyco.org. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “LIFE and TIMES” by Cheryl Amati Martin American Way Collection. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Reception Mar 8, 7-9 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Cumming Nature Center Hurst Gallery, 6475 Gulick Rd. Nature in Art: Selections from the Finger Lakes Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., SatSun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Livingston Art Center, 4 Murray Hill Drive. Apartment One. A show featuring the photographic art and graphic design created for the 2013 “official” Visitors Guide Livingston County. 243-6785. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Time & Again: Photography by Tom Policano. Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. Reception Mar 15 5-8 p.m. ntid. rit.edu/dyerarts/.; Time & Again, Photography by Tom Policano. Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. Reception Mar 15 4-8 p.m. ntid. rit.edu/dyerarts. Our House Gallery of Veterans Outreach Center, 783 South Ave. Faces of Veterans. Tue 5-7 p.m., Fri 1-3 p.m. or by appt. Reception Mar 8, 5-8 p.m. 295-7836. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Mis en Scène. Featuring the work of Richard Jenks and Daniel Mosner. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Mar

16, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. 2013 Annual Wayne County High School Art Exhibit. Reception Mar 10 2-4 p.m. 315-331-4593. waynearts. wordpress.com. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. Get a Grip 2013. The Roc City Park’s annual art show, featuring work made using griptape, skateboards, bikes, and even rollerblades. roccitypark.org. attheyards@ gmail.com. attheyards.com.

T

OV

Art Exhibits

facebook.com/CityNewspaper

...

Bring any art supplies you’d like to work with and come dressed as your favorite “Adventure Time” character if you would like. So far, the line-up of costumed models includes Finn the Human, Lumpy Space Princess, and Marceline the Vampire Queen, with more to be announced. Admission is $10 at the door, and the event is BYOB (21 and over). For more information, visit facebook.com and search Dr. Sketchy’s Rochester. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

on

...

The fifth installment of the Dr. Sketchy’s themed figure drawing events hosted locally by artist Greg Caggiano will take place on Saturday, March 9, 7-10 p.m., at Pandaman Toys (209 Monroe Ave.). This time the theme is the popular cartoon “Adventure Time,” and will include “Adventure Time” cosplay, figure drawing, contests, and of course, boobs and booze.

Like

You like us, but do you like like us?

. ..

ART EVENT | DR. SKETCHY’S ROCHESTER V: ADVENTURE TIME!

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “What Fury Fiends Find” Adelin Karius: New Paintings and Woodcuts. Through Mar 31. lobbydigital@ gmail.com. lobbydigital.com. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225. Hunk of Burnin’ Love. Through Mar 31. 414-5643. catclay.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “LIFE and TIMES” by Cheryl Amati Martin American Way Collection. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Reception Mar 8, 7-9 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. From 500 Sketches by Frank P. Phillips. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m, Sat 1-5 p.m. 315-781-3487. hws.edu/ academics/art/exhibitions.aspx.; All Juried Student Show. 5946442. roberts.edu. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “It’s Black It’s White” New Drawings by Tim Mack. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Camera Obscura” Through Apr 7. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org.; “Silver and Water” Through May 26. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Janice Jakielski “Being Here” Installation. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. Closed Mar 9-16 for UR Spring Break. 275-4188. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. THAW Flux Annual. thehungerford.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “What Shape is White” Featuring David Kerstetter, Monteiro Prestes, Peggy Corthouts, Edward Loedding. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. Operation P.H.O.T.O. (People Helping Others Overcome). TueThu & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., MonFri by appt. First Fridays 6-9 p.m. 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Art Reflected: 1913-2013. In Lockhart Gallery through May 12: “Becoming Modern: Armory Show Artists at MAG” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. Thu. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Jack Wolsky. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-2021. kfarrell@ monroecc.edu. monroecc.edu/ go/mercer. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Rochester Area Fiber Artists (RAFA) presents: “Winter’s End” millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Art Therapy.” A display of wooden sculptures by Cheryl and Don Olney. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. “Contrasts & Contours” Hamilton Aguiar. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Introducing regional sculptor Lucien Casartelli’s

UNIBROUE BEER DINNER

WED, MARCH 20 • 7PM

COME JOIN US for an exquisite 4-course menu paired with some outstanding Unibroue beers

1

Slow smokin’ the Best Grilled and Pit Style from the Legendary Barbeque Regions across the country! Memphis Pit Smoked BBQ Ribs Uncle Frank's State Fair Chicken Homemade Sides • Vegetarian Entrees Open for Lunch & Dinner

TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT www.THEOLDTOAD.com $40/person

277 Alexander Street | 232-2626 W W W .T H E O L D T O A D. C O M

BEST COMFORT FOOD!

Live Music & Full Bar 830 Jefferson Rd • Henrietta • 292-5544 Original Location 625 Culver Rd. at Atlantic • 288-1910

www.stickylipsbbq.com

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit & Workshops TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

FREE TRIAL OPEN HOUSE Sat., March 9th • 5:30pm-8:30pm

Cha Cha Fox Trot Salsa Swing Tango Waltz 1060 University Ave | 271-6840 Livehappyrochester.com

I AM Center of Radiant Awareness SOCIAL DANCING for EVERYONE! ESTHER BRILL - Personal Dance Trainer

Honky Tonk Dancing Mar 12-Apr 9 Intro Social Swing Dance Apr 23-May 14 Wedding Dance Private Lessons

Contact Esther with your questions! ebrill@frontiernet.net 585 721-8684 www.EstherBrillPartnerDance.com

Weekly guided meditations during Lent Release stress and open to expanded awareness March 6, 13, 20, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Sunday Celebration 11:00 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message March focus on Spiritual Awareness Children's Program

Christ Church Unity

Unity

Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 • www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Art Exhibits sophisticated, contemporary, mixed media sculptures. 2921430. nanmillergallery.com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Artwork by Alexander Currier. Through Mar 10. 360-2920. owlhouserochester.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Heroes and Villains. recordarchive.com. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Carla Bartow. carlasswanktank. blogspot.com. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Makers & Mentors. Through Mar 17. WedSun 1-5 p.m. New paintings, prints, and mixed media works by Kurt Feuerherm, Peter Monacelli, Patricia Dreher, and Kristine Bouyoucos. In Lab Space: Heather Swenson. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Art Shows. Jan 22-Mar 8: “Mediation and Negociations” by Elena Lourenco. Through Mar 13: “a*new*found*land” by Joe Ziolkowski. Mon, Wed, Thu Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt. 343-0055 x6616. stvierrico@ genesee.edu. genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Art & Music Library: Vicki Hartman: New Works on Paper and Ceramic Sculpture. library. rochester.edu/artmusic/home.; Rare Books & Special Collections: Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books

KIDS EVENT | MERMAID THEATRE OF NOVA SCOTIA

The Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia, unfortunately, does not employ any mermaids. But it does have plenty of puppets, and that’s good enough, right? After swimming around the world with award-winning performances in more than a dozen countries, this traveling children’s theater company will drop anchor in the Callahan Theater of the Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave.) for two matinee shows on Saturday, March 9. The Mermaid Theatre will present an hour-long show with adaptations of two classic, bunny-themed children’s books: Sam McBratney and Anita Jeram’s “Guess How Much I Love You” and Jeram’s “I Love My Little Storybook.” The performances will feature original music as well as lots of bunny puppets, so prepare in advance for a cuteness overload. The Mermaid Theatre’s shows are at 2 and 4 p.m. Tickets are $15-$18, and can be purchased by calling 389-2170 or through artscenter.naz.edu, which also has a full list of upcoming events and shows at Nazareth College. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. “Brighton Country Homes and Architects.” 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. “Modern Love A collection of Paintings” by Sam Snyder. 6134600. spotcoffee.com.

Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Let Them Eat Cake! Portraits of Pastries.”732-0036. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com. shoefactoryarts.com. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. Tue-Thu noon-6 p.m., Fri noon-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-8731. assisiinstitute.org.

When did you first learn the value of a good mechanic? Our Certified ASE technicians do precision car repair...Which means we get it right the first time. Because quality is our top priority, customer trust and satisfaction are very important to us.

THIS MONTH’S QUESTION FOR PAUL:

Hey Paul, what have the pot holes done to my car?

Plenty of Trouble this year with pot holes: Cars are just not built to take the jostling of Rochester Pot Holes. That’s why our Four Wheel Alignments are on sale @ 69.95. We inspect all the undercarriage and align your car to factory spec on the Hunter Aligner With Accuracy less than the thickness of a human hair!!! Bring in this advertisement. Offer expires May 31, 2013.

22 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue. “As ready as I’ll ever be,” new work by Andrew Cho. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Salvador Dalí: Dante’s Divine Comedy.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Closed from March 16–24 for academic break. 395-2805. brockport.edu/finearts. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. Light and Shadows. Through Mar 8. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. A black and white art show by family artists: Dick Roberts, Allison Roberts, and Eric Cady. 770-1923. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. PhotoBook Awards 2012. Reception Feb 26 7 p.m. 442-8676. vsw.org. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Realms of Goddesses Divine. Emma Brooks BFA solo exhibition. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. brockport.edu/finearts. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “From Thought to Image: Art Quilts of Nancy P. Hicks.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Thu 4:30-7:30 p.m. Reception Mar 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m. nancyphicks.com. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “Totems and Other Tributes to the Earth: Ceramic Works by Peter Gerbic.” Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 7851369. flccconnects.com.

Art Events [ WED., MARCH 6 ] HomeSpun. March 6, 7 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Stage 13. Spotlights musical, literary, and performing arts by students, staff, alumni, and neighbors $2, free with FLCC ID. 785-1367. flcc.edu. The Icarus Sessions. first Wednesday of every month, 7

p.m. Hanlon-Fiske Studios, 34 Elton St. Talk about your art. A presentation at an Icarus Session is 140 seconds long. 230-7369. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] Dr. Sketchy’s Rochester V: Adventure Time! March 9, 7-10 p.m. Pandaman Toys, 209 Monroe Ave. Bring your own booze and art supplies $10. 730-2142. emily.moore.awad@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ events/289157904545556/. “Rejuvinate: A Winter Blues Remedy”. March 9, 7-11 p.m. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 Vibrant art, massage, facials and lashes, wine tasting and more. Sat: Live music by George Hogan and his Band thegrassrootsgallery@gmail.com.

Comedy [ THU., MARCH 7 ] Alonzo Bodden. March 7-9. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] Chuckles & Chocolate: Comedy with a Cause. March 9, 7 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. University Gallery in University Services Center. Featuring Brad Todd, RIT Improv, and sweet treats. Benefits Birthright of Rochester $40/$25 (students w/ID). 385-2100. [ TUE., MARCH 12 ] Laugh Riot Underground: StandUp Comedy Showcase. 9-11 p.m. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. Free. laughriotcomedy.com.

Dance Events [ FRI., MARCH 8 ] Dance Concert 2013. March 8-10. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Fri-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 5 p.m $5-$9. 242-7682 x1551. sotarochester.org.

[ SAT., MARCH 9 ] The English Country Dancers. March 9, 1-4 p.m. Granger Homestead, 295 North Main St. Flat shoes are recommended for dancing on the wood floors $5, register. 394-1472. [ SUN., MARCH 10 ] The Boland School of Irish Dance. March 10, 3-3:30 & 4-4:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

Kids Events [ WED., MARCH 6 ] Paint Me a Story. March 6, 10-11 a.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 2+ Free. 2258951. greecelibrary.org. [ FRI., MARCH 8 ] Celebration of the 1913-14 American Girl Doll. March 8, 2-3 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free, register. 394-1381. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] Acorn Adventures. Second Saturday of every month, 1011:30 a.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Pre-schoolers. $6 per session. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/ helmer.htm. Chicken Socks Activities for Preschoolers. March 9, 11 a.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Ages 3-6 Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. EBNS Open House. March 9, 10-11 a.m. Ellwanger Barry Cooperative Nursery School, 4 Henrietta Rd. Free. 461-4250. ebns.org. “Guess How Much I Love You and I Love My Little StoryBook”. March 9, 2 & 4 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Ages 3-7 suggested $12$18. 389-2170. artscenter. naz.edu. Nature Explorers. Second Saturday of every month, 12:302:30 p.m Helmer Nature Center,


154 Pinegrove Ave Grades 2-4. $7 per session. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm. Science Saturday. March 9, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Concepts, Actions, and Objects Lab and Much Ado About Nothing Presentation. Lecture at 12:30 p.m.: “The Science of the Mind.”Included in museum admission $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ SUN., MARCH 10 ] Perinton Historical Society Children’s Program: First Kids - Life in the White House. March 10, 2:30 p.m. Fairport Historical Museum, 18 Perrin St. Free. 223-3989. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org. [ MON., MARCH 11 ] Preschool Dance Party. March 11, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 18 months to 4 years. 4288150. libraryweb.org. [ TUE., MARCH 12 ] Baby Sign Class. March 12, 10 a.m. Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. $20. 784-5260. townofbrighton.org/rec.

Lectures [ WED., MARCH 6 ] Conversations on Race: A Process of Discovery. March 6, 5-7 p.m. Lincoln branch Library, 851 Joseph Ave 428-8350. libraryweb.org. “The Future of Performance and Concert Life in Historical Perspective” by Leon Botstein. March 6, 4:30 p.m. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St esm.rochester.edu. [ THU., MARCH 7 ] From Bauhaus to the Boroughs of New York: Modernism and the Subway Map. March 7, 5:30 p.m. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Lecture and Book Signing with Peter B. Lloyd, author of

LECTURE | ROCHESTER CIVIC GARDEN CENTER SYMPOSIUM

We all know a beautiful garden when we see one. But there’s more to those gardens than meets the eye. They can represent artistic expression, provocative personal statements, and profound connections between the human arts and the natural sciences. Three guest speakers will open your eyes to what you’ve been missing in nature at the Rochester Civic Garden Center Symposium on Saturday, March 9, at the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.). Nationally renowned garden designer W. Gary Smith will give two lectures based on his newest book, “From Art to Landscape: Unleashing Creativity in Garden Design.” He will discuss the shared patterns in the arts and sciences and how to design elaborate gardens while remaining environmentally conscious. Pietro Furgiuele (pictured) will offer a lecture on unusual and provocative garden designs, titled “The CONCEPT Garden — Where Amazing Garden Concepts Sprout.” Finally, Mark Bayer of Bayer Landscape Architecture in Honeoye Falls will present a slideshow of the MAG’s new 2013 Centennial Sculpture Park. The symposium runs from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tickets are $58 for the public and $48 for MAG members, and allow all-day access to the gallery. For tickets and more information, visit rcgc.org or call 473-5130. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN “Vignelli Transit Maps.” Free. 475-2404. jleugs@rit.edu. ritpress.rit.edu. The Gold Coast and the ToddClark House. March 7, 7:30

p.m. St John’s Lutheran Church, 800 East Ridge Rd Irondequoit Town Historian Patricia Wayne will present “The Gold Coast and the Todd-Clark

House” $1, free to members. 336-7269. ggw.org/~ihsociety/. “The Great Museum of the Sea” with Prof James Delgado. March 7, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Israel Series: Tal Becker. March 7, 7:30 p.m. Temple Beth El, 139 S Winton Rd 461-0490. jewishrochester.org. “The Music of Duke Ellington” with Peter Luce. March 7, 7:30 p.m. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St Free. 637-3645. “Seth Green and the Caledonia Fish Hatchery” with Alan Mack. March 7, 7:30 p.m. Mendon Community Center, 167 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls/Town of Mendon Historical Society townofmendon.org. Solutions for Seniors: Ask the Experts. March 7, 2-3:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Spotlight on Catherine Cerulli. March 7, 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Welles-Brown room 275-4461. Stage Whispers Talk: “Acting Funny” with Tom Coiner. March 7, 10 a.m. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. 395-2787. brockport.edu. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] Nature of Montezuma Lecture Series. March 9, 2-3:30 p.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East “Behind the Scenes as a MARSH! Volunteer.”$3-$5. 315-568-5987 x229. tasha_daniels@fws,gov. Rochester Civic Garden Center 22nd Annual Spring Symposium. March 9, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $48-$58, register. 473-5130. rcgc.org. [ SUN., MARCH 10 ] Brunch: Solomone Rossi, A Jewish Composer in Renaissance Venice, with Marjorie A Roth. March 10,

10:30 a.m. Temple Emanu-El, 2956 St. Paul Blvd. Free, RSVP. 388-5212. schwartxljs@gmail. com. emanuelrochester.org. Deranged or Depressed? Diagnosing Mary Todd Lincoln. March 10, 2 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St Yesterday’s Muse Books sponsors this speech by Patricia A. Nugent, author of They Live On: Saying Goodbye to Mom and Dad. 265-9295. Opera Guild: Telling Tales. March 10, 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Voters Walk Enterprises Sunday Symposium. March 10, 2-4 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. March 10 featured guests: Eleanor Coleman speaking about the new Seed Folk Store coming to 540 W Main St, Barbara Hoffman presents Spring table-scapes, and Ruth Scott will speak about writing her memoirs. Original artwork by Voters Walk, raffles and time for socializing will be made during the program. There is no program charge Free, RSVP. 426-2739. voterswalk@ymail. com. [ TUE., MARCH 12 ] Entrepreneurship Talk. March 12, 12-1 p.m. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd “The Keys to Bank Financing for Start-Up and Early-Stage Business -- Debt as a Supplement to Venture Capital Funding.”276-6615. david_englert@rochester.edu. Linda Frank: “The Stantons: The Extraordinary Marriage that Started a Revolution.”March 12, 12:45 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Room A102 Free. flcc.edu. “The Portale Jew” with Dr Cynthia Baker. March 12, 6 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave 244-4060 x245. tbk.org. The Role of Women in the Civil War by Rebecca Budinger. March 12, 7 p.m. Greece Community

Center, 3 Vince Tofany Blvd $2. 225-7221. greeceny.gov/cs. Tuesday Travelogue: Hidden Cultures of Southeast Asia: Thailand and Indonesia. March 12, noon. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ WED., MARCH 13 ] Bringing Nature to Your Garden. March 13, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Ellen Folts, owner of Amanda’s Garden in Springwater Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Social Media 101: Lessons from Lady Gaga. March 13, 10 a.m.noon. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St Presenter: Deborah Mourey - Principal, Mourey Consulting $10-$50, register. 473-4000 x206. artsrochester.org.

Literary Events [ WED., MARCH 6 ] Pure Kona Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Free. 585-319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Spring Writers Workshop with Angela Dailey. March 6, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Naples Public Library, 118 Main St, Naples $10, register. 374-2757. napleslibrarydirector@owwl.org. [ THU., MARCH 7 ] Book Thieves: Young Professionals Book Club Meetings. March 7. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Group meets at 6:30 p.m. to eat and mingle, discussion follows 7-9 p.m. Jan-Mar: “Into the Beautiful North” meetings Feb 7, Mar 7. 473-2590 x105. facebook.com/book.thieves. Books Sandwiched In: “Steve Jobs.”March 7, 12:10-1 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. continues on page 25

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Arts Apply yourself for Fringe 2013 [ FEATURE ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

It’s fair to say that nobody knew what to expect from the First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival before it premiered in September 2012. But when more than 6000 people showed up at Manhattan Square Park on a Thursday evening to watch inaugural headliner Bandaloop dance on the side of One HSBC Plaza, “the penny dropped,” as Festival Producer Erica Fee put it. After that, thousands of people took in at least one of the 100-plus performances that went on over five days at the nearly two-dozen local venues, and more than a few local artists and performers likely found themselves wondering, “Why am I not a part of this?” For anyone who wanted to get involved in the Fringe Festival, now is the chance. The festival will return this fall, now expanded to 10 days — September 19-28 — and it is accepting show applications now through April 12 at its website, rochesterfringe.com. What separates Fringe festivals from other events is that they are open to all manner of performing arts, and more important, there is no centralized group determining the programming. Instead, acts apply online, and the venues decide what they want to host. Applications for 2013 opened on February 11, and according to Fee, within days festival organizers had received dozens of submissions, some from as far away as the Czech Republic. If the pace keeps up this year, Fee says she wouldn’t be surprised to receive 400 to 500 submissions. Because of that, Fee encourages would-be applicants not to wait. “Sooner is better,” she says. “It’s a rolling admissions process. It’s like applying to college: if you wait until the last minute to apply, and there are two spots left and 10 applicants — guess what?” A successful Fringe Festival application will

have a “clear vision of what the show is,” Fee says. That may start as something as brief as a synopsis, but should demonstrate a level of show-biz savvy. “How will you sell your show in the guide? Put it in brief, exciting terms that the venue can understand and grasp quickly,” Fee says. Last year, acts that stood out to venues included interdisciplinary collaborations, the mashing together of groups, and new works, Fee says. But each venue had its own preferences and processes. Mark Cuddy, artistic director of Geva Theatre Center, says that last year Geva 24 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

received about 80 Fringe applications for its Nextstage. A five-person committee went through them, trying to find what would work best for the venue; the focus ended up being on theatrical companies, both local and traveling. Although Cuddy says he is open to some dance or music performances this year, Geva’s 2013 Fringe schedule will still primarily favor theater. Cuddy gives the following advice to Fringe applicants: “It needs a hook — it has to stand out in originality. Two, you’ve got to be able to pull it off. We looked at some of the proposals and thought it was a great idea, but we weren’t sure of what the product was going to be. Videos are great; YouTube is really helpful.” He also suggests that performers consider applying to multiple venues. “Don’t put all your eggs in our basket,” Cuddy says. “Some applications said only Nextstage, only Geva. We had a bunch of ‘maybes,’ but if we said that this is not going to fit into our repertoire here, we let people know right away so that they could find another venue.” Writers & Books was another successful venue during the inaugural Fringe Fest. Director of Development Alexa Scott Flaherty had experience with the New York and Edinburgh Fringe festivals and, along with a committee, “We were looking for pieces that had some sort of tie-in to the literary arts, but that could be in a loose and flexible way.” Flaherty’s advice for new Fringe applicants is to “play; experiment,” she says. “This is the chance to make the project that only you can make. You don’t have to follow the rules. Pitch it from your heart and let us see what you want to create and how you plan on getting there. Remember, the original Edinburgh Fringe artists were renegades and self-enterprising. They moved away from the mainstream and did it themselves. That’s the spirit of Fringe.” That spirit is what appealed to Andrew

Pramuk and Alison Moritz, who with their partners presented “Hide the Moon: Based on Salome” at RAPA’s East End Theatre for the inaugural Rochester Fringe Festival. At the time, both were students at the Eastman School of Music and were intrigued by the collaborative, creative opportunities provided by the festival. “Andrew and I had worked together within the opera department, but wanted to do something less hierarchical,” Mortiz says. They went to one of the “Fringe 101” information sessions to learn more, knew they wanted to do a project, but weren’t sure how to proceed.

Erica Fee, festival producer for the First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival (left), and Mark Cuddy, artistic director at Geva Theatre Center (right), both encourage interested local artists not to wait until the April deadline to apply for performance slots for the 2013 edition of the arts festival. PROVIDED PHOTOS

After working on all of the elements for months, both Pramuk and Moritz say the Fringe experience fulfilled their experimental goals. Pramuk says, “The play was 100 years old, originally in French. We did the English version, cut it to 20 minutes, filled it with music, had instrumentalists acting and actors singing. It was cross-disciplinary, with students fulfilling roles that weren’t usual to them in their student lives. It all developed organically. It was a rewarding experience.” “Hide the Moon” was a free performance, and the group putting it on generated funds to support the project through the crowdsourcing fundraising website Kickstarter. com. Figuring out the financial aspect of a Fringe performance is important. Applying to Fringe is not free. The festival — a nonprofit corporation — charges a registration fee of $100 to $150, and also takes 10 percent of box-office receipts to cover operation costs. The rest of the ticket price is split between venue and performer via differing costsharing agreements. Linda Starkweather was another performer at the inaugural Rochester Fringe. Her “Traveling With a Broken Compass” played at the Geva Nextstage to two mostly full houses, with tickets costing $15. And yet Starkweather says she concluded her first Fringe experience losing money after paying for application fees, rehearsal fees, insurance costs, promotional materials, and a lighting professional. However, she still sees it as a positive experience overall, because it gave her a “kick in the pants” — she created the show expressly to participate in Fringe.

“I now have a show,” she says. “The weekend after Fringe I performed at Cobblestone in Farmington, and the proceeds from that got me above water. The motivation from that got me on my feet, and it was a great launching pad.” Her advice to prospective Fringe performers is to “keep it simple. Make it about your performance,” she says, and keep your costs low. Festival Producer Fee agrees with that advice, and says that, “No one’s performing at Fringe to come home with bags of cash. You might. What many people are doing is putting new work in front of the public, to help develop it.” Fee encourages performers to “put your independent producer hats on when negotiating contracts with venues,” she says. Just because a venue offers a primetime slot, that might not be the right space for you. Perhaps it’s too large, or not as keen on your act as another venue. And make sure that when the time comes, you’re getting the word out. “PUSH Physical Theatre and ‘The Bicycle Men’ were out marketing their shows during the festival with pop-up street performances. That can affect the bottom line,” Fee says. Fee says the festival will again bring in big headlining acts, and those should be announced in May, with the entire festival schedule revealed in mid-July.


Taste it!

Group: “The Madonnas of Leningrad” by Debra Dean. March 13, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free. 336-6060.

Saturday, March 16th 3:30pm

lk & Tasting Chocolate TTalk

Museum Exhibit

SPECIAL EVENT | UGLY DISCO

Bust out your leisure suits and polyester, and brush up on your best “Saturday Night Fever” moves, because the 10th Annual Ugly Disco Bash takes place this weekend on Saturday, March 9, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center (123 E. Main St.). The party provides a way to get down while doing some good for others, as the event benefits Golisano Children’s Hospital. Live music will be provided by Something Else, Atlas Band, The Skycoasters, Fever The Wrath of Polyester and a live DJ spinning the top radio hits of the late 70’s. Tickets are available at area Wegmans and ticketmaster.com. VIP packages are going for $125 and include admission to a 7-8 p.m. pre-party, the Disco Bash, food and drink until midnight, booze 7 p.m.-midnight, and soda and water all night. General admission is $40 in advance and a bit more at the door, and includes the Disco Bash and 12 drink tickets, which get you up to four beverages. Extra drink tickets cost $1. Party responsibly! Five free shuttles will run a continuous loop with stops at Hotshots, the corner of East Avenue and Scio Street, Murphy’s Law, the corner of Park Avenue and Berkley, and the corner of South Union and Monroe Avenue, and the event offers hotel packages for those who wish to make a night of it. Learn more at uglydisco.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Literary Events [ FRI., MARCH 8 ] Author signing: “Lessons from Katherine” by Glenda W Prins.. March 8, 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza 585 278 7501. bn.com. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] Author Salon: Bruce A. Austin. March 9, 2 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Conversation and book signing with Bruce Austin, author of Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and Commercial American Ceramics at MidCentury. The book is the companion to the RIT exhibit of Frans Wildenhain ceramics and offers the artist’s biography, discussion of Shop One and the School for American Craftsmen, and mid-century modern studio ceramists Free. 637-2260. Conversation and Book Signing: “Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and Commercial American Ceramics in MidCentury” by Bruce Austin. March 9, 2-3:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St liftbridgebooks.com. Ekphrastic Writing. March 9, 10 a.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. This workshop will explore the concept of ekphrasis (a dramatic description of a work of art) $20. 637-5494.

Wine Walk and Author Visit. March 9, 6-9 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St “Fruit of the Vine” by Cynthia Kolko 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ SUN., MARCH 10 ] History Book Club: Cold War. March 10, 2-3:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. Write, Publish, and Promote Your Own Book Seminar. March 10, 1-4 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St $30, two for $45. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ MON., MARCH 11 ] Open Mike. second Monday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., MARCH 12 ] Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Wayne Writers Guild. March 12, 7:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. [ WED., MARCH 13 ] All of Rochester Book Discussion: “Into the Beautiful North” by Luis Alberto Urrea. March 13, 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Irondequoit Public Library Contemporary Book Discussion

[ WED., MARCH 6 ] Baby It’s Cold Outside! TuesdaysThursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org. A Presidential Voice: The History of Presidential Speechwriting. Through March 8. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Mar 8. Seward Room, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 2754477. “Race: Are We So Different?” Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. “To My Valentine.” Through March 31. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Mar 31. Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. “You’ve Got Mail.” Through March 8 and March 6, 1-3 p.m. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Inhouse philatalist Bob Briggs will be present on Feb 27 and Mar 6. Much of Briggs collection is on loan to the Museum for the exhibit, featuring stamps, postcards and letters Free. 315956-4943. waynehistory.org.

Recreation [ THU., MARCH 7 ] Mt. Morris Canyon Trek. March 7, 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Meet at Me. Morris entrance gate. Bring lunch $8 parking fee. 493-3625. [ FRI., MARCH 8 ] Muxy Ski-Off to Benefit Foodlink. March 8. Bristol Mountain Resort, 5662 New York 64 $75, register. 374-6000. muxyskioff. eventbrite.com. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] GVHC Hike. March 9, 8:30 a.m. I-390 exit 11 for carpool, strenuous 10 mile hike Letchworth park $2 carpool. 8899792. gvhchikes.org. Mental Health Association Skyway Open. March 9, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Eastview Mall, 7979 PittsfordVictor Road $40 foursome, $10 per person. 325-3145 x111. mkauffman@wilmorite.com. mharochester.org. Public Hike: Sherwood Fields. March 9, 10 a.m. The Park is located on the north side of Rt. 441 next to the East Penfield Fire Station Free, register. 340-8655. penfieldrec.org. Woodpeckers in our Area. March 9, 10 a.m.-noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Free, RSVP. 359-7044. sites.google. com/site/hansennaturecenter. continues on page 26

Making Vegan Chocolate With Terry Kelleher, co-owner and chocolate maker of “Lucienne’s Fine Foods,” Ithaca, NY $4.00 admission

BUY - SELL

Sterling Silver, Flatware, Tea Sets, Broken Gold, Costume Jewelry

MIKE DEMING ANTIQUES 1458 Monroe Ave. formerly Stanley’s Flowers Mon-Sat 11-6 PM

244-1999 • Theantiqueguy.com

SEE

ALL

Sample fine chocolate crafted by “Lucienne’s”

Seating is limited, please call or visit online for reservations: cocoabeanshoppe.com

Cocoa Bean Shoppe • 203-1618 20 South Main St • Village of Pittsford

THE MARCH MADNESS GAMES HERE

A UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD BAR!

L&MES LAN

FEBRUARY BEER GENESEE BOCK BROOKLYN DRY IRISH STOUT CAPTAIN LAWRENCE IMPERIAL IPA PYRAMID WEISS CREAM

L&M Lanes Gift Cards Now Available!

Any denomination - Great gift idea!

OPEN BOWLING DAILY!

873 Mercha Merchants Rd. • 288-1210 www.L www.LMlanes.com Find us on

In a panic without your CITY Newspaper at East Avenue Wegmans? Stay calm and carry on by picking up CITY at these nearby locations!

Wegmans Pharmacy 1749 East Avenue Tops Supermarket 175 Winton Road R’s Market 2294 Monroe Avenue Abundance Cooperative 62 Marshall Street Country Club Diner 1743 East Avenue World Gym 1717 East Avenue Canaltown Coffee 1805 East Avenue Metro Retro 1241 Park Avenue Balsam Bagels 288 North Winton Road Jim’s Restaurant 233 North Winton Road Ravioli Shop 260 North Winton Road Joe Bean Coffee 1344 University Avenue Pomodoro Grill 1290 University Avenue Record Archive 33 Rockwood Street and all other Greater Rochester Wegmans locations!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


SPECIAL EVENT | REPEAL! A PROHIBITION ERA EVENT

Get a taste of the illicit entertainment that immediately followed the 18th Amendment’s ratification this weekend. The Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.) will host an adult evening event celebrating the Roaring 20’s on Friday, March 8, 7-10 p.m. with Repeal! A Prohibition Era Event. The museum will be transformed into a three-story speakeasy complete with live big-band music by Uptown Groove, activities including 1920’s trivia, snacks, and a cash bar featuring popular mixed drinks of the 1920’s. Classic black and white films will also be screened in the museum’s Bausch Auditorium. Ladies, come dressed as feather- and pearl-laden flappers and bring your dapper gents. Admission is $15 (21 and over only) and $12 for members, and attendance is restricted to ages 21 and up. Registration is highly encouraged. Call 697-1942 and get more details at rmsc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Recreation [ SUN., MARCH 10 ] Beginner Birder Trip: Charlotte, Braddock Bay, Lakeshore Fields. March 10, 8:30 a.m. Charlotte Beach, 4650 Lake Ave Extra spotting scopes helpful 4827778. rochesterbirding.com. GVHC Hike. March 10, 10 a.m. Lehigh Crossing Park, moderate 5-6 mile hike Free. 455-1932. gvhchikes.org. Search for Hidden Creatures. March 10, 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Meet at Castile entrance gate, may car pool. Bring lunch $8 parking fee. 493-3625.

Special Events [ WED., MARCH 6 ] Better Breathers Club. first Wednesday of every month, 2-3:30 p.m. The Northfield, 4560 Nine Mile Point Rd., Fairport. 377-5350. yourcaremedicalsupply.com. February Meeting: Love as a Revolutionary Force. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Green Party of Monroe County gpomc.org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. Spread the Word to End the “R” Word. March 6, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd Enjoy musical performances and sign the pledge r-word.org. 26 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

[ THU., MARCH 7 ] Development economist and practitioner Charles Kenny to present “Getting Better: Why Global Development is Succeeding”. March 7, 4 p.m. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. Newton Hall Room 202 Free. 245-5516. geneseo.edu. Film: “Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare.” March 7, 7-9 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Free. 258-0400. thelittle.org. Golisano Children’s Hospital Charity Auction. March 7, 8-10 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. Free admission. 292-9940. lovincup. com/happenings/details. php?id=1575. Lincoln Tours. Saturdays, 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse. org. Rochester Board of Education/ Community Conversation. March 7, 7-9 p.m. Central Office Building, Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St. “Fundraiser for Cobblestone School-Where Children Love to Learn!” March 7, 4-8 p.m. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way DJ Mc Ginnis spinning the tunes… Drink specials. Pizza provided by NAPA Wood-Fired Pizzeria Guest Bartenders Barb Q and Barbie K $5. 232-3230. info@ abilenebarandlounge.com. cobblestone.org. [ FRI., MARCH 8 ] Breakfast with Friends 2013 with Rachel Simon. March 8, 7:30-9 a.m. Irondequoit Country Club, 4045 East Avenue Free, register. 339-9800 x378. cccsrochester.org.

Camp Good Days Night of Gratittude. March 8, 6 p.m. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St $30, register. 624-5555. campgooddays.org. Flim: “One Drop Rule.” March 8, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Explores a recurring and divisive issue in African American communities -- skin color. Discussion follows screening Free, register. 5632145. thebaobab.org. International Women’s Day. March 8, 12-2 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. rit.edu. Marc Salem’s Mind over Rochester. March 8-9. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Repeal!: A Prohibition Era Event. March 8, 7-10 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Ages 21+. $12$15. 697-1942. rmsc.org. Zeta Phi Beta Annual Masquerade. March 8, 7 p.m.midnight. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Partial proceeds go to Scleroderma Foundation $55, register. 7291736. mag.rochester.edu. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] “Friends’ Night Out” Benefit. March 9, 7-9:30 p.m. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Rush Public Library’s “Friends’ Night Out.”$35, register. 533-1370. RushLibrary.org. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Interlock Annual Open House. March 9, 4 p.m. Interlock Rochester, 1115 E Main St. Suite 200 Door #7 Electronics, Lock Picking, 3D Printing, Origami, DSP, Squirtronics, Raspberry Pi, are just some of the cool things happening at Interlock’s Open House. Members will be on hand showing off their projects and answering questions about our space Free. 585-2108703. info@interlockroc.org. interlockroc.org. International Women’s Day Celebration. March 9, 2 p.m. Church of the Ascension, 2 Riverside St pilapa_e@yahoo. com. Re-Anime-Tors: Anime, Collaborative Networks, and Creative Platforms. March 9-12. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Free. 4756074. hxygsl@rit.edu. Say Cheeeese Event. March 9-10. Cayuga Lake Wine Trail $30-$45, DD tickets available. 800-6845217. cayugawinetrail.com. Taste the Winning Ice Wine Cocktails!. March 9, 1-5 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. $5. 223-4210. casalarga.com. Ugly Disco. March 9, 8 a.m.1 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St $40 advance and up uglydisco.com. Vino con Sabor: Wine Tasting Event. March 9, 6 p.m. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St Ages 21+. $40 includes tastings, meal, social. 546-3450. prfestival.com. Winter Mushroom Festival. March 9, 5 p.m. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St.

Join Smugtown Mushrooms and lets celebrate the end of Winter and the close arrival of the Spring season, the Growing Season. Local food, drink, art, vendors including photography and exhibits Free admission. smugtownmushrooms.com. [ SUN., MARCH 10 ] 4th Annual Brain Waves Benefit. March 10, 2 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. $15 includes dinner and live entertainment. 271-8640 x201. Annual Finger Lakes Wine Tasting. March 10, 2-5 p.m. Ravenwood Golf Club, 929 Lynaugh Rd $20 or $35 for two. rochesterymca.org. Gothic Cathedral Tour. March 10, 2 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave Free, donations accepted. 325-4041. sfxcrochester.org. [ MON., MARCH 11 ] Pittsford Rotary’s 10th Annual, “A Taste of Pittsford,” at Nazareth College. March 11, 6 p.m. Pittsford Rotary, c/o 46 Sycamore St. $45, advance only. 451-5831. DaveBoyer55@gmail.com. TasteofPittsford.com. You Are Not Alone: Voices of Survivors of Violence. March 11, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Campus Center Bamboo Room 475-4261. lrrgla@rit.edu. [ TUE., MARCH 12 ] East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. Irondequoit Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon series: “It’s Pay Day: Payroll 101.” March 12, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Jack’s Place at the Durand Eastman Golf Course, 1200 Kings Highway, Irondequoit $17$20, register. 234-1884. admin@ irondequoitchamber.org. One Take doc series: “Chasing Ice.” March 12, 7 p.m. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue $10. 258-0400. thelittle.org. Out of the Archive Film Screening. March 12, 7 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street An evening of LGBT themed films from the Visual Studies Workshop Archives that explore gender, sexuality, and representation. Cosponsored by ImageOut. Films: Who Happen To Be Gay (1979) A Woman’s Place Is In The House: A Portrait of Elaine Noble (1975) Kustom Kar Kommandos (1965) Lavender (1972) Magic Beauty Kit (1973). Free. 4428676. vsw.org. Rohrbach’s Food & Beer Pairing. second Tuesday of every month, 6 p.m. Rohrbach’s Brewpub, 3859 Buffalo Rd $30, register. 594-9800. rohrbachs.com/ Rohrbachs-Brewpub.html. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. Lots of giveaways, including hats, t-shirts, drinks, tacos - come alone or come with a team! $1.50 Beef Tacos, $2.50 Chicken Tacos, $2.50 Drafts except Guinness, $3 Bacardi Flavors 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com. Women for Winesense: French Wine 101 - Burgundy Region. March 12, 7 p.m. Inn on Broadway, 26 Broadway $40-$50. 232-3595. wwsrochesterinfo@yahoo.com.


THEATER | “LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS”/“RE-INVENTED: A DRACULA-INSPIRED GOTH ROCK MUSICAL”

The theater has the power to lift our spirits, to carry us away with its magic, to enchant us with gorgeous sets and wonderful songs. It also has the power to gross us out and scare the crap out of us. If you prefer fake blood to fables and fairy tales, you’re in luck: There are two shows this weekend that will fill the stage with guts and gore, and perhaps a bit of humor on the side. The Rochester Association of Performing Arts presents its production of “Little Shop of Horrors” (pictured) at the East End Theatre (727 E. Main St.) starting on Friday, March 8. This adaptation of Alan Menken and Howard Ashman’s classic rock musical, about a florist who raises an evil plant that needs blood and flesh to survive, is directed by Judith Ranaletta and features choreography by Kris Ashley. “Little Shop of Horrors” runs at 7:30 p.m. on March 8, March 9, March 15, and March 16, and at 2 p.m. on March 10 and 16. Tickets are $20 for general admission and $15 for students, seniors, and groups of eight or more. Visit rapatheatre.org for tickets and more information on RAPA shows. In its transition from high-school productions to community theater, Wilson Magnet High School’s Drama/Video Club presents “Re-Invented: A Dracula-Inspired Goth Rock Musical” at the MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.) this weekend. For those who thought that the classic Dracula stories weren’t ghoulish enough already, this original musical remixes the old-fashioned scares for the 21st century, with love-struck teenaged characters and a soundtrack featuring music by the Cure, My Chemical Romance, and AFI. “ReInvented” runs on Thursday, March 7, Friday, March 8, and Saturday, March 9, with all performances at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $3 in advance, $5 at the door, and free to DVC donors and Wilson students. Go to muccc.org for tickets and other events. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

Sports [ FRI., MARCH 8 ] Rochester Americans v Abbotsford Heat. March 8, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com. [ WED., MARCH 13 ] Rochester Americans v Binghamton Senators. March 13, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater August: Osage County. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Mar 24. Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “Bob.”Through March 13. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Mar 24. Previews Thu Mar 7-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 p.m. Opening Sat

Mar 9 8 p.m., Performances Sun 3 p.m., Wed Mar 13 7 p.m Tickets start at $30. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “The Book Club Play.”Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through March 21. Wed Mar 6-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (audio described) and 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Mar 13 7:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org “Book of Mormon”. Rochester Auditorium Theater, 885 E. Main St. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 1 & 6 p.m SOLD OUT! Sign up for our newsletter for updates! 2225000. rbtl.org. “Festival of Ten.” Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Mar 8-9 at 7:30 p.m. $8-$15. 395-2787. brockport. edu/finearts. Flanagan’s Wake. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Sat 8 p.m., Sun 7

p.m $29-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Little Shop of Horrors.” RAPA’s East End Theatre, 727 East Main St Fri-Sat March 8-9, 15-16 at 7:30 p.m., Sun Mar 10 & Sat Mar 16 at 2 p.m $15-$20. 3253366. rapatheatre.org. Re-Invented: a Dracula Inspired Goth Rock Musical. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Drama/Video Club. $3-$5. 244-0960. info@muccc. org. muccc.org. “Tartuffe.” SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. 8 p.m. (Sunday 2 p.m.). Alice Austin Theatre $10. 245-5833. geneseo.edu/bbo. “Tarzan.” Holley High School Auditorium, 3800 N Main St., Holley. Thu-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $6-$7. 638-6335.

Theater Audition [ WED., MARCH 6 ] “The Bald Soprano.” Through March 13. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Seeking three males aged 25-40. Rehearsal begins April 15th and performances are the last two week-ends in June at MuCCC 142 Atlantic Avenue, Rochester, New York. The female roles have been cast. Audition by appt 271-2087. michaelarve@yahoo.com. Seeking Musicians for Theater Productions. Through March 13. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre is seeking musicians (pianists / keyboardists, percussionists, bass players, guitarists, woodwind players, brass players) for upcoming productions. Learning / rehearsal fee and performance fee provided. Long-term work with many performances possible throughout the year (theatre operates year-round, and many shows are scheduled on open-ended runs). Also looking for subs for occasional dates 325-4370. dennis@ downstairscabaret.com. Technical Director, Musical Director, Musicians Wanted. Through April 24. Working Class Theatre Company is looking for a Technical Director, a Musical Director, and Musicians for their upcoming Summer 2013 production of The Fantasticks 643-0836. workingclasstheatre.net. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] City Lights. March 9. Understudies, covers, possible replacements. Seeking singers with a musical theatre/pop-rock sound. Send resumes and pix with contact info to admin@ downstairscabaret.com. [ SUN., MARCH 10 ] “Rent.” 7 p.m Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Please come prepared with a selection from the show, or a contemporary musical theatre selection. Production runs from July 19-28, 2013 4541260. bftix.org.

Workshops [ THU., MARCH 7 ] Fight Like a Girl: Self Defense for Women. March 7, 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 359-7092. A Holistic Approach to Treating and Coping with Depression. March 7, 6 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N

Goodman St. $10. 325-3145. mharochester.org. Spanish Night. March 7, 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo. com. Traditional Mexican Cooking. March 7, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Jose Abarca, owner of the new Mexican restaurant Itacate in Penfield. Free, register. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ FRI., MARCH 8 ] Borosilicate Glass: Couples Date Night. March 8, 7-11 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $150, register. 349-7110. rocafc.com. [ SAT., MARCH 9 ] Explorations in Ekphrastic Writing: Bringing Together Art & Literature. March 9, 10 a.m.noon. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. $20, register. chrissygreenny@gmail.com. Foodlink SNAP Outreach Training Session. Mar 9, 10 a.m. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, 929 S. Plymouth Ave Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program Free, RSVP. 463-3266. jnathaniel@foodlinkny.org. gandhiinstitute.org. Introduction to Zen Meditation Workshop. March 9, 9:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Rochester Zen Center, 7 Arnold Park Vegetarian lunch included: $60, $45 for students. Reduced fees available for low income persons 473-9180. rzc.org.

WEEKLY SPECIALS • $1 oyster Tuesdays after 5pm only • • No Corkage Fee Wednesdays • • $5 Custom Craft

Cocktails on Thursdays • OPEN FOR LUNCH Tues-Fri 11-2pm 274 N. Goodman St., Rochester

www.lentorestaurant.com ww l 271-3470 3470 • 271

[ MON., MARCH 11 ] Creative Bookbinding with Carol Henshaw. March 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Ages 12+ $5, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. Water Color Trading Card. March 11, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Register. 225-8951. greecelibrary.org. [ TUE., MARCH 12 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Computer Tutoring. 4 p.m Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Blvd. Remember to bring a disk or USB drive to save your files Free. 428-8214. Family Development Class: “How to Say NO to Your Child.” March 12, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester. org. [ WED., MARCH 13 ] The Dady Brothers Celtic Music Worksho. March 13, 5 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Stage 14. followed by concert with Irish foods ($2 admission, free with FLCC ID) Free. 7851335. flcc.edu.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com Movie Clips on page 30

Under the sea on a Russian sub [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

— open at your local multiplex. Sometimes those flicks actually prove more satisfying than the heavily publicized biggies. “Phantom” “Phantom” seems an odd throwback of a (R), WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY movie, linked with some moments and some TODD ROBINSON pictures from the past. To begin with it’s a NOW PLAYING submarine movie, a minor genre that never quite disappears, and that includes such memorable This time of year, the odd hiatus that occurs films as “Silent Running,” “The Hunt for Red somewhere in between the competing distractions of the holidays, the Oscars, and the anticipation of October,” and “Das Boot.” The form provides a most propitious setting for Hollywood the new spring crop, often serves as Hollywood’s filmmakers. The limited space crammed with dumping ground. It’s the place on the calendar fascinating machinery creates some compelling where films that have languished on the shelf visual possibilities; the simple fact of submersion for one reason or another, films without studio in hundreds of feet of ocean makes for a constant support — or in the case of “Phantom,” films tension; the sheer claustrophobia intensifies all without an inch of advertising or a note of hype other emotions; the reminders of danger in the sweating crew and the pinging of the sonar, and the dialectic of both hunting and eluding enemy vessels convince even the most skeptical audiences of the inherent, unending terror of undersea warfare. Johnathan Schaech and David Duchovny in “Phantom.” PHOTO COURTESY RCR

The movie also looks back to a different time, 1968, the Cold War, when Soviet and American submarines, armed with nuclear devices, patrolled the oceans, stalking each other and threatening global destruction. Inspired, as the credits state, by a true story, “Phantom” shows the last cruise of an obsolete, diesel-powered Russian submarine, about to be retired, under a captain (Ed Harris) also about to be retired, sent on a secret mission to the South Pacific. Puzzled by his orders, Harris learns that most of his crew of replacements consists of sailors with no records, and that he must work under the supervision of an arrogant KGB agent (David Duchovny), who issues orders that imperil the ship and the crew. They sail too close beneath a tanker, stalk another Russian submarine, and head toward the American fleet. The phantom of the title is a device that masks the profile of the sub for detection, sending out the sonar signal of another ship. When Duchovny reveals the goal of the secret mission, the captain reacts in shock — the KGB plans for the sub to fire a nuclear missile under the guise of a Chinese launch, so that the Americans will retaliate and the two nations will engage in total war. The Soviet Union, he believes, will sit contentedly on the sidelines while their enemies destroy each other, emerging to rule the world. Assisted by the replacement crew and the political officer — always the most powerful member of any

MEDIA GROUP

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! OPEN SATURDAY at 8AM SUNDAY at noon

serving REubens $7

& Traditional Dinners $9

Jack Ryan s Since 1954

825 Atlantic Avenue Rochester

28 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

FISH FOR LENT EAST AVE WEGMANS SHOPPERS INVITED!

Fresh fish/Seafood Fish/seafood lunch & dinner served daily Fish Fry everyday

HOT SOUP DAILY!

CAPTAIN JIM’S FISH MARKET DINE IN

482-3640

TAKE OUT

Corner of N. Winton & E. Main St.

TUES-THURS 9-7 • FRI 9-9 • SAT 9-7 • CLOSED SUN-MON


Another look West [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“West of Memphis” (R), DIRECTED BY AMY BERG OPENS FRIDAY

Soviet military unit — he takes over the sub and prepares to create World War III. Along with the multiple sources of tension, the movie exploits the captain’s emotional condition, a complicated mixture of sorrow, regret, and mental and physical exhaustion. He keeps remembering, through flashbacks and even hallucinations, a tragic accident from the past, a collision with another ship that killed a number of his crew and in effect doomed his career. The combination of his sense of duty, his guilt, and his horror at Duchovny’s plan, written on Ed Harris’s weary, lined, expressive face, epitomizes the movie’s central dilemma. While Harris and William Fichtner, who plays his executive officer, perform competently, David Duchovny as the brutal KGB agent turns in a most disappointing job. His offhand delivery and constant deadpan hardly suit the person he plays and the actions he takes; he works best in lighter roles and actually lacks the presence needed for the big screen. The movie never lets up its pacing, using the mission’s mystery as only one of the sources of suspense. Its shots of the several obvious, even necessary moments — the Russian submarine base, the visuals outside the submerged vessel, and of course, the crowded, claustrophobic interior — all look entirely authentic. Whether true or not, it also suggests that Soviet subs stocked a great many small arms and, surprisingly, a lot of liquor.

In May of 1993, the bodies of three 8-year-old boys were found naked, bound, and mutilated in a creek in a wooded area of West Memphis, Arkansas, known as Robin Hood Hills. The lurid nature of the crime led to rumors that the murders were part of a satanic ritual, incensing the local population to near hysteria, as they demanded for an arrest to be made. To say that the investigation conducted by the West Memphis police was poorly handled is an understatement. But nevertheless, three teenaged suspects were produced: black-clothes-wearing, heavy-metal-listening loners Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin, and Jessie Misskelley. In the heavily publicized trials that followed, the three boys were tried and convicted. Baldwin and Misskelley received life sentences, while Echols was sentenced to death. Filmmakers Bruce Sinofsky and Joe Berlinger documented the trial and investigation and made a case for the three boys’ innocence in their landmark HBO documentary, “Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills.” That film debuted in 1996, bringing national

Lorris Davis and Damien Wayne Echols in the documentary “West of Memphis.”

Photo courtesy Photofest

PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

attention to the case and inspiring a movement advocating for the release of the boys, now known as “the West Memphis Three.” Since then, Sinofsky and Berlinger have twice returned to the case, filming two sequels (the last installment, “Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory,” was released in January 2012) that documented the case all the way up through the boys’ ultimate release from prison at the end of 2011. That conclusion was the result of an unusual deal with Arkansas state prosecutors that allowed the three men to trade a guilty plea in exchange for their freedom. Now a new film produced by longtime West Memphis Three supporters Peter Jackson and Fran Walsh, and directed by Amy J. Berg (“Deliver us From Evil”), chronicles the entire ordeal all over again. The story of the original murders and the railroading of three likely innocent boys is fascinating, utterly compelling, and completely horrifying. But is there really enough reason to justify another movie when the case has already been so expertly documented? Somewhat surprisingly, the answer turns out to be “yes”. A main strength of the new film is hindsight, which allows Berg the opportunity to step back and view nearly the entire breadth of the case. The first two of the “Paradise Lost” films were made in the midst of the action, and the filmmakers had to do all their own investigating into the evidence as events developed. Berg had access to all that information right from the beginning. The investigation that “West of Memphis” wages also reaps the rewards of the significant financial backing of Peter Jackson. In addition to acting as producer, Jackson also appears on camera, detailing his interest in the case and exactly how he came to be involved. His funding allows this film to hire some of the country’s leading experts, as well track down and interview several people that those earlier films were never able to convince to appear on camera.

The “Paradise Lost” films focused a great deal on the boys themselves, but “West of Memphis” takes a different approach. Berg’s film is more clinical, digging deeper into exacting detail about the specifics of the case itself, sticking to the facts and delving less into character. While Damien Echols (who’s also listed as a producer on the film) gets significant screen time, the other two members of the West Memphis Three, Josh Misskelley and Jason Baldwin, are allowed to fade somewhat into the background. This film is lightly critical of “Paradise Lost 2,” specifically the way the filmmakers’ focused on John Byers, the step-father of another of the young victims, as a possible perpetrator. The “Paradise” filmmakers demonized the man, making a convincing case against him — though he was ultimately proven to be innocent. It’s hard not to see those criticisms as somewhat hypocritical: that film was working off the fairly solid evidence that was available at the time, and Byers, who was clearly fond of being in front of the camera, sure as hell acted guilty. Berg has access to new DNA evidence that didn’t exist years earlier, making her case much stronger. But she can’t resist utilizing some of the same questionable theatrics while making her case against her suspect, using menacing-looking footage of the stepfather of one of the other victims. “West of Memphis” provides a thorough overview of the case for those coming in cold, and manages to build an even stronger case for the innocence of The West Memphis Three while providing greater evidence against another suspect. In this way, the film works as a nice addendum to the “Paradise Lost” trilogy. If nothing else, the film is worthwhile for the emotional epilogue that concludes the film, as the three men journey into the outside world for the first time in nearly 20 years, enjoying their newfound freedom.

LADY AND THE TRAMP

Friday, Mar. 8, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Mar. 10, 2 p.m. | Wide Screen Series Cocker Spaniel Lady finds herself displaced when her owners leave her with their newborn baby and the dog-hating aunt in Disney’s first feature-length CinemaScope animation. When Tramp, a mutt from the wrong side of the tracks, visits her, the two fall in love over a plate of pasta. (Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske, US 1955, 75 min.)

REAR WINDOW

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week.

Saturday, Mar. 9, 8 p.m. | Edge of Your Seat Series James Stewart gives one of his career-defining performances in one of Alfred Hitchcock’s most suspenseful films. Stewart is a globetrotting photojournalist who suspects his Greenwich Village neighbor of a murderous crime, and enlists his Uptown girlfriend (Grace Kelly) and workaday nurse (Thelma Ritter) to collect evidence. (Alfred Hitchcock, US 1954, 112 min.)

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


ONE WORLD GOODS Spring p g Sale! March 8-13

Proudly since 1964

WHY fight TRAFFIC? WHY fight FOR A PARKING SPOT? WHY WALK all that way?

Stop by and find out why!

Up to 80% off clearance items 50% off select jewelry items • 40% off all winter clothes • 20% off all jams and chutneys • 20% off all furniture Accent your y life f Empower Emppower Another’s.

HAND TRIMMED MEAT CUT TO ORDER CRAF T BEER & GROWLERS LOCAL FAVORITES GROCERIES PRODUCE

Think Outside the “Big Box” OPEN EVERY DAY! Mon-Sat 9am-8pm, Sun 9am-6pm

Hours: M-Th 10-6; F-Sat 10-9; Sun 12-5 PITTSFORD PLAZA 387-0070 www.owgoods.org

2294 MONROE AVE. BRIGHTON 271-8270 | FIND US ON

Athlete's Foot Needed For a 6 week investigational trail for athlete's foot. Potential subjects must be in good general health, have athlete's foot, be over age 18 and be willing to attend 3 office visits. Study related exams and compensation included.

IF INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING, PLEASE CONTACT: THE RESEARCH OFFICE at SKIN SEARCH, 100 WHITE SPRUCE BLVD., ROCHESTER, NY 14623

(585) 697-1818

WWW.DERMROCHESTER.COM

30 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

Follow us on Like us on

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] CHASING ICE (PG-13): This Oscar-nominated documentary provides evidence of Earth’s changing climate through amazing time-lapse footage of the world’s shifting glaciers. Little DEAD MAN DOWN (R): The American debut of Niels Arden Oplev, director of the original “Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” films, stars Colin Farrell and Noomi Rapace as two strangers who team up to exact some violent revenge. Also starring Terrence Howard and Dominic Cooper. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster EMPEROR (PG-13): In this historical drama, Tommy Lee Jones plays General Douglas MacArthur during his postWorld War II investigation into the activities of emperor of Japan. Little, Pittsford LADY AND THE TRAMP (1955): The Disney animated classic about a streetwise mutt and the bitch who loves him. (alternatively: “the sweet Cocker Spaniel who loves him.”) Dryden (Fri Mar 8, 8 p.m.; Sun, Mar 10, 2 p.m.) LEVIATHAN (NR): This unusual, and beautiful, avant-garde documentary immerses audiences in the harsh life aboard a commercial fishing vessel at sea off the New England coast. Dryden (Wed, Mar 6, 8 p.m.) OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG): Director Sam Raimi presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster REAR WINDOW (1954): Jimmy Stewart stumbles upon a neighbor’s potentially murderous activities while playing peeping tom. Also starring Grace Kelly and Thelma Ritter. Dryden (Sat, Mar 9, 8 p.m.) THE SOUND OF FURY (1951): Noir thriller about a financially struggling family man who’s convinced by a criminal to participate in a series of robberies, until one goes horribly wrong. Starring Frank Lovejoy, Kathleen Ryan, and Lloyd Bridges. Dryden (Tue, Mar 12, 8 p.m.) TOUCH OF EVIL (1958): Orson Welles’ other masterpiece is a noir thriller famous for its lengthy opening shot and for the sight of Charlton Heston attempting to play a Mexican. Also starring Janet Leigh. Dryden (Thu, Mar 7, 8 p.m.)

A scene from “21 & Over.” PHOTO COURTESY RELATIVITY MEDIA WEST OF MEMPHIS (R): Produced by Peter Jackson, this documentary focuses on the infamous case of the“West Memphis Three,” three likely innocent young men convicted of the brutal murder of three small children. Little [ CONTINUING ] 21 & OVER (R): Straightarrow college student Jeff Chang decides to cut loose for the first time when his best friends plan a debaucherous night of celebrating in honor of his 21st birthday, putting his academic future in jeopardy. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Cinema, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster DARK SKIES (PG-13): An escalating series of disturbing events seems to hint that a malevolent force has targeted a suburban family. Starring Keri Russell and J.K. Simmons. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Culver Ridge ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH (PG): Interplanetary space adventure abounds in this kid-friendly animated feature about a geeky blue-skinned alien who must travel to Earth to rescue his more heroic brother. Featuring the voice talents of Brandon Fraser, Jessica Alba, Rob Corddry, William Shatner,

and Sarah Jessica Parker. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD (R): John McLane is back in the fifth installment of the “Die Hard” franchise, this time teaming up with his CIA agent son to take down a group of Russian terrorists. Starring Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney, Sebastian Koch, and Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Culver Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown IDENTITY THIEF (R): Hijinks ensue as Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy explore the lighter side of identity fraud in this comedy about a mild-mannered businessman who tracks down the con artist who’s been stealing from him. Also starring Jon Favreau, John Cho, and Amanda Peet. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster JACK THE GIANT SLAYER (PG13): Bryan Singer directs this epic, action-adventure retelling of “Jack and the Beanstalk” starring Nicholas Hoult, Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci, Ian McShane, and Bill Nighy. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE LAST EXORCISM PART II (PG-13): Immediately following the events of the first film, the sequel follows poor Nell Sweetzer (Ashley Bell) tries to start a new life for herself, only to find that the evil force that possessed her isn’t quite finished yet. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster LES MISÉRABLES (PG-13): The hugely popular, longrunning stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Pittsford


ROCHESTER’S BEST BAR FOR BEER Voted by CITY News Readers 2008-2012! & BeerAdvocate.com 381 Gregory St. 14620 (585) 473-0503 • Tapandmallet.com @tapandmallet

SOUTH WEDGE area businesses & restaurants

LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Little, Pittsford LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Cinema QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a comedy stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown SAFE HAVEN (PG-13): Attractive widower falls for equally attractive young woman on the run from her past. Adapted from a novel by Nicholas Sparks, so you pretty much know what to expect. Starring Josh Duhamel, Julianne Hough, and Cobie Smulders. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster SIDE EFFECTS (R): Steven Soderbergh’s latest (and possibly final) film, about a young couple whose lives are torn apart when one of them is put on a new anti-anxiety drug that has some deadly side effects. Starring Rooney Mara, Jude Law, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Channing Tatum. Cinema SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford SNITCH (PG-13): Dwayne Johnson infiltrates a drug ring as an undercover informant in order to clear the name of his wrongly convicted son. Also starring Susan Sarandon and Barry Pepper. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster

271-4930

389 Gregory St. Rochester www.tangocafedance.com

Ballroom - Swing – Salsa Casino Rueda – Argentine Tango and more!

Learn. Dance. Have Fun.

Jamaican R E S TA U R A N T & C AT E R I N G

Now Open 7 Days! Join us for Marley Monday Reggae music, games, vegetarian menu 133 Gregory St. • 585.473.3663 Eatatpeppapot.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Shared Housing Rent EAST END Cozy, conveniently located, 1-bedroom apartment in a house. W/W carpet. Parking available. Water included. Some pets accepted. Near: Downtown, Eastman, Park and East Avenue! $600+ 585-210-2473 NORTH WINTON AREA Upper two bedroom, washer, dryer, off-street parking. Deck, fenced yard, no pets. $750+ 585-586-0999

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com. LARGE FURNISHED ROOM Quiet surrounding. Utilities, Cable, off-street-parking included. On bus line, near bus stop. West Rochester. Call 585-328-2771. House has security.

Real Estate Auctions AUCTION CHEMUNG COUNTY REAL PROPERTY TAX FORECLOSURES- 150+ Properties March 27 @11AM. Holiday Inn, Elmira, NY. 800243-0061 HAR, Inc. & AAR, Inc. Free brochure: www. NYSAUCTIONS.com

Land for Sale AMERICA’S BEST BUY! 20 acres-only $99/month! $0 down, no credit checks, MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Owner financing. West Texas beautiful Mountain Views! Free color brochure. 1-800-755-8953 www. sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN) LENDER MUST LIQUIDATE! 30 acres- $49,900. Woods full of deer, awesome mountain views, year round road, utilities. EZ terms! Call (888)701-7509 LENDER ORDERED LAND SALE! 8 ACRES-$19,900. Mix of woods & fields, nice views! Less than 3.5 hrs NY City! Call (888)905-8847 www.NewYorkLandandLakes.com

Vacation Property OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Retirement Property DISCOVER DELAWARE’S Discover Delaware’s distinctive,

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

gated community. Larger than life amenities - equestrian facility and Olympic pool. New Homes mid $40’s. Low taxes. Brochures available 1-866-629-0770 or  www.coolbranc .com. EXERTER, NH 55+ New homes from $69,900-$129,000 2br/2ba Along Scenic Exeter River. 7 miles to ocean, 50 minutes to Boston! 603-772-5377 or email exeterriverlanding@comcast.net SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean.  772-581-0080, www. beach-cove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

Accounting & Tax Services I AM LOOKING FOR NEW CLIENTS. After more than 25 years I still enjoy doing taxes and helping my clients pay the minimum possible. Unlike H&R and other tax services I work year round and I answer my own phone. Call me LEW JONES, JONES TAX SERVICE 585-3815820 x27 1250 PITTSFORDVICTOR PITTSFORD RD. Pittsford, NY 14534

Adoption ADOPT - Happily married couple wishes to adopt! We promise unconditional love, learning, laughter, wonderful neighborhood, extended family. Expenses paid. (Se habla español.) www. DonaldAndEsther.com. 1-800965-5617 ADOPT - Our adopted son dreams of being a big brother! Loving family seeking baby; promises lifetime of happiness, security. Expenses paid. Angie/ Mike: www. angieandmikeadopt.com or call: 855-524-2542 ADOPT: Abundance of love awaits your precious newborn. Happily married couple promises to love and protect your baby. Expenses paid. Donna &

Paul 1-877-ADOPT-41 www. DonnaandPauladopt.info

Education

ADOPT: Casting for ‘film’ of our lives! Needed: baby to complete family.  Loving, married, educated couple, wishing to adopt the star.  Natalie/David 1-877-FOR BABY. www.davidandnatalie.info

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-201-8657www. CenturaOnline.com

ADOPTION: Stay-at-home wife and hardworking husband want to adopt and become Mommy and Daddy! Lots of relatives. Confidential; expenses paid. Rachel/ James 1-888-467-1645 PREGNANT? ANXIOUS? Get FREE, no-pressure, confidential counseling, guidance, financial assistance at our licensed agency; if families. Call Joy: 866-922-3678. www. ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption.org. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293.

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@rochestercitynews.com

Childcare LICENSED DAYCARE Lake/Dewey area. In-home Daycare for ages 1yr-12yrs. Before/After School care provided. Meals provided, Fenced-yard, Transportation provided. No Pets/Smoking. Gazali Care LLC. gazalicare@gmail.com 585-507-0312

Events ** GUN SHOW ** - Knights of Columbus Hall ** 2735 Union Road Cheektowaga, NY. $5 admission.  Public Hours: Saturday March 9th 9am-4pm and Sunday March 10th 9am3pm. www.nfcshows.com.

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $25 585-880-2903 BRONZE COLOR vintage metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $35 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FOR SALE Lady’s Used Haband Pants Collection, $49 cash. 12 pairs: 8 rainbow colors size 16A stretch polyester, 2 dungarees, 2 size 18A corduroy. Phone (585) 413-0827. GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $15.00 585-880-2903 PAINT never opened. 2 Gallon Behr Premium Moonlit Yellow $15 each 585-225-5526 RIVAL-SEAL-A-MEAL used food processor for $35 cash. Vacuum bags meals in freezer/cooking bags. Stretch your budget! Attractive white appliance, with built-in compressor. Ph: 585413-0827 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585225-5526

Jam Section Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com 32 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585426-7241 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. I SAY New Wave peaked in 1977-81. Who wants to play Blondie, The Cars, The Ramones, Squeeze, Elvis Costello, U2 and much more? I play bass. Craig. mooskamovers@aol.com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585-698-7784 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (1955) Conn Trumpet (Coprion Bell) serial#517429 $800; (1960) Conn Trumpet (Director)

$200; (1960) Wurlitzer Electric Piano model #200 serial #72828L $1500. All good condition 585-458-9722

Lost and Found

R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585-3284121

LOST CAT! Orange, Fluffy Female, 8 lbs., 10 years old. Please Call 585-747-5074 or 585-748-7146 PLEASE! We Miss Her

ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDA- Approved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic.com, 800-467-0295 FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

WONDERFUL HOME WITH ALL THE BEAUTY & CHARM! GREAT BIG BEDROOMS! GREAT KITCHEN WITH APPLIANCES INCLUDED, GREAT CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION! MANY MAJOR UPGRADES.

RochesterSells.com

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724 RochesterSells.com

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Miscellaneous

continues on page 34

27 W Boulevard Pkwy, Charlotte:

HomeWork

Search. Buy. Sell.

Here to work for you! Nino Vitale Real Estate Agent

Proudly serving the Rochester area.

Ready for Revival

124 Macbeth Street The true character of a city home can be seen in what remains. As it passes from owner to owner, so much can change, but the hope is that some things never do. It’s the details around the edges--what you see when you look up and down--that reflect the true craftsmanship of a home’s original construction. And so it is for the hardy American Foursquare at 124 Macbeth Street in the Culver-Winton-Main neighborhood. Built in 1922, this house stands tall because its previous owners took care to preserve what really matters: the unique and delightful original features that give it personality. A spacious front porch, framed by terraced gardens, provides an excellent view. Once through the front door, the house’s carefully preserved original features immediately become apparent. The entrance vestibule retains its original tile and a well-crafted French door. It’s an inviting space that sets the tone for the rest of the home. Through the entryway, the brightly painted living room boasts a cozy brick gas fireplace, mounted with a thick wood mantle and flanked by an immaculate built-in bookshelf with glass doors. Combined with the hardwood floors and well-preserved woodwork, this room has all the character to make it a comforting space to relax each night. The ceiling beams in the dining room add charm, giving off a mellow glow from the ample sunlight that floods the room through the large picture window. A butler’s pantry connects the dining room and kitchen at

the back of the house. It also retains wellpreserved original features, including the original swinging wood door. The open kitchen is well-lit, with several windows, and is large enough to host a cozy breakfast table. The upstairs features a full bath and four equalsized bedrooms that offer plenty of space and even more original features. All the rooms retain their classic woodwork and have well-kept hardwood floors. Each has a nice-sized closet. A bonus feature in this home is a partially finished attic. It’s a bright, comfortable space that is ready to fulfill your personal needs, whether it be a play room, art studio, office, or extra storage. Outside, the backyard has plenty of space for landscaping, gardening, and a potential deck or patio area. All the key features of a classic city house are available in this home, lovingly preserved by previous owners and ready for its next renewal. 124 Macbeth Street sits in a central location near the bustling commercial areas of Main St., Culver Rd. and Winton Ave. It offers approximately 1,424 square feet of living space and is listed at $67,900. This is a short sale and is being sold in “as-is” condition. For more information contact Stephen Jones of Nothnagle Realtors at 585-473-1320 or visit http:// rochestercityliving.com/property/R201613. by Peter Smith Peter lives and works in Rochester and is a Landmark Society volunteer.

CALL: 585-381-0540

email: ninovitale33@gmail.com web: vincent-associates.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Home and Garden Professionals

Once Over

Does Your Roof Leak?

Tear-offs • Flat Roofs • Re-Roofs • Ventilation & Repairs Commercial & Residential 10 year labor warranty on all workmanship

We Will Beat any Legitimate Written Estimate

• General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Repairs Big or Small • Metal Roofing • Electrical • Masonry

(7663)

ERNEST W. PETERSON INC.

*32”x14” solid glass block windows with any

full roofing or siding job. Coupon must be present at time of signing. *special excludes all previous work Certified Roofing in Owens Corning, GAF and IKO Roofing

Home Repair Specialist! Trusted quality service since 1994!

Do it right the first time

Call: 458-ROOF

2 Glass Block Windows Free*

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

703-7738

Build Your New Garage or Addition

Fast, with Custom Built Panelized Structures!

DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

• Attached/Detached Garages

Let us tear down and rebuild your new garage!

Professional Painting Service, 35 Years’ Experience

Packages available for any size garage!

FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

585-287-0692

Innovative Panelized Systems

> page 33 professional cleaning. Call 585314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” LOOKING FOR NUDIST FRIENDS. SBIWM 55 Looking for singles and couples as nudist friends. Wide variety of interests: Nudism, Bike riding, Volleyball, Tennis, Movies, Comedy. I’m very open minded. Jim P.O. Box 20081, Rochester, NY 146020081 SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

www.ipsgarages.com • Henrietta, NY • (585) 624-7780

Notices NEW YORK NEEDS TO KNOW about NOEP! MCLAC’s Nutrition Outreach & Education Program assists individuals, couples and families in Monroe County to apply for SNAP (food stamps). Monroe County residents should call MCLAC at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 295-5626 to find out more. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS, and NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Travel FOR YOUR FUTURE . Take advantage of our reliable Low Air Fare to any destination. Our experts are ready to serve you. Call us 212-682-5400

Wanted to Buy BUYING/SELLING: Gold, gold coins, sterling silver, silver coins, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek), paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

SNOW PLOW

CONTRACT SPECIALS For a limited time.

• SNOW PLOWING CONTRACT: STARTING AT $200 • YARD CLEAN-UP W/SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT: STARTING AT $350 • GUTTER CLEANING: STARTING AT $45

FREE ESTIMATES

ALL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE 802-6934

www.AllPropertyMaintenanceNY.com

Affordable

Home Improvements All Phases of Home Improvements • Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

Fully insured

Call

& MASONRY

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

WINTER IS HERE! Time to clean your chimney!

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Founda�on Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Pain�ng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

585-734-8444

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

Fully Insured

TRUSTED & RECOMMENDED FOR 25+ YEARS

Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including: • Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

• Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

414-3692

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

Lost?

ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS Did you know that

City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

34 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

Find your way home with SEE OUR

Real Estate Section ON PAGE 33

To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment

people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000.

AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@lifespan-roch.org.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend. Call Katie 287-6352 for info.

DELIVERY - DRIVERS/ Independent Contractors. Need reliable vehicles for same day delivery, call 1-800-818-7958 DISCOVER THE “Success and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1 (800) 470-7545. (AAN DRIVER - Daily or Weekly Pay. $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months.$0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) HELPWANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) LIVE LIKE A ROCKSTAR. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Shawn 800-716-0048 (AAN CAN) MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST NEEDED For a doctor’s office in Brighton. Person must be goal oriented, professional, with good interpersonal skills. Two years experience preferred. Competitive salary with benefits including paid time off, 401K and FLEX. Background check, references required. For further details email resume and contact info to: this_project@rocketmail.com (no attachments) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www. senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org MCC DENTAL STUDENT Seeking patients who would like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE of exchange for your time! Contact Tina S. 585-902-8009 or email tinahygiene@gmail.com ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time.

of the Adirondacks, 8- Lane Brunswick center, cosmic bowling and sound system, Qubica auto scoring & AMF SPC synthetic lanes installed 6 years ago, established leagues with 37 year annual tournament, turn key operation with many improvements - $300,000– www. riversidebowlinglanes.com – (800) 982-3747

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www. CenturaOnline.com VETERANS CAREER TRAINING - Use post 9/11 GI benefits to become professional tractor trailer driver. National Tractor Trailer School, Liverpool/Buffalo NY branch www.ntts.edu 800-2439300 Consumer Information: www.ntts.edu/programs/ disclosures

PRN TO PART TIME ULTRASOUND TECH A Progressive mobile imaging company is looking for a Registered Ultrasound Tech for PRN to Part Time work. Hours are flexible. The majority of work is paid on call and per study. Candidates should be ARDMS registered with experience in Abdomen and Vascular highly preferred. If you are interested please forward your resume to:

Teresa Moore 200 Buell Rd. Rochester, NY 14624 Fax (585) 436-5340 • Email: tmoore@rochestermobilexray.com

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-9576155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

Business Opportunities

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to

RIVERSIDE HOTEL AND BOWLING CENTER For SaleLocated in the Olympic Region

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS!

Call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

CITY

CLASSIFIEDS rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


Legal Ads [ ARVINE-ELMWOOD LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 1/30/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ HAN’S BEAUTY SUPPLY, LLC ] A Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company Han’s Beauty Supply, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on January 10, 2013. As specified in the Certificate of Change filed with the Secretary of State on February 1, 2013, its office is located at 1671 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620, Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process will be mailed to 1671 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE SALON STYLETTO LLC ] Notice of Organization: Salon Styletto, LLC was filed with SSNY on February 1, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 43 Timberwood Drive, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ACTION HERO, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 106 Arvine Hts., Rochester, NY 14611. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ARCONTRACTORS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process

against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 74 Root Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] EQUITABLE ASSET MANAGEMENT (BLOCK 1-2013), LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/14/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] FLAMING SPADE PRODUCTIONS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/18/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 75 Conmar Dr., Rochester, NY 14609. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] HONALEE CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 2/7/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 56 North Main St., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JC JONES PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/25/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Corporate Creations Network Inc. 15 N Mill ST Nyack, NY 10960. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Corporate Creations Network Inc. 15 N Mill ST Nyack, NY 10960. [ NOTICE ] MARY CORCORAN PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/27/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Corporation Service Company is its registered agent located at 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207 upon whom process against the LLC may be

36 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

served. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Name of LLC: Welcome Home Cinema LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 1/30/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act.

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by BP DOC, INC dba Captain’s Attic,37 Charlotte St., Rochester NY 14607, County of Monroe, for a Restaurant - Club.

[ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Dunleavy Irish Dance, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/12/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 101 Lincoln Pkwy, Suite D, East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Hare House Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 2/21/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 301 Willowbrooke Dr, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of L.D. Networking LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 79 Mission Hill Drive, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 109 STRONG STREET, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/24/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 30, Penfield NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of Roc Alternative, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 89 S Union St, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of 624 PITTSFORD VICTOR ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. Of Form. Of Scrapbook Creations Retreats, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 01/23/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, P.O. Box 1171, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of A Healthy Bite, LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y State (SSNY) on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 110 Culver Pkwy, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of South Ave Wine & Liquor, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 313 Pearson Lane, Rochester,

Notice of Formation of ABBOTT TRENTO ONLINE MEDIA LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 46 Rahway Lane, Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process

against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of American Homestead Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aquarian Partners, L.P. Certificate filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LP, 825 Allens Creek, Rochester, NY 14618. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Term: until 12/31/2063. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BURKWIT LAW FIRM, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: Charles F. Burkwit, 16 E. Main St., Ste. 450, Rochester, NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CandyBearLand, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 3340 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CARRETTA LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 1/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 145-G Gibbs St., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CC Interactive Marketing Services, LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 118 Kirklees Rd; Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CONCAL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/10/04. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Silver & Feldman, Esqs., Attn: Sammy Feldman, Esq., 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DeCiantis Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of F. Zhang, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/5/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

County. Princ. office of LLC: 20 Hinsdale St., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Jeremiahs Penfield LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: BLACKCOMB PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on December 12, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 10 Cambric Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Mason-Bauman Agency LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Greystone Vending LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal office of LLC: 1133 Webster Rd. Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC at the principal office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of MUNSON AND SULLY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: Adam C. Smith, 8 Reginald Circle, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of ICSH PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: Monroe

Notice of formation of NART LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/2012. Office location, County of

[ NOTICE ]

Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Law Office of Anthony A. Dinitto, L.L.C., 8 Silent Meadows Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of OPEN BOOKINGS LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 78 Rossmore St. Rochester, NY 14606 Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Popeye Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 29 Walnut Dr., Penfield, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROYCO SO NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 02/04/13, the name of LLC is: ROYCO NY, LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Spectrum Creative Arts, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 1/23/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 46 Durand Drive, Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stream D, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) on 01/18/13. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 31 Bracknell Circle, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpos:e Any lawful activity.


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE GENESEE EWE-ERY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/08/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 64 Beckerman Pl., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Joanne Albano-Vaugh at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TWIN TAVERN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1549 Lake Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate Fish, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ADVISORS CAPITAL PLANNING LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 03/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to NJ addr. of the LLC: 777 Terrace Ave., Ste. 608, Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604. Arts. of Org. filed with NJ Dept. of Treasury, P.O. Box 628, Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. As amended by Cert. of Correction filed with SSNY on 02/13/13, office location is Monroe County. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ATIS Elevator Inspections, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MO on 11/21/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom

process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MO and principal business address: 8531 Page Ave., Ste. 140, St. Louis, MO 63114. Cert. of Org. filed with MO Sec. of State, 600 W. Main St., Jefferson City, MO 65101. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of M&N Group Holdings, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/30/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Manning & Napier Group, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/24/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of PIPELINE EQUIPMENT RESOURCES COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 07/02/12. Princ. office of LLC: 3900 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. NJ addr. of LLC: 9 Mars Ct., Unit C-4A, Boonton, NJ 07005. Arts. of Org. filed with State Treasurer, Dept. of Treasury, Div. of Revenue and Enterprise Services, P.O. Box 628,

Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of qualification of RIVERSIDE INVESTING, LLC. Authority filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/05/13. Office in MONROE County. Formed in UT on 11/07/12. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 157 Moul Road Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Real Estate [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rosswood Villa Apartments, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in California (CA) on 1/22/1999. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 99 Washington Ave., Ste. 1008, Albany, NY 12260. Address to be maintained in CA: 9350 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 302, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, also the principal office. Arts of Org. filed with the CA Secretary of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Six Month Smiles, LLC. Fictitious name: Six Month Smiles, LLC (Delaware). Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/8/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Principal office: 35 Main St., Scottsville, NY 14546. Address to be maintained in DE: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Sweden SPE LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to:

c/o Paracorp Incorporated, 2804 Gateway Oaks Dr., Ste. 200, Sacramento, CA 92533. Address to be maintained in DE: 2140 S. Dupont Hwy, Camden, DE 19934. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE MidFirst Bank, Plaintiff, against Ronnie J. Davis; Laura Davis, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 12/17/2012 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the County Office Bldg, at 39 W. Main St., Rochester, in the County of Monroe, State of New York on 03/26/2013 at 10:30AM, premises known as 132 West Filbert Street, East Rochester, NY 14445 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town/Village of East Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, SECTION: 152.21, BLOCK: 2, LOT: 6. Approximate amount of judgment $35,009.28 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 8066/2011. Paul A. Guerrieri, Esq., Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff, 53 Gibson Street, Bayshore, NY 11706 Dated: January 28, 2013 1017169 2/20, 2/27, 3/6, 03/13/2013 [ NOTICE ] REBA NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/23/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY DOME LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY LAND LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of

Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WEBSTER PARTNERS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stephen Webster, 1595 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WINDLASS PROPERTIES & HOLDINGS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Leah M. Buttery, 8344 Ridge Rd W., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: BRU-BAG, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/13/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O BRU-BAG, LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Daniele SPC, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Modern Sales, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The

LLC, 4 Niagara Street, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Earlando Thomas, Physician, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on February 19, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 206 Mill Stream Run, Webster, New York 14580. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 206 Mill Stream Run, Webster, New York 14580 The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WESTMINSTER ST ROCHESTER-SODUS LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Westminster St Rochester-Sodus Lake Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 12/23/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 1 Chase Square, Suite 1900, Rochester, New York 14604, Attn: William R. Alexander, , Esq.. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-192 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Christine J. Butkowsky; Jean Butkowsky; Andrew Butkowsky Defendants. February 15, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 27, 2013 at 9:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 662 Moul Road, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 015.02-3-48.4, described

in Deed recorded in Liber 8970 of Deeds, page 301; 1.79 acres. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $137,460.41 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2013 Adrian J. Burke, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-5976 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs, Katherine I. Maggi, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 15, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 27, 2013 at 1:00 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 7 Rodenbeck Place, Rochester, NY 14620, Tax Account No. 121.742-37.001, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8372 of Deeds, page 424; lot size 70 x 80.62. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $85,352.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2013 Gilbert Perez, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys

for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-6268 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs Gary J. Lisman; Jackie Ward; Claire Howe; Katie Burke Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on April 9, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 51-53 Morningside Park, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.53-2-7 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6116 of Deeds, page 182. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $139,403.05 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 26, 2013 Joanne L. Best, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 2012-11232 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook, Melinda Ellis, individually and as Co-Executor of the Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook; Lisa Brunette, Individually and as CoExecutor of the Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook; Stephen Ellis; Thomas Ellis; Jerome John Pembrook, Deceased; and any persons who

cont. on page 38

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37


Legal Ads > page 37 are heirs or distributees of Jerome John Pembrook, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; Strong Memorial Hospital; Videos Plus; Account Management Services LLC; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, New York State Tax Commissioner; Fairlane Credit LLC; Workers Compensation Board of the State of New York; Georgia McCabe and Scott Brownstein; RAB Performance Recoveries, LLC; People of the State of New York; United States of America; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Location of property to be foreclosed: 153 Kings Lane, Town of Irondequoit, Monroe County, NY TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE

HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a Defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. NOTICE: YOU MAY BE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the Answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the Answer with the Court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your property. Speak to an

attorney or go to the Court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: October 9, 2012 MATTHEW RYEN, ESQ. Lacy Katzen LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION: The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage bearing date the 26th day of November 1999, executed by Jerome John Pembrook to ESL Federal Credit Union to secure the sum of $30,000.00, and recorded in Liber 14740 of Mortgages at page 363 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe on the 21st day of December 1999, and a further mortgage bearing date the 13th day of March 2000,

Adult Services Phone Services IF YOU ARE GAY Bi, curious, or versatile kind-of-guy, age 18-50, and HIV-negative, you may qualify to take part in an important medical research study at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Participants will be paid an average of $1,000. For more information, visit www. rochestervictoryalliance.org, or call 585.756.2329 to schedule an appointment.

38 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

executed by Jerome John Pembrook to ESL Federal Credit Union to secure the sum of $39,700.00, and recorded in Liber 14839 of Mortgages at page 582 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe on the 3rd day of April 2000, which mortgages were consolidated by the Consolidation, Modification and Extension Agreement dated the 13th day of March 2000 and recorded April 3, 2000 in Liber 14839 of Mortgages at page 593 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe on April 3, 2000 forming a single lien in the amount of $69,700.00. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, The plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named Defendants: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. J. Scott Odorisi, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated February 8, 2013 and filed along with the supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a mortgage. The premises is described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot 19 Kings Lane, as shown on a map of Kings Lane Subdivision filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s office in Liber 136 of Maps, Page 73. Tax Account No. 076.16-2-74 Property Address: 153 Kings Lane, Town of Irondequoit, Monroe County, New York [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 2012-4817 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff vs. MICHAEL AMMERING and JOHN DOE Defendants This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. To the above named Defendants: You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the plaintiff’s attorneys within thirty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. If you do not respond to this

summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon. J. Scott Odorisi , Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed the 24th day of January, 2013, Rochester, New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe, and State of New York, being Lot #36, as shown on a map of the L. Bauer Tract on file in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 6 of Maps, Page 85. Said Lot #36 is situate on the east side of Karnes Street and is 40 feet wide front and rear and 125 feet deep as shown on said map. Subject to an easement given by George A. Gillette to Rochester Railway Light Company and others dated November 15th, 1913, and recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 992 of Deeds at Page 357. Subject to all covenants, easements and restrictions, if any, affecting said premises. Being the same premises conveyed to the Mortgagor(s) herein by Deed to be recorded simultaneously herewith, this being a purchase money mortgage for the amount stated herein. A residence for one or two families only is located on this property. These premises are also known as 48 Karnes Street, Rochester, NY 14606. Natalie A. Grigg, Esq. Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 700 Crossroads Building 2 State Street [ SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION ] Index No. 2012-5294 Filing Date: May 14, 2012 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT

COUNTY OF MONROE RBS Citizens, N.A. f/k/a Citizens Bank, N.A. Plaintiff vs. Robert Werner Citizens Bank, N.A. Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. and “John Doe”, said name being fictitious and intended to include any and all parties having an interest in the mortgaged premises and not otherwise identified above, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. Dated: February 21, 2013 /s/ David P. Martin David P. Martin, Esq.HARRIS BEACH PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 423-7100 TO THE DEFENDANT, Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp.: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of Honorable Justice Richard A. Dollinger, J.S.C. (Acting), dated February 5, 2013, and filed with the Complaint in the office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York. The nature of this action is to foreclose a mortgage bearing date June 25, 2007, executed by Robert Werner to Citizens Bank, N.A., to secure the sum of NINETYTHREE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND NO CENTS ($93,000.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 21328, at Page 0001, in the County of Monroe, on July 23, 2007. The premises hereinbefore referred to are described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Clarkson, County of Monroe and State of New York, and being a part of Lot 4, Section 2, Township 4 of the triangular tract (so-called) bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point on the northerly boundary of Ridge Road, also known as Route

104 and being 99 feet wide, at a distance of 100 feet westerly, measured along the said boundary, from its intersection with the division line between Lot 10 on the East and Lot 4 on the west, said division line being also the easterly line of a parcel of land described in a deed to Carl H. and Bessie A. Nellis recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 2142 of Deeds, page 537; running thence northerly parallel to the division line between said Lot 10 on the east and said Lot 4 on the west a distance of 200 feet to a point; running thence westerly parallel to the northerly boundary of the Ridge Road, a distance of 100 feet to a point; running thence southerly parallel to the first described boundary a distance of 200 feet to the northerly boundary of Ridge Road; running thence easterly along the northerly boundary of Ridge Road a distance of 100 feet to the point or place of beginning; containing 0.46 acres be the same more or less. Subject to all covenants, conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements and rights of way of record. Dated: February 21, 2013 /s/ David P. Martin David P. Martin, Esq. HARRIS BEACH PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 423-7100 TO THE DEFENDANT, Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp.: That it appears from the public records that Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., holds a lien which is adverse to Plaintiff’s interest and which remains open of public record as follows: a mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989; That upon information and belief, the lien of the Fleet Mortgage has been paid in full, and is therefore, subordinate to the mortgage being foreclosed herein, and should be discharged of record. That the lien of the Fleet Mortgage should be declared invalid and extinguished pursuant to Real Property Actions and Proceedings Law

Article 15. That Plaintiff requests that the Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale state the following: ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the lien which appears to be prior and adverse to the mortgage being foreclosed herein, namely the lien of Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., is hereby declared invalid and extinguished pursuant to RPAPL Article 15; and it is further ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., and all persons or entities claiming by, through or under them, be and are hereby forever barred and foreclosed of and from all right, claim, lien, interest or equity of redemption in and to said Mortgage Premises; and it is further ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the record be reformed to reflect that the lien of Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., is invalid and extinguished, and upon granting and entering of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale, a certified copy of same be presented to the Monroe County Clerk so the clerk may mark the mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989, discharged of record. In the case of default, judgment shall be taken against you and ordering the mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989, invalid and extinguished and discharged of record.


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD An Arizona appeals court ruled in February that someone can be guilty of driving under the influence of marijuana even though its psychoactive ingredient has long left his system. Since tests of marijuana measure both active and inactive ingredients, and since the active substance vanishes quickly but the inactive one remains in the body for weeks, a marijuana consumer may test “positive” even though not the least bit impaired. (In fact, since neighboring Colorado recently legalized some marijuana possession, a Colorado driver motoring through Arizona weeks later could be guilty of DUI for a completely legal, harmless act, as could the 35,000 Arizona medical-marijuana users.) The appeals court majority reasoned that since the legislature did not distinguish the inactive ingredient from the active, neither would the court.

Compelling Explanations

— Richard Blake took the witness stand in Ottawa, Ontario, in January to deny that it was he who had invaded a home and stabbed two people numerous times. With a straight face, he had an answer for all of the incriminating evidence. He had the perp’s car because “a stranger” had just handed him the keys; he didn’t recall what the stranger looked like (but guessed that he probably resembled Blake, because for some reason Blake got picked out of the lineup); he donned the stranger’s bloody knit cap (abandoning his own cap); he handled the stranger’s knife and bloody glove, and that’s why his DNA was on them; he fled at the first sight of police, ramming a cruiser to escape (even though he had “done nothing wrong”); he fled on foot after the collision and hid in a tree (but

only to get away from a swarm of black flies). After deliberating politely for a day, the jury found him guilty. — A 61-year-old man in southern Sweden beat a DUI charge in February even though his blood-alcohol was five times over the legal limit. The man told the judge he is a hearty drinker and normally starts in even before work every day, with “no effect” on his performance. According to the Skanskan newspaper, that must have impressed the judge, who was so awed that he tossed out the charge.

Ironies

— A longtime high school teacher of French and Spanish is suing the Mariemont, Ohio, school district for having pressured her to resign in the face of what she calls her phobia, a “fear of kids” disorder, which she says should be protected by disability-discrimination law. Maria Waltherr-Willard, 61, had been reassigned to teach some junior high students, but doctors said she suffered hypertension, nightmares, chest pains and vomiting when around the younger-age children. — Lisa Biron’s recent biography shows her to be a licensed lawyer in two states, practicing in Manchester, N.H., and also affiliated with a group of volunteer lawyers that advocates “religious liberty, the sanctity of life, and marriage and family,” and issues warnings about the “homosexual agenda.” (She recently represented a church in Concord, N.H., and served on the board of directors of a Christian school in Manchester.) In January, Biron was convicted in federal court in Concord on nine counts involving taking her teenage daughter to Canada and creating child pornography.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 32 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t feel pressured by someone giving you an ultimatum or suggesting you move too fast when you aren’t ready. Love must be savored, and a relationship must be built on solid ground. Find out how much you have in common before jumping into intimacy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ll attract the coolest partners if you travel or get involved in an unusual event or activity. Someone from a different background will catch your eye and entice you into an interesting, exciting and adventuresome experience. Love

at first sight can happen. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Fickleness will stand in the way of true love. Whether it’s you or the person you choose, someone will not be able to make a decision when it comes to love. Don’t overreact or stretch the truth if you sincerely want to give this connection a fair chance. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Love, romance, intrigue, adventure and excitement highlight your week. Someone unusual will catch your eye and win your heart. Don’t be surprised if things move along quickly and a change of plans leads to a long-term commitment. Security,

stability and a passionate promise can be expected. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Be wary of anyone making demands or acting too possessive. Pushiness to move into a close, personal relationship must not be mistaken for unadulterated love. Control issues are present, and the chance of attracting someone who wants to own you is likely. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put a little thought into the type of activities and events you attend. Your choice will make all the difference between finding that special someone or not. Love is on the rise, and with the right choice of entertainment, you will

discover someone who shares your interests. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your emotions will surface, leading to romantic confusion. Too much choice and not being given a true assessment of what someone you meet actually has to offer will throw you off guard and into a relationship that is likely to fizzle and fade away. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll be drawn to someone different from your usual choice of partner. Explore the possibilities that this union has to offer, and you will find common ground. A unique lifestyle will suit your needs and add to your creativity.

Embrace a new direction. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll be pushed to become involved with someone you are not quite sure you want to pursue. Being nice or not wanting to hurt someone’s feelings will lead to a bad emotional situation that can end only in disaster. It’s not cruel to be honest about the way you feel. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Revisit past relationships and consider whether you actually suited each other or if the timing was just not right at the time. Reconnecting with someone you have history with will revitalize you and put you at

ease. Make the first move. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Circumstances are likely to dictate who you are with. A practical outlook and a discussion mapping out the best way to proceed will help you realize what you must do. Don’t fold under pressure or the demands being made. Do what’s best for you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are heading in the right direction when it comes to love. All arrows point to a solid and committed relationship with someone able to supply you with everything you need and want from a partner. Don’t waste time; seal the deal and get on with your life.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39


40 CITY MARCH 6-12, 2013

Profile for Rochester City Newspaper

March 6-12, 2013 - City Newspaper  

Cover story: The Flying Squirrel Community Center | News: Community Police | Dining: Brooks Landing Diner | Music: Kingsley Flood | Art: Dal...

March 6-12, 2013 - City Newspaper  

Cover story: The Flying Squirrel Community Center | News: Community Police | Dining: Brooks Landing Diner | Music: Kingsley Flood | Art: Dal...

Advertisement