Issuu on Google+

ROBYN WHITWHAM PORTFOLIO


WINTER 2013 1 i n f r a s t r u c t u r a l u r b a n i s m

6

FALL 2011 2 p a r k i n g s t r u c t u r e + e l e m e n t a r y s c h o o l

14

FALL 2012 3 e v e n t b o x

20

WINTER 2011 4 i c e r i n k p a v i l i o n WINTER 2012 5 a r t i s t s ’ r e t r e a t

28 30

WINTER 2011 6 b r o n f m a n a d d i t i o n

36

FALL 2012 7 m o c k - u p FALL 2012 8 s u n s h a d e p r o p o s a l SUMMER 2013 9 a r c t i c r e s e a r c h s t a t i o n X professional work resume

40 46 52 58 60


01

HIGH DINING: BARCELONA INFRASTRUCTURAL URBANISM PROF. JUDITH LECLERC + JAIME COLL WINTER 2013

Develop a new form of urban landscape in Barcelona that will take advantage of the opportunity of the new city infrastructures. Propose a crossing hybrid structure whose content and shape will arouse from an understanding of the site and of the different infrastructures to be connected (circulation, water,) while insuring the compatibility with the use of the local trains. Redefine the southern boundary of Ciutadella Park and conceive a green corridor from the park, to Barceloneta Park and the beach. Through an exterior design that takes a basis upon the solar analysis of the room, we engaged in a parametric design that pinpoints specific areas of maximum solar concentration. By separating a series of slender panels, we allow for light to permeate through, and by utilizing the sinusoidal curve, and varying the width of the panels according to the extracted data, the areas of high concentration were consequently blocked. In choosing materials we considered price, carbon footprint, and how the materiality of the shade would affect the room and possibly McGill campus as a whole. We chose to use wood, a renewable resource, to give a natural and organic quality to the studio and to harmonize the materiality of the room and McGill campus with its masonry facades, and wooden frames.

6

The construction of our prototype has led to many discoveries and ideas that can have countless benefits. The simplicity of the design and its aesthetics create a pleasant spatial experience that reduces

glare and sunlight exposure, while still preserving natural light penetration and views to the exterior. Its functionality is proven to be effective, and its design will create a beautiful addition to any facade. Our experiments have proven the many benefits and attributes of our sunshade, as well as the improvements that are necessary if the installation were to be implemented on a larger scale. The design of our installation is proven to be adaptable, sustainable, and energy efficient. The script allows for the design to be applied to any window surface, anywhere in the world. As well, it allows for the design to be customizable and adjustable for the amount of sunlight allowed into the space. Our sunshade has also shown to reduce heat gains and energy consumption. Furthermore, its simple construction can be adapted to have a very minimal carbon footprint. Its functional design is very beneficial for any space, and its simplicity and adaptability make it easily reproducible and usable for any window surface.


sell grow

HISTORIC GREENSPACE FOOD SOURCE

cross

eat bridge to nowhere

NETWORK RESTAURANTS EAT

process

COOK PRODUCE FOOD PREPARATION

SEA GATHERING FOOD SOURCE

fish

7


8


9


10


11


12


97 044 m² = 24 acres [developable space]

13


02

PARKING STRUCTURE & ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROF. TALIA DORSEY FALL 2011

Devise a strategic architectural intervention that aims to re-establish Old Montreal as an urban center in the context of the whole city. Combine a parking structure and a chosen second program that responds to programmatic needs of the area. A juxtaposition of programs. Exposing a child to urbanity while emersed in an environment of learning and thought, and simultaneously exposing the city to the innocent imagination of a child. Generating interactions between the two creates an interesting space inbetween. A child experiences a city in fragments, moments, or landmarks without necessarily understanding the space that connects these memories. Non-consistent in plan, the building attempts to play on the imagination of children and allow them to envision their own ideas of how these spaces connect.

14

Places of interaction are emphasized in the schoolparking interface (visual, audible, vibrations), encroachment of the entrance onto the sidewalk at street level, and the use of gathering spaces (courtyard on the top level, amphitheatre on the 6th floor, etc.). The intertwined car ramps produces obscure shapes that further creates unique moments and small spaces lending to the scale of children. A driver’s ascent is uniform and lands on parking floors alone, while the descent is not consistent and alternates between parking and school floors - collision of the two programs is stronger. How does attending an elementary school in the middle of an urban-scape affect a child’s perspective? How does the presence of youth in the city affect the course of a business day? Old Montreal becomes a centre for interaction and community.


15


16


17


18


19


03

DECOMPRESSION: EVENT BOX

PROF. MANON ASSELIN + KATSU YAMAZAKI + SINISHA BRDAR FALL 2012

In an attempt to revitalize Montreal’s Quartier des Spectacles, design a space for cultural gatherings of diverse programmatic opportunities; an event box. The Quartier de Spectacles is a vibrant mix of culture; with its perpetual movement of festivals and events it has become an attraction for the masses of visitors the city receives each year. However, once the visitors leave, this area transforms to vacant and inactive. How do we attract the local Montrealers into a predominently tourist setting? Our solution is to create a family-oriented space that can support the festivals and exhibitions, but also the day-to-day social fabric of Montreal. The event tower is an adaptable space for children with the possibility of a multiple of changing programs. The tower provides the framework for a variety of activities for. Among these: bungee jumping, rock climbing, diving, and trapezeing. Its skin is transparent, exchanging energy with the surrounding city and culture. The tower emerges from beneath the ground, through a surface reflecting pool, rendering an in20

finite structure in its mirror image. It becomes an object out of reach, untouchable, and only to be percieved from a distance. To enter, one must descend below the group by a ramp sunked into the water that submerges the visitor in the earth’s elements. Water spills down over the sides of the pool along the walls adjacent to the ramp; the visitor is compressed into the underground. Upon entry, a grid of columns leads to the tower. Initially dense and dark, the columns progessively become more spaced out as they move towards the light tower. Evocative of a sort of excavation, the space decompresses to ultimately release into the infinite space of the tower. By only experiencing the tower from far away and extremely close, a relationship of fantasy is established with the person: dreamlike and playful.


21


22


1_ polished concrete floor with metal decking 2_ supporting truss 3_ steel I-beam horizontal bracing 4_ bolts 5_ insulated glass, double pane 6_ mullion 7_ steel cross-bracing 8_30mm fiberglass flooring vapour barrier 200mm concrete slab 9_ insulated glass, double pane 10_300mm concrete slab with steel reinforcing rebar 40mm extruded polystyrene underslab insulation polyethylene vapeur barrier compacted soil 11_ steel anchor plate 12_ concrete foundation

23


24


25


26


27


04

ICE RINK PAVILION

PROF. DAVID COVO WINTER 2011

Design a pavilion for McGill University’s seasonal ice rinks to provide a space where students can tie skates, sit, watch, socialize, etc. It is required to be able to disassemble and be taken down each spring. With the recent addition of a second ice surface on McGill University’s lower campus, the need for a covered structure is even more evident. Students and other users of the space need a place to sit that is protected from the wind and snow, while still providing visibilty. The proposed site design separates the two ice surfaces farther apart from each other (than the existing design) with the pavilion in between. Evocative of McGill’s Roddick gates, a design of dichotomy gives the pavilion both functional and sculptural expressions. Facing both ice surfaces, the two curves provide a sheltered space to sit and put on skates, take a break, or spectate. Wooden panels act as blinds that block the wind when closed, but allow for transparency through the structure when opened.

28

As a temporary structure, the hinges and select removable panels make a simple assembly and disassembly (as well as allows for compact storage).


29


05

ARTISTS’ RETREAT

PROF. MARTIN BRESSANI WINTER 2012

What happens when industry leaves substantial marks on the earth? The Wells-Lamson quarry in Barre, Vermont reveals the beauty of the rock from human intervention. Design an artists’ retreat that harmonizes with the substantial mark in the landscape, and use the quarry to seduce visitors and encourage reflection on the environmental consequences of our activities. Robust concrete forms balance a heaviness that is absorbed into the landscape of the quarry. An insertion into the earth bridges the separation of the land where a sliver of water connects two bodies of water. The sensibility of a strong, forceful structure emulates that of a fortress. Thick walls and narrow spaces protect but also allows for a relationship with the exterior. One is alone with a single and direct view of the surroundings.

30


31


32


33


34


35


06

BRONFMAN ADDITION

PROF. DAVID COVO WINTER 2011

Design an extension to McGill University’s School of Managment Bronfman building that accounts for the programmatic needs of the faculty. Explore the potentials of steel construction and use biomimicry to inspire the design.

Faculty Space Administrative Space Public Study

From offices to lecture rooms to social spaces, the programmatic requirements for the expansion amounts to a one-third addition to the existing school within McGill Univerity’s downtown campus. The essential element in the design is a large steel vierendeel truss that lifts the roof mass and creates an open, column-free space in which new program can be inserted. The exposed truss appears lightweight, yet provides a strong structural solution as it allows for circulation and versatile programmatic use. The biomimetic concept draws its inspiration from the human nervous system. The communication and organization of neurons within this unified system can be translated into an architectural language by establishing a logical communication between programmatic elements. This was achieved by analyzing the organization of the existing building as well as that of the addition, and then linking

36

similar spaces together through location and circulation. On the north facade, a series of circulation staircases provides a web of paths, study platforms, and social spaces dispersed at various levels. The idea of communication is reinforced by penetrating the building at various points, permeating the interface of exterior and interior spaces. The nervous system serves an important role in stimulating the idea of communication, literally, through efficient circulation and planning of the innerworkings of the school.

Private Study Group Study Public Space Circulation Service


Management Building

New It’s Kind of a Big Vierendeel. The project calls for a one-third expansion of an existing school of management within a downtown university campus.1839 Diverse proAcademic Offices Adjunct Professor Offices (8) 920 grammatic elements are required, from more 2415 Administrative Offices (21) than 30 new offices, to social spaces and Student Offices (10) 2209 lectureDoctoral rooms. The conceptual process is shown in the parti. The massing Research Centers (3) preliminary 1600 Teaching Support Offices (14)roof space 1561 on the exscheme occupies the isting building, as well as the alley between it Classroom 75 pers (3) 5400 and the adjacent hotel, and the lane behind the building. The15 massing is then 1500 altered by Student Discussion Spaces pers (15) Computer Labs (2) 2400 and an exsite constraints such as site lines SpacesThe (2) 2400 istingLounges/Reception parking ramp. essential element in Meeting Rooms 12 - 16 persis (6) a large2100 the design however steel vierend2500 and Program Space eelAdministrative truss which lifts the roof mass and creAdministrative Clusters 2000 ates an open, column-free space in which program can beWashrooms inserted. The4000 exposed truss is lightweight, as well as strong, and therefore provides an excellent structural solution Public Space as it allows for circulation through 15200 it and versatile programmatic use.

Existing Street

6th floor

Alley

5th Floor

Roof

4th floor

Sight line

New3rd floor

Street View

Lift

6th floor

Academic Offices Adjunct Professor Offices (8) Administrative Offices (21) Faculty Space Administrative Space

1839 920 2415

Doctoral Student Offices (10)

2209

Research Centers (3)

Insert 1600

Teaching Support Offices (14)

1561

Classroom 75 pers (3)

5400

Private Study

Student Discussion Spaces 15 pers (15) Computer Labs (2)

1500

Group Study

Lounges/Reception Spaces (2)

2400

Public Study

Public Space Circulation

Existing

Ground Floor

5th Floor

2400

Meeting Rooms 12 - 16 pers (6)

2100

Administrative and Program Space

2500

Administrative Clusters

2000

Washrooms

4000

Public Space

15200

4th floor

Service

3rd floor

37


2nd floor plan 1 : 200

3rd floor plan 1 : 500

Front elevation 1:200

4th floor plan 1 : 500

5th floor plan 1 : 500

7th floor plan 1 : 200

6th floor plan 1 : 500

38 8th floor plan 1 : 200

Longitudinal section 1:200


WINTER 2011

To ere Top Right: Connec do erendeel truss isne c double steel c-cha be Top Right: Connection Detail, nected The vi- with rectan an erendeel truss is constructed bers usingwhich are ins andconthen bolted.pla C double steel c-channels that are th nected with rectangular steel placed mem- on top ofbo

bers which are inserted in thei]r gapsto provide s bolted and then bolted. C-channels are also 06Bo placed on top of these members and Right: The Bottom bolted to provide stiffness. vierendeel trussvie an

08ate

ates a space that c

Bottom Right: The open nature of the tiv tively for circulatio vierendeel truss and its lightness crefor ates a space that can be usedforms. effectively for circulation stairs and plat14 forms.

16 20 22 26 30

achieved by bolting two

34 40

rOBYN WHITWHAm

Bottom Left: Grounding Bottom Left: Grounding Detail. The steel columns Detail. The steel columns which form theGrounding truss Left: which form the trussBottom taper as they approach Detail. The steel columns taper as they approach the ground, making them the ground, making which them form the truss gracefully come to a gracefully come to a taper as they approach point and therefore point and therefore the ground, making them create more open space. create more open space. This tootois a come This connection too gracefully is connection achieved bolting two achieved by bolting point two andbytherefore c-channels through create a c-channels through more openaspace. rectangular plate that exrectangular plate that exconnection too is tends into the gap. This tends into the gap.

39 3/3


07

FIELDS: MOCK-UP

PROF. MANON ASSELIN + KATSU YAMAZAKI + SINISHA BRDAR FALL 2012

Drawing inspiration from a previous material exploration, build a 1:1 mock-up of a space to be inhabited; a wall, that evokes the material qualities discovered. Translucency, movement and fluidity. These elements drawn from a picture of corn are what inspired the space created, a collection of fine elements creating an opaque mass. The grouping of parts is meant to be a transitional space, an important connection between places.   Directionality is a focal point of our project. By creating a density from individual fibers and extracting a path through them we carved a link from one point to the next.  

40

The space simulates passive interaction. When moving through the field the memory of your motion resonates through the fibers, similar to the attraction present within the individual strands of corn. Situated on the north-south axis, our passageway acts as a device interacting with the sun path, filtering light throughout the day. The space becomes a transitory moment in time where one can connect with their surroundings and experience light from varying perspectives.


41


42


43


44


45


08

WAVE: SUN SHADE PROPOSAL

PROF. MARIA MINGALLON FALL 2012

Design and fabricate a sunscreen for the windows of the first year studios, at the Macdonald-Harrington Building of McGill University. Each team will need to design and fabricate a sunscreen to cover at least 2m long window area. A solar digital analysis via the use of algorithms in Grasshopper3D, and adapted to specific project needs, shall be used throughout the design phase. Through an exterior design that takes a basis upon the solar analysis of the room, we engaged in a parametric design that pinpoints specific areas of maximum solar concentration. By separating a series of slender panels, we allow for light to permeate through, and by utilizing the sinusoidal curve, and varying the width of the panels according to the extracted data, the areas of high concentration were consequently blocked. In choosing materials we considered price, carbon footprint, and how the materiality of the shade would affect the room and possibly McGill campus as a whole. We chose to use wood, a renewable resource, to give a natural and organic quality to the studio and to harmonize the materiality of the room and McGill campus with its masonry facades, and wooden frames. The construction of our prototype has led to many discoveries and ideas that can have countless benefits. The simplicity of the design and its aesthetics create a pleasant spatial experience that reduces 46

glare and sunlight exposure, while still preserving natural light penetration and views to the exterior. Its functionality is proven to be effective, and its design will create a beautiful addition to any facade. Our experiments have proven the many benefits and attributes of our sunshade, as well as the improvements that are necessary if the installation were to be implemented on a larger scale. The design of our installation is proven to be adaptable, sustainable, and energy efficient. The script allows for the design to be applied to any window surface, anywhere in the world. As well, it allows for the design to be customizable and adjustable for the amount of sunlight allowed into the space. Our sunshade has also shown to reduce heat gains and energy consumption. Furthermore, its simple construction can be adapted to have a very minimal carbon footprint. Its functional design is very beneficial for any space, and its simplicity and adaptability make it easily reproducible and usable for any window surface.


47


O

O

O

10.62 14.74 17.49

48

O

18.73

O

18.41

O

16.53

O

13.18

O

8.57

O

3.07

O

2.75


49


50


51


09

ACROSS THE ARCHIPELAGO

PROF. AARON SPRECHER + ELISABETH BOUCHARD SUMMER 2013

It is up to our generation of architects to propse new forms and systems to answer the future and existing challenges of Arctic development and research. Design a research station on the existing Alert site in Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, thats general function is to monitor the earth’s atmosphere. Current circumstances in Northern climate, environment and political landscapes indicate changing conditions in the near future. Shifting sea ice coverage, water levels, shipping routes, and rising temperatures will ultimately change the face of the North. These inevitable factors raise the need to monitor a more substantial part of the considerably uninhabited Canadian Arctic. Envisioning a system that can adapt to this environment is a main priority. This vision aligns with the nomadic traditions of the Inuit people. Their traditional lifestyle allowed them to adjust to changing seasons, food sources and environmental factors. In the North, having the ability to adapt to new conditions is paramount in order to thrive in its extreme environment. In the challenging topography and climate, air travel is the only viable option for transportation to remote locations. Not only does air travel have a strong historical presence in the identity of northern inhabi52

tation and research, as the North becomes a new frontier of development there is now a renewed focus on the need to develop more efficient, reliable and safe means of transportation. The Arctic Airship is the paragon of this future vision for inhabitation of the rapidly changing parameters of the North. It provides a patrolling presence in the Canadian Arctic, as the need to establish sovereignty and advocate for the protection of the already fragile environment should be of the utmost priority. Researchers live on the Airship and travel between stations to collect data and maintain equipment. As with Inuit nomadic dwellings, our research docking stations leave almost no trace on the land, as they require little intervention on the landscape. They are erected quickly and as one pre-assembled structure, and are removed in the same manner. Research equipment is left unmanned to monitor conditions.


53


1 The collapsed Research Docking Station and Airship preparing for Deployment in Alert.

4 The Airship flies to the location of the new Research Docking Station.

54

2 The Airship is inflated from the underground Helium storage facility and the interior structure is assembled. Research crew board the Airship.

3 The Airship takes off with the collapsed Research Docking Station as an external load beneath the Airship.

5 The Airship places the Docking Station at the research site. Ground crew exit the Airship for Docking Station Assembly.

6 The Airship lifts the top of the Docking Station into place while ground crews secure the structure and tensile membrane.


55


56


57


X

PROFESSIONAL WORK - C& PARTNERS ARCHITECTS INC. INTERN ARCHITECT 2013

As both projects are currently in progress, these images are basic and preliminary concept renderings for the purpose of presenting form, materiality, and spatiality to the client.

58

The Lakeshore Boulevard project design was an amalgamation of the best qualities in various different iterations our design team produced. With a retail and cafe space on the first floor and a ballet academy on the second and third floors, the program calls for an open but private facade that responds to the different interior spatial configurations. The ballet academy wants to achieve an exclusivity to its members, while the retail and cafe space requires an entrance open to the public.


B D

As the new office for C& Partners on the third floor and D E a medical clinic Con the first two floors, the design of the Queen/Woodbine project proposed a challenge. Working E F G individually on these inital design iterations, I wanted to convey a particular language to the passerby: a safe and welcoming facade to attract patients to the clinic while retaining an innovative, yet timeless exterior to communicate the relevance of our architecture office. This reNotes:

This drawing, as an instrument of service, is provided by and is the property of C& Partners Architects Inc. The contractor must verify and accept responsibility for all dimensions and conditons on site and must notify C& Partners Architects Inc. of any variations from the supplied information. This drawing is not to be scaled. The architect is not responsible for the accuracy of survey, structural, mechanical, electrical, etc., information shown on this drawing. Refer to the appropriate consultant's drawings before proceeding with the work. Construction must conform to applicable codes and requirements of authorities having jurisdiction. The contractor working from drawings not specfiically marked "For Construction" must assume full responsibility and bear costs for any corrections or damages resulting from his/her work.

C& Partners Architects Inc 1 Palace Pier Court, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M8V 3W9

quired much back-and-forth collaboration with the client F G an optimized solution. While the to develop the design into Notes: entrance to the architecture office is discreet and shapes the visitor’s path with concrete walls, the entrance to the medical clinic is transparent, open, and encroaching into the public space. This concept was used to treat the interior layout as well as the second and third floor facades. This drawing, as an instrument of service, is provided by and is the property of C& Partners Architects Inc. The contractor must verify and accept responsibility for all dimensions and conditons on site and must notify C& Partners Architects Inc. of any variations from the supplied information. This drawing is not to be scaled. The architect is not responsible for the accuracy of survey, structural, mechanical, electrical, etc., information shown on this drawing. Refer to the appropriate consultant's drawings before proceeding with the work. Construction must conform to applicable codes and requirements of authorities having jurisdiction. The contractor working from drawings not specfiically marked "For Construction" must assume full responsibility and bear costs for any corrections or damages resulting from his/her work.

C& Partners Architects Inc 1 Palace Pier Court, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M8V 3W9

T 416-825-9650 E info@ candpartnersinc.com

W www.candpartnersinc.com

T 416-825-9650 E info@ candpartnersinc.com

W www.candpartnersinc.com

QUEEN & WOODBINE

No.

Description

Project number 1328 Date

11/15/13

Drawn by

RW

Checked by

AC

Scale

Date

QUEEN & WOODBINE

No.

Description

Date

Project number 1328 Date

11/15/13

Drawn by

RW

Checked by

AC

Scale

59


ROBYN WHITWHAM EDUCATION

T: 647 633 6359 robyn.whitwham@mail.mcgill.ca

McGill University | Montreal, Quebec 2012 - 2013

M. Architecture • Alpha Rho Chi Medal | for leadership, service, and professional merit

2008 - 2012

BSc. Architecture • Spectra Energy Scholarship | for academics, leadership, and community involvement • Engineers Nova Scotia Scholarship | for academics and extra curricular activities • Nova Scotia Lieutenant Governor’s Medal | for academics and leadership

60

ARCHITECTURE EXPERIENCE

2013

Intern Architect | C& Partners Architects Inc.

2011

Research Associate in the Affordable Housing Research Group | McGill University School of Architecture

2011

Summer school in Greece | McGill University School of Architecture

• Independently developed design proposals, conceptual work, prepared working set drawings, and OBC specifications • Applied artistic skills to design both new constructions and renovations of projects, predominantly in the field of healthcare • Collaborated with our creative team, working iteratively to engage and respond to the client’s design and practical needs • Extensively researched materials to achieve optimized selections based on cost, aesthetics, LEED performance, and quality • Research assistant for Dr. Avi Friedman, internationally recognized expert in housing innovation • Conducted research in the area affordable housing design • Co-authored several papers on the topic of narrow front housing, including “Design Principles of Narrow Townhouses: for Affordability and Adaptability”, published in the journal Open House International (September, 2012 issue) • Extensive travel throughout Greece, visiting cities and sites of architectural significance. • Explored themes of topothesia, limits, and memory in the context of ancient Greek architecture, landscape, and myth. • Created and presented an installation in the landscape to demonstrate interpretations of the studied themes.


ACADEMIC EXTRA-CURRICULARS 2012 - 2013

Vice President of Academic Affairs

Graduate Architecture Students Association | McGill University • Concerned with active involvement of the graduate students within the school of architecture • Organization of academic events such as guest lectures and software tutorials

2011 - 2013

Student representative

School of Architecture Curriculum Committee | McGill University • Represented students in matters related to structure and content of both undergraduate and graduate architecture programs. • Contributed to the preparations for accreditation of the School of Architecture by the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB).

2011 - 2012

Vice President of Academic Affairs

Architecture Students Association | McGill University • Acted as the liaison between the students and the university administration. • Responsible for resolving issues and concerns of the students relating to the curriculum and faculty policies. 2011 - 2012

School of Architecture representative

Engineering Students Academic Committee | McGill University • Collaborated with other Faculty of Engineering departments to resolve academic-related issues and make recommendations related to improving the efficiency of academic programs. • Promoted a “unique voice” of architecture students while being integrated into the Faculty of Engineering.

SKILLS Computer and Technology • Revit • AutoCAD • Rhinoceros • V-Ray • Grasshopper

• Autodesk 3ds Max • Adobe InDesign • Adobe Illustrator • Adobe Photoshop

Model making

• 3D Printing • Various materials including wood, metal, • Lasercutting concrete, plaster, resin, • CNC machine cardboard, wax, wire, etc. • Soldering

Languages • English • French

61


Architecture Portfolio - Robyn Whitwham