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Fishtales - The Student Handbook 2016 - 2017

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Table of Contents Topic

Page Number(s)

Introduction

4

Changes to College Policy

4

Emergency Information

5

Mission

6

History

7

Alma Mater

8

Fight Song

9

Academic Policies

11 - 19

Intellectual Property Rights

11 - 14

Policy on the Disclosure of Academic Records

15 - 18

Academic Program Policies

18

Academic Calendar

19

Academic Integrity Code

21 - 32

Campus Life Policies

34 - 38

Student Mission Statement

35

Student Bill of Rights

36 - 37

Student Complaints

38

Student Conduct Code

41 - 60

College Alcohol Policy

63 - 67

College Illegal Drug Policy

69 - 72

Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy

75 - 90

Risk Management and Social Host Policy

93 - 105

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Table of Contents Topic

Page Number(s)

Residential Facilities Policies

107 - 124

Residence Life Policies

107 - 109

Residency Requirement

110

Residential Facilities Policies and Procedures

111 - 120

Fraternity and Sorority Housing Policies

122 - 124

College Hazing Policy

127

Other College Policies & Procedures

129

Computer Resources

129 - 132

Non-Discrimination and Harassment Policy

134 - 143

Online Copyright Infringement Policy

144 - 145

Posting and Distribution Policy

146

Solicitation Policy

147

Policy on Parking, Motor Vehicle Registration, and Parking

148-151

Registered Sex Offenders

152

Emergency Procedures for Assisting Victims of Sexual Assault

153

Emergency Procedures for Assisting Victims of Relationship Violence

154

Emergency Procedures for Assisting Victims of Stalking

156

College Offices

158

Yellow Jacket’s Step UP! Bystander Intervention Tips

159

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Introduction This handbook, published by the Dean of Students Office, is intended to provide important information about college life. It includes a section with reference material, including emergency information, a segment that outlines student rights, another that delineates student responsibilities, including most student-related policies, and a list of College resources. These materials represent a long tradition and will assist you in participating as an active member of the R-MC community as students, faculty, staff and alumni . Changes to College Policies The policies and regulations of R-MC may be amended from time to time by action of the responsible bodies. Therefore, the documents in this handbook are subject to change during the academic session. Because of the likelihood of these changes, the official policy is the online version of Fishtales, which can be found on the website All official communication between the College and student(s) will be through the R-MC student mail services and/or through a student’s College assigned e-mail account.

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Emergency Information Services

Number

Hanover Emergency Services (24/7)

911 9-911 Campus Phones

Campus Safety (24/7)

752-4710 0 Campus Phones

Ashland Police (24/7)

798-1227

R-MC Counseling Center *

752-7270

Sexual Assault Responders*

752-7270

R-MC Student Health Services **

752-3041

Hanover Safe Place

752-2702

Virginia Family Violence & Sexual Assault Hotline (24/7)

1-800-838-8238

Official School Closing Hotline (24/7)

752-3633

* If you need to access these on-campus services after business hours, please contact the Office of Campus Safety. ** Student Health Services is open Monday– Friday from 9:00am—4:00pm when school is in session.

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Mission Statement A Randolph-Macon College liberal arts education develops the mind and character of each student.

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Randolph-Macon College History By the 1820s, clergy of the Virginia Conference of the Methodist Church had recognized a need to educate prospective clergymen in the fields of English, history, and geography, so that they could pass required examinations for entrance into the ministry. This growing need, coupled with the rise of more cities with more learned congregations, called for the establishment of a liberal arts college where prospective ministers could study and learn the art of communication with urban townspeople. In 1830, the Virginia legislature approved a charter for Randolph-Macon College, to be located in Boydton, Virginia, near the border of North Carolina. The names of John Randolph, a Virginia statesman, and Nathaniel Macon, a North Carolina statesman, were given to the college to dispel the notion that the school was to be only a sectarian one. Neither man was Methodist. The college was moved to Ashland, Virginia, in 1868 after the railroads to Boydton were destroyed during the Civil War. The move to Ashland challenged the college’s spirit and stimulated new growth. The students themselves raised most of the funds for the first major building constructed on the new campus — Washington and Franklin Hall, a national historic landmark which was completely renovated in 1987. In this century, Randolph-Macon’s campus has grown to more than 60 major buildings (three of which are on the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register; three others are included in the Ashland Historic District) on 105 acres. The college’s second oldest building — Pace Hall — underwent renovation and reopened in mid-1998 as a center for the studio arts. The third historic building, the Old Chapel, is used for music, art history, and drama classes. Throughout its history, Randolph-Macon College has attracted and educated students of all faiths. Founded as an all-male institution, the college has been coeducational since 1971. A Phi Beta Kappa college, Randolph-Macon offers 30 majors and opportunities for internships, study abroad, and independent study.

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Alma Mater Verse 1 Bowered midst its oaks and maples Beautiful to view, Stands our noble Alma Mater, Randolph-Macon true. Chorus Lift the chorus, speed it onward; Ne’er let praises fail! Hail to thee our Alma Mater, Randolph-Macon hail! Verse 2 Yet ’tis not thy stately buildings, Sylvan home for youth, But thy spirit we most cherish, Full of love and truth Chorus Lift the chorus, speed it onward; Ne’er let praises fail! Hail to thee our Alma Mater, Randolph-Macon hail! Verse 3 Randolph-Macon, Alma Mater, Beautiful and free, Second home to all thy children, Where we joy to be. Chorus Lift the chorus, speed it onward; Ne’er let praises fail! Hail to thee our Alma Mater, Randolph-Macon hail!

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The Fight Song I’m a Yellow Jacket born, I’m a Yellow Jacket bred. And when I die I’ll be Yellow Jacket dead. Chorus

So, Rah-Rah O Randolph-Macon Rah-Rah O Randolph-Macon Rah-Rah O Randolph-Macon Rah-Rah-Rah Lemon and Black Will wave on high. Old R.M.C Will never die

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Academic Policies

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Intellectual Property Rights Policy Randolph-Macon College I. Basic Principles and Purpose Randolph-Macon College subscribes to the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure jointly agreed upon by the American Association of University Professors and the Association of American Colleges (now the Association of American Colleges and Universities). This Statement says that "Teachers are entitled to full freedom in research and in the publication of the results, subject to the adequate performance of their other academic duties; but research for pecuniary return should be based upon an understanding with the authorities of the institution." The Statement further notes that "Institutions of higher education are conducted for the common good and not to further the interest of either the individual teacher or the institution as a whole. The common good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition." (See Randolph-Macon College Faculty Handbook, Section 2.1) The purpose of this policy is to promote the free search for truth by faculty, staff, students and visitors at Randolph-Macon College while guarding the rights of authors of intellectual property and the rights and appropriate interests of the College in the use of its facilities and resources. II. Traditional Academic Work - Author Owns Intellectual Property

The AAUP Statement on Copyright (1999) states that "Prevailing academic practice is to treat the faculty member as the copyright owner of works that are created independently and at the faculty member's own initiative for traditional academic purposes." The College historically has not, and does not now, assert any claim or ownership interest in the categories of traditional academic work including but not limited to: textbooks, class handouts and presentations, research articles, proposals or monographs, student theses or dissertations, paintings, drawings, sculpture, musical or dramatic compositions and performances, poetry, and popular fiction and nonfiction. The AAUP Statement on Copyright notes that this practice has been followed for the most part, regardless of the physical medium in which these "traditional academic works" appear; that is, whether on paper or in audiovisual or electronic form. Staff members may also produce works that are covered under this policy, and enjoy ownership of the intellectual property so created. Students enjoy academic freedom and the right to free inquiry and expression. Such inquiry and expression may result in the production of traditional academic works. Students enjoy ownership of the intellectual property so created. Students serving as interns may also be subject to the intellectual property policies of the outside agency to which they are assigned. The recognition of students' intellectual property rights shall not be interpreted to contradict the College's policies regarding student publications (see Fishtales, "Student Bill of Rights").

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Visitors to the campus enjoy academic freedom and the right to free inquiry and expression. Such inquiry and expression may result in the production of traditional academic works. Visitors may enjoy intellectual property rights to such work, subject to the College's policies regarding access to and use of its facilities. III. Work for Hire - College Owns Intellectual Property Materials written, created, produced or otherwise generated "for hire" are defined as inventions, creations, manuscripts, or other works or things of commercial value which are written, created, produced or otherwise generated by persons, including but not limited to faculty and staff members, who are engaged by the College specifically to write, create, produce or otherwise generate such materials or to conduct the research or other activity which produced anything included in the material (s); or are released from other College responsibilities in order to write, create, produce or otherwise generate materials at the initiative of the College. Works for hire are the exclusive property of the College. IV. Joint Works - College and Author Co-own Intellectual Property Traditionally, "co-authorship" means that two or more faculty members, staff members, or students, often from different academic institutions, have collaborated on a creative work and are co-owners of the intellectual property. This traditional understanding of co-authorship is under this policy to be treated as traditional academic work.

Under some conditions, the College may assert co-authorship and thus co-ownership of intellectual property. Such conditions may hold if there is significant use of College resources, and/or if outside sponsorship contractually shares intellectual property rights with some entity not under the control of the College. Significant Use Use of office or classroom space, libraries, general computational facilities or equipment routinely used in the regular performance of academic duties, does not constitute significant use of College resources. The use of specialized experimental or computational laboratory facilities or equipment or other special instrumentation is not considered significant use if it involves brief periods of time or limited use, e.g. for exploratory tests. Significant use includes utilization of College laboratories or special instrumentation outside of the expected use deriving from regular teaching and professional activities; dedicated assistance by College employees; special financial assistance beyond sabbatical leaves, faculty development grants or monies obtained through other ordinary competitive processes; or extensive use of shared facilities. If the College determines that the production of intellectual property is governed by this "significant use" policy, it may reasonably request reimbursement for any unusual financial or technical support, possibly in the form of compensation from future royalties. The College should consider whether an assertion of co-ownership of the copyright or patent has a detrimental impact on the free inquiry of faculty, staff or students before making such assertion. 12


B. Outside Co-Sponsorship Materials written, created, produced or otherwise generated pursuant to or under the sponsorship of an outside foundation, agency or government and under the auspices of a College grant shall be subject to the copyright, patent, and exploitation terms and conditions of said grant, contract or agreement. Where said grant, contract or agreement obligates the faculty member to share or convey intellectual property rights to the outside sponsor or third party, the College shall be given the right to review the contract and assess whether it has an interest in asserting co-ownership of the rights. This is especially the case when the ownership of intellectual property rights by an outside agency would remove the knowledge created from general distribution, such as in the creation of 'trade secrets.' Where no obligation to convey to the sponsor exists, all rights revert to the author, subject to the terms of this policy. In the case of government contracts or grants, the government always retains the right to duplicate and use the works for government purposes. V. Notification Requirements It is the obligation of the author of intellectual property to notify the Provost if Section IV may be applicable. When notification is made, the College will determine on a timely basis if the intellectual property produced is subject to Section IV, and if so, whether the College wishes to assert a claim of co -ownership. It is the obligation of College employees entering into contractual arrangements for the production of intellectual property that may be governed by Section IV and assign or may assign rights to an outside sponsor or third party to notify the College and permit the College to review the contract and its terms. VI. Reciprocity For works governed by Section IV, if the intellectual property right is retained by the author, the College shall enjoy nonexclusive royalty-free license to the work for internal educational and administrative purposes. Conversely, when the College holds all or part of the copyright, the author shall retain the right to take credit for creative contributions, to reproduce the work for his or her instructional purposes, and to incorporate the work in future scholarly works produced by said author (AAUP, Statement on Copyright). For works governed by Section III., the author shall retain the right to take credit for creative contributions, to reproduce the work for his or her instructional purposes, and to incorporate the work in future scholarly works produced by said author.

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VII. Outside Employment Under some circumstances the exercise of a property right by a faculty member or staff member may constitute outside employment. A faculty member should consult with the department chair and if the exercise of the property right might be construed as constituting outside employment. If the Provost determines that such exercise of the property right does constitute outside employment, then policies governing such employment shall be invoked (see 13.1.10 of the Faculty Handbook). VIII. Disputes and Appeals A. Disputes

Disputes between the author(s) and the College over ownership of intellectual property rights or the application of policies governing intellectual property rights will be heard by an ad hoc committee convened for the purpose, made up of two persons named by the author(s), two persons named by the College, and one person named by the four members previously seated to serve as chair. Legal counsel shall not be allowed to attend any hearing. The decision of the ad hoc committee will take the form of findings of fact, conclusions, and a recommended resolution. The findings of fact, conclusions, and recommendations must be based solely on the hearing record, pertinent College policies and procedures, and the law. The committee's recommended resolution shall be made to the President of the College. B. Appeals

Appeals will be addressed per the College's grievance procedures. IX. Rights Sharing For intellectual property for which the faculty member, staff member, student or visitor retains ownership rights, the author and the College may by mutual agreement enter into an arrangement under which the costs, ownership, and rewards of the property are shared by the author and the College. *Portions of this policy are drawn from policies at Ferrum College, Roanoke College, University of Delaware, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute

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Policy on the Disclosure of Academic Records Registrar’s Office Randolph-Macon College adheres to a policy of compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended (Buckley Amendment) which became law on June 17, 1976 and has as its objective to insure the privacy of student records. As such, it is the policy of the College to (1) permit students to inspect their education record, (2) limit disclosure to others of personally identifiable information from education records without students’ prior written consent, and (3) provide students the opportunity to seek correction of their education records where appropriate. Anyone interested in reading the legislation may come to the Office of the Provost or the Dean of Students.

Definitions A. “Student” is any person for whom Randolph-Macon College maintains education records. B. An “Education Record” is any record which contains information that is personally identifiable to a student and is maintained by the college. Education records include but are not limited to: 1. the academic record 2. student health record 3 student personnel folder 4. placement information 5. financial aid file 6. disciplinary record C. Exclusions – The following are not education records: 1. records about students made by faculty and administrators for their own use and not shown to others 2 campus safety records maintained solely for law enforcement purposes and maintained separately from the education records described above 3. employment records except where a currently enrolled student is employed as a result of his or her status as a student 4. records of a physician, psychologist, or other recognized professional or paraprofessional made or used only for treatment purposes and available only to persons providing treatment 5. records that contain only information relating to a person’s activities after that person is no longer a student at the College D. A “School Official” is a person employed by Randolph-Macon College in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or supportive staff position. This may include contractors, consultants, volunteers, or other parties to whom the school has outsourced institutional services or functions.

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II.

Access to Records A. Right of Access – A student may have access to his/her education records, except confidential letters of recommendation for which the student waived the right of access, and the financial records of the student’s parents. B. A student must request access to the record in writing with the official responsible for maintaining the appropriate record. C. Access will be permitted during the succeeding 45-day period of the request only in the presence of the official responsible for the record or his/her designee. D. A student may request a hearing for the purpose of challenging the content of his/her records, to insure that the records are not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of his/her privacy, and to provide an opportunity to correct or delete any inaccurate, misleading or otherwise inappropriate data. This hearing request must be filed in writing to the officer responsible for maintaining the appropriate record. The hearing shall take place before this officer not later than 30 days after the request is received. The officer shall see that the source of the material challenged has an opportunity to be heard, where appropriate. The officer shall subsequently make the decision on the challenge.

III.

No material in a student’s official records other than “directory information” may be released to anyone without the written consent of the student. A. The following categories have been designated directory information: 1. Name

2. Address 3. Telephone Number (on and/or off-campus) 4. Campus E-mail Address 5. Date and Place of Birth 6. Previous Institution(s) Attended 7. Current Enrollment Status (e.g. class standing-freshman) 8. Dates of Attendance

9. Major and/or Minor Fields of Study 10. Awards and Honors (e.g. Dean’s List) 11. Degrees Conferred (including date) 12. Full-Time or Part-Time Status 13. Participation in College Recognized Activities and Sports 14. Weight and Height of Athletic Team Members 15. Photograph or Videotaped Image 16


B. This information may be disclosed even in the absence of consent unless the student files written notice requesting the College not to disclose any or all of the categories within three weeks of the first day of the semester in which the student begins each school year. This notice must be filed annually within the above allotted time to avoid automatic disclosure of directory information. The notice should be filed with the Registrar’s Office. C. Directory information may appear in public documents, on the Randolph-Macon website, or otherwise be disclosed without student consent unless the student objects as provided above. D. The College will give annual public notice to students of the categories of information designated as directory information. E. All requests for non-disclosure of directory information will be implemented as soon as publication schedules will reasonably allow. F. The College will use its best efforts to maintain the confidentiality of those categories of directory information that a student properly requests not be publicly disclosed. The College, however, makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees that directory information designated for non-disclosure will not appear in public documents. G. Prior consent is not required to release personally identifiable information if the disclosure is to the following: 1. To school officials whom the college has determined to have legitimate educational interests. 2. To officials of another school where the student seeks or intends to enroll, or where the student is already enrolled if the disclosure is for purposes related to the student’s enrollment or transfer 3. To authorized representatives of the U. S. Comptroller General, the U. S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or State and local educational authorities, such as a State postsecondary authority that is responsible for supervising the university’s State-supported education programs. Disclosures under this provision may be made, subject to the requirements of §99.35, in connection with an audit or evaluation of Federal- or State-supported education programs, or for the enforcement of or compliance with Federal legal requirements that relate to those programs. These entities may make further disclosures of PII to outside entities that are designated by them as their authorized representatives to conduct any audit, evaluation, or enforcement or compliance activity on their behalf. (§§99.31(a)(3) and 99.35) 4. In connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or which the student has received, if the information is necessary to determine eligibility for the aid, determine the amount of the aid, determine the conditions of the aid, or enforce the terms and conditions of the aid

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5. To organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, the school, in order to: (a) develop, validate, or administer predictive tests; (b) administer student aid programs; or (c) improve instruction. 6. To accrediting organizations to carry out their accrediting functions. 7. To parents of an eligible student if the student is a dependent for IRS tax purposes. 8. To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. 9. To appropriate officials in connection with a health or safety emergency. Information the school has designated as “directory information.” 10. To a victim of an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, subject to the requirements of §99.39. The disclosure may only include the final results of the disciplinary proceeding with respect to that alleged crime or offense, regardless of the finding. 11. To the general public, the final results of a disciplinary proceeding, subject to the requirements of §99.39, if the school determines the student is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense and the student has committed a violation of the school’s rules or policies with respect to the allegation made against him or her. 12. To parents of a student regarding the student’s violation of any Federal, State, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the school, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines the student committed a disciplinary violation and the student is under the age of 21. H.

No authorized release of records may occur when a student has outstanding financial obligations to Randolph-Macon College.

I.

Grade reports including midterm reports of unsatisfactory progress are distributed to students through their MyMaconWeb accounts.

Academic Program Policies All policies governing the Academic Program at Randolph-Macon College can be found in the current College Catalog. The College Catalog is available online at:

http://www.rmc.edu/offices/registrar/academic-catalogs

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RANDOLPH-MACON COLLEGE ASHLAND, VIRGINIA 2016-2017 ACADEMIC CALENDAR Fall Term 2016 September September September October October October October October October October November

5 12 16 7-9 14 14 19 21-23 25 26 8

Monday Monday Friday Fri-Sun Friday Friday Wednesday Saturday Tuesday Wednesday Tuesday

November November November December December December December

16 22 28 9 12 16 19

Wednesday Tuesday Monday Friday Monday Friday Monday

January Term 2017 January January

3 5

Tuesday Thursday

January January January January

7 13 16 20

Saturday Friday Monday Friday

January January

27 30

Friday Monday

Spring Term 2017 February February February February March March March April April

6 13 17 27 17 24 24 3 14

Monday Monday Friday Monday Friday Friday Friday Monday Friday

April April

20 27

Thursday Thursday

May May May May May May May June

11 12 15 19 22 26 27 19

Thursday Friday Monday Friday Monday Friday Saturday Monday

First day of classes - Labor Day Last day to add/enroll in classes Last day to drop a course without notation on transcript Family Weekend Reports of Unsatisfactory Progress due Fall Break begins after classes & labs Classes Resume Homecoming Last day to withdraw from a course with grade of W Registration for Spring Term begins Last day to withdraw from College without all Fs End of 9th week of classes Application for Degree (Seniors) Due Thanksgiving Recess begins after classes & labs end Classes resume Last day of classes Examinations begin Examinations end Fall Term Grades Due Registration and Classes begin Last day to add/enroll in classes AND to drop a course without notation on transcript Regular Class Meeting Last day to withdraw from a course with grade of W Fall Incomplete Grades Due Last day to withdraw from College without all Fs End of 3rd week of classes January Term Examinations January Term Grades Due First day of classes Last day to add/enroll in classes Last day to drop a course without notation on transcript January Incomplete Grades Due Reports of Unsatisfactory Progress due Last day to withdraw from a course with grade of W Spring Recess begins after classes & labs Classes resume Last day to withdraw from College without all Fs End of 9th week of classes Pre-registration for fall and January Terms begins Application for Degree Due (Summer 2017, Fall 2017, and January 2018 Finishers) Last day of classes Research Day & Honors Convocation Examinations begin Examinations end Spring Term Grades Due Baccalaureate Commencement Spring Incomplete Grades Due 19


Academic Integrity Code

220


Academic Integrity Code Randolph-Macon College Passed by the Majority of Faculty and Students - Spring 2013 Article I. Preamble and Pledge of Academic Integrity Randolph-Macon College is a community of scholars in which students and faculty work and study together for the intellectual enrichment of all. For such a community to thrive it is essential that all of its members honor the principles of intellectual and academic integrity, for without these principles scholarship is without merit and education of questionable value. Academic integrity is a matter of exerting the most scrupulous care in acknowledging one’s scholarly debts, in giving credit for every source of information, in being fully responsible for the independence and integrity of one’s own work. Academic integrity is an ethical commitment. Such a commitment is made in the knowledge that the existence of a community of scholars depends upon it and in the belief that scholarship is worthwhile in its own right. It is the hope of the College that the commitment will be lifelong. It is in the interest of every member of the Randolph-Macon community to see that the tradition of academic integrity is honored. Each student, therefore, upon enrolling in the College and entering the community, is required to sign the following Pledge of Academic Integrity: As a member of the student body of Randolph-Macon College, I guarantee to my fellow students, the faculty and the administration that I have read and that I will uphold the principles and procedures of the Code of Academic Integrity in all its articles during my residency and will make every effort to discourage violations by others. Article II. Composition of the Academic Integrity Council 1. The Academic Integrity Council shall be a shared responsibility of Students, Faculty, and Administrators. 2. The Council shall consist of nine members: six students; two faculty members; and one administrator. The Student members shall consist of: one senior, one junior, one sophomore, one member-at-large, one alternate member-at-large, and one non-voting freshman auditor. There shall also be one alternate faculty member. 3. An Academic Integrity Council Selection Committee shall be established to select new student members as needed and the freshman class auditor. This committee shall consist of the current Chair and Vice Chair and at least one other student member of the Academic Integrity Council. As new student members are needed, the Academic Integrity Council Selection Committee shall choose the new members through an application process with confirmation by the Student Government Association. The freshman auditor shall be selected in the fall term through the same standardized application process and confirmed by the Student Government Association. It will be the responsibility of the selection committee to determine the application process. 4. A student member’s term shall last for the duration of his or her enrollment at Randolph-Macon College. The Chair, Vice Chair and any replacements for graduating members shall be selected by the Academic Integrity Council annually in the month of April by majority vote of the Council. The Chair must be a member of the student body who has served at least one academic year on the Council and the Vice Chair must be a member of the faculty. The freshman auditor shall remain a non-voting member until the beginning of his/her sophomore year. The Council reserves the right to allow the freshman member to vote before his/her sophomore year if agreed upon by unanimous vote of the Council. 21


5. To be eligible to serve, a student must not be on academic or extracurricular probation nor have been convicted of any violation of the Code of Academic Integrity. In the event of any conviction under the Code of Student Conduct, the Council reserves the right to hold a hearing by which a member of the Council may be removed by a majority vote with at least one faculty member in agreement. 6. The Faculty Members shall be elected at the May Faculty meeting for a two-year term. The terms shall be staggered. An alternate shall be elected annually for a single year term. A faculty member may serve for no more than two consecutive terms but shall be eligible for reelection to subsequent terms in accordance with this section after a period of at least one academic year has elapsed. 7. The Administrative Member shall be the Provost of the College, the Associate Dean of the College or a substitute designated by the Provost of the College. 8. A quorum shall consist of the Chair or Vice Chair and four of the members of the Council of which there must be at least one student and one faculty member. 9. An emergency quorum shall consist of three members, including at least one faculty or administrative member, if the Chair and the Provost of the College concur in advance that the assembly of a full Council is impractical and that a timely resolution of the case is desirable. Article III. Violations A. The following acts will be considered violations of this Code: 1. Committing plagiarism, which, in addition to the traditional definition (“[T]he unauthorized use of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one’s own.” The Random House College Dictionary, 1995, p. 1032) includes the act of turning in, as one’s own, work done wholly or in part by another person,]. 2. Knowingly doing work for another person to turn in as his or her own, or knowingly permitting one’s work to be used in this manner. 3. Illicitly reading, copying, or discussing another student’s academic work, or knowingly permitting another student to illicitly read, copy, or discuss one’s own academic work. 4. Using any unauthorized books, notes, or devices in the performance of academic work, or bringing any such unauthorized materials into an examination room, contrary to the expressed directions of the instructor or proctor. 5. Violating any clearly expressed stipulation or restriction applied to the performance of academic work. 6. Gaining unauthorized access to examination or test papers before or after an examination or test. This includes those administered in previous terms if such access is specifically prohibited by the instructor. 7. Falsely reporting research or laboratory/field work as having been done, or deliberately falsifying the results, including the illicit submission of one’s own graded work in a different course or for a different instructor. 8. Knowingly making a false statement to any faculty member or academic official of the College in regard to an academic matter, including forgery on academic forms.

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9. Deliberately defacing, mutilating, or damaging library, classroom, or laboratory materials or equipment, or the removing, or attempting to remove, the same from general use without authorization (e.g. hiding or misfiling). 10. Illicitly or maliciously accessing, altering, copying, using, or damaging computer software or files. 11. Illicitly or maliciously accessing, altering, copying, using, or damaging confidential academic records or materials. 12. Contempt of Council, which includes: a. Making any deliberately false statement regarding a violation of the provisions of this Code to the Academic Integrity Council or to any student, faculty member, or administrator involved in the investigation of such a violation; and b. Any act or conduct prohibited by Article VI, B2(e). All of these provisions apply to Randolph-Macon students who are pursuing academic work in offcampus situations or through cooperative agreements with other institutions, unless other provisions apply. Article IV. Reporting Procedures, Responsibilities and Options A. Definitions: 1. Observer: A student, faculty member, or administrator who has observed a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity or has reason to believe that a violation has occurred. 2. Instructor: A faculty member (or staff member with faculty status) teaching a course in which an alleged violation of the Code of Academic Integrity occurred. An instructor may also be the observer; however, Section E of Article IV outlines procedures specific to the instructor that must be followed in all cases, even when the instructor is also the observer of the alleged offense. 3. Responsible Official: Any College official, including an instructor defined above, who has the authority to administer the Code of Academic Integrity or its sanctions. These officials include, but are not limited to, library staff, the College’s Registrar and Assistant Registrars, and the members of the Academic Integrity Council. 4. Day, Business Day, or Working Day: When used in this Code, these terms refer to regular College work days during which College offices are open for students, staff, and faculty to transact academic business. Weekends, College holidays, and published calendar recesses (e.g. spring break, fall break, Thanksgiving recess) shall not count against any limits on days, business days, or working days specified herein. B. An observer who suspects that a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity has occurred: 1. Must secure evidence and/or witnesses, and; 2. Should talk to the student involved and inform him or her of the evidence, and; 3. In the course of this conversation must give the student involved the chance to explain. C. If the observer is satisfied by the explanation and convinced that no violation has occurred, the matter should be dropped.

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D. If, after following the procedure in Article IV, B, the observer is convinced or has reasonable grounds to believe that a violation has occurred, the observer either: 1. Should counsel the offender and warn him or her of the consequences of repeated offenses, if the offense seems to be minor or unintentional or uninformed; or, 2. Should report the offense to the instructor (or responsible official) involved (or a neutral party such as the Chair of the Department involved, or to a member of the Academic Integrity Council) who will refer the charges back to the instructor involved: a. If extenuating circumstances prevent and/or make inadvisable a direct confrontation; or, b. If the offense does not seem to be minor, unintentional, or uninformed; or, c. If the alleged offender chooses not to heed the warnings given. In any case, the observer must accept the responsibility to appear as a participant in the case of subsequent hearings, since anonymous accusations cannot be pursued or admitted for consideration in any subsequent hearing. The observer must submit all evidence and the names of any witnesses to the appropriate party. E. When the instructor (or responsible official) learns of an offense as a result of the procedure outlined in Section D or as a consequence of direct observation as the observer, he or she must also proceed within five business days in accordance with Sections B, C, and D, with the following exceptions and additions. 1. If the instructor (or responsible official) believes that an offense has been committed, before taking any action or commenting on the possible disposition of the matter, the instructor (or responsible official) must ask the Provost of the College if the student in question has been previously convicted of an offense of this code. 2. If the student has been found guilty of a prior offense, the Provost will notify the instructor (or responsible official) that the new case must be referred to the Academic Integrity Council. 3. If this would be the student’s first offense, the faculty member (or responsible official) may handle the matter him or herself, if the student concurs, or may refer the case to the Academic Integrity Council. 4. If either party wishes the Academic Integrity Council to handle the matter, the case must be referred to them. 5. If the instructor (or responsible official) intends to handle the case, he or she: a. Must inform the student of the option which the student has to take the case to the Academic Integrity Council; b. Must inform the student of the range of penalties from among which an instructor (or responsible official) is authorized to choose; c. Should not reveal the intended penalty, since he or she might not be making the final judgment of penalty; d. Must ask the student to decide, within 24 hours, who will adjudicate the case. 6. If the student so elects, the instructor (or responsible official) must refer the case to the Academic Integrity Council within 48 hours of the student’s decision.

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7. If the case is to be decided by the instructor (or responsible official), he or she: a. Must have the student acknowledge in writing that he or she will submit the matter to the judgment of the instructor and will waive the right to a hearing by the Academic Integrity Council. Such a declaration shall not be considered an admission of guilt. b. Must inform the student that an appeal may only be made in accordance with the provisions of Article IX; c. Must present the charge to the student, must provide evidence, and must allow the student to respond to the charge and/or evidence. F. If the instructor (or responsible official) decides on a verdict of guilty, he or she may choose one or more of the following: 1. Reprimand and counsel the student; or 2. Require that the work in question be done again or may make some suitable substitute or additional assignment; or 3. In the case of non-course related offenses, require some form of compensation or sanction; or 4. Award a reduced grade, grade of F or a grade of 0 (zero) on the work in question depending on the seriousness of the offense; or 5. Award a reduced grade in the course; or 6. Award a grade of F in the course in question. The instructor or responsible official must report any of the above actions taken to the student involved and the Provost of the College in writing within three to five (3-5) working days of that action. Copies of relevant materials must be sent to the Provost of the College, to be subject to the provisions of Article X. The Provost will keep a record of all such actions (see Article X). Article V. Academic Integrity Council Investigation Procedures A. Any proceeding of the Academic Integrity Council shall consist of three phases: investigation, hearing, and judgment. All members of the Council will take steps to ensure that the confidentiality of the accused student(s) is preserved throughout each of the phases. When a possible violation of the Code of Academic Integrity has been referred to the Academic Integrity Council in accordance with the procedures outlined in Article IV, the Chair of the Academic Integrity Council will initiate the investigation process. B. The Chair of the Academic Integrity Council will: 1. Receive a charge or notice of a violation in writing. 2. Set the time and place of the hearing, which should be within 3 to 7 working days of receiving the charge at a time and place when all parties involved can be present, if circumstances permit. a. When requested by the accused, an additional 48 hours of preparation time beyond the three to seven days may be granted by the Council to accommodate a verifiable physical illness or academic disability. Any such request for, or grant of, additional time shall not be considered by the Council during subsequent proceedings.

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3. Notify in writing all parties of the time, place and purpose of the hearing. This notification shall be delivered to the student’s mailing address on file with the College. The College is not responsible for address errors or a student’s failure to check or read his or her campus mail. 4. Inform in writing the person accused of his or her rights and obligations, and provide him or her with information as to the procedures of the hearing, and any possible penalties. 5. Designate a Hearing Coordinator whose place on the Academic Integrity Council for that case will be filled by one of the alternates, in accordance with the stipulations of Article II. C. The Hearing Coordinator will: 1. Manage the delivery of, in sealed envelopes, on behalf of the Chair, all notifications and correspondence arising from the case. 2. Secure a final version of the written charges signed by the observer(s) and make it available to the principals at least 24 hours prior to the hearing. 3. Secure a list of witnesses scheduled to appear at the hearing, and make it available to the principals at least 24 hours prior to the hearing. 4. Insure that all witnesses and evidence are directly material to the specific charge. 5. Secure a list of the evidence to be presented at the hearing, and make it available to the principals at least 24 hours prior to the hearing. 6. Serve as a facilitator and source of information regarding the Code, hearing and investigation procedures for the accused and the observer. 7. Attempt to gain a thorough knowledge of the facts of the case and the perspectives of both sides, while maintaining an objective outlook. 8. Act as a resource for the Academic Integrity Council during the hearing. D. A person accused of a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity should: 1. Write a response to the charge and provide it to the Hearing Coordinator at least 24 hours prior to the Hearing. 2. Provide to the Hearing Coordinator a list of witnesses who will appear on his or her behalf at least 24 hours prior to the Hearing. 3. Provide to the Hearing Coordinator the physical evidence, which is to be presented at the hearing at least 24 hours prior to the Hearing. 4. Secure from the Hearing Coordinator all available information, guidance and advice. 5. Be available to the Council for the duration of the proceedings. This includes responding to requests for information from the Provost’s Office and the Hearing Coordinator, as well as checking his or her campus mailbox or otherwise following instructions concerning the retrieval of important documents. Failure to respond to a request for information, to retrieve or read documents relating to the case, or to appear at a hearing without prior notice may reduce or void the procedural protections provided to the accused in this Code. E. An observer of a possible offense must: 1. Cooperate with the Hearing Coordinator and agree to appear at the hearing. 2. Give the Hearing Coordinator the names of all witnesses and any physical evidence available at least 24 hours prior to the Hearing. 3. Secure from the Hearing Coordinator all available information, guidance and advice. 26


Article VI. Hearing Procedures A. The Chair of the Academic Integrity Council shall call the hearing to order at the appointed time and place under the following considerations: 1. A quorum of the Academic Integrity Council must be present (see Article II). 2. The observer (accuser) of the alleged offense should be present at the hearing. 3. If the accused declines or fails to appear at the hearing, the hearing may proceed in his or her absence. 4. If more than one person is accused in the same offense, the Academic Integrity Council may, at its discretion, hold one hearing or separate hearings. B. During the course of a hearing, the Chair or the presiding member of the Academic Integrity Council will chair the proceedings, maintain order and decorum, protect the rights of the accused and see that minutes are kept. To facilitate the taking of minutes, a recording device should be employed by a member of the Council. No other recording devices may be used during the hearing. Only the accused, the observer or responsible official, witnesses, and members of the Academic Integrity Council may be present during the hearing. The hearing will adhere to the following format: 1. The Chair will introduce for the record the members of the Council who are present at the hearing. 2. The Chair of the Academic Integrity Council will read the following statement of rights: a. “The purpose of this hearing is to permit the members of the Council to make a fair and informed judgment on the matter presently before us. This is an administrative hearing and formal rules of evidence and jurisprudence do not apply. Unlike a court of law, it is not an adversarial process. All questions and comments from those appearing before the Council should be directed to the presiding Officer of the Council and not to those appearing before it. b. Both those bringing a charge before the Council and those accused in the charge may present evidence in the form of documents, objects, and other things, as well as witnesses to support their respective positions. The right of rebuttal is permitted through the Presiding Officer of the Council. Any member of the Council may ask questions of those bringing the charge and those accused of a violation, as well as any witness. c. The accused may be asked to testify by the Presiding Officer on matters that could involve selfincrimination and an adverse inference may be drawn from a failure to respond. A student’s previous conduct at the College is admissible. d. The Presiding Officer may declare a recess or a postponement in the hearing whenever appropriate or at the request of one of the parties involved in the hearing. e. Any act or conduct which shows disrespect for the dignity and authority of the Council during the hearing, or which obstructs, tends to obstruct, interrupt, prevent, or embarrass the proceedings or the prior investigations or the administration of justice shall constitute contempt of the Council. False testimony of a person in a hearing shall also constitute contempt of the Council. Any member of the Council may bring a contempt charge before the Council. Charges brought during the hearing may be decided at that hearing.�

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3. The Hearing Coordinator will introduce the accused and the observer(s) of the alleged offense. 4. The Hearing Coordinator will read the written charges against the accused. The Chair will ask the observer(s) if the statement is correct as read. 5. The Hearing Coordinator will read the response to the charge written by the accused. The Chair will ask the accused if the statement is correct as read. 6. The Hearing Coordinator will inform the Academic Integrity Council of witnesses and evidence to be presented. Witnesses may be sequestered until their testimony is required, at the discretion of the Academic Integrity Council. 7. The Chair of the Academic Integrity Council must: a. Ask the observer to indicate what evidence or other witnesses substantiate the charge; b. Allow the other members of the Academic Integrity Council to ask questions of the observer and/ or witnesses; c. Insure that questions asked are appropriate to the discovery of guilt or innocence. 8. If the accused is present, the Chair of the Academic Integrity Council must: a. Ask the accused to present evidence and/or witnesses and/or a reasonable number of character witnesses on his or her behalf; b. Allow the accused the opportunity to question the evidence and/or testimony presented; (At the discretion of the Academic Integrity Council, witnesses may be recalled for clarification of fact.) c. Allow the accused to present extenuating circumstances, explanations and/or a reasonable number of character witnesses. d. Allow the other members of the Academic Integrity Council to ask questions of the accused and/ or witnesses; e. Insure that questions asked are appropriate to the discovery of guilt or innocence. 9. During the course of the hearing all parties must speak on their own behalf. 10. Throughout the hearing the Hearing Coordinator is to act as a resource person for the Council, the observer and the accused. 11. At the discretion of the Academic Integrity Council, short concluding remarks may be permitted. 12. Before concluding the hearing, and in accordance with the provisions of Article VIII, the Presiding Officer will ask the observer to indicate in writing and without comment his or her suggested penalty in the event the Council reaches a guilty verdict. C. At the conclusion of all testimony the Presiding Officer will read the following statement: “The Council has now had an opportunity to hear from both sides in this matter, and will meet in closed session to reach a decision. The decision will be based on the merits of the case as presented and will be decided by a majority vote. The decision will be made in writing within three (3) days and will include findings of fact, and where appropriate to such findings, it will include a suitable penalty. This hearing is now closed.�

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Article VII. Judgment A. The judgment phase of the hearing shall proceed immediately after the procedures outlined in Article VI have concluded. B. The determination of guilt: 1. A finding of guilty requires the affirmative vote of a majority of the members of the Academic Integrity Council present. 2. If the accused is found not guilty, the Chair will notify the Provost of the College and direct the Hearing Coordinator to destroy all records of the proceedings. The instructor or other college official involved will be informed of the finding by the Provost of the College and advised to proceed on the assumption of innocence in the matter. Faculty members and College officials will be bound by the decisions of the Academic Integrity Council once a case has been submitted. 3. If the accused is found guilty, the Council will proceed immediately to the penalty phase. C. The Judgment and penalty phases must be kept separate and distinct. No discussion of penalties is to be permitted before a finding of guilt or innocence is made. Article VIII. Penalties A. If the offense involved course work of any kind, the Academic Integrity Council must ask the instructor involved to suggest an appropriate penalty or range of penalties from those listed below. The Council will seek the instructor’s suggested penalty in writing at the conclusion of the hearing. These suggestions are informative and non-binding, but the Council must give serious consideration to them. The instructor must also provide contact information for the Council to use following a finding of guilt in the event that course or grading-related information is required for the determination of a suitable penalty.

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B. A penalty decision requires the affirmative vote of a simple majority of the members of the Academic Integrity Council present. In general, the Council will impose a penalty that reflects the nature of the instant offense, that is more severe than the penalty received in any prior offense(s), and, in the case of a course-related offense, that has a greater impact on the student’s academic record than would have occurred had he or she simply not done the work in question. A student’s conduct during the proceedings will also be considered. The Council reserves its harshest penalties for those students who have committed multiple offenses under the Code. One or more of the following penalties, listed in descending order of severity, may be imposed: 1. Expulsion; 2. Suspension a. For a term or terms, not to exceed the equivalent of an academic year b. For the remainder of a term; 3. Failure in the course involved; 4. A reduced grade in the course; 5. Failure in the work involved; a. 0 (zero) on the work involved if the course is graded on a numerical scale. b. F on the work involved if the course is graded on a letter grade system. 6. Extra work with the consent of the instructor or responsible official involved. Additional work will also be subject to the Code of Academic Integrity. 7. Substitute assignments with the consent of the instructor or responsible official involved. Any substitute assignment will also be subject to the Code of Academic Integrity. 8. Letter of reprimand. C. Faculty members and College officials will be bound by the decisions of the Academic Integrity Council once they have been submitted. D. The accused must be notified of the decision within three working days of the decision. The observer will be notified of the Council’s decision once the time for any appeal has expired. E. The results of the Academic Integrity Council proceedings for the previous academic year shall be published in the Yellow Jacket Newspaper, without names or punishments, noting only the category of the violation and the outcome.

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Article IX. Appeals 1. If a student is found guilty by the Academic Integrity Council or by an instructor (or responsible official), he or she has a right to appeal the decision. The appeal may be made only on the question of guilt, not on a question of the severity of the penalty imposed. Appeals may be made on the basis of new evidence, new witnesses, wrong jurisdiction, or improper procedure. Appeals may not be made on the basis of mere dissatisfaction with the sanction received. 2. The Appeals Board shall be composed of seven members of the Randolph-Macon community: three students appointed annually in the Spring by the Student Government Association, three faculty members elected in the Spring to two-year terms, and the Provost or Associate Dean. The Provost or the Associate Dean of the College will serve as Chair for appeal hearings. If the appeal originates from an Academic Integrity Council decision, the Chair must be whichever did not did not sit on the original hearing. One faculty alternate shall also be elected in the Spring, as well as one student alternate appointed by the SGA, who will serve as substitutes when needed. To be eligible to serve, a student must not be on academic or extracurricular probation nor have been convicted of any violation of the Code of Academic Integrity. 3. Temporary or long-term vacancies on the Appeals Board will be filled by action of the appropriate appointing authority. 4. A quorum shall consist of the Provost or Associate Dean of the College and three members of the Appeals Board, of which there must be at least one faculty member and one student member. 5. Intention to appeal by a convicted student must be filed in writing with the Provost of the College within three working days after the announcement of the verdict by the Academic Integrity Council or the adjudicating instructor (or responsible official). The Provost shall decide within three working days following the filing of the appeal if the facts of the case warrant an appeal and inform the student in writing of that decision. If the appeal is granted, the Provost must convene the Appeals Board within three to seven working days. 6. The Appeals Board will determine its own procedure for reaching a decision, within the following parameters: a. The appellant must bear the burden of proof in order to warrant a reversal of an Academic Integrity Council or instructor’s (or responsible official) decision. b. The Appeals Board must call the Chair of the Academic Integrity Council or his/her designee as a witness in all appeals proceedings in all cases arising from the decisions of the Academic Integrity Council. c. The party bringing the appeal and the party responding to the appeal shall both be present during the appeal hearing to ensure the right of rebuttal. d. To facilitate the taking of minutes, a recording device should be employed by a member of the Appeals Board. No other recording devices may be used during the hearing. e. Any penalty decision shall be made in accordance with Article VIII, B. 7. The Appeals Board may only affirm or reverse the guilty verdict; it may not impose a new sanction. Reversal of an Academic Integrity Council or instructor‘s (responsible official) decision requires the affirmative votes of a simple majority of the Appeals Board members. 8. The decision of the Appeals Board is final. 9. The Appeals Board shall inform both parties of its verdict in writing within three days of the decision.

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Article X. Record Keeping 1. The Academic Integrity Council and the Appeals Board will keep minutes of all procedures. 2. If a student is found not guilty, all records and minutes are to be destroyed and no mention of the proceedings is to be made in the student’s academic records. All other minutes and materials will be deposited in the office of the Provost of the College as soon as each case resulting in a guilty verdict is resolved. 3. On or about July 1 of each year, the minutes and accompanying materials from the preceding year will be placed in a secure archive and dated. 4. When files have been on deposit for more than five years, they should be destroyed at the end of the next academic year. 5. All of the above records are for the exclusive use of the Academic Integrity Council and the Administration of Randolph-Macon College, in the enforcement of the Code of Academic Integrity, and may be used and consulted only as is consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). 6. If a student is suspended from the college, his or her transcript shall be stamped “Suspended for Violation of Code of Academic Integrity for the period ____________.” Upon readmission to the College, or petition by the student, this transcript notation will be removed once the period of suspension has expired. 7. If a student is expelled from the college, his or her transcript shall be stamped “Expelled for Violation of Code of Academic Integrity.”

Article XI. Amendment An amendment to this Code requires a majority vote of the Faculty Meeting and a majority vote of the students voting in a referendum. Article XII. Implementation This Code shall take effect upon approval by a majority vote in a Faculty Meeting and a majority vote of the students voting in a referendum. Article XIII. Suspension of Constitution This Code shall be deemed null and void if so voted by two-thirds of the students voting in a referendum or if so voted by two-thirds of the Faculty Meeting.

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Campus Life Policies

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Student Mission Statement AS A RANDOLPH-MACON STUDENT I will display integrity and self-respect in all of my endeavors and I will respect all community members and the property of the school.

AS A RANDOLPH-MACON STUDENT I will act in a manner appropriate for the occasion and be responsible for my actions in academic, athletic, spiritual, social and other Collegiate activities.

AS A RANDOLPH-MACON STUDENT I will hold my peers to the same standards that I hold myself.

I AM A RANDOLPH-MACON STUDENT.

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Student Bill Of Rights Preamble The purpose of R-MC is to transmit knowledge, encourage the pursuit of truth, and develop individuals. R-MC offers an education that includes not only academic knowledge, but also the cultivation of social skills. In order to achieve these goals, the College recognizes freedom, civility, and respect as fundamental values. The freedom of inquiry and the freedom of expression are indispensable freedoms to an academic community. These freedoms may only be limited by the responsibility of the College to secure and protect the general well being and safety of the community.

I. Freedom of Access A. The facilities and services of the College must be open to all enrolled students and student groups on an equal basis. II. Freedom in the Classroom A. Students have the right to participate in free discussion, inquiry, and expression. B. Students have the right to only be evaluated on an academic basis and not on opinions of conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards. C. Students have the right to reasonably disagree with views offered in any course of study as long as they take responsibility for learning the content of the course if they are enrolled in it. D. Students have the right of protection from prejudiced or capricious academic evaluations as long as they maintain the standards of academic performance established for the course. E. Students have the right against improper disclosure of views, beliefs, or political associations. F. Students have the right to protection of the privacy of their records as set forth in the Family Educational Right to Privacy Act of 1974 (Buckley Amendment). (See Policy on Disclosure of Student Records on p.74) III. Freedom of Student Organizations

A. Students have the right to organize and join associations to promote their common interests. However, the College maintains a process to properly recognize student organizations (see Office of Student Life for further explanation). Affiliation with a non-Randolph-Macon organization may not solely disqualify a student organization from institutional recognition. Campus advisors should advise organizations on the exercise of responsibility, but they shall not have the authority to control the policy of the organization.

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B. Students and student organizations have the right to the freedom of discussion, of expression, and to orderly support of causes of interest to them as long as they do not disrupt the essential operation of the College. C. Students and student organizations have the right to invite any persons of their choosing to speak on campus. However, organizations should consider the rights and responses of individuals within the R-MC community as well as the community as a whole in all organizational activities. IV. Freedom of Participation in Institutional Matters A. Students have the right to individually and collectively express their views on issues of institutional policy and on all matters of interest to the student body.

B. Students have the right and must be provided clearly defined means to participate in the formulations and application of institutional policy affecting academic and social student affairs. C. Students have the right of access to documents concerning institutional policy and information with the exclusion of confidential information. D. Students have the right to maintain student publications and press with the freedom from censorship and advance approval of copy. Disapproval of editorial policy or content is not considered a sufficient reason for arbitrary suspension or removal of editors and managers of student publications. V. Freedom of Off-Campus Activities A. Students have the right to the same freedom of speech, peaceful assembly, and petition they are granted by way of citizenship. VI. Freedom in Disciplinary Proceedings A. Students have the right to only be subject to disciplinary proceedings for violations of standards of conduct stated in Fishtales. B. Students have the right to privacy of their room of residence, subject to the College’s right to enforce its rules of conduct and to maintain its physical property. Searches may only be made after an application has been made to the Dean of Students or Associate Dean of Students or his/her designee. The student whose room is to be searched will be notified and should be present, if possible, during the search. C. Students have the right to protection against the alteration of their status while charges against them are pending. This includes his/her right to be present on the campus and to attend classes, except for reasons related to the safety and well being of self, other students, faculty, staff, or R-MC property.

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Student Complaints Students who have complaints about any aspect of the college’s operations or programs can address their complaints in writing to the Dean of Students, and the Dean will respond in a timely fashion.

Dr. Grant L. Azdell Vice President for Student Affairs & Dean of Students gazdell@rmc.edu 204 Henry Street Ashland, VA 23005

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The Edge Boot Camp Randolph-Macon College Students Engaged in Career and Professional Development

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Student Conduct Code

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Student Conduct Code Randolph-Macon College Office of Student Conduct

I. Purpose The Purpose of the Student Conduct Code is to foster within Randolph-Macon College (sometimes referred to herein as the “College”) a community of responsible citizens who conduct themselves according to principles of honor, integrity, respect and civility. To maintain such a community, all students of the College are required to abide by the Student Conduct Code’s standards, and further agree to hold all other citizens of the community equally accountable for adherence to the provisions of the Student Conduct Code. The students, faculty, and administrative staff have collaboratively established the following Student Conduce Code.

II. Jurisdiction and Authority for Disciplinary Action 1. Scope - The Student Conduct Code applies to all students individually and to all student groups, whether or not the group has complied with the College’s requirements for registration as a student organization. Student groups and organizations are accountable for the conduct of their members when any such group has encouraged or participated in an activity which violates the Student Conduct Code or any other College policy or when any member had knowledge of such activity and failed to take reasonable steps to prevent it. For the purposes of the Student Conduct Code, “student” means any person who is currently enrolled at the College, or who is accepted for admission or readmission to the College, or who has been enrolled at the College in a prior semester or summer session and is eligible to continue enrollment in the semester or summer session that immediately follows, or who is attending an educational program sponsored by the College while that person is on campus, or who engaged in conduct prohibited by the Student Conduct Code at a time when he or she met the above criteria. 2. Authority for Student Discipline - Disciplinary authority for non-academic matters at the College is delegated to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students and his/her designee(s). Students are asked to assume positions of responsibility in the student conduct process so they can contribute their skills and insights toward the resolution of disciplinary matters. The interpretation of the Student Conduct Code is within the discretion of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students. 3. Nature of the Student Conduct Process – The Office of Student Conduct is the College entity responsible for implementing and executing the processes outlined in the Student Conduct Code. The Office of Student Conduct processes and hearings are not “trials” as in the criminal justice system. The standard of proof for finding someone responsible for violating the Student Conduct Code is “preponderance of the evidence and/or information.” The processes and procedures outlined in the Student Conduct Code are not similar to civil or criminal court proceedings. Due process is defined as adherence to the procedures and processes outlined in the Student Conduct Code for the resolution of student conduct concerns. All students are treated fairly and are afforded the protections and rights outlined in this Student Conduct Code. “Double Jeopardy” is a concept which applies only in the criminal justice system; it does not apply to the resolution of alleged violations of the Student Conduct Code. Alleged violations of the Student Conduct Code are resolved using the processes outlined in the Student Conduct Code and are independent of any outside legal action, civil or criminal.

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4. Off Campus Behavior - The Student Conduct Code applies equally to behavior that occurs on or off College property. 5. Relationship with Law Enforcement and Criminal Charges - If an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code also is an alleged violation of criminal law, the College will cooperate fully with law enforcement authorities. In these instances, the Office of Student Conduct will move forward with the resolution of any alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code independently of pending outside investigations or trials. The outcome of the Student Conduct process will not be subject to challenge on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident were reduced or dismissed. The Student Conduct Code is based on the expectation that students will respect and obey all regulations of the College, the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the federal government. As adults, students are obligated to obey all laws and to bear ultimate responsibility for their actions. 6. Room Search Policy - College policy allows for room searches, as well as searches of on-campus vehicles when there is reasonable cause to believe that a violation of the Student Conduct Code or other specific violations of College policy have occurred or are occurring. Reasonable cause is defined as credible information provided to College officials that a student is violating or has violated a specific College policy. All such room searches are to be authorized by the Vice President for Student Affairs or the Senior Associate Dean of Students and conducted by professional staff members from Campus Safety or other authorized Student Affairs staff members. The College will make every attempt to contact the occupant(s) of the room or vehicle in question. In cases where the student(s) cannot be located, College officials and/or Campus Safety will conduct their investigation by documenting the search of areas reasonably related to the alleged policy violation. In all cases of room entry or searches where the student is not available or cannot be contacted, College officials and or Campus Safety will leave written notice that the room was entered and/or searched and specify the reasons for the search.

III. Respect for Self and Others Students should take responsibility to serve as leaders in promoting compassion for others and in challenging prejudice against all individuals and groups whether due to race, gender identity, age, marital status, religion, nationality, socioeconomic status, political persuasion, sexual orientation, disability, or health status. In interpersonal relationships, students are expected to respect the rights of others, particularly their right to refuse to participate in any activity. At no time should students harass, assault, or violate the privacy of other persons.

IV. Components of the Student Conduct Code and Severability The Student Conduct Code includes all text in the Student Conduct Code, including the Sexual Misconduct Conduct Policy, Illegal Drug Policy, and the Policy on Alcohol. All sections and provisions of The Student Conduct Code are hereby declared to be independent and severable, and if any Article, statement, section, sub-section, subdivision, paragraph, sentence, clause or word be held void or non-enforceable, such holding shall not affect the validity or enforceability of any other part or parts of the Student Conduct Code.

V. Changes to the Student Conduct Code College students are responsible for knowing the information, policies, and procedures outlined in this document. The College reserves the right to make changes to the Student Conduct Code as necessary and once those changes have been posted to the Office of Student Conduct website, they are in effect. At that time, all prior versions of the Student Conduct Code are invalidated. Students are encouraged to review the Student Conduct Code online for updated versions of all policies and procedures.

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VI. Student Rights in the Student Conduct Code The following rights are extended to any student who has been notified that his/her conduct is being investigated or who has been charged with an alleged violation. Deadlines for exercising these privileges may be established by the Office of Student Conduct. For any alleged violation(s) of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, the rights afforded and the process utilized will be governed by the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, which policy controls in the event of a conflict with the Student Conduct Code. (See Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy) A. The right to be presumed not responsible for violations of the Student Conduct Code until the student either accepts responsibility or until responsibility is determined to exist by the appropriate Student Conduct Board. B.

The right to be provided with written notification of charge(s), if issued, within five business days after an initial investigation has been completed. (“Business days” do not include Saturdays, Sundays, examination periods, student holidays, summer or winter terms, or days on which College classes are delayed or canceled due to inclement weather or other circumstances);

C.

The right to comment on, provide information about, or attend proceedings related to an infraction which he/ she allegedly committed. When a student elects to provide information about an incident, he/she is required to provide honest, accurate, and complete information. Providing information that is false, incomplete, or misleading may result in additional disciplinary action under the Student Conduct Code. When a student decides not to attend proceedings, make comments on, or provide information about an infraction which he/ she allegedly committed, the proceedings will continue without the participation of respondent or the information that they would otherwise have provided;

D. The right to have an investigation conducted; E.

The right to be assured of confidentiality, in accordance with the terms of the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act;

F.

The right to be assisted by an advisor (current Randolph-Macon College students, faculty members, or staff members only) in accordance with parameters detailed in “ Section VII, Advisor;”

G.

The right to a fair hearing after being charged;

H.

The right to have at least three business days to prepare for a hearing, except in cases involving interim suspension, at the end of an academic semester, or during summer or winter terms;

I.

The right to have a hearing packet containing the information collected during the investation made and the right to be provided with the collected hearing packet at least (3) three days prior to the hearing either electronically or in person;

J.

The right to have the hearing panel reach its decision based upon the evidence heard by the hearing panel in the presence of the respondent;

K.

The right to be present in the hearing room for the duration of the hearing except for the executive session, where the panel deliberates in private, and during periods of recess;

L.

The right to present information verbally or in writing during the hearing;

M. The right to request that the Office of Student Conduct call to the hearing witnesses (current Randolph-Macon College students, faculty members, or staff members only) who have first-hand knowledge of the alleged infraction, without guarantee that the request will be granted; N. The right to be advised in writing of the results of the hearing;

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O. In cases where interim suspension has been imposed by the Vice President for Student Affairs or his or her designee, the student has the right to a fair hearing within a reasonable time not to exceed 30 days; and P.

The right to submit a written appeal of the Student Conduct Board’s decision on the grounds as outlined in “Appeals”, in section XVI below:

Written notices regarding charges of alleged infractions issued, scheduled hearings, hearing materials and hearing results are sent to a student’s College issued e-mail address. Failure or refusal to see, open, or read notices does not remove the recipient’s obligation to adhere to any instructions, sanctions, or deadlines issued in the notices or constitute a procedural error for which an appeal is granted.

VII. Advisor A student or student group who has been notified that his/her/its conduct is being investigated or who has been charged with an alleged violation that will be resolved through the Office of Student Conduct has the right to be assisted by an advisor who is a current Randolph-Macon College student, faculty member, or staff member. The student may be accompanied by an advisor to any meeting, investigation, hearing, or appeal proceedings that the student attends. If the student elects not to attend a proceeding, the advisor cannot attend that proceeding. When exercising the right to be accompanied by an advisor, a student or student group should make the identity of the advisor known to the College. Although a student or student group can be accompanied to a particular proceeding by only one advisor, a student may elect to change advisors during the course of the student conduct process. A previously scheduled proceeding, meeting, investigation, hearing, or appeal is not subject to postponement due to the unavailability of a specific advisor. If requested by the student, an advisor can provide support, guidance, and advice. An advisor can also assist the student in preparing comments that the student will present during a proceeding. To enhance effectiveness, an advisor should read the contents of Fishtales. The College is not responsible for the quality, accuracy, or effectiveness of assistance provided by a student’s advisor. Throughout the student conduct process, an advisor cannot present information, advocate for, or argue on behalf of a student or student group; the student or student group is responsible for presenting comments they wish to provide, even when accompanied by an advisor. During any proceeding, an advisor’s communication is limited to conferring with the student or student group through written note; the advisor may not address any other participant or the hearing panel. The advisor may not interfere in, disrupt, or delay a proceeding. The representative of the Office of Student Conduct or the hearing panel chair may remove or dismiss an advisor who becomes disruptive or who does not abide by the restrictions on advisor participation. In the event of the advisor being removed, the proceeding will continue.

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VIII. Student Conduct Code Prohibited Behaviors Behaviors prohibited by the Student Conduct Code are grouped into two categories: A-level infractions and B-level infractions. When charges of possible violations are issued to a student and they include one or more A-level policies, then the charges are resolved through a hearing conducted by the Student Conduct Board or the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board as assigned by the Office of Student Conduct in consideration of jurisdictional guidelines noted for each Student Conduct Code policy. B-level infractions may be resolved administratively without a hearing. Repeated or accumulating B-level infractions may be adjudicated by a Student Conduct Board. Also, the Student Conduct Administrator may refer a B-level violation to the Student Conduct Board at his/her discretion. All charges of A-level infractions are adjudicated by a Student Conduct Board. In addition to the prohibited behaviors enumerated below, the Student Conduct Code includes policies that are stated or elaborated on in the sections entitled “Residence Life Policies” and “Other College Policies.” Also, alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, which are referred to the Office of Student Conduct by the Title IX Coordinator are reviewed by the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board. The specific policies and procedures applicable to alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy are found in the “Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, Section XII Prohibited Conduct.”

A – Level Violations A1

Dating Violence - dating violence is violence committed by a person who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship with the person against whom the violence is committed. Whether there was such relationship will be gauged by its length, type, and frequency of interaction. (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Section XII)

A2

Domestic Violence – domestic violence is violent misdemeanor and felony offenses committed by a person’s current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, person similarly situated under domestic or family violence law, or anyone else protected under domestic or family violence law. (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Section XII)

A3

Drug Possession, Use, or Distribution – possession, use, or distribution or illegal drugs (See Illegal Drug Policy)

A4

Drug Paraphernalia – possession, use, or distribution of Drug Paraphernalia (See Illegal Drug Policy)

A5

Explosives – possession or discharge of explosives or fireworks.

A6

Failure to Complete Sanctions (Third Offense) – Failure to complete sanctions imposed under this code within the time granted by the Office of Student Conduct for the third time.

A7

Harassment - any unwelcome conduct based on actual or perceived status including but not limited to sex, gender, gender expression, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion, sexual orientation, or other protected status. Any unwelcome conduct should be reported to campus officials, who will act to remedy and resolve reported incidents on behalf of the community. Harassment is also behavior that significantly and unreasonably interferes with an individual’s or group’s educational or work performance or creates a significantly and unreasonably intimidating, hostile, or offensive work, or living environment.

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A8

Hazing - Recklessly or intentionally endangering the health or safety of a student or students or inflicting bodily injury on a student or students in connection with or for the purpose of initiation, admission into or affiliation with, or as condition for continued membership in a club, organization, association, fraternity, sorority, or other organization regardless of whether the student or students so endangered or injured participated voluntarily in the relevant activity. The College further defines as hazing, any action taken or situation created, intentionally, to produce mental, emotional or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment or ridicule for the purpose of initiation into, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, a group or organization. Such activities may include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol; paddling in any form; creation of excess fatigue; physical and psychological shocks; quests, treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on outside or inside the confines of College property; wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and indecent; involuntary nudity; engaging in public stunts; morally degrading or humiliating games and activities; and any other activities which are not consistent with academic achievement, College policies, or federal, state and local laws. Quests in academic classes or student programs may be approved by the Provost or Vice President for Student Affairs, respectively. Consent by participants in any activity is not considered a defense for violating the hazing policy.

A9

Lying to a College Official - making a false statement to any staff member (including student staff member) or faculty member of the college community.

A10

Sexual Assault – Non-Consensual Sexual Contact - non-consensual sexual contact includes the intentional touching, manipulation or fondling either of a person by another person or when a person is forced to touch directly or through clothing another person’s groin, genitals, breasts, thighs or buttocks or when a person is compelled to touch the above named parts of their own bodies for the sexual gratification of another, against the complainant’s consent or after a person has withdrawn their consent. It also includes non-consensual kissing, or stroking, or fondling of a non-sexual body part, in an intimate way (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Section XII).

A11

Sexual Assault – Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse - non-consensual sexual intercourse involves any form of sexual intercourse with a person, without their consent, or after consent is withdrawn. This includes non-consensual anal, oral, or vaginal penetration, whether by a finger, tongue, penis or an inanimate object, as well as compelling an unwilling person to perform any of the above named acts. (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Section XII)

A12

Sexual Exploitation - sexual exploitation is defined as activity of a sexual nature which results in the non-consensual exploitation of one person by another for the purposes of gaining some sort of advantage, including, but not limited, to economic, social, and academic advantages. The sexual behavior which results in such exploitation may have been consensual or non-consensual in its original nature. Sexual Exploitation also includes prostitution, videotaping or recording (by any electronic means) sexual activity without permission, voyeurism, and engaging in sexual activity with another while concealing that one is infected with HIV/AIDS, an STI, or an STD. (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Section XII)

A13

Sexual Harassment – sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and/or other verbal or physical acts of a sexual nature which, because of their severity and/or persistence, interfere significantly with an individual’s or a group’s work or education, or adversely affect an individual’s or a group’s living conditions. Sexual harassment may include but is not limited to quid pro quo (something for something, such as a demand or offer of sexual activity to retain or obtain academic or employment benefits), and/or an abusive or hostile environment which interferes with the ability to function as a full participant in the Randolph-Macon College community. (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Section XII)

A14

Stalking – stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for their or other’s safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress. (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Section XII)

A15

Violence - Behavior that constitutes physical assault, and which threatens the health, safety or well-being of another individual, or which would cause another to fear immanent bodily harm, is frightening, and/or causes injury .

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A16

Weapons - Major - Possessing, storing, or using a firearm of any type, a destructive device, stun gun or any other potentially dangerous weapon (knives [longer than four inches, except those needed for food preparation], nun chucks, ninja stars, swords, etc.), including concealed weapons for which the carrier has a legal permit.

B – Level Violations (Note: B-level violations may be resolved administratively without a hearing.) B1

Alcohol Violation: Underage Consumption, Possession, or Sale - Consumption, possession, or serving of alcohol under any circumstance for or by individuals under 21 years of age.

B2

Alcohol Violation: Underage Possession of Empty Containers - Possession of alcohol containers devoid of alcohol in residential rooms, including Greek residential facilities, occupied by students under the age of 21, including but not limited to bottle caps, alcohol labels, empty alcohol cases and “honor walls

B3

Alcohol Violation: Using False Identification in Alcohol Purchase - Use, manufacturing, or distribution of a fake ID to purchase alcohol.

B4

Alcohol Violation: Open Containers in Public - consumption of alcohol and possession of open containers of alcohol in unauthorized public areas. Unauthorized public areas include campus grounds, athletic fields, sidewalks and roadways, hallways and lounge areas of campus buildings, townhouse apartment courtyards and fraternity & sorority facilities and, special interest housing. Areas where alcohol may be consumed by those over age 21 include: residential rooms where at least one room occupant is 21 years of age or older, townhouse apartment interior common areas, special interest house interior common areas, and fraternity & sorority life residential facilities interior common areas where at least one house occupant is 21 years of age or older.

B5

Alcohol Violation: Public Intoxication - public intoxication

B6

Alcohol Violation: Supplying Alcohol to a Minor - purchasing/providing alcohol for someone under the age of 21

B7

Alcohol Violation: Possession of Alcohol Paraphernalia - use or possession of paraphernalia to enhance the ingestion of alcohol (e.g., beer bongs, beer pong tables, etc.).

B8

Alcohol Violation: Disruptive Conduct under the Influence - behavior subsequent to the use of alcohol that interferes with another person’s ability to sleep, study, or live in a safe environment.

B9

Alcohol Violation: Participation in Drinking Games - participation in drinking games. All drinking game paraphernalia will be confiscated and not returned.

B10

Alcohol Violation: Driving While Intoxicated - driving while intoxicated

B11

Alcohol Violation: Sale or Manufacture of Alcoholic Beverages - the sale, distribution, or manufacture of alcoholic beverages, unless authorized as part of the academic curriculum or otherwise authorized by state and Federal agencies.

B12

Alcohol Violation: Bulk Quantities - possession of excessive amounts of alcohol. The definition of “excessive” includes, but is not limited to, pressurized containers or containers that require a tap, or an amount of alcohol that is perceived as a common source/provider. Kegs, party balls, trashcans, or other large receptacles containing alcoholic beverages are prohibited. No keg(s) or deposit money will be returned to students.

B13

Alcohol Violation: Unregistered Party - a gathering in a residential facility, where alcohol is present, and there excessive number of people and/or a disturbing level of noise and is not registered according to the Risk Management and Social Host Policy found in Fishtales.

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B14

Alcohol Violation: Advertising a Private Event with Alcohol - Advertisement of gatherings where alcohol will be present in a residential facility.

B15

Alcohol Violation: Failure to Follow Social Host Policy - The possession, sale, use or consumption of alcoholic beverages while on campus premises, or during a student organization event, in any situation sponsored by or endorsed by a student organization, or in any event an observer would associate with a student organization that is not in compliance with any and all applicable College policies, and federal, state, and local laws; non-compliance with either the Bring Your Own Beer (BYOB) or Third Party Vendor Guidelines (see the Risk Management and Social Host Policy).

B16

Alcohol Violation: Purchase of Alcohol with Organization Funds - alcoholic beverages purchased with organizational funds, alcoholic beverages purchased for members or guests, or purchased by any member in the name of, or on behalf of, the organization.

B17

Alcohol Violation: Purchase of Bulk Quantities of Alcohol - the purchase or use of bulk quantity of common sources of such alcoholic beverage (included but not limited to kegs or cases).

B18

Alcohol Violation: Open Party with Alcohol Present - open parties, meaning parties/social events with unrestricted access by non-members of the organization, without specific invitation, where alcohol is present (a guest list must be used for all events).

B19

Alcohol Violation: Providing Alcohol to a Minor by an Organization - purchasing for, serving to, or selling alcoholic beverages to anyone under the age of 21 by any member of a College organization, including clubs, athletic teams, departmental programs, fraternities and sororities, and other student organizations, collectively or individually.

B20

Alcohol Violation: Co-Sponsorship - co-sponsorship of an event with an alcohol distributor, charitable organization, or tavern (tavern defined as an establishment more than half of annual gross sales from alcohol) where alcohol is given away, sold, or otherwise provided to those present.

B21

Alcohol Violation: Alcohol at Recruitment Events and/or New Member Activities - alcohol at recruitment activities associated with any organization. Alcohol at any pledge, associate member, new member, or novice program, activity, or ritual of an organization.

B22

Alcohol Violation: Advertising for Closed Events - Advertising for closed events where alcohol is permitted.

B23

Alcohol Violation: Consumption of Display of Alcohol in Unapproved Locations - Consumption or display of alcoholic beverages in unapproved public areas. “Public� includes the campus grounds, athletic fields, sidewalks and roadways, hallways and lounge areas of residential facilities, common areas of buildings (including academic buildings, fraternity houses unless approved as a registered social gathering with alcohol, fraternity and sorority yards, porches, roofs and other outdoor structures). Therefore the legal use of alcohol on campus is restricted to specifically designated areas. Requests to use these specifically designated areas should be submitted to the Office of Student Life in accordance with the Risk Management and Social Host Policy.

B24

Animal Mistreatment - Behavior which results in the mistreatment of an animal.

B25

Contempt of the Student Conduct Process - The following are prohibited: disrupting student conduct proceedings, insulting the dignity of the hearing panel and the Student Conduct System and failing to appear as a witness at a hearing.

B26

Dangerous Practice - an action or practice which has potential to cause emotional or bodily harm, injury, and/or death to one’s self or another person.

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B27

Discrimination and Incitement to Hatred - verbal, physical, or graphic conduct that denigrates or shows hostility or aversion toward an individual or group on the basis of race, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, age, disability, gender expression, socio-economic status, or veteran’s status, which has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment (employment, educational, or living) or which inflicts emotional distress on that person or groups of persons or incites hatred against an individual or identifiable group. Prohibited behavior also includes conduct or material (physical, verbal, written or graphic including e-mails posted or circulated in the community) involving epithets, slurs, negative stereotyping, demeaning depictions or treatment, and threatening or actual abuse or harm.

B28

Disruptive Conduct - willful or reckless obstruction of the normal administrative and educational processes and auxiliary enterprises of the College. Conduct which disturbs interrupts or interferes with Randolph-Macon College community members’ and other citizens’ peaceful enjoyment of their homes, residence halls, and businesses in the Ashland area, is also prohibited.

B29

Exhibitionism - indecent exposure, lewd or sexual acts which take place in general-use areas (within and outside of the buildings) or in residential rooms (in front of roommates, guests, other hall residents and/or other community members).

B30

Failure to Comply - failure to comply with the directions of anyone functioning in an official capacity on behalf of the College including Campus Safety Officers and Resident Assistants who are acting in an official capacity on behalf of the College is prohibited, as is failing to abide by the terms of a Non-Disclosure or Confidentiality Agreement. College officials, whether or not in the Division of Academic Affairs or Student Affairs, may instruct students to undertake or not undertake certain actions; students may be instructed to not undertake certain activities, even if such activities are not prohibited conduct under the Student Conduct Code or any other College Policy. Prohibited conduct under this section, therefore, includes failing to abide by instructions issued as part of a behavioral contract or order of nocontact. Depending on the conditions that apply, a student who violates a behavioral contract may be subject to interim suspension. In addition, students are expected to comply with all directives of local law enforcement and emergency services acting in performance of their duties.

B31

Failure to Complete Sanctions - failure to complete sanctions imposed under this code within the time granted by the Office of Student Conduct.

B32

Falsification – knowingly furnishing, creating, or possessing false, falsified, or forged materials, documents, accounts, records, identification, or financial instruments.

B34

Fire/Safety Violations - setting a fire or tampering with fire extinguishers, fire alarms, smoke detectors, emergency call boxes, batteries or other safety equipment is prohibited. In addition, obstructing halls and stairwells with furniture, debris and/or other items is prohibited.

B35

Misuse of a Communications Device – use of a communication device (telephone, computer, emergency call box, personal digital assistant, smart phone, computer network, and any software which can be used therein, etc) to commit any of the following, is prohibited: actions prohibited by federal, state or local laws or regulations, or the Student Conduct Code or any other College Policy; disrupting the normal operations of the College; harassing another member of the College community; actions which violate the “Unacceptable Use of Resources” policy found in the College Computer Resources Policies in Fishtales; on-line copyright infringement of video or audio recordings; actions prohibited under the Copyright Act (1976),the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (2000) or the No Electronic Theft Act (1997); violation of any Federal or state law regarding electronic harassment; and the production, sale, distribution or possession of images of child sexual abuse or extreme pornographic images (which include images depicting bestiality, necrophilia, or acts likely to lead to injury or death)

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B36

Misuse or Damaging Door Access Systems and Doors - tampering with the door access system (card readers, alarm sirens, wiring, etc.) or propping open doors or exits on College buildings is prohibited.

B37

Negative Interpersonal Relations - verbal abuse, destruction of personal property, unwelcome phone calls, or e-mails between people who are in any kind of relationship, whether it be platonic or romantic.

B38

Retaliation - the College prohibits retaliation of any sort. Any act of retaliation including, but not limited to, harassment, abuse, threat, or intimidation toward the victim, the accused, or any witness who makes a report of an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code or any other College Policy is prohibited.

B39

Solicitation - any violation of the Solicitation Policy located in Fishtales; for safety reasons and to protect residents from unwanted disturbances, soliciting on campus grounds is prohibited except under the terms described in Appendix E.

B40

Spectator Behavior - inappropriate spectator/audience/participant conduct. Unacceptable behavior in/at College sponsored or recognized events such as athletic contests, intramurals, and any registered or student organization sponsored events. Unacceptable behavior includes: taunting, intimidating or harassing behavior, and abusive language and gestures directed at participants, officials or fans. Intoxicated individuals will not be permitted entry into events. Students who engage in these behaviors will be ejected from the event.

B41

Theft – stealing is the taking of personal or institutional property, whether of the College, a member of the College community like faculty, staff or students, or a business or restaurant establishments without the consent of the owner. The non-payment of outstanding debts to other members of the College community and/or the possession of stolen property is also considered theft.

B42

Threats and Intimidation - threatening or intimidating a student, guest, faculty member or staff member is prohibited. In addition, threatening or intimidating a witness in the investigation or adjudication of any student conduct proceeding is a violation in the Student Conduct Code.

B43

Unauthorized Entry - any unauthorized entry or use of any College building at any time, including College breaks. Use of the roofs or balconies of any College building is prohibited, unless otherwise authorized by a College official. Examples of the roof and balcony areas include, but are not limited to: the small entry roof areas on the townhouses, the special interest houses, residence halls, fraternity and sorority chapter facilities, academic buildings, trash and bicycle shelters. Entering a residential room or administrative or faculty office without permission or prior consent, whether the room is locked or unlocked, is also prohibited.

B44

Unauthorized Smoking - smoking is prohibited in all buildings on campus, including residence halls and Greek facilities. Smoking is prohibited within twenty-five (25) feet of any campus building, including residence halls, townhouses, and special interest houses. Smoking on steps, stoops, or covered areas adjacent to campus buildings are also prohibited even if they are more than 25 feet from entrances/exits. Smoking is also prohibited in areas beyond 25 feet where smoking would adversely affect the environment of those entering or exiting the building; and within 25 feet of storage areas containing flammable liquids or gases. For both safety and aesthetic reasons, and to avoid possible student conduct referral, cigarette butts must be placed in provided containers located at designated smoking places outside buildings.

B45

Unlawful Behavior - Any behavior that violates federal, state or local law, regardless of whether it has been adjudicated by civil authorities or not.

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B46

Vandalism - Conduct which results in damage to College property, the property of any members of the academic community, students, faculty or staff, or the property of any authorized contractors or vendors is prohibited. In order to prevent damage or injury, running, speed walking, jogging, rollerblading, skateboarding, skating, roughhousing, scuffling, using water guns, water balloons and the throwing, bouncing, or kicking of objects in halls, stairwells, and other common areas of buildings are prohibited. This list is by no means exhaustive.

B47

Violation of Other College Policies - Violations of other published College regulations or policies, including but not limited to the Campus Computing Policy, Policy on Motor Vehicle Registration and rules pertaining to student organizations, which are published or referenced in the student handbook, Fishtales.

B48

Violation of the Risk Management and Social Host Policy – Violation of the College’s Risk Management and Social Host Policy are expressly prohibited. (See the Risk Management and Social Host Policy)

B49

Visitation Violation - Residents are responsible for the behavior of their guest(s), whether their guests are overnight, from another hall, or from off-campus, and will be held responsible for any Student Conduct Code or any other College Policy violations or damages their guests may cause. Hosts must inform guests of College policies. A Student Visitation Agreement Form must be fully completed for each guest and it must be delivered to the Office of Campus Safety. Policy violations may result in disciplinary action being taken against the host and guest(s).

B50

Weapons – Minor - Possessing, storing, or using a pellet gun, air gun, sling shot, or other projectile-expelling device.

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IX. Sanctions Below is a list of sanctions that may be imposed individually or in combination upon students for violation of College policies. Recognizing the authority of student conduct boards and administrators to impose sanctions that are appropriate for the circumstances of an individual case, this list is not intended to be all-inclusive. Sanctions become increasingly severe for repeated or accumulating infractions. 1. Warning: Notice that continuation or repetition of conduct found wrongful may be cause for more serious disciplinary action. 2. Community Service Hours: Completion of a specified number of hours of community service work within a defined period of time. 3. Task Completion: Fulfillment of a project assigned for educational benefit. 4. Fine: Payment of a specified sum of money. 5. Restitution: Reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of property. Restitution may take the form of appropriate service or other compensation. 6. Restriction: Limitation of a student’s activity and/or use of College facilities. Examples include but are not limited to:  Exclusion from privileges or participation in co-curricular College activities (e.g., event attendance, organization membership, intramurals, receipt of award);  Revocation of access to residential facilities or other campus locations; and/or  Revocation of the privilege to live on-campus or to live off-campus due to an off-campus waiver  Relocation of a student, as a result of student conduct action, may occur if it is decided that a student would benefit from living in another room or residence hall. A Residence Life professional staff member will decide which hall and room may be most conducive for the student to experience a positive living/learning environment. Relocation options may be limited by the number of available spaces  Restriction of use of College services and resources. Seniors nearing degree completion found responsible for violating College policy, including violations committed during the last week of classes, exams, or the period between course completion and the awarding of a diploma, may be prohibited from participating in Commencement activities/ceremonies and/or from obtaining a diploma/ transcript pending completion of all sanctions. 7. Conduct Probation: Infraction(s) committed during the specified period of disciplinary probation are likely to result in suspension. Conduct probation may be general, encompassing adherence to all College policies, or it may be limited to particular types of conduct (e.g., housing, alcohol and/or drug use. 8. Suspension: Exclusion, for a specified period of time, from the College community entirely. This includes the entire College campus. Readmission is not automatic after the expiration of the suspension period, and students must reapply. Suspension supersedes student-initiated withdrawal from the College. During the suspension period, the individual is not permitted to visit the campus or attend College-sponsored events. In the case of student organizations, suspended organizations may not be represented on any College affiliated organizational council or cocurricular activity and shall forfeit rights to College-funding, housing and recognition.

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9. Dissolution of a Group or Organization: Termination of student organization status permanently or for an indefinite period. Dissolved organizations may not be represented on any College affiliated organizational council or co-curricular activity and shall forfeit rights to College-funding, housing and recognition. 10. Expulsion: Termination of student status permanently or for an indefinite period. Expulsion supersedes student-initiated withdrawal from the College.

X. Sanctioning Guidelines The full range of sanctions are available to the appropriate decision making body or administrator in the resolution of violations of the Student Conduct Code.

XI. Reporting Alleged Violations 1. Violations of the Student Conduct Code or other College policies shall be reported directly to the Office of Student Conduct. Faculty, staff and students may make a written report to the Office of Student Conduct in the event of an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code.

2. All incident reports or alleged violations will be sent to the Office of Student Conduct for appropriate resolution. All violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator. (see Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy)

XII. The Student Conduct Process When a report of a possible Student Conduct Code or any other College Policy violation is received by the Office of Student Conduct, the following process is implemented except in cases of alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy and Residential Facilities Policies, which are governed by the processes stated in those respective policies. Please review the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy and the Residential Facilities Policies for more information on these policies and the special nature of these processes. Initial Incident Review The Student Conduct Administrator conducts a preliminary review of incident complaint or notice, the information available, and the parties involved. The preliminary review may lead to:

1. A determination that there is insufficient evidence to pursue an investigation, because the behavior alleged, even if proven, would not violate the Student Conduct Code, (e.g.: for reasons such as mistaken identity or allegations of behavior that falls outside the Student Conduct Code);

2. A Student Conduct Meeting with the student or student group. 3. After a Student Conduct Meeting, if appropriate, a formal charge will be issued in writing to the student or student group alleged to have committed the violation.

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Student Conduct Meeting The responding student(s) or student group (respondent) will receive notification from the Office of Student Conduct that a Student Conduct Meeting is needed to resolve an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code. At this conference, the following will/can occur: 1.

The respondent will be notified of their rights and responsibilities as outlined in the Student Conduct Code.

2.

The respondent will be offered the opportunity read the information that the Student Conduct Administrator examined during the initial incident review. They will, also, be allowed to offer any insights that they have concerning the incident.

3.

The Student Conduct Meeting can result in the following: A. A determination that there is insufficient evidence to pursue an investigation, because the behavior alleged, even if proven, would not violate the Student Conduct Code, (e.g.: for reasons such as mistaken identity or allegations of behavior that falls outside the code); B.

The Student Conduct Administrator may inform the respondent of an alleged violation or violations of the Student Conduct Code in writing.

4.

If the Student Conduct Meeting, ends in a finding that there is insufficient evidence to pursue the investigation, then, the case will be closed.

5.

If the Student Conduct Administrator informs a respondent of an alleged violation or violations of the Student Conduct Code, then, the Student Conduct Administrator will also explain the methods of resolving the alleged violation at that time. In the case of B-level violations, the respondent will have up to 24 hours following the Student Conduct Meeting to decide if they wish to proceed with administrative action, with a hearing for sanctions, or with a hearing to contest the alleged violation(s) of the Student Conduct Code. The student retains the right to move directly to administrative action or to a hearing without waiting 24 hours if they so choose as well.

Resolving Alleged Violations of the Student Conduct Code Alleged Violations of the Student Conduct Code are resolved in a number of ways. The Student Conduct Administrator will explain the available methods of resolution to each respondent during their Student Conduct Meeting. The methods of resolution are as follows: 1.

Administrative Action: Alleged B-level violations of the Student Conduct Code may be resolved without a hearing through Administrative Action. Administrative Action is chosen by the respondent. Administrative Action is available in cases where the student or student organization does not contest the alleged violation and accepts responsibility for the violation. In these cases, the following may happen: A. The Student Conduct Administrator will offer an appropriate sanction, and the respondent may accept responsibility for the violation and the sanction as presented. These decisions are not subject to appeal. B.

The Student Conduct Administrator will offer an appropriate sanction, and the respondent may accept responsibility for the violation but reject the sanction. In these cases, a hearing will be held to determine sanction only.

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2.

Hearing: Alleged A-level violations are always resolved by the appropriate hearing panel. In the case of most violations, this is the Student Conduct Board. In the case of alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, this is the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy). Hearings for B-level violations are conducted when a student or student organization contests their responsibility for an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code. Hearings are, also, conducted for sanctions only when the respondent accepts responsibility for a B-level violation, but they do not accept the sanction of the Student Conduct Administrator. Alleged B-level violations of the Student Conduct Code may also be resolved by a hearing panel if the Student Conduct Administrator determines that it is in the best interest of the respondent for a Student Conduct Board to review the alleged violations. Finally, repeated B-level violations will be referred to a hearing at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator.

3.

Interim Suspension: Pursuant to the policies outlined in Section XII below, a respondent may be placed on Interim Suspension until such time as the appropriate hearing panel makes a final decision.

XIII. Interim Suspension The Vice President for Student Affairs, or his or her designee, has the authority to place a student or student group on interim suspension pending College student conduct proceedings. Interim suspension can be imposed according to the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee’s determination that any of the following situations exist:

1.

The conduct of a student or student group reflects a disregard for the principles of social responsibility and selfdiscipline.

2.

The continued presence of a student or student group would disrupt the stability and integrity of the educational mission and processes of the College, endanger the well-being of other members of the College community, or would prevent other members of the community from having a safe living and learning environment.

3.

Reasonable modifications do not or cannot mitigate or resolve numbers 1 and 2. Such situations are detrimental to students and to the best interest of the College, and therefore the College reserves this right to impose interim suspension.

Such determinations will be made after analyzing all available, relevant information about the student in question, the student’s observed conduct, actions and statements, including any relevant and readily available information from medical or mental health professionals, or other professionals qualified to interpret this information, and after consulting the Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Team. This Policy will be applied in a non-discriminatory manner and determinations shall be based on conduct, actions and statements. If a student or student group is placed on interim suspension, the student or student group may be temporarily separated from the College, and therefore at the discretion of the Vice President for Student Affairs may be required to leave residential housing and/or College property, as well as cease attending classes or other College activities within the time specified in the notice of interim suspension. The student or student group may also be required to receive mandated medical assessments or treatments, for an interim period. Cases of Interim Suspension shall, be resolved by the appropriate hearing panel or alternatively, by a Dean’s Administrative Board at the discretion of the Vice President for Student Affairs. The student or student group, also, has the right to waive the opportunity to be heard by the hearing panel assigned by the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students. The student or student group may, instead, decide to have their case heard by only the Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee.

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XIV. Withdrawing During an On-Going Student Conduct Process A student may not avoid resolving an alleged Student Conduct Code or any other College Policy violation by withdrawing from the College. When an investigation of an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code begins, the Student Conduct Administrator or the Title IX Coordinator will notify the registrar to place a withdrawal hold on the student’s academic record until the completion of the student conduct process. Should a student depart from the College before review of a reported incident and/or resolution of an alleged Student Conduct Code or any other College Policy violation is completed, the student conduct process will proceed and, where appropriate, sanctions for Student Conduct Code or any other College Policy violation(s) will be issued. Hearings may take place without the presence of the student who is the subject of an investigation or hearing.

XV. Hearing Boards and Procedures Hearing Boards 1.

Student Conduct Board – the Student Conduct Board is composed of the Chair and two to four other members of the Student Conduct Board. There must be at minimum one student member and one faculty/staff member in addition to the Chair. All members of the Student Conduct Board are trained to evaluate alleged violations of the Student Conduct Code.

2.

Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board – (See the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy)

3.

Dean’s Administrative Board – in cases where interim suspension has been imposed by the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students may refer a case to be heard by a Dean’s Administrative Panel which is composed of a Chair and two other faculty or staff members from a pool of faculty and staff members who have been appointed by the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students.

4.

Student Conduct Appeals Board – the composition of a Student Conduct Appeals Board is specific to the type of board that reviewed the original alleged violations. The specific compositions are as follows: A. Student Conduct Board – appeal requests originating from a Student Conduct Board will be reviewed by three members of the Student Conduct Board who did not participate in the original hearing one of whom must be a student and one of which must be a faculty or staff member. B. Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board – appeals originating from a Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board will be reviewed by three members of the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board who did not participate in the original case (See the Sexual and Relation ship Conduct Policy, Section XIX “Appeals”. C. Dean’s Administrative Board or Dean’s Hearing – appeals originating from a Dean’s Administrative Board or a hearing only by the Vice President for Student Affairs due to an imposed interim suspension will be reviewed by three faculty or staff members of the Dean’s Administrative Panel who did not take part in the original case.

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Investigations When a case is referred to a hearing panel, either because it is an alleged A-level violation, because the respondent requests a hearing for an alleged B-level violation, or because the Student Conduct Administrator has referred the case to a hearing panel for review as they deem it in the best interest of the student or student group, the Student Conduct Administrator assigns a Student Conduct Investigator to investigate the case. Cases involving alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy will be governed by the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, which policy control in the event of a conflict with this Student Conduct Code (See Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy). Responsibilities of the Student Conduct Investigator

1.

The Student Conduct Investigator will investigate assigned cases within the timeline specified by the Student Conduct Administrator. The report will be comprised of the original incident documentation, alleged violations of the Student Conduct Code, statements of the respondent and complainant ( in cases where the complainant is not the College), statements of witnesses with direct knowledge of the incident or event(s) in question, and any documentary information provided to the investigator by any of the above parties.

2.

The Student Conduct Investigator will prepare and distribute a report of their investigation to the Student Conduct Administrator, the Respondent, the Complainant (in cases where the complainant is not the College), and to the hearing panel either electronically or in person at least 36 hours prior to the hearing.

3.

The Student Conduct Investigator will be present at the hearing to present their findings to the hearing panel.

General Hearing Policies and Procedures Where a case is referred to a hearing panel under this policy, the following policies and procedures will be used. Cases involving alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy will be governed by the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, which policy control in the event of a conflict with this Student Conduct Code (See Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy).

1.

Standard of Proof – All Student Conduct hearings will be conducted using the preponderance of the evidence standard meaning the College must establish that it is more likely than not that there is a violation of the Student Conduct Code for a student to be found responsible.

2.

Privacy - Hearings will be conducted in private. Only current students, faculty, and staff of the College may participate in hearings without the express permission of the Student Conduct Administrator and the Chair of the sitting hearing board.

3.

Confidentiality - All participants are required to maintain confidentiality.

4.

Necessary Adjournments - Hearing boards make every effort to complete hearings in a timely fashion. If unforeseen circumstances arise, the Chair may call for an adjournment to be reassembled at a specific time determined at the hearing

5.

Recesses - Any participant, except Student Conduct Advisors, may make a request for a recess to the Chair, and the Chair, at their discretion, may grant a recess. The Chair has sole discretion as to the length and number of any granted recesses.

6.

Multiple Hearings - The Student Conduct Administrator will be responsible for determining the need for multiple hearings. If the Student Conduct Administrator determines that multiple hearings are necessary, then, all respondents are expected to be present at and participate in each hearing.

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7.

Respondent Fails to Appear – If a respondent student or group fails to appear at a hearing after having been duly notified of the time and place, the student or group has forfeited its rights. The hearing board may proceed in the absence of the respondent or it may reschedule the hearing at the discretion of the Chair. A hearing may be rescheduled only once.

8.

Witness Fails to Appear – The Student Conduct Administrator or their designee may require the presence of any witness with pertinent information about a case. Failure to comply could result in student conduct action against a student witness.

9.

Character Witnesses – Character Witnesses are not permitted in any hearing. Only witnesses that have direct knowledge of the case will be considered by the hearing board.

10.

Hearing Record – The Student Conduct Administrator or his/her designee are the only parties that may record the proceedings of any hearing board whether in audio, video, or audio-visual format. Copies of the hearing record are for College use only.

11.

Hearings During College Recesses – When there is a need for a hearing before school opens in the Fall, during January term, during college breaks, during the final exam period, after school closes in the Spring or Summer session, that case may be heard by the Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee.

Hearing Board Specific Procedures Student Conduct Board and Dean’s Administrative Board hearings are conducted according to the following outline. The Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board uses the procedures detailed in the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy for the review of alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy. (See “Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Hearing Procedures”): 1.

Call to order

2.

Introductions

3.

The Oath of Honesty

4.

Reading of the charge(s) to be considered

5.

Statement by the respondent as to whether they are not responsible or responsible for the alleged policy violation(s

6.

Presentation of information concerning charge(s), including the following components if relevant to the hearing but not necessarily in this order: a. Investigation report b. Information from witnesses c. Information from the respondent concerning their account d. Information from the complainant concerning their account (in cases where the College is not the complainant)

7.

Questions by hearing board members

8.

Summary comments by the respondent if they elect to make them

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9.

Hearing board meets in closed executive session to deliberate. If the board determines that the charged student is responsible for one or more infractions, the board then also determines appropriate sanctions. If the hearing panel needs additional information to determine appropriate sanctions, the board may invite the respondent to return to the hearing room to respond to additional questions.

10.

Verbal presentation of the hearing board’s decision(s)

11.

If applicable, the Chair reminds the respondent and the complainant of the provisions for appeals as found in the Student Conduct Code.

12.

Adjournment

XVI. Appeals Student Conduct Board and Dean’s Administrative Board appeals are conducted according to the following outline. The Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board uses the procedures detailed in the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy to review appeals from violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy. (See Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy Hearing Procedures). 1.

Notification – a student or student group found responsible for a violation of the Student Conduct Code by a hearing board or a Dean’s hearing will be notified of their right to appeal by the Student Conduct Administrator at the conclusion of the hearing.

2.

Student Conduct Appeals Authority – The Student Conduct Appeals Authority is defined as either the Vice President for Student Affairs or the appropriate board as defined in the Student Conduct Code and the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy.

3.

Appeal Request - an accused student or student group who has been found responsible may submit a written appeal request to the Student Conduct Administrator within three (3) business days of the hearing at which they were found responsible. Such requests must be submitted to the Student Conduct Administrator and must contain the detailed information that the appellant has that would justify action by the Student Conduct Appeals Authority as outlined below.

4.

Appeal Hearing - After an appeals request has been submitted, the Student Conduct Appeals Authority will be convened within a reasonable amount of time at the discretion of the Student Conduct Appeal Authority. The Student Conduct Appeals Authority shall not include any member(s) who sat on the hearing panel of the hearing board that found the student or student group responsible initially.

5.

Grounds for Granting an Appeal - In deciding whether to take action on a case, the following items will be assessed: A. The presence of substantial new evidence unavailable to the appellant at the time of the hearing;

6.

B.

The presence of new witness(es) unknown to the appellant at the time of the hearing;

C.

To determine whether the hearing was conducted using improper procedures that impacted the fairness of the hearing.

Appeal Outcomes - The Student Conduct Appeals Authority can take any of the following actions: A.

The original decision of the hearing panel may be vacated in its entirety.

B.

The Student Conduct Appeal Authority may send the case back to the original hearing board to consider new evidence or witnesses; or the case may be sent to a new hearing board for a new hearing at the discretion of the Student Conduct Appeal Authority.

C.

The Student Conduct Appeal Authority can find that grounds for an appeal have not been satisfied, and allow for the decision of the original board to stand, which will close the case. 59


7.

Burden of Proof - The appellant bears the burden of proof, i.e., a preponderance of the evidence, in any appeal.

8.

Hearings During College Recesses – When there is a need for a hearing before school opens in the Fall, during January term, during college breaks, during the final exam period, after school closes in the Spring or Summer session, that case will be reviewed by the Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee.

9.

Finality of the Appeal - The decision of the Student Conduct Appeals Authority is final.

XVII. Notification of Parents/Guardians for Student Conduct Matters Written notice of responsibility determinations for violations and sanctions are sent to the student’s e-mail address listed in College records and, in the case of dependent students, to their parent(s) or legal guardian(s) physical address. Parent/legal guardian notification is intended to involve the larger network of people concerned about the student, his or her behavior and his or her handling of the sanction. A dependent student may submit a written request that no parent/guardian notification be made, specifying extenuating circumstances that they believe warrant deviation from this practice. Such requests are evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students or his/her designee, and in accordance with state and Federal laws.

XVIII. Notification of Student Organization Advisors and International Headquarters Written notice of responsibility determinations for violations and sanctions are sent to a student organizations faculty/staff advisor, chapter or national advisors, house corporation advisor, and/or inter/national headquarters. These notifications are intended to involve the larger network of people concerned about the student organization, their behavior and their handling of the sanction.

XIX. Transcript Notation The Registrar is required, by Virginia law, to make a prominent notation on the academic transcript of any student who is found responsible for a violation of the Student Conduct Code and/or College Policy and who has been sanctioned with either suspension or expulsion. The notation must remain on the record until the completion of the sanction. The Randolph-Macon College Student Conduct Code is adapted from The NCHERM Group Model Developmental Student Conduct Code and is used here with permission.

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Service Fellows Student Leaders Engaging in Service and Exploring Social Needs

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College Alcohol Policy

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College Alcohol Policy Dean of Students Randolph-Macon College is a community of faculty, staff, students, and alumni acting together for the intellectual enrichment of all and for the development of the qualities of mind and spirit essential for leadership, service, and selffulfillment. Social life at College is an important aspect of the total collegiate experience, and Randolph-Macon recognizes that fact in many ways.

Responsibilities It is possible that social life at the College may include the use of alcohol and the College expects members of the R-MC community to use alcoholic beverages in a responsible manner. Students 21 years of age or older may choose to consume alcoholic beverages and are expected to do so in moderation. This responsibility is understood to mean the following:

Knowing and abiding by College policy and federal, state, and local laws and regulations.

Becoming informed about the complexities and the risks, both personal and social, associated with the use of alcohol. This includes knowledge on the part of student organizations about social host liabilities and policies.

Recognizing and accepting as legitimate/appropriate a decision not to use alcoholic beverages, whether as a matter of principle or whether as a matter of convenience, and respecting the rights of non-users by providing suitable and appealing non-alcoholic beverages at social events.

Being sensitive to the needs of students who experience problems as a result of irresponsible use of alcoholic beverages, by encouraging moderation, or supporting students in a decision to refrain from alcohol use.

Discouraging students from driving motor vehicles, or otherwise endangering themselves and others, after they have been drinking, and helping students to contact appropriate sources of assistance for alcohol-related problems.

Regulations Governing Student Conduct – Alcohol The Student Conduct Code and other College policies of Randolph-Macon College include policies restricting the use of alcohol and other alcohol-related beverages. Persons under 21 are prohibited from possessing or using alcoholic beverages. Those 21 and older are permitted the privilege of possessing and using alcoholic beverages in moderation in specifically designated places or at specifically designated functions as indicated; the possession or use of alcoholic beverages is permitted only by persons who are 21 years of age or older AND only as follows: In a student campus residential room with the door closed AND: One or both of the room’s assigned residents are age 21 or older AND the room is not in a residential area designated to be alcohol free. Inside the Townhouse apartments in accordance with the terms of the residential agreement and other guidelines established by the Office of Residence Life and Housing.

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In other residential locations on occasion and in accordance with guidelines established by the Office of Residence Life, the Office of Student Life and the Dean of Students Office. In licensed locations on special occasions for the time, place and area defined in a banquet license.

Medical Amnesty Policy The health and safety of all students is Randolph-Macon College’s primary concern including instances of intoxication, overdose, and/or alcohol poisoning. The potential for student conduct sanctions can deter students from seeking medical attention for themselves or others in cases of intoxication, overdose, and/or alcohol poisoning. In order to encourage students to seek help for their peers and themselves, as well as, to remove barriers that prevent students from seeking medical attention, the College has instituted this medical amnesty policy. The medical amnesty policy applies to all students who seek medical help for themselves and their peers for intoxication, overdose, and/or alcohol poisoning particularly in cases where students are victims of violence, assault, or other crimes. The Policy Information A student who actively seeks medical attention for another student or for their own person due to intoxication or overdose may do so without fear of formal College sanction for violation of the College polices related to illegal use or possession of alcohol or other drugs. Students granted medical amnesty are required to complete an evaluation and any other recommended treatment at the Center for Counseling Services within a time frame determined by the Office of the Dean of Students. The Office of the Dean of Students may require the student to participate in the drafting of and adherence to a Behavioral Contract Agreement following the use of the Medical Amnesty Policy. Failure to complete the evaluation, other recommended treatment, or violation of the Behavioral Contract Agreement will result in student conduct action. The College reserves the right to take administrative student conduct action in any case that involves the unlawful provision of illegal controlled substances or drugs from one person to another. Resources If you or another individual are experiencing a medical emergency related to alcohol or other drugs contact the Office of Campus Safety immediately at 804-752-4710 or “0� from an on-campus phone.

Health Risks Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person's ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described. Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol

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withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol particularly, when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver. Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than other youngsters of becoming alcoholics. (What Works: Schools Without Drugs, 1989 edition).

Counseling, Treatment, and Rehabilitation Services Students are urged to seek assistance for drug and alcohol related problems. Students may seek assistance in identifying appropriate resources from the College's Counseling Center. Any inquiries will be treated confidentially. Drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation services are available in the community to students.

Prohibited Conduct (See the Student Conduct Code Prohibited Behaviors B-level Alcohol Violations)

Enforcement The enforcement and operation of this policy is within the purview of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students who may be reached at 804-752-7266 or gazdell@rmc.edu and delegated to the Office of Student Conduct which may be reached at 804-752-3205 or jamesmcghee@rmc.edu. The full range of sanctions are available to the appropriate decision making body or administrator in the resolution of violations of the Student Conduct Code. A single incident may result in more than one violation in which case the sanctions are cumulative. Second violations typically will involve more, in terms of sanctions, than a first violation and may include referral to a Board-certified and licensed mental health professional for a substance abuse evaluation. Third violations will result in suspension from the College for a minimum of one semester. Violations are cumulative over the entire period of a student’s matriculation. Violations of federal, state or local laws may or may not be referred to local law enforcement as well as be resolved under the provisions of the Student Conduct Code.

Social Host Policy (See the Risk Management and Social Host Policy)

Policy Review Randolph-Macon College will review this policy biennially, at a minimum, to determine its effectiveness and to recommend changes in the program to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students if they are needed. Such a review will also confirm that the College's disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced.

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Code of the Commonwealth of Virginia § 4.1-305 Purchasing or possessing alcoholic beverages unlawful in certain cases; venue; exceptions; penalty; forfeiture; deferred proceedings; treatment and education programs and services A. No person to whom an alcoholic beverage may not lawfully be sold under § 4.1-304 shall consume, purchase or possess, or attempt to consume, purchase or possess, any alcoholic beverage, except (i) pursuant to subdivisions 1 through 7 of § 4.1-200; (ii) where possession of the alcoholic beverages by a person less than 21 years of age is due to such person’s making a delivery of alcoholic beverages in pursuance of his employment or an order of his parent; or (iii) by any state, federal, or local law-enforcement officer or his agent when possession of an alcoholic beverage is necessary in the performance of his duties. Such person may be prosecuted either in the county or city in which the alcohol was possessed or consumed, or in the county or city in which the person exhibits evidence of physical indicia of consumption of alcohol. It shall be an affirmative defense to a charge of a violation of this subsection if the defendant shows that such consumption or possession was pursuant to subdivision 7 of § 4.1-200. B. No person under the age of 21 years shall use or attempt to use any (i) altered, fictitious, facsimile or simulated license to operate a motor vehicle, (ii) altered, fictitious, facsimile or simulated document, including, but not limited to a birth certificate or student identification card, or (iii) motor vehicle operator’s license, birth certificate or student identification card of another person in order to establish a false identification or false age for himself to consume, purchase or attempt to consume or purchase an alcoholic beverage. C. Any person found guilty of a violation of this section shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor; and upon conviction, (i) such person shall be ordered to pay a mandatory minimum fine of $ 500 or ordered to perform a mandatory minimum of 50 hours of community service as a condition of probation supervision and (ii) the license to operate a motor vehicle in the Commonwealth of any such person age 18 or older shall be suspended for a period of not less than six months and not more than one year; the license to operate a motor vehicle in the Commonwealth of any juvenile shall be handled in accordance with the provisions of § 16.1-278.9. The court, in its discretion and upon a demonstration of hardship, may authorize an adult convicted of a violation of this section the use of a restricted permit to operate a motor vehicle in accordance with the provisions of subsection E of § 18.2-271.1 or when referred to a local community-based probation services agency established pursuant to Article 9 (§ 9.1-173 et seq.) of Chapter 1 of Title 9.1. During the period of license suspension, the court may require an adult who is issued a restricted permit under the provisions of this subsection to be (a) monitored by an alcohol safety action program, or (b) supervised by a local community-based probation services agency established pursuant to Article 9 (§ 9.1-173 et seq.) of Chapter 1 of Title 9.1, if one has been established for the locality. The alcohol safety action program or local community-based probation services agency shall report to the county violation of the terms of the restricted permit, the required alcohol safety action program monitoring or local community-based probation services and any condition related thereto or any failure to remain alcohol-free during the suspension period.

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D. Any alcoholic beverage purchased or possessed in violation of this section shall be deemed contraband and forfeited to the Commonwealth in accordance with ยง 4.1-338. E. Any retail licensee who in good faith promptly notifies the Board or any state or local law-enforcement agency of a violation or suspected violation of this section shall be accorded immunity from an administrative penalty for a violation of ยง 4.1-304. F. When any adult who has not previously been convicted of under aged consumption, purchase or possession of alcoholic beverages in Virginia or any other state or the United States is before the court, the court may, upon entry of a plea of guilty or not guilty, if the facts found by the court would justify a finding of guilt of a violation of subsection A, without entering a judgment of guilt and with the consent of the accused, defer further proceedings and place him on probation subject to appropriate conditions. Such conditions may include the imposition of the license suspension and restricted license provisions in subsection C. However, in all such deferred proceedings, the court shall require the accused to enter a treatment or education program or both, if available, that in the opinion of the court best suits the needs of the accused. If the accused is placed on local community-based probation, the program or services shall be located in any of the judicial districts served by the local community-based probation services agency or in any judicial district ordered by the court when the placement is with an alcohol safety action program. The services shall be provided by (i) a program licensed by the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, (ii) certified by the Commission on VASAP, or (iii) by a program or services made available through a community-based probation services agency established pursuant to Article 9 (ยง 9.1-173 et seq.) of Chapter 1 of Title 9.1, if one has been established for the locality. When an offender is ordered to a local community-based probation services rather than the alcohol safety action program, the local community-based probation services agency shall be responsible for providing for services or referring the offender to education or treatment services as a condition of probation. Upon violation of a condition, the court may enter an adjudication of guilt and proceed as otherwise provided. Upon fulfillment of the conditions, the court shall discharge the person and dismiss the proceedings against him without an adjudication of guilt. A discharge and dismissal hereunder shall be treated as a conviction for the purpose of applying this section in any subsequent proceedings. When any juvenile is found to have committed a violation of subsection A, the disposition of the case shall be handled according to the provisions of Article 9 (ยง 16.1-278 et seq.) of Chapter 11 of Title 16.1.

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College Illegal Drugs Policy

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College Illegal Drug Policy Dean of Students Office Randolph-Macon College does not condone or tolerate the use/abuse of illegal drugs. R-MC believes that the use of illegal drugs by students is inconsistent with its educational objectives and may also violate the rights of other students. Accordingly, the College strongly condemns the abuse of illegal drugs. The College prohibits, in accordance with College policy, federal, state, and local laws: the manufacturing, possessing, selling, transmitting, using, or being party to any illegal drug or drug paraphernalia or the illegal possession, sale or use of controlled substances.

Regulations Governing Student Conduct - Illegal Drugs The following rules and procedures have been established with regard to the use/abuse of illegal drugs : 1. The Code of Student Conduct prohibits the use/abuse of illegal drugs. Students are responsible for their own actions; they are also responsible for the actions of their guests. 2. Campus Safety, Resident Assistants, and other College officials are required to report to the Dean of Students Office when they have knowledge of illegal drug use. The Dean of Students or his or her designee will determine the appropriate course of action.

3. Students found responsible for violating the regulations pertaining to drug use will be subject to disciplinary action under the Student Conduct Code, the Residential Facilities Policies, and the Housing Contract. The College may revoke a student’s housing agreement and cause a student to move from a residence hall for the use of illegal drugs. This is in addition to and apart from College Student Conduct Processes. 4. The College reports drug violations to local law enforcement officials.

Medical Amnesty Policy The health and safety of all students is Randolph-Macon College’s primary concern including instances of intoxication, overdose, and/or alcohol poisoning. The potential for student conduct sanctions can deter students from seeking medical attention for themselves or others in cases of intoxication, overdose, and/or alcohol poisoning. In order to encourage students to seek help for their peers and themselves, as well as, to remove barriers that prevent students from seeking medical attention, the College has instituted this medical amnesty policy. The medical amnesty policy applies to all students who seek medical help for themselves and their peers for intoxication, overdose, and/or alcohol poisoning particularly in cases where students are victims of violence, assault, or other crimes.

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The Policy Information A student who actively seeks medical attention for another student or for their own person due to intoxication or overdose may do so without fear of formal College sanction for violation of the College polices related to illegal use or possession of alcohol or other drugs. Students granted medical amnesty are required to complete an evaluation and any other recommended treatment at the Center for Counseling Services within a time frame determined by the Office of the Dean of Students. The Office of the Dean of Students may require the student to participate in the drafting of and adherence to a Behavioral Contract Agreement following the use of the Medical Amnesty Policy. Failure to complete the evaluation, other recommended treatment, or violation of the Behavioral Contract Agreement will result in student conduct action. The College reserves the right to take administrative student conduct action in any case that involves the unlawful provision of illegal controlled substances or drugs from one person to another.

Resources If you or another individual are experiencing a medical emergency related to alcohol or other drugs contact the Office of Campus Safety immediately at 804-752-4710 or “O� from an on-campus phone.

Health Risks Use of illicit drugs may result in serious health consequences. A description of health risks associated with substances covered by the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 811) is given on the Drug Enforcement Agency’s website at (https://www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml)

Counseling, Treatment, and Rehabilitation Services Students are urged to seek assistance for drug and alcohol related problems. Students may seek assistance in identifying appropriate resources from the College's Counseling Center. Any inquiries will be treated confidentially. Drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation services are available in the community to students.

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Prohibited Conduct 1. Illegal Drug sale, possession or use - The illicit sale, possession, use, cultivation, production, manufacture, extraction, preparation, offering, offering for sale, distribution, purchase, delivery on any terms whatsoever, brokerage, dispatch, dispatch in transit, transport, importation and exportation of stimulant, depressive, hallucinogenic, narcotic or date rape drugs, or any other substance listed on Schedule I of the U.S. Controlled Substances Act and the Convention on Psychotropic Substances, or Schedules I and IV of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, as well as any other violation of the US Controlled Substances Act, the Virginia Drug Control Act, and other applicable Federal and state laws, are prohibited. The illegal or unauthorized use of any substance listed on Schedules II through V of the U.S. Controlled Substances Act, Schedules II through IV of the Convention on Psychotropic Substances or Schedules I through III of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs is also prohibited, which includes, inter alia, the abuse of prescription drugs. The use of any substance controlled under the Controlled Substances Act, Convention on Psychotropic Substances, or the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs for which valid prescriptions are necessary, when not in possession of a valid prescription is also prohibited. Any chemical substance that is not for human consumption, but which is consumed by a person for purposes of producing a stimulant, depressive, hallucinogenic, or narcotic effect in that person is considered an illegal drug in those circumstances, under this policy. In addition, in compliance with the 21 U.S.C. § 813, any chemical "substantially similar" to a controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II (of the US Controlled Substances Act) is to be treated as if it were also listed in those schedules, for the purposes of the Policy on Illegal Drugs. Any substance that the Attorney General temporarily places on a Schedule to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety, shall be treated as if it were also listed in that schedule, for the purposes of the Policy on Illegal Drugs. Any recommendation by the World Health Organization for the placing of substances on a schedule of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs or the Convention on Psychotropic Substances, shall be treated as binding until such time as this decision is ratified by the Commission on Narcotic Drugs. 2. Possession of drug paraphernalia – The possession of drug paraphernalia such as, but not limited to, bongs, pipes, clips, rolling paper, etc. is prohibited. The full range of sanctions are available to the appropriate decision making body or administrator in the resolution of violations of the Student Conduct Code. The College reports drug violations to local law enforcement officials.

Enforcement The enforcement and operation of this policy is within the purview of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students who may be reached at 804-752-7266 or gazdell@rmc.edu and delegated to the Office of Student Conduct which may be reached at 804-752-3205 or jamesmcghee@rmc.edu. The full range of sanctions are available to the appropriate decision making body or administrator in the resolution of violations of the Student Conduct Code. The College reports drug violations to local law enforcement officials.

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Policy Review Randolph-Macon College will review this policy biennially, at a minimum, to determine its effectiveness and to recommend changes in the program to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students if they are needed. Such a review will also confirm that the College's disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced.

Laws Regarding Controlled Substances Both the federal Controlled Substances Act and the Virginia Drug Control Act penalize the unlawful manufacturing, distribution, use, and possession of controlled substances. The penalties vary based on the type of drug involved, amount possessed, and whether or not there was an intent to distribute. Federal law sets penalties for first offenses ranging from one year to life imprisonment and/or $100,000 to $4 million in fines. Penalties may include forfeiture of property, including vehicles used to possess, transport, or conceal a controlled substance or denial of Federal benefits such as student loans and professional licenses (e.g., nursing license, teaching license, admission to the legal bar). Convictions under state law may be misdemeanor or felony crimes with sanctions ranging from six months to life imprisonment and/or $250 to $100,000 fines. Federal law provides that any person who distributes, possesses with intent to distribute, or manufactures a controlled substance, on or within 1,000 feet of an educational facility is subject to a doubling of the applicable maximum punishments and fines. A similar state law carries sanctions of up to five years imprisonment and up to $100,000 in fines for similar violations. Additionally, if an individual distributes a controlled substance to a person with the intent to commit a crime of violence, the Drug-Induced Rape Prevention and Punishment Act of 1996 provides criminal penalties of up to twenty years imprisonment. An example of such behavior is giving rohypnol (“date rape drug”) to a person for the purpose of committing rape. Penalties vary widely, depending both on whether distribution or intent to distribute is found and depending on the scheduled “class” of the drug involved. Complete information on the Controlled Substances Act can be found at https://www.dea.gov.

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Student Government Association Student Leaders Promoting Engagement and Civic Responsibility

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Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy

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Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy The Dean of Students Office

I.

Introduction Randolph-Macon College (“the College”) is committed to encouraging and sustaining a learning and living community that is free from harassment, violence, and prohibited discrimination. In that regard and consistent with federal law (e.g., Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and the Violence Against Women Act), R-MC has developed this Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy (“the SRC Policy”), applicable to all students. Further, R-MC conducts extensive education and awareness programs with the goal of preventing and discouraging sexual/gender violence and other forms of sexual misconduct. The SRC Policy prohibits all forms of sexual assault, sexual exploitation, sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. Collectively, these terms are referred to in this policy as “Prohibited Conduct.” Prohibited Conduct is more specifically defined in section XIII of this Policy. The Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy serves three principal purposes. 1. It establishes conduct standards and defines prohibited behavior 2. It outlines the rights and responsibilities of complainants and respondents and the process for resolution of reports of alleged sexual misconduct 3. It presents resources available to all members of the campus community

II.

Terminology The Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy refers to the individual who is the alleged victim of the behavior(s) in question as the “complainant” and the student alleged to have committed the violation of the policy as the “respondent.” Both the complainant and the respondent will be treated fairly and with respect throughout the process. Respondents are entitled to a presumption of innocence throughout the disciplinary process until they are found responsible for a violation of this policy.

III.

Scope of the Policy This Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy applies to any instance in which any R-MC student is alleged to have engaged in Prohibited Conduct against anyone (e.g., a student, employee, or third party such as a visiting athlete, guest speaker, or contractor), regardless of the complainant’s or respondent’s sex, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity. The College will respond to any complaint of prohibited conduct, including conduct alleged to have occurred during breaks, leaves of absence, or periods of dismissal, whether on or off campus.

IV.

Title IX Coordinator The Title IX Coordinator is primarily responsible for implementing these procedures outlined in this Policy. Anyone who is concerned that a violation of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy by a student has occurred is encouraged to contact the Title IX Coordinator who is Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs, William Franz, 1st Floor of Peele Hall (804-752-7268) available at wfranz@rmc.edu.

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V.

Deputy Title IX Coordinator A Deputy Title IX Coordinator is a professional staff member identified by the Title IX Coordinator to perform the functions of the Title IX Coordinator as his/her designee. These functions may include, but are not limited to, conducting intake meetings and advising students about available resources.

VI.

Title IX Investigator A Title IX Investigator is a professional staff member who is trained to investigate alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy. The Title IX Coordinator assigns a Title IX Investigator to conduct an investigation in all reports of alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy. The investigator interviews witnesses, collects information, and submits a written report of relevant information to the Title IX Coordinator.

VII.

Vice President for Student Affairs The Vice President for Student Affairs is the chief student affairs officer at the College. The Vice President for Student Affairs convenes the Behavior Assessment and Intervention Team. The Vice President for Student Affairs, also, appoints the members of the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board. In terms of immediate or interim measures, The Vice President for Student Affairs, or his/ her designee, has the authority to place a student on interim suspension pending the College’s student conduct proceedings, but only does so as outlined in “Section XIII - Interim Suspension” in the Student Conduct Code. When there is a need for a hearing while the College is in recess, the hearing may be conducted by, the Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee. The Vice President for Student Affairs is the Student Conduct Appeals Authority. In his/her role as the Student Conduct Appeals Authority, the Vice President for Student Affairs oversees the appeals process except in cases where he adjudicates the original proceeding during a college recess. In those cases, the Vice President for Student Affairs will designate an administrator to serve as the Student Conduct Appeals Authority. The Vice President for Student Affairs is Dr. Grant L. Azdell, Vice President for Student Affairs, 2nd Floor of Peele Hall. He may be contacted at (804-752-7266) or gazdell@rmc.edu.

VIII. The Student Conduct Administrator The Student Conduct Administrator is the professional staff member designated by the Vice President for Student Affairs to oversee the Office of Student Conduct and its processes and procedures. When, and if, the Title IX Coordinator determines that a case should proceed to a hearing, the case is referred to the Office of Student Conduct and will be resolved by the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board. The Student Conduct Administrator will oversee this process. The Student Conduct Administrator is James McGhee, Assistant Dean of Students, 2 nd Floor Brock Commons, The Student Engagement Center Room 216. He may be reached at (804-752-3205) or jamesmcghee@rmc.edu

IX.

The Office of Student Conduct The Office of Student Conduct is charged with supporting the College's educational mission and goals by promoting a just, safe, and civil College climate through informational programming, upholding community and behavioral standards as embodied in the Student Conduct Code, conducting fair and impartial student conduct processes and training Student Conduct Board members.

X.

Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board The Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board is composed of a Chair and two other faculty or staff members from a pool of faculty and staff members who have been appointed by the Vice President for Student Affairs and have been extensively trained to review alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy.

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XI.

Confidentiality 1.

Confidential Employees A student may confidentially discuss an alleged violation of this policy (i.e., without the information being reported to the Title IX Coordinator) to those who serve in a professional role in which communication is privileged under Virginia law and to those whom the College has designated as a confidential resource consistent with Title IX. Persons who may maintain confidentiality under the SRC policy and within the scope of their professional responsibilities are limited to:

2.

XII.

a.

The Student Health Center Staff

b.

The Counseling Center Staff

c.

The College Chaplain

Non-Confidential Employees Students should be aware that, with the exception of the confidential resources listed above, all employees who become aware of conduct that might violate this policy are required to notify the Title IX Coordinator with the names of the parties involved and the details of the report. Students who serve in an ongoing peer-advising role (such as Resident Assistants) are also required to file such reports with the Title IX Coordinator.

Prohibited Conduct Randolph-Macon College prohibits all forms of sexual assault, sexual exploitation, sexual harassment, relationship violence (dating violence and domestic violence), and stalking. 1.

Sexual Assault – Non-Consensual Sexual Contact - non-consensual sexual contact includes the intentional touching, manipulation or fondling either of a person by another person or when a person is forced to touch directly or through clothing another person’s groin, genitals, breasts, thighs or buttocks or when a person is compelled to touch the above named parts of their own bodies for the sexual gratification of another, against the complainant’s consent or after a person has withdrawn their consent. It also includes non-consensual kissing, or stroking, or fondling of a non-sexual body part, in an intimate way.

2.

Sexual Assault – Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse - non-consensual sexual intercourse involves any form of sexual intercourse with a person, without their consent, or after consent is withdrawn. This includes nonconsensual anal, oral, or vaginal penetration, whether by a finger, tongue, penis or an inanimate object, as well as compelling an unwilling person to perform any of the above named acts.

3.

Sexual Exploitation - sexual exploitation is defined as activity of a sexual nature which results in the nonconsensual exploitation of one person by another for the purposes of gaining some sort of advantage, including, but not limited, to economic, social, and academic advantages. The sexual behavior which results in such exploitation may have been consensual or non-consensual in its original nature. Sexual Exploitation also includes prostitution, videotaping or recording (by any electronic means) sexual activity without permission, voyeurism, and engaging in sexual activity with another while concealing that one is infected with HIV/AIDS, an STI, or an STD.

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4.

Sexual Harassment – sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and/or other verbal or physical acts of a sexual nature which, because of their severity and/or persistence, interfere significantly with an individual’s or a group’s work or education, or adversely affect an individual’s or a group’s living conditions. Sexual harassment may include but is not limited to quid pro quo (something for something, such as a demand or offer of sexual activity to retain or obtain academic or employment benefits), and/or an abusive or hostile environment which interferes with the ability to function as a full participant in the Randolph-Macon College community.

5.

Dating Violence – dating violence is violence committed by a person who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship with the person against whom the violence is committed. Whether there was such relationship will be gauged by its length, type, and frequency of interaction.

6.

Domestic Violence – domestic violence is violent misdemeanor and felony offenses committed by a person’s current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, person similarly situated under domestic or family violence law, or anyone else protected under domestic or family violence law.

7.

Stalking – stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for their or other’s safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress.

XIII. Retaliation Retaliation is prohibited under Title IX and the SRC Policy and is adjudicated under the Student Conduct Code. Retaliation is defined as words or acts taken in response to good-faith reporting of Prohibited Conduct, or to an individual or group's participation in the College’s complaint process or the follow up to a complaint. The College prohibits retaliation of any sort. Any act of retaliation including, but not limited to, harassment, abuse, threat, or intimidation toward the complainant, the respondent, or any witness who makes a report of an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code or College policy is prohibited. (See the Student Conduct Code Section titled “Prohibited Conduct”)

XIV. Consent Consent is an affirmative decision to engage in mutually acceptable sexual activity freely given by clear actions or words. Consent is an informed decision made freely and actively by all parties. Relying solely upon nonverbal communication can lead to miscommunication. It is important not to make assumptions; if confusion or ambiguity regarding the issue of consent arises anytime during a sexual interaction, it is essential that each participant stops and clarify, verbally, their willingness to continue. Students should understand that consent may not be inferred from silence, passivity, or lack of active resistance alone. Furthermore, a current or previous dating or sexual relationship is not sufficient to constitute consent, and consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Conduct is considered “without consent” if no clear consent, verbal or nonverbal, is given. An individual is "unable to freely give consent" when the individual is incapacitated (arising, for example, from the use of alcohol or other drugs or when the individual is passed out, asleep, unconscious, or mentally or physically impaired). An individual is "unable to freely give consent" when the individual is coerced into sexual activity, such as, for example, through the use of physical force, threat of physical or emotional harm, undue pressure, isolation, or confinement.

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In the absence of mutually understandable words or actions, it is the responsibility of the initiator, or the person who wants to engage in the specific sexual activity to make sure that they have the consent from his/her partner(s). Consent to some form of sexual activity does not necessarily imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Mutually understandable consent must be obtained by the initiator at every stage of sexual interaction. The perspective of a reasonable person will be the basis for determining whether a person knew, or reasonably should have known, whether another person was able to freely give consent and whether consent was given. Additionally, being intoxicated or incapacitated does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain consent and will not be an excuse for engaging in prohibited conduct. The use of alcohol or other drugs can impair effective communication about consent to sexual activity and can hinder one’s ability to resist and assault and to pick up on cues that a situation may be dangerous. Alcohol or other drugs can also lower inhibitions and create an atmosphere of confusion over whether consent is freely and effectively given. Unless an individual is substantially physically or mentally impaired, consent while under the influence of alcohol or drugs is valid consent. The use of alcohol or drugs does not minimize a student’s responsibility for violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy. In particular, it does not mitigate or nullify a charge of sexual assault or any other form of prohibited conduct. The use of alcohol or drugs does not, in and of itself, negate a student’s ability to give consent, nor does it remove a student’s responsibility to communicate their feelings and ensure that any consent given is valid.

XV.

Information for Complainants A complainant’s rights and responsibilities, outlined in this policy, will be protected. During an intake meeting, the Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee will provide the complainant with a general understanding of the SRC Policy and to identify forms of support or immediate interventions available, including all of their options under this Policy. The Title IX Coordinator will communicate substantive and, when warranted, procedural developments regarding an investigation. The alleged conduct may also be criminal in nature, and complainants have the right to report—or not to report—the conduct to Ashland Police or other appropriate law enforcement agency. A criminal report does not preclude college disciplinary action. Complainants are strongly encouraged to seek counseling and support available through resources such as the Counseling Center and Hanover Safe Place. Regardless of whether a complainant pursues a criminal complaint and/or the college’s complaint process through this policy, the college will investigate the incident(s) in question and will take appropriate responsive action to ensure that the educational environment is free of harassment and to prevent the recurrence of a hostile environment—and, if appropriate, remedy the effects of the alleged misconduct on the complainant. Mediation is not appropriate for any allegation of sexual violence. A complainant may request or the college may issue administrative actions and supports such as a “no contact” order and changes to academic and living situations through the Title IX Coordinator regardless of whether a complainant files a formal report. A complainant will be notified as to what changes are reasonably available and/or are being implemented.

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XVI. Information for Respondents A respondent’s rights and responsibilities, as outlined in this policy, will be protected. During an intake meeting, the Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee will provide the respondent with a general understanding of the SRC Policy and to identify forms of support. The Title IX Coordinator will, also, make the respondent aware of the allegations against them. The Title IX Coordinator will communicate substantive and, when warranted, procedural developments regarding an investigation. Note that alleged behavior may also be criminal in nature, and a respondent may be subject to a criminal investigation by the appropriate law enforcement agency at the same time as an investigation by the College under this policy; the respondent may wish to consult with a criminal lawyer as the college does not provide advice as to the criminal process. Respondents are entitled to a presumption of innocence throughout the disciplinary process until they are found responsible for a violation of this policy. Respondents have the right to (and are strongly encouraged to seek) counseling and support available through resources such as the Counseling Center or other college and local resources. A respondent may request or the college may issue administrative actions and supports such as a “no contact� order and changes to academic and living situations through the Title IX Coordinator. A respondent will be notified as to what changes are reasonably available and/or are being implemented. A respondent may request, or the Title IX Coordinator may change, academic and living situations and the respondent will be notified as to what changes are reasonably available and/or are being implemented.

XVII. Complaint Resolution 1. Reporting There are multiple channels for reporting Prohibited Conduct. A complainant may choose to report to the College, to law enforcement, to both, or to neither. These reporting options are not exclusive. Complainants may simultaneously pursue criminal and disciplinary action. The College will support Complainants in understanding, assessing and pursuing these options. A. Law Enforcement complainants have the right to notify or decline to notify law enforcement. In keeping with its commitment to taking all appropriate steps to eliminate, prevent, and remedy all Prohibited Conduct, the College urges Complainants to report Prohibited Conduct immediately to local law enforcement by contacting: i. 911 (for emergencies) ii. Ashland Police Department ((434) 977-9041) (for non-emergencies) iii. Police have unique legal authority, including the power to seek and execute search warrants, collect forensic evidence, make arrests, and assist in seeking Emergency Protective Orders. Although a police report may be made at any time, complainants should be aware that a one-year statute of limitations may apply to certain misdemeanors in Virginia. The College will assist complainants in notifying law enforcement if they choose to do so.

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B.

B.

2.

Randolph-Macon College - the College also urges anyone who becomes aware of an incident of Prohibited Conduct to report the incident immediately to the College through the following reporting options: i.

The Title IX Coordinator Dr. William Franz Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs 804-752-7268 wfranz@rmc.edu 1st Floor Peele Hall

ii.

The Dean of Students Office Dr. Grant Azdell Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students 804-752-7266 gazdell@rmc.edu 2nd Floor Peele Hall

iii.

The Office of Campus Safety 804-752-4710 Campus Safety House – Caroline Street

iv.

Online Through the College’s website for online reporting (which also allows for anonymous reporting). https://secure.rmc.edu/student_affairs/sexualassault or https://secure.rmc.edu/student_affairs/sexualharassment.

There is no time limit for reporting Prohibited Conduct to the College under this policy; however, the College’s ability to respond may diminish over time, as evidence may erode, memories may fade, and respondents may no longer be affiliated with the College. If the respondent is no longer a student or an employee, the College will provide reasonably appropriate remedial measures, assist the complainant in identifying external reporting options, and take reasonable steps to eliminate Prohibited Conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects. The College will not pursue disciplinary action against complainants or witnesses for disclosure of illegal personal consumption of drugs or alcohol where such disclosures are made in connection with a good faith report or investigation of Prohibited Conduct. Complainants may simultaneously pursue criminal and College complaints.

Notification of the Behavior Assessment and Intervention Team The Title IX Coordinator will notify the Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Team (BAIT) and the BAIT will meet within 72 hours of receiving a report of an alleged violation of this policy to review the available information.

3.

Timely Warning The College may be required, in accordance with the Clery Act, to issue a timely warning to the campus. The college will remove all personal identifiers from the notice; however, the College cannot guarantee that a timely warning will not compromise or appear to compromise confidentiality.

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4. Intake Meeting Upon receipt of any allegation of Prohibited Conduct under the SRC Policy, the Title IX Coordinator will first schedule meetings with the complainant and respondent in order to provide them with a general understanding of this Policy and to identify forms of support or immediate interventions available, including all of their options under this Policy. The Title IX Coordinator will, also, make them aware of their rights and responsibilities. i.

Unknown Complainant If an on-line report is received by the Title IX Coordinator, which was written by either the complainant or another individual, and the name of the complainant is excluded from the report, the College’s ability to respond may be limited. In such cases, Title IX nevertheless requires the Colleges to investigate and take prompt and effective action to limit the effects of the alleged sexual misconduct and to provide a safe and non-discriminatory environment for all students.

Ii.

Complainant Wishes to Pursue Action The Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee will schedule an individual intake meeting with the complainant and seek to determine how the complainant wishes to proceed, i.e. whether or not the complainant wishes to pursue action under the College’s Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy. If the complainant wishes to proceed, the Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee will: (i)determine the name of the respondent, and the date, location and nature of the Sexual or Relational Misconduct (unless this information was already shared with the Coordinator); and (ii) identify forms of support or immediate interventions available to them; and (iii) assign a Title IX Investigator to the case. The Title IX Coordinator or his or her designee will also schedule an individual intake meeting with the respondent to (i) inform the respondent of the allegations asserted against him/her; and identify forms of support or immediate interventions available.

iii.

Complainant Does Not Wish to Pursue Action If the complainant does not wish to pursue action under the College’s Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, or requests that they remain confidential, in the case of alleged Prohibited Conduct, Title IX nevertheless requires the College to investigate and take reasonable action. The Coordinator or their designee will inform the complainant that the College’s ability to respond may be limited. In cases, where alleged sexual misconduct is involved, Title IX requires the College to evaluate the complainant’s request that they remain confidential or that the complaint not be adjudicated in light of the College’s commitment to provide a reasonably safe and non-discriminatory environment for all students. In order to make such an evaluation, the Coordinator or their designee may conduct a preliminary investigation into the alleged Sexual Misconduct and may weigh the complainant’s requests against the following factors: the seriousness of the alleged Sexual Misconduct, an assessment of any threats to the health and safety of the community, patterns of behavior, use of weapons, evidence of predation, and whether there have been complaints of Sexual Misconduct against the same respondent student. The final determination will be made by Title IX Coordinator. The Coordinator will inform the complainant if the College cannot ensure confidentiality and must move forward under this Policy. Even if the College cannot take action under the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy against the respondent student because the complainant insists on confidentiality or that the claim not be adjudicated, Title IX nonetheless requires the College to take prompt and effective action to limit the effects of the alleged Sexual Misconduct and to prevent its recurrence.

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5.

Immediate and/or Interim Measures The Title IX Coordinator, or his/her designee, may issue administrative actions immediately and/or on an interim basis as deemed appropriate, including but not limited to restrictions on contact between the complainant, the respondent, and/or other involved parties; exclusion from areas of campus; and, removal or relocation from residential areas. The Vice President for Student Affairs, or his/her designee, may impose an interim suspension (See Interim Suspensions in Section XIII of the Student Conduct Code).

6.

Rights and Responsibilities During the initial intake meeting, the Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee will meet with both complainant and respondent and to review this policy and explain their rights and responsibilities.

7.

Advisor A student who has been notified that their conduct is being investigated or who has been charged with an alleged violation of the SRC Policy that, after an investigation has been referred to the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board for a hearing has the right to be assisted by one (1) advisor. An advisor can be any person selected by the student to advise them through the stages and processes set forth in the SRC Policy and may include students, faculty, staff, or an attorney. The student may be accompanied by their advisor to a meeting, investigation, hearing, and appeal. If the student elects not to attend a proceeding or the investigation, the advisor cannot attend that proceeding or investigation. When exercising the right to be accompanied by an advisor, a student should identify the person who will attend proceedings as scheduled by the College. A student may elect to change advisors during the course of the student conduct process. A previously scheduled proceeding, meeting or investigation is not subject to postponement due to the unavailability of a specific advisor. If requested by the student, an advisor can provide support, guidance, and advice. An advisor can also assist the student in preparing comments that the student will present during a proceeding. To enhance effectiveness, an advisor should read the contents of Fishtales. The College is not responsible for the quality, accuracy, or effectiveness of assistance provided by a student’s advisor. Throughout the student conduct process, an advisor cannot present information, advocate for, or argue a case on behalf of a student; the student is responsible for presenting comments he/she wishes to provide, even when accompanied by an advisor. During any proceeding, an advisor’s communication is limited to conferring with the student through written note; the advisor may not address any other participant or the hearing panel. The advisor may not interfere in, disrupt, or delay a proceeding. The representative of the Office of Student Conduct or the hearing chairperson may remove or dismiss an advisor who becomes disruptive or who does not abide by the restrictions on advisor participation. The removal of an advisor will not delay or halt the proceeding.

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5.

Investigation The Title IX Coordinator will assign a Title IX investigator to investigate in all reports of alleged violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy. The investigator interviews witnesses, collects information, and submits a written report of relevant information to the title IX Coordinator. The Title IX Coordinator will review the report for completeness and relevance, and direct further investigation as necessary before the report is shared with the complainant and respondent. The investigator’s report will be shared with the complainant and respondent, who then have five (5) business days to respond in writing to the report with any clarifications, witnesses, or other information. The complainant and respondent must also submit in writing by that time the names of any witnesses the complainant/respondent wishes to appear (should the matter proceed to a hearing). Character witnesses are not permitted in any type of hearing. Names of witnesses provided by the complainant/respondent will be shared with the other party by the Title IX Investigator. After the five-business-day deadline, the complainant and respondent may not provide any additional information for the hearing packet (defined below) and may not produce any additional material at the hearing, unless that information was not reasonably available prior to the closing of the five-day window. The Title IX Coordinator will determine what, if any, changes or additions are made to the investigator’s report based upon his/her review of the report and feedback from the complainant and respondent. The Title IX Coordinator will determine whether to proceed to a hearing based on their assessment of whether there is sufficient information to believe that a violation of the SRC Policy may have occurred. The Title IX Coordinator will convey this decision in writing to the complainant and respondent.

6. Time Frames The Title IX Coordinator seeks to resolve complaints under this policy within 60 days from receipt of a report, excluding days classes are not in session. An investigation typically takes approximately 45 business days to complete. Generally within 14 business days after completion of an investigation, a Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board hearing, if applicable, is scheduled. Special circumstances may require the College to extend this overall time frame or any individual time frame discussed in this policy. Examples of reasons why time frames may need to be extended include but are not limited to the complexity of the case, delays due to fall/spring/summer/holiday breaks, inclement weather, and other extenuating circumstances. Exceptions to these time frames will be communicated to the complainant and respondent.

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XVIII. Hearing Procedures When the Title IX Coordinator decides that a case should proceed to a hearing, the case will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct and will be resolved by the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board. 1.

Student Conduct Meeting Once the Title IX Coordinator has determined that a case should proceed to a hearing, the Title IX Coordinator will forward the Title IX Investigators report to the Office of Student Conduct. The Student Conduct Administrator will meet with the complainant and the respondent to go over their rights and responsibilities again as well as the hearing outline included in the SRC policy. The respondent will have the charges recommended by the Title IX Coordinator presented to them, and they will complete a form acknowledging that their case will be heard before the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board.

2.

Notice The complainant and respondent will receive notices of the date, time, location, and members of the hearing panel at least five (5) days prior to the hearing.

3.

Standard of Proof – Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board hearings are conducted using the preponderance of the evidence standard, meaning that it must be established that it is more likely than not that there is a violation of the SRC Policy for a student to be found responsible.

4.

Privacy - Hearings will be conducted in private. Only current students, faculty, and staff of Randolph-Macon College may participate in hearings without the express permission of the Student Conduct Administrator and the chair of the sitting hearing board.

5.

Confidentiality - All participants are required to maintain confidentiality.

6.

Necessary Adjournments – Dean’s Sexual Conduct Boards make every effort to complete hearings in a timely fashion. If unforeseen circumstances arise, the Chair of the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board may call for an adjournment for a specific time.

7.

Recesses - Any participant, except advisors, may make a request for a recess to the Chair, and the Chair, at their discretion, may grant a recess. The Chair has sole discretion as to the length and number of any granted recesses.

8.

Multiple Hearings – The Title IX Coordinator will be responsible for determining the need for multiple hearings. If the Title IX Coordinator determines that multiple hearings are necessary, then, both parties are expected to be present at and participate in each hearing.

9.

Respondent Fails to Appear – If a respondent fails to appear at a hearing after having been duly notified of the time and place, the respondent has forfeited his/her rights to participate in the hearing. The hearing board will proceed in absentia.

10. Witness Fails to Appear – The Student Conduct Administrator or their designee may require the presence of any witness with pertinent information about a case. Failure to comply could result in student conduct action against a student witness.

11.

Character Witnesses – Character Witnesses are not permitted in any hearing. Only witnesses that have direct knowledge of the case will be considered by the hearing board.

12.

Hearing Record – The Student Conduct Administrator and/or Administrative Liaison are the only parties that may record the proceedings of any hearing board whether in audio, video, or audio-visual format. No participant will be granted access to the recording as access is reserved for official College use.

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13.

Electronic Devices. - A respondent, complainant, advisor, and/or witness may not bring electronic devices that capture or facilitate communication (e.g., computer, cell phone, audio/video recorder, etc.) into a hearing room, unless authorized by the hearing panel.

14.

Hearings During College Recesses – When there is a need for a hearing before school opens in the Fall, during January term, during college breaks, during the final exam period, after school closes in the Spring or Summer session, that case may be adjudicated by the Vice President for Student Affairs or their designee.

15. Hearing Board General Procedure – The Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board has general authority over the manner in which a hearing is conducted (e.g., it may set time frames for witness testimony, recesses, etc.). A complainant or respondent may not question each other or other witnesses directly, but may raise questions to be asked of that party through the hearing chair, who will direct the question to the appropriate party and receive a response for the record. The hearing panel determines the relevancy of any information presented/submitted at the hearing and can exclude irrelevant information or prohibited information.

16. Hearing Board Specific Procedures The Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board hearings are conducted according to the following outline. The information below is provided only as a guideline. a.

Call to order

b.

Introductions

c.

The Oath of Honesty

d.

Reading of the charge(s) to be considered

e.

Statement by the respondent as to whether they are not responsible or responsible for the alleged policy violation(s)

f.

Presentation of information concerning charge(s), including the following components if relevant to the hearing but not necessarily in this order: i.

Investigation report

ii.

Information from witnesses

iii.

Information from the respondent concerning their account

iv.

Information from the complainant concerning their account (in cases where the College is not the complainant)

g.

Questions by hearing board members

h.

Summary comments by the respondent if they elect to make them

i.

Summary comments by the complainant if they elect to make them

j.

Hearing Board meets in closed executive session to deliberate and determine if the respondent is responsible for a violation of this policy

k.

Verbal presentation of the hearing board’s decision(s)

l.

If there is a finding of responsibility, the respondent is allowed to make an impact statement.

m.

If there if a finding of responsibility, the complainant is allowed to make an impact statement.

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n.

If there is a finding of responsibility and following the complainant’s impact statement, the Hearing Board meets in closed executive session to deliberate and determine the appropriate sanction(s).

o.

Adjournment

p.

The Student Conduct Administrator will present appeals paperwork to both the respondent and the complainant following the hearing regardless of the result.

19. Relevance of Sexual History - A complainant’s or respondent’s prior or subsequent sexual activity is typically not relevant and will only be considered as evidence when the previous or subsequent behavior was substantially similar to the conduct at issue or indicates a pattern of behavior and substantial conformity with that pattern. This determination is at the sole discretion of the chair of the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board.

20. Sanctions - The full range of sanctions are available to the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board in the resolution of violations of the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy.

XIX. Appeals 1. Notice – the Student Conduct Administrator will notify the respondent and complainant of their right to request an appeal at the conclusion of any Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board Hearing.

2. Appeal Request – the respondent and/or the complainant may submit a written appeal request to the Student Conduct Administrator within three (3) business days of a hearing. Such requests must be submitted to the Student Conduct Administrator and must set forth the grounds for the appeal with detailed information that would justify action by the Student Conduct Appeals Authority.

3. Appeal Hearing - After an appeals request has been submitted, the Student Conduct Appeals Authority will be convened within a reasonable amount of time at the discretion of the Student Conduct Appeal Authority. The Student Conduct Appeals Authority shall not include any member(s) who sat on the original hearing panel.

4. Necessary Adjournments – Appeals Boards make every effort to complete hearings in a timely fashion. If unforeseen circumstances arise, the Chair of the Appeals Board may call for an adjournment for a specific time.

5. Grounds for Granting an Appeal - In deciding whether to take action on a case, the following will be assessed: A. The presence of substantial new evidence unavailable to the appellant at the time of the hearing; B.

The presence of new witness(es) unknown to the appellant at the time of the hearing;

C.

To determine whether the hearing was conducted using improper procedures that impacted the fairness of the hearing;

6. Appeal Outcomes - The Student Conduct Appeal Authority can take any of the following actions: A. The original decision of the hearing panel may be vacated in its entirety. B. The Student Conduct Appeal Authority may send the case back to the original hearing board to consider new evidence or witnesses; or the case may be sent to a new hearing board for a new hearing at the discretion of the Student Conduct Appeal Authority. C. The Student Conduct Appeal Authority can find that grounds for an appeal have not been satisfied, and allow for the decision of the original board to stand, which will close the case.

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7. Burden of Proof - The appellant bears the burden of proof in any appeal.

8. Hearings During College Recesses – When there is a need for a hearing before school opens in the Fall, during January term, during college breaks, during the final exam period, after school closes in the Spring or Summer session, that case may be adjudicated by the Vice President for Student Affairs or their designee.

9. Finality of the Appeal - The decision of the Student Conduct Appeals Authority is final.

XX. Special Protections for Individuals To encourage reporting of misconduct under this Policy and to ensure fairness to all participants in the student conduct process outlined in the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy, the following is a list of rights of both respondents and complainants involved in proceedings under the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy:

All students are entitled to the following: i.

To an explanation of the actions available to him/her and the Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy

ii.

To request that the College write a letter to all involved individuals emphasizing that the Student Conduct Code and College policy prohibit all types of harassment and retaliation by all involved individuals and their supporters. Contact between individuals may be prohibited by the College

iii.

To have an advisor (an advisor may not question witnesses or make statements before the panel in the case of a hearing)

iv.

An assurance that the College will keep the complaint and investigation, if requested, confidential to the extent possible

v.

In the event of a hearing, to an explanation of the process, to know the names of witnesses, and the specific prohibited conduct to be adjudicated

vi.

Not to have past sexual history discussed during the hearing unless it is highly relevant, and it would be manifestly unfair not to consider such information

vii.

To remain present for the entire proceeding, aside from the executive session deliberations, and to inspect information presented, as well as to use alternative methods to observe the proceedings and question witnesses, such as closed circuit technology (Skype or television), partitions or over a phone line from an alternate location

viii.

To identify witnesses, individuals who have relevant, first-hand knowledge of the case being investigated, and, in the event of a hearing, to pose questions to them through the Chair of the Dean’s Sexual Conduct Board

ix.

To a fair and impartial hearing

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x.

To speak on his or her own behalf

xi.

The right to know the status of the case at any point during the process upon request

xii.

To be informed in a timely manner of the panel’s findings and of the outcome of the hearing in writing and to be informed verbally of the outcome of the hearing at the conclusion of the hearing

xiii.

The right to request an appeal the decision of the hearing panel as outlined in this policy

XXI. Withdrawing During an On-Going Student Conduct Process A student may not avoid resolving an alleged Student Conduct Code or College Policy violation by withdrawing from the College. When an investigation of an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code begins, the Student Conduct Administrator or the Title IX Coordinator will notify the registrar to place a withdrawal hold on the respondent’s academic record until the completion of the student conduct process. Should a student depart from the College before review of a reported incident and/or resolution of an alleged Student Conduct Code or College policy violation is completed, the student conduct process will proceed and, where appropriate, sanctions for Student Conduct Code or College policy violation(s) will be issued. Hearings may take place without the presence of the respondent.

XXII. Transcript Notation The Registrar is required, by Virginia law, to make a prominent notation on the academic transcript of any student who is found responsible for a violation of the Student Conduct Code and/or College Policy and who has been sanctioned with either suspension or expulsion. The notation must remain on the record until the completion of the sanction.

XXIII. Long-Term/Indefinite Measures and/or Remedies At the conclusion of a hearing regarding Sexual Misconduct, regardless of the outcome of the case, the Title IX Coordinator will review all of the evidence used to determine whether the complainant or respondent is entitled to any remedy under Title IX that may not be provided for in the hearing process. The Title IX Coordinator and/or staff in the Office of Student Conduct will work with the complainant and respondent as applicable to identify and implement any appropriate/necessary long-term or permanent measures/remedies. Where sexual misconduct has been found to have occurred, these measures seek to address the effects of the sexual misconduct, restore a sense of safety and well-being, and maximize educational opportunities. Where the information does not result in a finding of a policy violation, similar measures may be appropriate for both parties. The Title IX Coordinator and/or staff in the Office of Student Conduct will also identify appropriate remedies/measures to address any effects of substantiated conduct on the College community. Long-term remedies/measures may include extending or making permanent any interim protective measures or implementing additional measures. The Title IX Coordinator and/or staff in the Office of Student Conduct will consider whether there is a need for additional measures/remedies, which may include “no-contact” directives and reassignment or removal from a class or on-campus living area.

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XXIV. Prevention and Awareness Programs The College is committed to the prevention of Prohibited Conduct through regular and ongoing education and awareness programs. Incoming Students and new Employees receive primary prevention and awareness programming as part of their orientation, and returning Students and current Employees receive ongoing training and related education.

XV.

Annual Policy Review The College will review and update this policy, as appropriate, each year. The College will evaluate, among other things, any changes in legal requirements, existing College resources, and the resolution of cases from the preceding year (including, but not limited to, timeframes for completion and sanctions and remedies imposed).

XVI. Compliance Randolph - Macon College, in compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972, applicable Federal, state and local laws and regulations, and in accordance with the values reflected in our Non-Discrimination policy, will not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, disability, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or gender expression.

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Diversity Council Student Leaders Promoting and Inclusive Community and World

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Risk Management & Social Host Policy

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Risk Management and Social Host Policy Definition A social function or event is defined as any event or gathering hosted by an organization or that a reasonable observer would associate with an organization either on or off organizational premises where alcohol is present, consumed, used or possessed by either members or non-members of an organization.

Scope The possession, sale, use or consumption of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, while on chapter or organization premises or during an organization event, in any situation sponsored or endorsed by the chapter or organization, or at any event an observer would associate with the organization, must be in compliance with any and all applicable laws of the state, locality, country, and Randolph-Macon College, and must comply with either the BYOB or Third Party Vendor Guidelines as outlined in the Social Host Responsibility Policy and Procedures below.

Registration Any event that meets or is described in the definition of social functions or events and/or operating within the scope of this policy are required to be registered with the Office of Student Life in the case of organizations and with the Office of Residence Life in the case of townhouse residents. Any College organization that will have alcohol at an event must register the event with the Office of Student Life by noon on Monday the week in which the event will be held, unless the event is an outdoor event or off-campus event, in which case additional procedures (see below) must be followed. A guest list and a Social Event Notification Form, are required, in addition to documents relevant to the type of event being held, such as BYOB or Third Party Events (for further details see Section II below). Social events at which alcohol is consumed, possessed, or served by a Third Party Vendor may take place only between the hours of 6 p.m. to 2 a.m., Friday and Saturday. Thursday events may only be held between 6 p.m. and 12 a.m. Any event to be held at a time other than these times must be approved by the Assistant Dean of Students or his/her designee. Social events may not exceed a four (4) hour length of time, and no organization may register more than one event on any given day. Exceptions will be made twice a year for alumni events on the weekends of Homecoming and another weekend to be determined by the organization. When more than one event is registered on these weekends, the events must have four (4) hours between the end time and the start time of the two events. Unregistered social functions are expressly forbidden.

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Access and Guest Lists Open parties, meaning those with unrestricted access by non-members of the organization without invitation and inclusion on a guest list submitted and approved by the Office of Student Life during the registration process and where alcohol is present, are expressly prohibited. Organizations are responsible for monitoring and controlling access to their facility at all times. Guests are also responsible for making certain that they are included on the registered guest list. Access should never be granted to a guest who is already intoxicated. Additional security may be required by the Assistant Dean of Students or the Assistant Director of Campus Safety as a condition of approval.

Guest lists are due by noon on the last business day prior to the event. No amendments can be made after that time. Attendance at social events sponsored by student organizations at which alcohol is consumed, possessed, or served by a Third Party Vendor shall be restricted to members of the R-MC community and their personally escorted guests. The organization guest list may be no more than four (4) times the membership of the organization, as determined by the official roster on file with the Office of Student Life, however if your Inter/national organization has a policy which restricts the numbers of guests per member to a higher degree than Randolph-Macon College, the more restrictive policy will prevail. Guest lists must also be accurate. Those uninvited students (not on the guest list) who attempt to gain entrance to an event by way of force, subterfuge, or negligence of the host will face judicial referral. The guest list should be kept at the door and guests’ names should be checked off as they arrive.

Alcohol All social functions or events at Randolph-Macon College where alcohol is present must be registered and follow either the BYOB or Third Party Vendor Guidelines. In addition, no alcoholic beverages may be purchased through or with organization funds nor may the purchase of same for members or guests be undertaken or coordinated by any member in the name of or on behalf of the organization or guests. The purchase or use of a bulk quantity or common source(s) of alcoholic beverage, for example, kegs, handles of spirits, or cases, is prohibited. Moreover, no members, collectively or individually, shall purchase for, serve to, or sell alcoholic beverages to any minor (i.e., those under legal drinking age).

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Co-Sponsorship and “Mixers� Organizations that wish to co-sponsor events may do so with the approval of the Office of Student Life. The guest list may be no more than four (4) times the combined membership rosters of the sponsoring organization; however, the guest list may not exceed the posted fire code of the facility. They must also follow the other conventions of this policy and its associated procedures. No organization may co-sponsor an event with an alcohol distributor or tavern (tavern defined as an establishment generating more than half of annual gross sales from alcohol) at which alcohol is given away, sold or otherwise provided to those present. This includes any event held in, at or on the property of a tavern as defined above for purposes of fundraising. However, a chapter may rent or use a room or area in a tavern as defined above for a closed event held within the provisions of this policy, including the use of a third party vendor and guest list. An event at which alcohol is present may be conducted or co-sponsored with a charitable organization if the event is held within the provisions of this policy. Also, any co-sponsored function must comply with the policy of the organizations’ headquarters and the most stringent policy will prevail should there be differences. No organization may co-sponsor, co-finance or attend or participate in a function at which alcohol is purchased by any of the host chapters, groups or organizations. College Panhellenic Council Bill 1-2000 also states collegiate chapters will cosponsor functions at fraternity facilities only if those functions are alcohol-free.

Risk Management Training All initiated/active members of an organization must satisfactorily complete Risk Management Training each year prior to registering of any social function or event. Any group not completing such training will be unable to hold social functions until such time as their membership has been properly trained.

Advertising No on-campus advertising is allowed for closed events where alcohol is permitted by those 21 years of age. Advertising is only allowed for those events that are alcohol free.

Event Signage Signs must be prominently displayed at any function where alcohol is consumed, possessed, or served either through BYOB or Third Party Vendor. These signs must state: a. Non-alcoholic beverages are available or provided and the locations of said beverages. b. It is illegal for persons under 21 years to consume or possess alcoholic beverage. c. Violators will be subject to College policies and/or criminal action.

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Bring Your Own Beverage (BYOB) Procedure In cases where organizations wish to host a BYOB event, the following guidelines must be followed. If an organization’s risk management guidelines are more stringent, the most stringent will prevail. Only events hosted within an organizations facility can be BYOB. I - Themes a. Themes make an event special, but organizations should to use common sense and good taste. Questionable or inflammatory themes will be adjudicated by the IFC Community Standards Board or the College Panhellenic Judicial Review Board and/or the Student Conduct Board. b. The NIC Theme Party Kits are full of exciting new theme ideas for chapters

II - Entrance a. One well-lit entrance, controlled and monitored by security or initiated members, is mandatory. New members are prohibited from door duty. b. Door Monitors must check to see if those seeking entry are members or are on the guest-list c. Members and guests with alcohol are required to show proof of legal drinking age such as picture ID with a birth date and student ID are required for those bringing in alcohol. d. A guest’s name is then checked off the list. Guests are encouraged to request to see their name on the list. e. Several exits must be made available due to fire codes; however, exits cannot be used as entrances. f. No purses or bags are allowed at BYOB events to reduce outside alcohol issues. III - Invitation guest lists a. Invitation guest lists with specific names of all members and non-members who have been invited must be generated for each function. A bag full of invitations delivered to an organization is not an acceptable method. b. Social events (with alcohol) open to the entire Greek or student population encourage the likelihood of accidents and risky behavior and are expressly prohibited c. The guest list must be submitted with the social event registration form. The accurate guest list numbered and typed in alphabetical order is due with the other registration materials discussed in the section on Registration above. It may be amended by noon on the business day prior to the event. No other changes are allowed.

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IV - Wristbands a. Members and guests who are of-age and bring alcohol to the event receive a non-adjustable, hospital-type wristband. Tyvek is preferred. b. Individuals checking alcohol into the event also receive a hand-stamp on each hand (this is to show that the individual has already entered the event and checked in alcohol) c. The individual’s name is checked off the invitation guest list and the type of alcohol is written by his/her name d. Of-age guests and members who do not check in alcohol DO NOT receive a stamp or a wristband (only those who bring alcoholic beverages are allowed to consume alcoholic beverages) The Office of Student Life will provide wristbands. You must make an appointment to pick them up. If you do not have appropriate wrist bands Campus Safety, the On-Call Professional and/or the Office of Student Life has the right to close your event. V - Punch cards a. For each and every event, punch cards should be created that are event specific. b. Punch cards should be about credit card size with pertinent information clearly printed on each card. c. The name of the individual, his/her birthday, the type and the amount of alcohol, the date of the event, and the theme of the event should all be somewhere on the punch card. d. Punch cards, unlike tickets, are easy to handle and are a more effective means for proper redistribution Punch cards are to be collected at the exits when your guests leave. VI - Types and amounts of alcohol a. The following stipulations apply per person, for a typical four hour function b. All the soda, juice, flavored water, or other non-alcoholic beverages you care to consume (provided by the host organization) c. Six (6), twelve (12) ounce cans of beer -or- Four (4), ten (10) ounce wine coolers d. No kegs or common source containers e. No liquor, hard alcohol, spirits or the like f. No squeeze bottles, beer bongs, party balls, pitchers, tumblers, handles or other containers g. No beer/wine/alcohol for common use in members’ rooms h. No glass bottles (except wine coolers that are poured into plastic cups before redistribution) i. No shots, drinking games, or other activities that encourage inappropriate drinking behavior

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VII - Food and non-alcoholic beverages a. The amount of non-alcoholic beverages should at least equal the number of underage members and guests at the event. b. Breads, meats, cheeses, vegetables, brownies, cookies, subs, pizza, fruits, and dips are considered appropriate foods. c. Food and non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages should be contained within one centralized location. d. Coin-operated soda machines are not considered appropriate alternative beverages e. Non-alcoholic beverages should be served from closed containers (cans, plastic bottles, or fountain dispersing machines) During the last 45 minutes of an event, alcohol service should stop, and a new non-alcoholic beverage and a new food item should be served for those who wish to switch beverages and begin winding down. VIII - Event monitors & security a. Monitors are charged with regulating social events and maintaining the risk management policy of the chapter involved. b. There must be two (2) door monitors/ID Checkers c. There must be two (2) alcohol distribution monitors d. There must be one (1) contact person available at all times e. No one person may serve in more than one role at a single event, and they must serve for the duration of the event. f. There should be one (1) sober monitor for every 20 guests g. If hired security is not used, monitors must regulate behavior and notify Campus Safety when needed. h. Monitors should be older members (preferably seniors) of all participating organizations who will serve as general monitors or as service monitors working at the service distribution center. Alcohol Distribution Monitors must be 21 years of age. i. Sober Monitors, ID Checkers, and Alcohol Distributors must be Risk Management trained and cannot change once submitted on the Social Event Notification Form and may not change during the event without the express permission of the Assistant Dean of Students or the Senior Associate Dean of Students. j. Specialty clothing may be worn by the monitors to set them apart from the rest of the party-goers. k. Chapter presidents and social chairs should remain sober during social events so that they can, along with the monitors, ensure that a safe social environment is maintained. l. Monitors have the right to and should deny access to the event to anyone they think is already impaired by alcohol or other drugs, even if the person is on the invitation guest list. m. Organizations are 100% responsible for the opening, monitoring, and closing of their events. All personal on the registration must be present and completing their roles. If they are not, the organization will be found in violation of the Risk Management and Social Host Policy.

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IX - Alcohol distribution center a. One centralized location should be established for the distribution of all food, non-alcoholic beverages, and for the distribution of all alcoholic beverages. b. No other location, especially members’ rooms, may be used for the distribution of alcoholic beverages. c. The holding tank, which serves as a cooling area for the alcohol brought to the function by members and guests, is as simple as a large rubber trash can filled with ice. d. Non-alcoholic beverages are to be presented in an attractive and accessible manner, and they must also be free to anyone who desires an alcohol-free beverage. e. Anyone who wishes to acquire an alcoholic beverage that s/he brought to the event, must present the punch card, show the wristband and stamp. f. The service monitors must not serve anyone who is intoxicated, even if the person has alcohol remaining. g. Only one beer or wine cooler may be acquired at a time. Left-over alcohol can be picked up the following day; otherwise it is to be discarded.

Third Party Vendor Procedure Third Party Vendor Events are those where a third party has been contracted to provide service of alcohol for the duration of the event. The following procedure will facilitate a successful and compliant Third Party Vendor Event. I - Themes a. Themes make an event special, but organizations should to use common sense and good taste. Questionable or inflammatory themes will be adjudicated by the IFC Community Standards Board or the College Panhellenic Judicial Review Board. The NIC Theme Party Kits are full of exciting new theme ideas for chapters. II - Entrance a. One well-lit entrance, controlled and monitored by security or initiated members, is mandatory. New members are prohibited from door duty. b. Two (2)Door Monitors must check to see if those seeking entry are members or are on the guestlist. c. Members and guests are required to show proof of legal drinking age such as picture ID with a birth date. Also, a valid R-MC Student ID should be presented. If the guest is not a student at R-MC, they must register with the Office of Campus Safety before attending a social function on campus. Guests are the responsibility of both the host and the host organization should they attend a social function. d. A guest’s name is then checked off the list. Guests are encouraged to request to see their name on the list. e. Several exits must be made available due to fire codes; however, exits cannot be used as entrances.

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III - Third Party Vendor Agreement a. In addition to the registration requirements detailed above for all social events, Third Party Vendor events require the completion of the Third Party Vendor Agreement. b. Proof that the vendor is properly licensed by the appropriate local and state authority. This might involve both a liquor license and a temporary license to sell on the premises where the function is to be held. c. Proof of $1,000,000.00 in liability insurance must also be provided to the Office of Student Life upon registration. The certificate must also state that the vendor has “off premise liquor liability coverage and non-owned and hired auto coverage.” d. The certificate of insurance must name as additional insured (at a minimum) the local chapter of the fraternity hiring the vendor as well as the national fraternity with whom the local chapter is affiliated. The vendor agrees to conduct only a cash bar and must divulge the cost of each drink as it will be assessed to members and guests on the Third Party Vendor Agreement. IV - Vendor Responsibilities By completing the Third Party Vendor agreement and signing it, the vendor agrees to all the responsibilities that any purveyor of alcohol would assume in the normal course of business which includes but is not limited to:  Checking Identification cards upon entry and prior to service  Serving only those proving by identification to be the legal drinking age, 21.  Refusing service to anyone who is intoxicated  Maintaining control of ALL alcohol containers present  Collecting and removing all remaining alcohol at the conclusion of the event  No excess alcohol, opened or unopened, is to be given, sold, or furnished to the organization, members, or guests. V - Venue A. If the event is to be held on campus, the Office of Student Life must approve the selected venue and receive all proper registration materials prior to approval. B. If the event is to be held off-campus, a copy of the venue contract must be presented with the registration material to the Office of Student Life. C. If the event is to be held off-campus, transportation to and from the event must be provided by the organization(s) for members and guests. This should be in the form of registered and bonded bus lines without the express permission of the Dean of Students or his/her designee.

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Off-Campus Events Events held off-campus must also be registered and are only allowed when an organization follows the Third Party Vendor Procedure. Organizations are reminded that any event a reasonable observer would associate with an organization should be registered. Off-campus events differ slightly from oncampus events and these differences include: a. Registered off-campus events must follow the Third Party Vendor Procedure (see #11) and be registered at least two weeks prior to the event or 21 Days for outdoor events. b. The host organization(s) must provide transportation to and from the event for members and guests. This should be in the form of registered and bonded bus lines. No other transportation option is allowed without the express written permission of the Dean of Students or his/her designee. c. No overnight social events are permitted for any student organization. d. Students are expected to abide by College policies and federal, state, and local laws. The Code of Student Conduct includes the provision that a violation of the code, which is committed ―under the influence, constitutes a separate and additional violation of the code. Violations of policy that occur off-campus will be adjudicated through the College Judicial System.

Outdoor Events A. An organization wishing to have an outdoor event with alcohol must reserve the space through the Office of Student Life and complete the necessary registration paperwork for a Third Party Vendor Event. B. Approved areas for outdoor events are the Mary Branch Terrace, the Brock Center Parking Lot, and the Copley Courtyard. Other sites must be approved by the Office of Student Life. C. The set-up requests must be submitted at the time of reservation, including the requirements for Third Party Vendor set-up. D. If an organization wishes to host an outdoor event, an Outdoor Event Form application and its requirements must be completed 21 days in advance of the event. This form can be picked up in the Office of Student Life or the Office of Campus Safety. The form must be signed and approved by the Senior Associate Dean of Students, the Assistant Dean of Students and the Ashland Police Department. An event is not considered approved until official notification from the town of Ashland is received. E. If amplified music will be present at an event, the Town of Ashland requires a special outdoor festival permit that can be picked up from the Ashland Police Department and must be completed 21 days in advance of the event. This is in addition to the Randolph-Macon College Outdoor Festival Permit. F. If an organization is sponsoring an outdoor event where alcohol is consumed or possessed, it must be served by a Third Party Vendor and must be in compliance with College regulations and the Virginia ABC regulations. In addition to the general regulations of the College Alcohol Policy, outdoor events require the following: 1. The event must be approved 21 days in advance by the Office of Campus Safety and the Office of Student Life, and all proper Virginia ABC paperwork must be completed. 2. An area within the approved space should be designated a beverage service and consumption area. This area should have some type of physical barrier by which all access is controlled. This may include a double roped area, a separate room, etc. Only individuals of legal age should enter this area. 3. All alcoholic beverages should be consumed by individuals in the controlled area. No alcoholic beverage should be taken out of this area. 101


Illegal Drugs FIPG Policy - The possession, sale or use of any ILLEGAL DRUGS or CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES while on chapter premises or during a fraternity event or at any event that an observer would associate with the fraternity is strictly prohibited. Randolph-Macon does not condone or tolerate the use/abuse of illegal drugs. R-MC believes that the use of illegal drugs by students is inconsistent with its educational objectives and may also violate the rights of other students. Accordingly, the College strongly condemns the abuse of illegal drugs. The College prohibits, in accordance with College policy, and federal, state, and local laws: the manufacturing, possessing, selling, transmitting, using, or being party to any illegal drug or drug paraphernalia or the illegal possession, sale or use of controlled substances.

For a detailed review of the Randolph-Macon College Drug Policy, please see Fishtales, the R-MC student Handbook.

Hazing FIPG Policy - No chapter, colony, student or alumnus shall conduct nor condone hazing activities. Permission or approval by a person being hazed is not a defense. Hazing activities are defined as: "Any action taken or situation created, intentionally, whether on or off fraternity premises, to produce mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule. Such activities may include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol, paddling in any form, creation of excessive fatigue, physical and psychological shocks, quests, treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on outside or inside of the confines of the chapter house; wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and not normally in good taste, engaging in public stunts and buffoonery, morally degrading or humiliating games and activities, and any other activities which are not consistent with academic achievement, fraternal law, ritual or policy or the regulations and policies of the educational institution or applicable state law."

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R-MC Policy – Recklessly or intentionally endangering the health or safety of a student or students or to inflict bodily injury on a student or students in connection with or for the purpose of initiation, admission into or affiliation with, or as condition for continued membership in a club, organization, association, fraternity, sorority, or student body regardless of whether the student or students so endangered or injured participated voluntarily in the relevant activity. Randolph-Macon College further defines as hazing, any action taken or situation created, intentionally, to produce mental, emotional or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment or ridicule for the purpose of initiation into, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, a group or organization. Such activities may include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol; paddling in any form; creation of excess fatigue; physical and psychological shocks; quests, treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on outside or inside the confines of College property; wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and indecent; involuntary nudity; engaging in public stunts; morally degrading or humiliating games and activities; and any other activities which are not consistent with academic achievement, College policy, or federal, state and local laws. Quests in academic classes or student programs may be approved by the Provost or Dean of Students, respectively. Consent by participants in any activity is not considered a defense for violating the hazing policy.

Sexual Conduct FIPG Policy – No organization will not tolerate or condone any form of sexist or sexually abusive behavior

on the part of its members, whether physical, mental or emotional. This is to include any actions, activities or events, whether on chapter premises or an off-site location, which are demeaning to women or men, including but not limited to verbal harassment, sexual assault by individuals or members acting together. The employment or use of strippers, exotic dancers, or similar, whether professional or amateur, at a fraternity event as defined in this policy is prohibited. R-MC Policy – See Fishtales

Weapons R-MC Policy –See Fishtales

Auxiliary Groups - Little Sister/Brother Groups R-MC Policy - The formation of a chapter auxiliary or little sister/brother group for any purpose is expressly forbidden. Violations will be adjudicated by the IFC Community Standards Board or the College Panhellenic Judicial Board of Review. The National Panhellenic Conference and the NorthAmerican Interfraternity Conference also strictly forbid the formation and establishment of such groups.

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Campus and Personal Safety R-MC Statement on Campus Safety - Each organization is to encourage their members to practice good habits of personal and campus safety, and take advantage of the safety services provided by the Campus Safety Office. R-MC Statement on Violence, Fighting & Conduct Unbecoming a Fraternity/Sorority Member: No chapter, colony, student or alumnus shall conduct nor condone acts of violence or fighting, and all will support and follow the all policies pertaining to appropriate student conduct as stated in the Randolph-Macon College Student Handbook, Fishtales. Additionally, any action, activity, or statement that is unbecoming of a fraternity/sorority member, or one that is deemed inappropriate, will be referred to the College Judicial Officer for investigation, the IFC Community Standards Board, or the College Panhellenic Judicial Board of Review based on whichever is best equipped to address the situation. R-MC Statement on Vandalism, Destruction of Property, and Pranks: No chapter, colony, organization, student or alumnus shall conduct nor condone acts of violence, vandalism, destruction of property, or pranks, and all will support and follow all policies pertaining to appropriate student conduct as stated in the Randolph-Macon College Student Handbook, Fishtales. Organizations, their members, residents of facilities, etc. will be held accountable for their actions.

Fire and Health Safety 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

All chapter houses must meet all local fire and health codes and standards. All chapters must post by common phones and in other locations emergency numbers for fire, police and ambulance and should have posted evacuation routes on the back of the door of each sleeping room. All chapters should comply with engineering recommendations as reported by the insurance company or municipal authorities. The possession and/or use of firearms or explosive or incendiary devices of any kind within the confines and premises of the chapter house is prohibited. Candles should not be used in chapter houses or individual rooms except under controlled circumstances such as initiation.

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Clean Yard and Facility Policy Fraternities and Sororities are expected to maintain their facilities and grounds. If at any time a College official determines the level of cleanliness at the facility to be unacceptable, the organization will be found to be in violation of the Clean Facility and Yard Policy. a. For First Offenses minimum sanction: a $100 fine b. For Second Offenses minimum sanction: a $200 fine and the organization will be placed on Housing Warning c. For Third Offenses minimum sanctions: $300 fine and the organization will be placed on Housing Probation d. For Fourth Offenses minimum sanctions: loss of housing for no less than one academic year.

Substance Free Events All Greek-letter organizations are required to host one (1) substance-free social event per semester during the school year as outlined Chapter Excellence Agreement.

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Residential Facilities Policies

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Residence Life Policies Office of Residence Life

Article I: Regulations Governing Student Conduct R-MC Residence Hall Policies are guidelines for group living and are essential in forming a positive community in and around residential facilities. In order to enjoy a positive educational environment, it will be necessary to follow all policies and procedures. Residents are asked to cooperate with and respect staff and other residents at all times. At least one Resident Assistant (RA) is “on duty� every night of the week. RAs act on behalf of the College and are therefore College Officials when acting in their RA role. RAs have jurisdiction over the campus but not in Fraternity and Sorority Housing facilities. Resident Assistants regularly have Hall Meetings, which residents attend. Residents are responsible for the information that is shared at hall meetings or sent via official e-mail. If any problems arise, contact the staff member on duty for your area (duty signs are posted next to all RA rooms) or the Campus Safety Office at x0 or x4710 from an on-campus phone or (804) 752-4710 from a mobile/cell phone.

Article 2: Residence Life and Housing Administrative Actions The Office of Residence Life reserves the right to take the following administrative actions in relation to residential students: A. Relocation A Residence Life professional reserves the right to relocate a student if the student may benefit from living in another room or residence hall. A Residence Life professional staff member will decide which hall and room may be most conducive for the student to experience a positive living/learning environment. Relocation options may be limited by the number of available spaces and subject to a fee for the administrative change assessed by the Business Office. B. Contract Termination The College may cancel the housing contract if a student fails to meet the full terms and conditions of the contract, including adhering to College and Residence life policies, or if a student becomes a detriment to the residential community. A student will normally be given 24 hours to clear the residence hall and vacate the room, but the College reserves the right to dictate the timeline. All of the restrictions of housing warning also apply to contract termination. Students who have their contract terminated may not be allowed to live in residential housing for the remainder of their matriculation. If you are not attending class and making satisfactory academic progress, your ability to be a residential student may be revoked immediately by the Office of the Dean of Students in conjunction with the Office of the Provost.

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Article 3: Your Residence Hall Responsibilities As a resident of Randolph-Macon College, students must assume certain responsibilities when moving into the residence halls. Specific fundamental responsibilities that deserve emphasis are outlined below. A.

Responsibility for the Rules The Code of Student Conduct, Residence life policies and other College policies are clearly articulated in Fishtales. Students are responsible for knowing and adhering to these policies at all times.

B.

Responsibility for Attending Hall Meetings Hall meetings are held when necessary. Hall meetings are for the students’ benefit and students are responsible for any and all information discussed at the time of the meeting. If you are unable to attend a hall meeting, you should contact your Resident Assistant.

C.

Responsibility for your Living Area Students, along with their roommate(s) in non-single rooms, are fully responsible for activities that occur in their room and living area. Even if students are not actively involved in a policy violation, they will be held responsible if they are present during a violation or if they give access to their room. Therefore, students should not let visitors in without escort. Students must always lock their room when they leave, even if only for a few minutes, this includes windows. This will prevent others from committing violations in their room that can have consequences for the residents and the community. Locking rooms can also help prevent thefts. Students should not condone violations by their presence. It is the student’s responsibility to put an end to any violation that occurs in their room and living area and to call an RA or Campus Safety if they need assistance. Students are also responsible for the community areas in the residential facilities in which they live (this can include lobbies, hallways, courtyards, study rooms, bathrooms and other areas within the facilities). Students should keep these areas clean and treat them with respect. Students should report vandalism of these areas to the College. Students may be held responsible for community damages at any time, including at the end of the school year.

D.

Responsibility for your Guests Overnight guests (same or opposite sex) are allowed, but no more than two consecutive nights and no more than two, two-night periods within any 30-day period. The roommate hosting an overnight guest must obtain permission from their roommate before the guest’s arrival. All non-RMC overnight guests must additionally be registered with Campus Safety. Overnight guests are not allowed when Residence Halls are closed or during exam week (for students and non-students. Students are responsible for the conduct of their guests when they are present in the residence halls. Each year, cases of vandalism and policy violations occur as a result of visitors who lack respect for the residence halls and the community. If a student intends to have visitors or guests in the hall, they should be aware that they may be subject to disciplinary action for the behavior of their guest. Additionally, residence hall staff members reserve the right to ask any individual who is not a resident of the building or hall to vacate the residence halls immediately.

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E.

Responsibility to Staff All members of the College community share the responsibility for governing their own conduct. Staff members who, in the course of their duties, are confronted with violations of the Code of Student Conduct or Residence life policies are required to report them. Staff members are not expected to tolerate abuse in the performance of their duties; therefore, the harassment of any staff member will result in disciplinary action.

F.

Responsibilities to the Housing Contract As a member of our Residence Hall community students have a contractual responsibility with the College and to the community. Part of that responsibility requires that you have a thorough knowledge of the terms and conditions of the housing contract. Students are responsible for fulfilling their responsibility to the contract and all of its terms and conditions. The Office of Residence Life is available to assist students in its best interest to fulfill such responsibility.

G.

Responsibility for Room Maintenance and Damages Students, the College, the Physical Plant, and the Office of Residence Life share responsibility to maintain the rooms and the residence halls. Work Request Forms are available on-line, and are to be used to report all damages and/ or other maintenance problems. Student responsibilities include: maintaining the condition and cleanliness of their room and its contents, timely and specific reporting of all damages or problems, arrangement of furniture and personal belongings to facilitate easy access by physical plant staff, immediate correction of unsafe or potentially hazardous conditions which students may create in their room (such as overloaded power outlets) as requested by the Residence life staff, and restitution for damages to the physical area of their room (including the window and the outside of the door).

Article 4: Transgender Policy Statement The College is dedicated to providing safe and comfortable living environments for all students, including those whose gender identity and/or expression does not fit in binary terms of male/female. A transgender student looking for a supportive living arrangement in the residence halls should contact the Office of Residence Life. Because of limitations in the available housing options, there is no guarantee that all of a student’s preferences can be met, but we are committed to working with the student to find appropriate accommodations. Housing assignments for transgender students are guided by the following values:

·

Respect for and affirmation of the student’s gender identity and/or expression.

·

Prioritized attention to the student’s physical comfort and emotional health.

·

Enhancing the student’s opportunity for success at the College by finding an appropriate match between the student’s needs and the options available.

·

Respect for roommates of transgendered students.

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Residency Requirements The Office of Residence Life Randolph-Macon College requires that all students live in College-owned residence halls unless they are: residing with their parents, guardians, or spouses; 23 years of age or older; part-time students with eight or fewer semester hours; or those students who have special medical or personal considerations, which must be accommodated (documentation is required) through Disability Support Services. In order for students to be approved for commuter status, they must live within 35 miles of Ashland. Due to capacity constraints, there will be times when the College will permit other students to move off-campus. When this permission is given, the criteria for students selected will be based on class seniority and will be regulated by the Office of Residence Life. The authorization to live off-campus will be granted for that particular academic year only. A waiver must be signed and approved in the Office of Residence Life for every student living off-campus. Waivers may be revoked at any time due to any unacceptable behavior of that student. If this Residence Requirement Waiver is not completed and approved by the College, the student will be billed for room and board as a residential student.

Room Search Policy Dean of Students Office and Campus Safety Although the College respects the students’ rights to privacy of their room of residence and does not wish to intervene unnecessarily in student’ lives, the College reserves the right to enforce its policies and regulations. While residing in residential facilities, student accept full responsibility for their actions under local, state and federal laws, as well as policies and guidelines outlined in the College’s Housing Contract, Student Handbook, and the Fraternity and Sorority House Corporation Agreement. Room Searches College policy allows for room searches, as well as searches of on-campus vehicles, when specific policy violations are suspected, or when there is reasonable cause to believe that a violation of the Student Conduct Code or College policy has occurred or is occurring. Reasonable cause is credible information provided to College officials that a student(s) is violating or has violated a specific policy.

All such room searches are to be authorized by the Dean of Students or Senior Associate Dean of Students and conducted by professional staff members. The College will make every attempt to contact the room’s occupants. In cases where the student(s) cannot be located, College officials and Campus Safety will conduct their investigation by documenting the search of areas reasonably related to the alleged violation. In all cases of room entry or searches where the student(s) is not available or cannot be contacted, College officials will leave written notice that the room was entered or searched and specify the reasons for the search.

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Residential Facilities Policies and Procedures The Office of Residence Life I.

General Statement on Residential Facilities Policies and Procedures

All of the sections appearing in Residential Facilities Policies and Procedures, and the rules, regulations and procedures described below, apply to College residential facilities and their residents. College residential facilities are divided into two categories Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing Facilities and Residence Life and Housing Facilities. Residence Life and Housing facilities include the traditional residence halls of Thomas Branch, Mary Branch, Conrad, Moreland, Starr, Irby, Olin, Smith, Bennett, Garland, Jones, and Andrews, the Special Interest Houses, the Birdsong Apartments, and the Townhouse Apartments. Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing facilities include the houses of Theta Chi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi Delta Theta, Delta Zeta, Alpha Gamma Delta, Lambert Hall, Kappa Alpha Theta and Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Unless designated as “Residence Life and Housing Facilities only” or “Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing Facilities only,” all of the policies and prohibitions listed below apply to residents of all College residential facilities. If a policy is indicated as applying to “Residence Life and Housing Facilities only” or “Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing Facilities” it only applies to that specific category of College residential facility. Violations of Residential Facilities Policies and Procedures are resolved through administrative action by the Student Conduct Administrator or his/her designee(s). Administrative Conduct Action by these officials is different from other Student ConductAction undertaken by the Student Conduct Administrator or their designee, in that it may comprise either Informal Administrative Action or Formal Administrative Action. Informal Administrative Action In Informal Administrative Action, the designee of the Student Conduct Administrator will send a letter to the student asserting that they are required to meet with the designated administrator to resolve an alleged violation of the College’s Residential Policies. The letter will state the alleged violation as well. Informal Administrative Action may result in a student accepting responsibility for the alleged violation or not accepting responsibility for the violation. If the student accepts responsibility, then, the designated administrator will assign a sanction. If a student does not accept responsibility for the alleged violation or rejects the sanction offered by the designated administrator, the case will be referred for Formal Administrative Action.

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Formal Administrative Action During Formal Administrative Action, a student will review their case with the designated administrator and will be allowed to present information and witnesses who have direct knowledge of the incident in question. The student may be accompanied by a Student Conduct Advisor (any Randolph-Macon College faculty, staff, or student). Students will be given not less than 3 (Three) business days from the original Informal Administrative Action appointment to prepare for Formal Administrative Action. At the conclusion of the meeting, the designated administrator will determine whether there is sufficient and compelling evidence to indicate that a policy violation occurred. If there is sufficient evidence, the accused student will be assigned an appropriate sanction by the designated administrator. The decision of the designated administrator is final. There is no appeal in either Informal or Formal Administrative Action.

II. Prohibited Conduct R1

Appliances A. Residents may have and use appliances with closed coil elements, such as: coffee pots, George Foreman-type grills, hot pots, hot air popcorn poppers, and blenders. B. Residents may only use grills with self-igniting charcoal. Grills are only to be used outside. Charcoal and lighter fluid may not be stored in or around residential facilities. C. Residents may have one microwave per room, but each room resident may have a refrigerator. Maximum output for microwaves is 1000 watts and refrigerators are to be no larger than 4.1 cubic feet. D. Halogen lamps and space heaters are not allowed in residential facilities. E. Personal air conditioner units are not allowed in residential facilities unless installed by the College. Minimum Sanction: $50 Fine.

R2

Abandoned Property In the event that student property is left in the facilities after the housing contract period is over, the property will be removed at the owner’s expense and thrown away, or donated to charity. Throughout the year if property is found, it will be held for 14 days. If not claimed and removed, it will be disposed of or donated. Minimum Sanction: $50 Fine for Removal of Items.

R3

Bed Risers Any device used to prop or elevate furniture is not permitted in any College approved housing facility, (i.e. cinder blocks, bed risers, wood blocks etc.). Minimum Sanction: $50 Fine.

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R4

Bulletin Boards Vandalizing or removing bulletin boards is prohibited. Bulletin Boards are created and main tained by the Resident Assistants for educational purposes, and are for your benefit. They often contain information that is helpful in a variety of spheres, including academics, wellness, societal issues, community or social life. Minimum Sanction: A $100 fine may be assessed to Individuals and/or the Hall Community.

R5

Cohabitation Cohabitation is defined as a non-resident or guest using a room as if they were a resident of the room. The Office of the Dean of Students could also define cohabitation as a guest or nonresident staying in a room on a regular basis. A guest or non-resident should also not be left in the room without their escort. Students and their guests, whether student or non-student, are required to abide by the Student Visitation Agreement and the Visitation Violation Policy of the Code of Student Conduct. Also prohibited are any incidents which violate his/her roommate’s right of entry into their room or ability to study and/or sleep within the room or which disturbs, interrupts or interferes with other students’ peaceful enjoyment of their living and learning environment, because of a guest or non-resident’s presence. Minimum Sanction: $100 Fine and/or Loss of Guest Privileges.

R6

Community Bathroom Standards Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: All residential students residing in residence halls which utilize community bathrooms must agree and abide by the terms of the Community Bathroom Agreements. Minimum Sanctions for Violating Community Bathroom standards: A first violation will result in an official warning letter sent to the student. A second violation will result in a $25 fine. A third violation will result in a $75 fine.

R7

Community Damages Financial charges relating to the damage or theft of College property are billed to the specific individual(s) responsible. Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: If the responsible individual(s) cannot be identified, the charges will be divided equally among the residents of the affected floor, building, or area. Physical Plant personnel and student affairs professional staff will assess all damages. Please reference your Housing Contract for more information. Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing Facilities only: If the responsible individual(s) cannot be identified, the charges will be deferred to the chapter and the Housing Corporation which will be responsible for payment and collection of necessary fees from their membership. Please refer to your Housing Contract for more information. Minimum Sanction: Restitution for the cost of repair, replacement, cleaning or maintenance (inclusive of parts, labor and material), as assessed by the Office of the Physical Plant.

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R8

Courtesy Hours Courtesy hours for all College housing, including Fraternity and Sorority facilities, are in effect 24 hours a day and 7 days a week., regardless of Quiet Hours. Be considerate and flexible concerning the sound/noise level in your room/hall to reduce the disturbance to others around you. Minimum Sanction: $50 Fine.

R9

Decorations No decorations may hinder the use of or restrict access to hallways, doorways, stairs, windows, or fire related equipment. Do not attach anything to or tamper with light fixtures or exit signs. Live Christmas trees and garland are not permitted in any residential facility. Holiday lights may not be hung on or around room doors, since the wires could get caught in the door. Decorations must be within fire code regulations. Minimum Sanction: $25 fine.

R10

Door Entry Codes Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing Facilities only: All door entry codes should be kept confidential. The first time a code must be changed, there will be no charge. The second time a code must be changed and with any subsequent changes, a fine will be imposed. Minimum Sanction for Second Code Change: $25.

R11

Electric Power Strips Residents must use UL approved electrical power strips with built in circuit breakers when in need of additional electrical outlets. Students are not permitted to use multiple plug adapters. Students may not plug power strips into power strips. Extension cords are not permitted in the residence halls. Minimum Sanction: $25 fine.

R12

Exterior Doors and Keyfobs – All exterior residence hall doors are locked 24 hours a day. Keyfobs are used to gain access to residence halls and academic/administrative buildings, and other designated areas or rooms on proximity readers. Keyfobs allow access to your residence hall 24/7 and to other residence halls between the hours of 8 AM and midnight. Students will keep their keyfob for their entire academic career at Randolph-Macon College. Keyfobs should remain with students at all times. Propping exterior doors and/or tampering with locks is prohibited. Students can acquire replacement keyfobs from Campus Safety when reported lost, stolen or damaged. Keyfobs will be returned to Campus Safety or the Office of Residence Life upon leaving Randolph-Macon College. Propping exterior doors and/or tampering with locks: open Sanctions Replacement Fee for lost, stolen or damaged keyfobs: $15.00

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R13

Fire Drills Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: State law requires that each residence hall shall have a fire drill during each semester. Participation in evacuation is mandatory and all rooms will be checked by a Residence Life staff member, Campus Safety personnel, or appropriate fire personnel. Students must promptly evacuate the building and go to the meeting locations. Minimum Sanction: $50 fine. Fraternity and Sorority Life Residential Facilities only: All fraternity and sorority facilities should create and practice a Fire Emergency Plan with their advisors and Housing Corporation officers a report of this plan should be filed monthly with the Office of Student Life. Sanctions are open.

R14

Hall Opening and Closing Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: 1. Check-in – Students must follow all policies set in place, which include, but are not limited to: pay the appropriate fees, sign, complete and return all necessary paperwork to the appropriate office by the given deadline, including completing a Room Condition Report and obtain a key to their residential facility. 2. Check-out – Within 24 hours of their last final examination (or by the final date and time for the halls closing), all students must completely remove themselves and all their belongings out of the residence hall, then check out in the appropriate office, turn in one’s key, follow closedown expectations, and sign, complete and return all necessary paperwork and to the appropriate office. Exceptions may be made only upon the discretion of the Director of Residence Life and Housing or his or her designee. 3. Students may occupy their rooms on the dates specified by the College calendar. Any student entering a College residential facility during specified vacation periods or staying in housing after the time and date indicated for each break must obtain express written permission of the Director of Residence Life and Housing or his or her designee. 4. Seniors are permitted to stay in residential facility through graduation and checkout with the appropriate office by 5:00 PM on graduation day. 5. Students involved in summer programs will not be allowed to store their items in residential facilities between the end of the academic year and the start of their respective summer program or the end of their summer program and the start of the academic year. 6. Students must follow all procedures given from the appropriate office for checking in and out of rooms properly, including completing a Room Condition Report. Minimum Sanctions for improper or incomplete check-in or improper or incomplete checkout for break closings: $50 fine (this may also be adjudicated as a Failure to Comply with a College Official). NOTE: Failure to complete the check out form on the BUZZ when leaving for breaks will result in an automatically assessed $50.00 fee. This is not subject to review or appeal under the Residence Life Policies and Procedures Process, and may be levied in addition to other fees assessed for improper checkout. Minimum Sanctions for late or improper checkout at the end of the year: $100 fine

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R15

Fraternity & Sorority Life Facility Opening and Closing Fraternity and Sorority Life Residential Facilities only: 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Check-in – The Office of Student Life will provide access codes for fraternity and sorority facilities, both College and non-College owned. Residents of these facilities must fill out appropriate paperwork in order to obtain codes. Also, residents of College maintained facilities must receive their keys and sign housing contracts from the Office of Student Life prior to occupation of their facility. In addition, residents of non-College owned houses must sign housing contracts with the Office of Residence Life before occupying their facilities. Check-out – Within 24 hours of their last final examination, all students must completely remove themselves and all their belongings from fraternity and sorority facilities, then check out with the Office of Student Life, turn in their key, and complete all necessary forms. All college owned facilities will have a final walk-through no more than 12 hours after facilities close. The Fire Marshall as well as Physical Plant and the Office of Student Life will walk through all facilities within a week of closure to assess general health and safety following closing. Students may occupy College-owned fraternity and sorority facilities on the dates specified by the College calendar. Any student entering a College-owned fraternity or sorority facility during specified vacation periods or staying in those facilities after the time and date indicated for each break must obtain express written permission of the Office of Student Life. Seniors are permitted to stay in fraternity and sorority facilities through graduation and checkout with the Office of Student Life by 5:00 p.m. on graduation day. Students will not be allowed to store their items in College-owned fraternity and sorority facilities between the end of the academic year and the start of the academic year without express written permission of the Office of Student Life. Also, students may not store items between the end of the academic year and the beginning of their respective summer program or between the end of their summer program and the beginning of the academic year. Any student wishing to store items in a non-College owned facility must have express written person of the fraternity or sorority Housing Corporation. Students must follow all procedures, as directed by the Office of Student Life, for Checking in and out of College-owned fraternity and sorority facilities properly. Minimum Sanctions for improper or incomplete check-in or improper or incomplete checkout for break closings: $50 fine (this may also be adjudicated as a Failure to Comply with a College Official). Minimum Sanctions for late or incomplete checkout at the end of the year: $50.

R16

Hall Meetings Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: Hall meetings are held when necessary and attendance is mandatory. Hall meetings are for your benefit and you are responsible for any and all information discussed there. If you cannot attend a hall meeting for an excused reason, please speak with your hall’s Resident Assistant. Minimum Sanction: $25. 116


R17

Health, Sanitation and Safety Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: Student affairs professional staff will ask residents to clean areas (including their own room) if the lack of cleanliness could subject others to health/safety risks, pests, or extreme discomfort. If residents fail to clean the room when asked by staff, the staff can request the room be cleaned by housekeeping staff and the residents will be charged for labor and material costs or other sanctions. Resident Assistants conduct Safety Checks of every resident room regularly. They will be testing smoke detectors, ensuring the safe use of electrical cords, and looking for potential fire hazards. Items that are in violation of College and/or fire and safety policies may be confiscated. Minimum Sanction: $50. Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing Facilities only: Fraternities and Sororities are expected to maintain their facilities and grounds. If at any time a College official determines the level of cleanliness at the facility to be unacceptable, the organization will be found to be in violation of the Clean Facility and Yard Policy. A. For First Offenses minimum sanction: a $100 fine B. For Second Offenses minimum sanction: a $200 fine and the organization will be placed on Housing Warning C. For Third Offenses minimum sanctions: $300 fine and the organization will be placed on Housing Probation D. For Fourth Offenses minimum sanctions: loss of housing for no less than one academic year.

R18

Housekeeping Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: Housekeepers are responsible for normal cleaning duties in public areas and student bathrooms and are not responsible for cleaning student’s rooms. Townhouse, Birdsong Apartment, and Special Interest House residents are responsible for cleaning their own residences. Students may be charged for excessive or repeated cleaning if deemed necessary by the Physical Plant. Minimum Sanction: Cleaning Charges may be assessed to individuals and/or the hall community.

R19

J-Term Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: Only students who are enrolled in January Term course(s) may live in on-campus housing during J-Term. Students who are not attending J-Term but are returning for Spring semester may leave their personal belongings in their residence. Exceptions may be made only upon the discretion of the Director of Residence Life or his or her designee. Minimum Sanction: $50 fine.

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R20

Keys Any assigned keys should be kept in your possession at all times. If you lose your key, inform Campus Safety and the office from which you obtained it immediately. The lock will be changed and you will be billed for a lock change and replacement keys. Students may not duplicate their keys. Minimum Sanction for Duplicating Keys: $100 Fine. Minimum Sanction for Replacing Key Lock $100 Fine.

R21

Lock-Outs Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: Residents need to carry their keys, R-MC ID card, and key fob at all times. If a student is locked out of his/her room, contact an RA on the hall, the Duty RA, or Campus Safety. A student will be in violation if they have an unreasonable amount of lockouts due to them not carrying their keys, key fob or R-MC ID card, to be determined by the Director of Residence Life and Housing or his or her designee. Minimum Sanction: $50 fine.

R22

Lofts Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: Only College-provided lofts are permitted in residence halls. Minimum Sanction: $100 Fine and/or Removal of Loft. Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing Facilities only: Lofts in non-College owned fraternity and sorority facilities must be approved by the Housing Corporation, and a written statement of this approval must be provided to the Office of Student Life. Lofts already installed in College-owned fraternity and sorority facilities must be approved by Physical Plant. No additional lofts may be installed in any College-owned fraternity and sorority facility. Minimum Sanction: $100 Fine and/or Removal of Loft.

R23

Lounge Furniture Lounge furnishings must remain in their designated areas. Minimum Sanction: $50 fine

R24

Lounge Usage and Facility Guidelines Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: These facilities are provided for the use of residence hall students, but may sometimes be reserved for meetings and programs. Organizations or offices which wish to make use of residence hall lounges and facilities must have such use approved by the Office of Residence Life. Minimum Sanction: $50 fine

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R25

Open Flame Paraphernalia requiring the use of an open flame, whether or not they are odor-producing, as well as heating elements which are used to release a scent are prohibited in all residential facilities, including candles, incense, candle warmers and simmering potpourris. Candles may be used only for fraternity and sorority ritual and only for the duration of that ritual, in Fraternity and Sorority Life Housing facilities only; otherwise, ritual candles must be stored in the appropriate ritual closet/cabinet Minimum Sanction: $50 Fine.

R26

Personal Furniture/Items and Clothing All personal items brought to school must be kept within student rooms and must not be left in the hallways, bathrooms, laundry rooms or any other common area. College provided furnishings may not be removed from the room to accommodate personal items. Minimum Sanction: $100 Fine.

R27

Quiet Hours Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: Quiet hours are from 10:00 p.m. to 9:00 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and from 1:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday. During finals week, 23-hour Quiet Hours are in effect with a snap hour from 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. (‘Finals week’ starts after the last class prior to finals.) Minimum Sanction: $50 Fine.

R28

Room alteration Residence Life and Housing Facilities only: Students are not permitted to make any alterations or install anything in their residence hall room or common area, permanent or semi-permanent that may cause damage upon the installation or removal. Examples include but are not limited to: wall-mounted televisions, shelving, adhesives or hardware that penetrates the surface of walls and ceilings. Minimum sanction: $100 Fine and removal of item, plus any cost of damages.

R29

Room Changes Students desiring to make a room change must do so through the Office of Residence Life with the Coordinator of Residence Life. Only those students completing the appropriate processes through the Office of Residence Life will be allowed to conduct a room change. Students changing rooms with the permission of the Office of Residence Life will be assessed a $100 room change fee assessed by the Business Office and will turn in their old room key to the Office of Residence Life within 24 hours of the change, unless otherwise stipulated. Minimum Sanction for improper move: $100 Fine.

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R30

Room Furniture When arranging furniture in residence rooms, students should not block access to windows, air vents, or air conditioning or heating units. Room furniture should be used in the way that it was intended, and it must remain in the room. Students will be held accountable for costs of any missing items at the end of the year. Minimum Sanction: $100 Fine plus the cost of missing item(s).

R31

Single Rooms The Office of Residence Life does not guarantee any on-campus resident a single room during the school year unless a single room request is granted by the Disability Support Committee. An accidental single is created when one of two roommates move out of the room. Within 48 hours, the remaining occupant must: select another person to fill the vacancy, move to another double room where an accidental single exists, or after the initial 48-hour period accept a room mate when assigned by the Office of Residence Life.

R32

Signs College owned signage, local, state, and federal signs are prohibited in residential facilities, even If privately owned. Minimum Sanction: $50 Fine.

R33

Stickers Permanently mounted stickers are not allowed on College-owned residential facilities. Minimum Sanction: Restitution for the cost of repair, replacement, cleaning or maintenance (inclusive of parts, labor and material), as assessed by the Office of the Physical Plant

R35

Universal Access Card Universal Access Cards are used by students to gain access to the Brock Center, to eat at Estes Dining Hall, Birdsong Cafe and at Greenberry’s Coffee, and to check out books from the Library, as well as a means of identification. Universal Access Cards should remain with students at all times. Students will keep their Universal Access Cards for their entire academic career at Randolph-Macon College. Students can acquire replacement cards from Campus Safety, when it is reported lost, stolen or damaged. Students must present their Cards to College officials upon request, including Resident Assistants. Replacement fee for lost, stolen or damaged Cards: $15.00

R36

Pets Service animals, approved emotional support animals, and fish are the only pets permitted in the residential facilities. Students and guests are not allowed to have animals other than service animals in any other college owned facility. Minimum Sanction: $75.00

R37

Extension Cords Extension cords of any type are not allowed in the residence halls. Minimum Sanction: $25.00

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Resident Assistants Student Leaders Promoting Engagement and Community in the Residence Halls

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Fraternity and Sorority Housing Policies The Office of Student Life Fraternity and Sorority Housing Policies are the same as those for Residential Facilities. Please see the Residence Life and Residential Facilities Policies for specific regulations. The Assistant Dean of Students reserves the right to take administrative action against students who fail to adhere to the fraternity and sorority facilities guidelines, the housing contract, and the policies found in Fishtales. A. Housing Policies Alumni Members Members of Fraternities and Sororities who voluntarily or involuntarily take alumni status may not reside in Fraternity and Sorority Housing. Arrangements should be made with the Assistant Dean of Students and the Office of Residence Life to relocate immediately upon changing to an alumni membership status. New Members New Members of Fraternities and Sororities who have not completed their new member education process and have not been initiated as an active member of their organization may not reside in Fraternity and Sorority Housing. B. Administrative Actions Relocation A student may be relocated if, in the opinion of the Director of Student Life, a student may benefit from living in another room or residence hall. The Director of Student Life will work with each chapter and Housing Corporation if relocation is necessary within the facility. However, if relocation becomes necessary outside the facility, the Director of Student Life with work with the Office of Residence Life to provide space, if such space is available. Contract Termination The College may cancel the housing contract if a student fails to meet the full terms and conditions of the contract, including adhering to College and Policies on Fraternity and Sorority Life, or if a student becomes a detriment to the community. A student will normally be given 48 hours to clear the facility and vacate the room, but the College reserves the right to dictate the timeline. All of the restrictions of housing warning also apply to contract termination. Students who have their contract terminated will NOT be allowed to live in residential housing for the remainder of their matriculation.

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Your Fraternity and Sorority Facility Responsibilities As a resident of Randolph-Macon College, there are certain responsibilities that you must assume when you move into fraternity or sorority facility. Some fundamental responsibilities deserve emphasis and those are outlined below. Responsibility for the Rules The College Code of Student Conduct and Residence Hall policies are clearly spelled out in Fishtales. You are responsible for knowing and adhering to them at all times. Responsibility for your Living Area

You, along with your roommate(s) in non-single rooms, are fully responsible for activities that occur in your room and living area. Even if you are not actively involved in a policy violation, you will be held responsible if you are present during a violation or if you give access to your room. Therefore, you also shouldn’t let visitors in without escort. Always lock your room when you leave, even if only for a few minutes. This will prevent others from committing violations in your room that can get you in trouble. Do not condone violations by your presence. It is your responsibility to put an end to any violation that occurs in your room, and to call Campus Safety if you need assistance. Responsibility for Your Guests

You are responsible for the conduct of your guests when they are present in fraternity and sorority facilities. Each year, cases of vandalism and policy violations occur as a result of visitors who lack respect for College facilities. If you intend to have visitors or guests in the facility, be aware that YOU may be subject to disciplinary action for THEIR behavior. Additionally, College staff members reserve the right to ask any individual who is not a resident of the building or hall to leave the facility. Responsibility to Staff All members of the College community share the responsibility for governing their own conduct. Staff members who in the course of their duties are confronted with violations of the Code of Student Conduct or policy on fraternity and sorority life are required to report these violations. The staff is not expected to tolerate abuse in the performance of their duties; therefore, the harassment of any staff member will result in disciplinary action.

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Responsibilities to the Housing Contract As a member of our Fraternity and Sorority community you have a contractual responsibility with the College and to your community as well as with your Housing Corporation. Part of that responsibility requires that you have a thorough knowledge of the terms and conditions of the housing contract. You are responsible for fulfilling your responsibility to the contract and all of its terms and conditions. The Director of Student Life as well as your Housing Corporation Board are available to assist you in its best interest to fulfill such responsibility. Responsibility for Room Maintenance and Damages You, the College, and the Director of Student Life share responsibility to maintain your room and the college-owned fraternity and sorority facilities. Work Request Forms are available through your House Manager, and are to be used to report all damages and/ or other maintenance problems. Your responsibilities include: maintaining the condition and cleanliness of your room and its contents, timely and specific reporting of all damages or problems, arrangement of furniture and personal belongings to facilitate easy access by physical plant, staff, immediate correction of unsafe or potentially hazardous conditions which you may create in your room (such as overloaded power outlets) as requested by college staff, and restitution for damages to the physical area of your room (including the window and the outside of the door).

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Fraternity & Sorority Life Student Leaders Promoting Values, Service, Leadership, and Scholarship

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College Hazing Policy

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College Hazing Policy The Office of Student Conduct

Recklessly or intentionally endangering the health or safety of a student or students or to inflict bodily injury on a student or students in connection with or for the purpose of initiation, admission into or affiliation with, or as condition for continued membership in a club, organization, association, fraternity, sorority, or student body regardless of whether the student or students so endangered or injured participated voluntarily in the relevant activity. Randolph-Macon College further defines as hazing, any action taken or situation created, intentionally, to produce mental, emotional or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment or ridicule for the purpose of initiation into, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, a group or organization. Such activities may include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol; paddling in any form; creation of excess fatigue; physical and psychological shocks; quests, treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on outside or inside the confines of College property; wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and indecent; involuntary nudity; engaging in public stunts; morally degrading or humiliating games and activities; and any other activities which are not consistent with academic achievement, College policy, or federal, state and local laws. Quests in academic classes or student programs may be approved by the Provost or Dean of Students, respectively. Consent by participants in any activity is not considered a defense for violating the hazing policy.

Report Hazing The Office of Campus Safety The Office of Student Conduct The Office of Student Life

752-4710 752-3205 752-3205

If someone you know is in danger, please call 911 or 9-911 from a campus phone. Also, please call the Office of Campus Safety.

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Other College Policies and Procedures

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Computer Resources Information Technology Services Acceptable Use Policy for Computer Resources Randolph-Macon College makes computing facilities available to students, faculty, and staff for their use in pursuing the educational and research goals of the College. When a community shares any resource, the community needs to adopt a set of principles that determine what constitutes proper use of that resource. Such principles should assure that the resource is put only to uses that are ethical, legal, responsible in terms of preservation of the resource, and considerate of all members of the community. The following regulations are intended to serve as a basic outline of such a set of principles for Randolph- Macon’s computing facilities. Note: Violating these regulations, or the principles upon which they are based, constitutes an offense against the Randolph-Macon community and will be treated as such. Punishment for such violation ranges from removal of computing privileges to action under the college’s Student Conduct Code and the Code of Academic Integrity to prosecution under laws including but not limited to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (as amended), the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986, the Computer Virus Eradication Act of 1989, Interstate Transportation of Stolen Property, the Virginia Computer Crimes Act, and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.

Technology Regulations 1. Computer equipment, facilities, and network accounts are owned by the College. 2. Consideration of and respect for the rights, property (whether intellectual, electronic, or material), and time of others are central to the responsible use of computing facilities. 3. Inconsiderate or malicious actions such as stealing or using another’s password or data, degrading the performance of the computer system, employing abusive or objectionable language, using more than one machine except where required for class work, and using another person’s account are forbidden. These facilities are for use by all Randolph-Macon students, faculty, and staff. 4. Any action that interferes with another person’s use is prohibited. 5. Computing resources must be conserved. Do not waste them by sending prank messages, printing or downloading large files, sending chain mail, or other frivolous actions. Do not destroy equipment or resources. Do not remove equipment from its designated area. Since network disk space is limited and network and computer lab systems are purged at appropriate times, users should keep their files on their own storage media (OneDrive, DVD, jump drive) unless instructed otherwise or in designated storage folders on network or cloud servers that are to be used for class work only. 6. Only authorized software may be used on college-owned equipment. The use of personal copies of software on R-MC equipment without permission is not allowed. 7. Use only legal versions of copyrighted software in compliance with vendor licenses. Piracy of computer software is stealing and is punishable by law. It will not be tolerated at Randolph-Macon College. Public Domain software is for use by the college and is not intended to be passed on to users.

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Unacceptable use of resources includes: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Using another person’s system, User ID, password, files, or data without permission. Using computer programs to decode passwords or other access control information. Attempts to circumvent or subvert system or network security measures. Purposefully engaging in any activity that might be harmful to systems or to any information stored thereon, such as creating or propagating viruses, disrupting services, damaging files, or making unauthorized access or modification of college data. 5. Using college systems for commercial purposes, such as using electronic mail to circulate advertising for products or services. 6. Downloading, copying or using illegal copies of copyrighted materials in print, audio or video formats; storage of such copies on college systems, or transmitting illegal data (e.g., P2P {peerto-peer} sharing of any copyrighted materials including music and video) over the college’s networks. 7. Using apps, mail or messaging services to harass or intimidate another person, for example by broadcasting unsolicited messages, by repeatedly sending unwanted mail, or by using someone else’s name or User ID. 8. Wasting computing or network resources (e.g., by intentionally placing a program in an endless loop, by printing excessive amounts of paper, or by sending chain emails or unsolicited mass mailings). 9. Using the college’s systems or networks for personal gain (e.g., by selling access to a User ID or to college systems or networks or by performing work for profit with college resources in a manner not authorized by the college). 10. Use of personal, wireless access routers in offices, buildings and residence halls are prohibited. These units (referred to as rogue access points) both compromise network security and interfere with the performance of the college installed wireless access points. 11. Personal computers should not be connected to wired connections in offices and academic rooms on campus. 12. For clarity, any of the following actions are strictly prohibited on the R-MC Network: A. Offensive content of any kind B. Promoting discrimination or antagonism on the basis of race, gender, national origin, age, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, or disability. C. Illegal activities or promoting illegal activities. D. Commercial messages. E. Personal financial gain. F. Sending college-sensitive information by email or over the Internet. 13. Engaging in any other activity that does not comply with the general principles outlined above.

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Policy Enforcement The College considers any violation of acceptable use or guidelines to be a serious offense and reserves the right to copy and examine any files or information resident on college systems allegedly related to unacceptable use. Violators are subject to college disciplinary action. All current and future policies of the college are applicable and enforceable in regards to network use. These include, but are not limited to, the R-MC policy on Non-Discrimination and Harassment, the Code of Academic Integrity, the Student Conduct Code and all policies printed in the student handbook (Fishtales), the faculty handbook, and the staff handbook. In addition, copyright and intellectual property laws and all federal and state laws, including those regarding distribution of obscene materials, are applicable. The Role of Privacy on the R-MC Network While the college respects and encourages each individual’s right to privacy, it reserves the right to view all files for the purposes of administering and maintaining the system or to investigate complaints from other users or law enforcement officials. Users of the R-MC network are expected to respect the privacy of other users and are prohibited from breaking into individual, departmental, office, or system files or from using another person’s access code in order to obtain or alter information in those files. Remember that college owned equipment and network assets are for activities directly associated with the mission of the institution. College assets are not for personal use for entertainment, social activities outside the college, or for use in personal business transactions (such as sale of personal property, or advertising personal or commercial business transactions, etc.)

Compliance with This Policy Web Documents and Pages The World Wide Web Committee, under the authority of the president of the college, may investigate documents that do not comply with this policy. Questions about the policy or reports of noncompliance may be addressed to any member of the committee at any time. Upon receipt of a notice of a possible problem, the committee chair will investigate. If, in the chair’s opinion, a page is not in compliance with these policies, he/she may temporarily take it off-line, pending a meeting of the World Wide Web Committee to review the problem. In the absence of the committee chair, any member of the committee may take immediate action to shut down a site temporarily, pending further review by the committee. If the committee concludes that a violation of this or other college policies or of state or federal laws has occurred, the violation will be forwarded to the appropriate authority. Violations not covered by existing college policies will be handled directly by the World Wide Web Committee. In addition, where state and/or federal laws have been violated, the college reserves the right to cooperate with authorities of these jurisdictions. This means that any communication or record of any communication is subject to interception or monitoring by the college at any time.

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Network Resources and Computers Issues that deal with suspected illegal or inappropriate use of college network or computing equipment should be reported to the Chief Information Officer (CIO), Information & Technology Services (ITS). Upon receipt of a report that there is a violation of policy or abuse of network or computer assets, action will be taken to advise the appropriate office of the offense. Student violation/abuse issues will be forwarded to the Dean of Students. Faculty issues will be forwarded to the Provost office, and staff issues will be forwarded to the affected Senior Administrator for appropriate actions. Punishment for such violation ranges from removal of computing privileges to action under the college’s Code of Academic Integrity, Student Conduct Code, and even prosecution in a court of law. Users should note that local, state, or federal laws, such as the Freedom of Information Act, or the USA Patriot Act, may mandate the monitoring and delivery of information technology data to law enforcement or to others without notification to users. Information Disclaimer Individuals using computer systems owned by Randolph-Macon College are subject to applicable laws and college policies. Randolph-Macon College disclaims any responsibility and will not honor any warranties for information or materials residing on college systems or available over publicly accessible networks. Such materials do not necessarily reflect the attitudes, opinions, or values of the college administration or its faculty, staff, or students. These guidelines should not be construed as a limit on any individual’s rights under the constitutions of the United States or the Commonwealth of Virginia. Copyrighted Materials The college will assist owners of copyrighted material that is stored in or accessed through the RandolphMacon’s data network during the investigation and prosecution of individuals who are identified as having obtained or distributed such materials without properly compensating the owners.

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Leadership Fellows Student Leaders Exploring the Theory and Practice of Leadership

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Non-Discrimination and Harassment Policy The Provost and Title IX Coordinator Statement on Nondiscrimination Randolph-Macon College values the complexity and diversity of the world in which we live and seeks to be a community that recognizes the dignity and inherent worth of every person. The College is committed to the principles of fairness and respect for all and believes that a policy embodying these principles fosters a community that favors the free and open exchange of ideas and provides its students, faculty and staff with the best environment for study, work and fellowship. Accordingly, no member of the College community shall willfully harass, discriminate against, or interfere with the activities or legitimate rights of any person in a way that deprives that person of due consideration as an individual. For the purposes of this document, the “College community” includes: students, faculty and staff; prospective students and employment applicants; visitors to and guests of the College. Any person engaged in Randolph-Macon College activities is subject to and protected by the provisions of this policy. In compliance with Title IX of the Education Act Amendment of 1972, Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act and Amendment (2008) and other federal, state and local equal opportunity laws, and in accordance with our values, Randolph-Macon College will not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, disability, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or gender expression in any phase of its admissions, financial aid, educational, athletic or other programs or activities, or in any phase of its employment practices. The Provost of the College is the College’s Title IX and Nondiscrimination Coordinator responsible for coordinating and ensuring compliance with Title IX and the Nondiscrimination policy and compliance with equal opportunity regulations and laws. Questions or concerns regarding compliance issues and equal opportunity matters should be directed to the Office of the Provost, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, VA 23005, (804) 752-7268. The Federal Government resource on such issues is the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202. A. Definitions 1. Discrimination is an act or communication that interferes with an individual’s or a group’s ability to participate fully in the Randolph-Macon College community on the basis of race, gender, disability, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation or gender expression.

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2. Harassment is conduct and/or verbal action which, because of its severity and/or persistence, interferes significantly with an individual’s or a group’s work or education, or adversely affects living conditions. Discriminatory harassment of this sort includes but is not limited to incitement to or threat of violence; epithets referring to race, gender, disability, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation or gender expression; and/or physical conduct that is unwelcome, hostile or intimidating. College policy also recognizes as discriminatory harassment other forms of conduct and/or verbal communication that are derogatory, hostile, intimidating, threatening, “bullying,” humiliating or violent, although not necessarily illegal and that do not necessarily refer to a legally protected status or environment. 3. Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination which includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and/or other verbal or physical acts of a sexual nature which, because of their severity and/or persistence, interfere significantly with an individual’s or a group’s work or education, or adversely affect an individual’s or a group’s living conditions. Sexual harassment may include but is not limited to quid pro quo (something for something, such as a demand or offer of sexual activity to retain or obtain academic or employment benefits), and/or an abusive or hostile environment which interferes with the ability to function as a full participant in the Randolph-Macon College community. 4. Sexual Misconduct is also a form of discrimination and refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to the victim’s use of drugs or alcohol. An individual also may be unable to give consent due to an intellectual or other disability. A number of different acts fall into the category of sexual misconduct, including sexual assault (nonconsensual sexual intercourse, non-consensual sexual contact, non-consensual intimate touching) and sexual exploitation. All such acts of sexual misconduct are forms of sexual harassment covered under Title IX. For further examples of discrimination and harassment, see Appendix 1.

B. Resources Victims may initiate the complaint procedures by bringing complaints of discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct directly to the Coordinator for Nondiscrimination (hereinafter referred to as “the Coordinator,” or to any of the parties listed below (who will report the complaint to the Coordinator). At the complainant’s request, the College will make an effort to maintain the complainant’s confidentiality unless otherwise required by law (e.g., an investigation is required in sexual misconduct cases) or if doing so would unreasonably endanger the safety of the community; however, note that requests for confidentiality may impede the College’s ability to respond or investigate.

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Student victims may report incidents of sexual harassment or misconduct to the Office of Student Counseling, Student Health Services, and the Office of the Chaplain confidentially, and no action will be taken without the victim’s consent unless required by law. The Coordinator for Nondiscrimination/ Title IX Coordinator/ Provost of the College 752-7268 The Associate Dean of the College 752-7268 The Dean of Students 752-7266 Campus Safety 752-4710 Director of Human Resources 752-3747 A College Ombuds The Director of Athletics 752-3609 Faculty and staff members serving on the Nondiscrimination Committee Tools for reporting harassment and sexual assault are available online at the Counseling Services website. At any time, persons who believe they have been victims of discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct may file a formal complaint with the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202. In addition to the procedures below, victims of sexual misconduct have the right to pursue criminal prosecution and/or civil litigation. Campus Safety is available to provide assistance and information on criminal prosecution. The College is committed to providing full and prompt cooperation and assistance in notifying the proper law enforcement personnel if the victim so chooses. The victim has the right to pursue all legal and disciplinary remedies and counseling services without academic penalty. C. Procedures The following are internal options for addressing discrimination and/or harassment. 1. Informal Process: Mediation The Office of the Ombuds is a safe, informal venue in which to explore questions of discrimination and harassment (for an expanded description of the Ombuds, see Appendix 2). Persons who believe or suspect they have experienced discrimination, harassment, or any other behavior that prevents them from participating fully as a member of the College community should contact an Ombuds to consider the options for response.

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An Ombuds’ mediation may include, but is not limited to listening and providing an impartial sounding board, suggesting strategies for the individual or group to adopt, meeting informally with the complainant and the accused (individual or group representative) with the intent of bringing about resolution, meeting privately with the accused and acting as go-between, or advising the alleged victim to file a formal complaint. The Ombuds may arrange a meeting between the parties if all are willing. In cases where groups are involved, the Ombuds may require that one or two members of the group/s be authorized in writing to act on behalf of the group/s in the informal process, and all members of the group/s are bound by the terms of the informal resolution. In no event will a victim be forced or coerced by the College to mediate directly or indirectly with the accused against the victim’s will.

If the complainant so requests, the Ombuds will make every effort to maintain the complainant’s confidentiality unless otherwise required by law or if doing so would unreasonably endanger the safety of the community; however, note that requests for confidentiality may impede the Ombuds’ ability to respond or investigate. Complainants should be advised, moreover, that incidents of sexual misconduct against students must be reported to the Coordinator in compliance with Title IX. Only exchanges with the Offices of Student Counseling, Student Health Services and the Office of the Chaplain are considered privileged by law in such cases. (Please see C3.” Special Procedures for Sexual Misconduct Against Students”) While any Ombuds makes every effort to protect and assist the complainant, the Ombuds seeks to protect the rights and further the legitimate interests of both the complainant and the accused. An Ombuds keeps records of all meetings and consults with the other Ombuds when appropriate. All records and communications are confidential except in cases of sexual misconduct against students. Normally, complaints brought to the Ombuds will be resolved within sixty days. The Ombuds may find that some complaints are not appropriate for informal mediation. In such cases, or at any time during or after informal mediation, the complainant may make a formal complaint to the Coordinator. If an informal complaint is taken to a formal process, the Ombuds who assisted the complainant will not be asked by the Coordinator or any College official to serve as a witness or be required to offer evidence or testimony of any sort.

2. Formal Process: If complainants are dissatisfied with the outcome of the Informal Process, or do not wish to proceed informally, they may initiate the Formal Process. Cases of sexual misconduct against students are automatically subject to the Special Procedures for Sexual Misconduct and may not be addressed informally.

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Upon receipt of a written complaint describing details of the alleged discrimination or harassment, the Coordinator or his/her designee will promptly initiate an investigation. The Coordinator will report complaints to the Nondiscrimination Committee and consult with the Committee as warranted. Any party to the complaint is entitled to the following considerations if they are permitted by law and are appropriate under the circumstances: notification of the nature of the accusations and the opportunity to respond to them; access to relevant documents; and the opportunity to address the Committee and the Coordinator. At the conclusion of the investigation the Coordinator will report findings, and communicate them to all relevant parties in writing. If the results of the investigation indicate that discrimination/ harassment has occurred, the Coordinator will take steps, a. to see that the behavior immediately ceases, b. to prevent the behavior from reoccurring (including forestalling retaliation), and, c. direct the appropriate authority to implement any sanctions and/or remedies as applicable (See D “Implementation of Findings”). Normally, the above process will be completed within sixty days of the receipt of the initial written complaint. In the event that the Coordinator is a party to the complaint, formal complaints may be filed with the President or with the Chair of the Nondiscrimination Committee, in which case that person takes on the role of Coordinator and follows all the directives as outlined in the formal process. If the Committee Chair is the recipient of the complaint s/he will promptly inform the President. 3. Special Procedures in Cases of Sexual Misconduct Against Students Upon receipt of a report of alleged sexual misconduct, the Coordinator will promptly initiate an investigation. In addition, the Coordinator will take steps to see that the alleged behavior ceases and does not reoccur and to remedy the effects as necessary. The investigation will follow established procedures as outlined in the “Sexual and Relationship Conduct Policy” in the Student Handbook (Fishtales). Findings will be reported and acted upon as in C2 and D. 4. Third-party complaints Third parties (those who are not the subjects of alleged discrimination but who are aware of a possible case) have the following options: 

Seek counsel from an Ombuds;

Notify the Coordinator or the Committee of their concerns; or

 Initiate the Formal Process provided that the subject consents to the complaint in writing and authorizes a detailed statement describing the harassing or discriminatory behavior. The subject should be aware that disclosure of his or her identity may be necessary in order to investigate the facts surrounding the allegation.

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

All employees of the College, except those exempted by law, must report incidents of sexual misconduct against students to the Coordinator who will initiate an investigation.

D. Implementation of Findings: Where there is a finding that harassment, discrimination or sexual misconduct has occurred, the College will follow its established procedures as outlined in the Faculty Handbook, Staff Handbook or Student Handbook (Fishtales). This will include possible corrective action, with appropriate due process protections for any accused, and taking steps to ensure that the harassing or discriminatory practice or misconduct ceases. Violations of the Policy on Nondiscrimination or other College policies may warrant imposition of sanctions. Continued violations of College policy on harassment and discrimination will result in those violations being deemed presumptively willful. Continued, repeated, or multiple violations may result in stronger sanctions. Single acts of sufficiently severe discrimination or harassment, including sexual misconduct, may result in strong sanction including expulsion. If the results of the investigation indicate that the College should impose sanctions and/or implement remedies, the matter will be referred to the appropriate authority. In the case of a student, the Dean of Students or the College Judicial Council will implement sanctions. In the case of a faculty member, the Provost of the College or the Committee on the Faculty will implement sanctions. In the case of a staff member, the appropriate Cabinet officer or designee will implement sanctions. In the case of a Cabinet officer, the person or group to whom that officer reports will implement sanctions. In the case of the President or a Board member the matter will be referred to the Chair of the Committee on Trustees who will proceed according to Board guidelines. All such implementations are normally carried out within sixty days of the appropriate authority receiving formal notification of the case, with the exception that the appropriate authority may extend the time for fifteen additional days under extenuating circumstances. If the academic term ends within the sixty-day period or the fifteen-day extension thereby precluding resolution, the time periods may extend into the following term. Except in circumstances where immediate action is necessary, any penalty or disciplinary action shall not be implemented until an appeal has been made, or until the time limit for making an appeal has passed. E. Appeals Both the complainant and anyone accused have the right of appeal for any reason. Third parties (see section C.4 above) do not have any right to appeal. The failure to appeal within the stipulated time period shall constitute a waiver of such appeal. A written statement outlining the grounds for the appeal must be received by the Coordinator for Nondiscrimination within three days of issuance of a finding. Upon notification by the Coordinator for Nondiscrimination that an appeal has been filed, the President will select a panel of three members of the College community to hear the appeal.

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The person filing the appeal is entitled to the following considerations if they are permitted by law and are appropriate under the circumstances: notice of the time and place of the proceedings; access to relevant documents, the presence of an advisor drawn from the Randolph-Macon community; opportunity to present new information or new witnesses; receipt of notice of the disposition of the appeal; and freedom from retaliation. The panel will inform the President of its findings and the President shall make the final decision in the case. All decisions of the President are final. Normally, this process will be completed and a response provided in writing within thirty days of the filing of the appeal. F. Statistical Reporting

The College will provide statistics of reported sexual assaults as required and defined by the Campus Security Act and the Student-Right-to-Know-Act. All personally identifying information will be removed from statistical reports. Appendix 1: Discrimination and Harassment The following are examples of activities that could be considered discrimination, harassment or sexual misconduct. The lists are not meant to be exhaustive, but only give an idea of what could occur. Examples of Discrimination:

Not hiring an applicant for employment due to that individual’s race or age.

 Not allowing a student to join a particular club on campus based on that individual’s sexual orientation or national origin. Failing to make reasonable accommodations for a student or employee with a disability Examples of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct:  Requesting sexual favors that may be subtle or overt but particularly when the requests are suspected to be linked to career advancement or academic rewards. 

Committing physical assault of a sexual nature, for instance, inappropriate touching or rape.

 Sending unwelcome letters, notes, or materials, by any means, or making phone calls of a sexual nature.  Name calling, teasing, or making other derogatory or dehumanizing remarks involving sex, gender or sexual orientation.  Activity involving nonconsensual sexual exploitation of one person by another for the purposes of gain or other advantage.

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Examples of Harassment:  Threatening or intimidating another person because of the person’s race, gender, disability, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or gender expression. 

Committing hostile acts that are based upon another’s race or color.

Bullying or intimidating anyone, either physically or psychologically. Appendix 2: The Office of the Ombuds The Ombuds are advisors, conflict resolution facilitators, and advocates available to all members of the college community on an informal basis. They are appointed by the President to three-year terms, which are renewable. Persons who believe or suspect they are victims of discrimination, harassment, or any other behavior that prevents them from participating as full members of the college community may contact an Ombuds to consider the options for response.

An Ombuds’ duties in such cases may include, but are not limited to listening and providing an impartial sounding board, suggesting strategies for the individual or group to adopt, meeting informally with the complainant and the accused (individual or group representative) with the object of bringing about resolution, meeting privately with the object of complaint and acting as go-between, or advising the alleged victim to file a formal complaint.

An Ombuds keeps records of all meetings and consults with the other Ombuds when appropriate. All records and communications are confidential except in cases of sexual misconduct against students, which College representatives (including the Ombuds) must report to the Coordinator of Nondiscrimination in compliance with Title IX. Only exchanges with the Offices of Student Counseling, Student Health Services and the Office of the Chaplain are considered privileged by law in such cases.

Appendix 3: The Nondiscrimination Committee The Nondiscrimination Committee serves in an advisory capacity to the Coordinator in matters pertaining to harassment and discrimination. The Nondiscrimination Committee shall consist of the Coordinator, the Dean of Students or his/her designee, the three College Ombuds, the Director of Human Resources, the Director of the Counseling Center, and two faculty members elected by the Faculty for staggered three-year terms. The Chair of the Committee shall be one of the three College Ombuds.

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Policy on Amorous Relationships between Faculty Members and Students Amorous relationships between faculty and students are not permitted. This is true even when one or both parties regard the relationship as consensual. The College considers amorous relationships between faculty and students to be a violation of the Statement on Professional Ethics, particularly Section II, where faculty are to adhere to their “proper role as intellectual guide and counselor,” “to assure that their evaluation of students reflects their own merit,” and where they are to “avoid any exploitation of students for...private advantage...” Faculty who violate this policy are subject to remedial action and sanctions including possible termination of employment. Determination of appropriate remedial action and exceptions will be the responsibility of the President. Policy on Amorous Relationships between Staff Members and Students Amorous relationships between staff and students are contrary to the interests of the College community and are not permitted. This is true even when one or both parties regard the relationship as consensual. It is deemed a violation of “Causes for Disciplinary Action” for a staff member to be a party to an amorous relationship in violation of this policy. Staff who violate this policy are subject to remedial action and sanctions including possible termination of employment. Determination of appropriate remedial action and exceptions will be the responsibility of the President. “Staff” refers to employees who do not hold faculty rank. Policy on HIV/AIDS Randolph-Macon College recognizes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) as a communicable, life threatening disease with no cure at this time. AIDS results from infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Infection with HIV is indicated by the presence of an antibody to the virus in the bloodstream. After an incubation period of several months to years, the immune system is often compromised to a point where patients begin to develop infections or malignancies characteristic of AIDS. All persons with the HIV infection can transmit the virus to others under certain conditions. The goals of the College Policy are to prevent the spread of HIV infection through education and to address those infected with HIV in a caring, compassionate and informed manner. The College’s primary response to the HIV infection is prevention through education. The purpose of the education program is to provide an organized institutional effort to protect the College community from the disease and to provide a safe environment. Randolph-Macon will seek to educate students, faculty, and staff about HIV, its modes of transmission, and precautions that may be taken to reduce the likelihood of transmission. The College will seek to disseminate the most currently available knowledge about HIV.

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The current information provided by the Centers for Disease Control indicates that HIV infection is not transmitted by ordinary social or occupational contact. An infected person does not endanger others by remaining in classes, laboratories, residence halls or work environments. Based on these facts, Randolph-Macon will not treat differently, solely on the basis of their health status, any person infected with HIV except as expressly provided in this policy. Students with HIV will not be excluded from enrollment or employment, or restricted in their access to College facilities unless a medically based judgment by the Student Health Service staff determines that restriction is necessary to protect the welfare of the infected individual or the welfare of other members of the College community. Students will not be transferred from assignments or activities due only to their fear of acquiring the infection.

The Counseling Center is available to provide counseling and support for students infected with HIV. The Student Health and Counseling Center staffs will consult with students regarding interactions with persons infected with HIV. Students with MV infection are encouraged to obtain regular medical monitoring and to identify themselves to the Student Health Services so that they may be advised of appropriate medical care and education. It is important that the confidentiality of medical information be protected. The duty of health care providers to protect the confidentiality of information is superseded by the necessity to protect others (implying a duty to warn) only in circumstances involving a very clear specific risk to other people. As with other medical conditions, a physician’s statement may be required to certify absences or to provide accommodation arrangements. With appropriate medical recommendation, a student with HIV infection may be excused from institutional requirements for certain vaccinations as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control. Discrimination and harassment against members of the community who have or are thought to have HIV infection or who are perceived to be in high-risk groups will not be tolerated. Infractions will be dealt with through the College discrimination and harassment procedures. The College seeks to comply with the safety procedures contained in the guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration for the handling of blood and other body fluids. Each individual in the community has a responsibility to minimize his or her risk of HIV infection by taking appropriate precautions. Individuals infected with the HIV are expected to observe recommended behaviors for preventing the transmission of the virus to others. In the event of public inquiry concerning HIV infection on campus, the Director of Marketing and Communications will serve as the official spokesperson for the College. All external inquiries should be directed to that office.

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On-line Copyright Infringement Policy Information Technology Services and The Office of Student Conduct

Please bear in mind when utilizing the R-MC Network on your personal computers, that peer-to-peer file sharing of copyrighted motion pictures and sound recordings is not only illegal under the Copyright Act (1976), the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (2000), and the No Electronic Theft Act (1997) but it is also a violation of the Acceptable Use Policy for Computer Resources, and therefore also a violation of the Student Conduct Code as found in Fishtales.

As we do not wish you to face a violation of College policy, or incur possibly severe civil or criminal penalties please refrain from peer-to-peer downloading or uploading, and remove peer-to-peer file sharing programs from your computers. The R-MC Network has implemented firewall programs that prevent peer-to-peer file sharing in most instances. The preventive measures have been effective to help you avoid the violation of this Policy. Under the Copyright Act (1976) the online infringement of copyrighted music or motion pictures can be punished by up to five years in prison and $250,000 in fines, with a minimum of one year imprisonment and $25,000 in fines. Individuals also may be held civilly liable, regardless of whether the activity is for profit, for actual damages or lost profits, or for statutory damages which range between $750 and $300,000 per infringed copyright. Once legal actions are started, the minimum reported settlement to keep the case from going to trial is $5,000 plus legal fees. The No-Electronic Theft Act (1997) clarifies that copyright infringement can be criminally punished even if the infringer does not derive financial gain from the infringement, and it increased penalties: for infringers who seek financial gain, it raises the minimum term of imprisonment to 10 years, and for infringers who do not seek financial gain, it raises the maximum term to 6 years. Again, please note that uploading or downloading, even when you do not personally benefit commercially or financially from the infringement, is a Federal offense. In 2007, a Minnesota woman accused of infringing 24 songs was ordered to pay $220,000 in statutory damages; however in 2009, when a new trial was granted at her request, she was again found in violation, and ordered to pay a staggering $1.92 million in statutory damages. In July 2009, a college student in the US was ordered to pay $675,000 in statutory damages for infringing 30 songs.

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Most individuals that download peer to peer software are not fully aware that the software used to allow the transfer of these music and video files now opens their computers to others on the Internet to look for titles. Having a peer-to-peer file sharing program on your computer can easily result in sharing copyright works without even realizing it. Installing such software on your computer can cause you to unintentionally share files with other uses, for which you could face criminal and civil penalties. When the individual from off campus finds what they want on your computer, they then download it from your system through the R-MC network to their computer. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the Motion Pictures Association of America (MPAA) use the same method to find illegal downloads and then file infringement notifications prior to finally taking legal actions if the offending computer is not cleaned of software and illegal music. The movie industry is also taking aggressive actions to deter pirating or theft of copy righted materials. We all need to be careful to avoid legal and monetary consequences from down loading and thus sharing illegal materials over the Internet or on the R-MC Network. The Student Conduct Code lists “Misuse of a Communications Device” as a violation: Misuse of a Communications Device – Use of a communication device (telephone, computer, emergency call box, smart phone, computer network, and any software which can be used therein, etc.) to commit any of the following, is prohibited: actions prohibited by federal, state or local laws or regulations, or the Student Conduct Code or college policy; disrupting the normal operations of the College; harassing another member of the R-MC community; actions which violate the “Unacceptable use of resources” policy found in the R-MC Computer Resources Policies in Fishtales; on-line copyright infringement of video or audio recordings; actions prohibited under the Copyright Act (1976),the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (2000) or the No Electronic Theft Act (1997); violation of any Federal or state law regarding electronic harassment; and the production, sale, distribution or possession of images of child sexual abuse or extreme pornographic images (which include images depicting zoophilia, bestiality, necrophilia or acts likely to lead to injury or death). To be clear, while Peer-to-Peer file sharing programs are not illegal, the overwhelming majority of the content moved across these programs is illegal. Because Peer-to-Peer file sharing programs continue to allow files to be downloaded from your computers, even when you are not actively using them, we prohibit student personal computers from operating Peer-to-Peer file sharing programs. These programs must be completely disabled or removed while on campus, effective immediately. File-sharing programs include, amongst others, but are not limited to any program that uses the BitTorrent or Gnutella protocols, as well as Kazaa, Ares Galaxy, and LimeWire. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and SafeNet Inc., as well as R-MC Information and Technology Services can detect and block illegal downloading and identify those responsible. Those found responsible will be held judicially responsible with the College, and can be held civilly and criminally responsible by the owner and the Federal government

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Posting and Distribution Policy The Office of Student Life

All Notices that provide information regarding student activities or academic matters, or make announcements pertinent to the business of the College, may be posted on-campus, with appropriate approval from the Office of Student Life for permission to use in public areas on campus (i.e.-library, academic buildings, campus center, etc). Commercial advertising matter and posters unrelated to the College are prohibited except in designated areas since advertising opportunity is provided in College publications. Individuals who advertise services to students may post small notices on bulletin boards in designated areas on campus. All notices must carry the name of the responsible College organization or department and contact information. Nails, tacks, staples or any kind of adhesive tape other than quick release (blue) masking tape may not be used to attach posters to trees but posters and banners may be tied to tree trunks with string. Stakes bearing signs may not be driven into the ground. Tape should not be used on glass surfaces or walls anywhere on College property. Bulletin boards that are not designated for a particular office may be used for poster display. Notices may be attached to kiosks or bulletin boards with thumbtacks. Notices may not be posted on automobiles. Students may use chalk to advertise as well. The chalking may not appear on vertical surfaces, must be appropriate and can only be placed in areas that are approved by the Office of Student Life. Permission to display banners inside or outside of any building or residence hall must be obtained from the Office of Student Life. Students should not post flyers directly inside or outside of Residence Halls themselves. If they are to be posted in the Residence Halls, the appropriate number of flyers/posters are to be delivered to the Office of Student Life by Thursday at noon. The information will be put up for you in the halls that you designate by Resident Assistants, who will post them by noon on the following Monday. Permission to hang posters in the interior of Estes Dining Hall must be obtained from Chartwells. Posters that are not removed within three days after the date of an event, or posters that do not bear the appropriate approval stamping, will be removed by the College, and the person or organization responsible for them may be charged for their removal. Organizations will be held financially responsible for enforcing these policies with candidates for their respective offices. If an organization continually violates these policies, it may lose the privilege of posting notices or have its registration withdrawn.

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Solicitation Policy The Office of Student Life

Solicitation and the sale of items by students on campus (including in residence halls) are prohibited unless approved by the Office of Student Life. Individual students and student organizations should use the procedures for solicitation and fundraising as published by the Office of Student Life and available on the Office of Student Life webpage. Failure to comply with those procedures will result in adjudication under the Student Conduct Code. See http://www.rmc.edu/studentlife. Outside individuals or organizations, even if represented by students, may not solicit funds or sell items anywhere on campus or use the campus system for solicitation or promotion without authorization from the Dean of Students. Failure to comply will result in the parent organization, if any, being notified and any non-community representative being asked to leave campus.

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Policy on Motor Vehicle, Registration, and Parking Regulations The Office of Student Life Vehicle Registration: Vehicle registration is mandatory for all Students (including Commuters), Faculty and Staff who use or drive a vehicle while attending or employed by R-MC. Students: The Vehicle Registration/Waiver Form is included as a section in the Student Information Form which is made available to all students on-line through MyMacon Web. Vehicle Registration and Vehicle Waiver Forms may also be filled out and submitted on line at https://gormc.sharepoint.com/campussafety/SitePages/Home.aspx or in person at the Office of Campus Safety. The Vehicle Registration Fee is directly billed to the student’s account by the Business Office. (Students not using/driving a vehicle will need to complete the waiver section of the vehicle registration form in order to be reimbursed their registration fee, or complete and submit an on-line Vehicle Waiver Form) Completed Vehicle Registration Forms can also be mailed to the Office of Campus Safety, 203 Caroline St. Ashland, VA 23005. (Forms should be postmarked no later than July 30th) Student vehicle decals will be distributed during Athletic Check-In, Freshmen Orientation and Returning Student Check- In. Late registrations must be completed in person at the Office of Campus Safety within the first two weeks of the semester. Faculty and Staff: Vehicle Registration and Vehicle Waiver Forms may be filled out and submitted on line at https://gormc.sharepoint.com/campussafety/SitePages/Home.aspx or in person at the Office of Campus Safety. A vehicle is considered registered when a valid parking decal is displayed in the bottom left corner of the rear window of the registered vehicle. It is the responsibility of all Students, Faculty, and Staff who are operating a motor vehicle on-campus to be familiar with and obey the parking and traffic regulations of R-MC, the town of Ashland, and the State of Virginia. Vehicle violations will be charged to the owner of record, and/or the person the assigned decal has been registered under. Vehicle decals cannot be transferred, sold or otherwise given to any other individual for use. Students, including commuters, are required to park in student designated lots only. Flagrant violations of the R-MC Parking Rules and Regulations Policy may result in the student being referred and subjected for judicial review. The college reserves the right to revoke parking privileges to any habitual offenders. Freshmen Parking Regulations These rules are in effect 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Freshmen RED ZONE parking violations are non – appealable. In order to maintain compliance with the Randolph – Macon College Parking Plan approved by the Town of Ashland, all freshmen vehicles will be required by college regulation to park on the northern most end of campus. Freshmen are required to park their vehicles north of East Patrick St, north of the South Brock Parking Lot entrance and north of the Business Office. Designated parking lots (highlighted in blue on parking map) for freshmen are: Andrews, Garland, Jones, Bennett, Starr, Irby, North Brock Lot, 500 North Center Lot, and the Old Tennis Courts located on West Patrick Street. As is the case for all parking lots on campus, any spaces reserved for faculty / staff, visitors, handicapped and service vehicle purposes must not be used. Also shown is all legal, on – street parking that is available north of East Patrick Street within the boundaries of the campus. There are ample parking spaces in these locations to accommodate our freshmen vehicles. Refer to the on-line Freshmen Parking campus map http://www.rmc.edu/docs/default-source/campus-safety/rmc-freshman-parking-map-low-res-(2)-pdf-april2015.pdf?sfvrsn=2 148


Parking regulations are enforced diligently by the Office of Campus Safety and special care should be given to adherence of the rules. Instructions are available at the Campus Safety Office in order to assist students and parents in determining valid freshmen parking areas. Temporary Parking Permit Policy for Students, Faculty Staff and Visitors: Temporary parking permits are available for limited use of borrowed, rented, or other temporary vehicles. Temporary parking permits are valid no more than 5 days and may not be used in lieu of vehicle registration. Temporary parking permits are available by visiting the Office of Campus Safety. All guests to Randolph-Macon College are subject to the college’s motor vehicle, bicycle and parking regulations. Vehicles located in college owned parking lots without proper permits will be subject to tow. Special Needs Permit: Students with special parking needs, whether temporary or permanent should contact Dr. Jack Trammell in the Higgins Academic Center to apply for a special permit to display in their vehicle. This special permit is in addition to the vehicle decal required of all R-MC students. There is no charge for this special permit. Parking Rules and Regulations: Upperclassmen may park in faculty/staff parking lots Monday through Friday, 5pm – 8:00am and 24/7 on the weekends EXCEPT for the following parking lots and designated spaces. South Brock Parking Lot (24/7 off limit to student parking) Day Field Parking Lot (24/7 off limit to student parking) Pole designated Old Chapel Visitors spaces are off limits to faculty/staff/students 24/7 Lot closures by notice from the Office of Campus Safety for athletic and/or special events. A) Unauthorized parking in the following areas results in a fine of $100 and cannot be appealed:

Fire Lane Handicapped designated space B) All violations below are $40 per each offense:

            

Parking a freshman vehicle in a non-approved designated area – non appealable (see above Freshman Parking Regulations) Parking in an entrance, exit, or traffic lane. Parking in a driveway, loading dock area, on a side-walk, or blocking a trash dumpster. Illegally parked in such a way as to constitute a hazard to vehicular / pedestrian traffic or to the movement or operation of emergency equipment. Parking in an unauthorized space: for example, in a space reserved for Faculty, Staff, Visitors, and lot closures by notice from the Office of Campus Safety for athletic and/or special events. South Brock and Day Field Parking Lots are off limits to students 24/7. Designated Old Chapel Visitors spaces are off limits to faculty/staff/students 24/7. Parking in a manner in which an adjoining space is rendered unusable. Parking on the grass. Failure to register vehicle. (not appealable) Failure to display vehicle registration decal. (not appealable) Fraudulent registration. Operating a vehicle in a reckless manner.

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Parking Appeals: If you feel that you were issued a citation unjustly or your circumstances warrant further consideration, you may dispute your citation by appealing in writing within (5) business days to the Office of Campus Safety.

Appeal forms are available at the Office of Campus Safety or can be found online at: https://secure.rmc.edu/ CampusSafety/ParkingCitationAppeal/

The following parking citations cannot be appealed: Fire Lanes Handicapped Spaces Non-registered vehicle Failure to display registration decal Freshmen RED ZONE violations Towing: The College reserves the right to tow any vehicle that is parked in an unauthorized space, which includes: Parking in a fire lane Parking in a handicapped space Parking in a reserved space Blocking in another vehicle Impeding the flow of traffic Blocking a refuse container (dumpster) Failure to obey directives from the Office of Campus Safety regarding special lot and street closures.

College Liability: The College is not responsible for the care or protection of any vehicle or its contents while operated or parked on College property Payment of Vehicle Fines: Vehicle fines may be paid directly to the Business Office located at 310 N. Center Street within 7 (seven) business days of the citation’s issuance, otherwise, the fine will be charged to the student’s account.

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Parking Map

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Registered Sex Offenders The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where they may obtain law enforcement agency information provided by a state about registered sex offenders. The Act also requires sex offenders already required to register in a state to provide notice of each institution of higher education in that state at which the person is employed, carries on a vocation, or is a student. In the Commonwealth of Virginia, convicted sex offenders must register with the Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry maintained by the Virginia Department of State Police . In accordance with the law, information concerning offenders registered may be disclosed to any person requesting information on specific individuals . You can find information about sexual offenders who are required by law to register in the Commonwealth of Virginia from several sources: Virginia’s Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry, maintained by the Virginia State Police, available at http://sex-offender.vsp.virginia.gov/sor/ National Sex Offender Public Website, maintained by the Department of Justice, available at: http://www.nsopw.gov/en/Registry

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Emergency Procedures for Assisting Victims of Sexual Assault Immediate Medical Assistance and the Preserving of Evidence Any Emergency Room at a Bon Secours Hospital can provide an individual with a PERK (Physical Evidence Recovery Kit) Exam. St. Mary’s Hospital (804-281-8184) is the Richmond area hospital that is equipped around the clock to collect forensic evidence following sexual assault. Individuals who are interested should call and ask for the forensic nurse. Whether or not you choose to prosecute, after a sexual assault the physical evidence needed for a prosecution should be collected immediately, ideally within the first 24 hours and usually not later than 72 hours after the incident (3 days). In order not to destroy any evidence needed, it is important that you do not: • Bathe or shower • Brush or comb your hair • Douche • Change clothes • Eat or drink anything or brush or rinse your teeth if there was oral contact • Touch items at the scene of the assault • Put on makeup Clothing worn during the assault may be kept as evidence, however Bon Secours hospitals will provide a change of clothes. If you have changed clothes since the assault or rape, take what you were wearing at the time of the assault or rape with you in something other than a plastic bag. At the emergency room the nurse may collect hair samples, semen, and other evidence. With your permission, the police may be contacted to take possession of these samples. Virginia law allows victims of sexual assault to go to the hospital to be treated for injuries and collect the physical evidence without a report being taken by police. See http://www.dcjs.virginia.gov/victims/documents/PERKFAQFINAL082208.pdf for further information, Regardless of whether you decide to report the assault immediately, at a later time or never, the PERK kit will be stored in a manner to protect your privacy, pending your decision on reporting to law enforcement. The Commonwealth of Virginia will pay for the costs of the P.E.R.K. exam. Actions to take immediately following a sexual assault If you are a victim of sexual misconduct involving sexual intercourse or contact, we encourage you to do the following: Get to a safe place as soon as you can. Try to preserve all physical evidence; follow the instructions above on how to do so. Get medical attention as soon as possible. A medical examination will provide any necessary treatment and collect important evidence. Injuries may not be immediately apparent. It is important to seek immediate and follow-up medical attention for several reasons: To assess and treat any physical injuries you may have sustained. To determine the risk of sexually transmitted diseases or pregnancy and take appropriate medical measures. To gather evidence that may aid criminal prosecution. For emergency services assistance, including contacting law enforcement, emergency medical services or crisis response, contact Campus Safety 804-752-4710 (or x4710 from an on-campus phone). On campus, a blue light emergency phone will connect you directly to the Campus Safety Communications Officer

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Even if you choose not to have a hospital exam immediately, it is still important to get medical attention. An exam, in these instances, will include treatment of any physical problems and lab tests for sexually transmitted diseases and/or pregnancy. Any non-emergency treatment can be arranged on campus by calling the Student Health Center at (804) 752-3041 and making an appointment. Consider contacting the local law enforcement agency, the Ashland Police Department at 804-798-1227. Campus Safety may also assist in establishing contact with the Ashland Police Department. Talk with a counselor/ sexual assault responder, who will maintain confidentiality, help explain your options, give you information, and provide emotional support. On campus, you can call the Center for Counseling Services at 804-752-7270. When the Center is closed, a counselor is on-call and may be reached through Campus Safety at (804) 752-4710 or through your Resident Assistant; you only need to say that you would like to speak with the sexual assault responder on-call. Contact someone you trust, such as a close friend, to be with you and support you. If you are comfortable, officially report the incident to the College, through Campus Safety, The Title IX Coordinator, the Office of Student Conduct or the Dean of Student’s Office. Also, any faculty or staff member can assist you in making a report. Seek academic, living and working accommodations through the Title IX Coordinator. Follow up with the Student Health Services or Center for Counseling Services once you establish contact initially. Consider contacting the local victims services agency, Hanover Safe Place, which can provide companion and advocacy services. Call 24 hours a day at : 804-752-2702 or 1-800-838-8238.

Emergency Procedures for Assisting Victims of Relationship Misconduct Immediate Medical Assistance and the Preserving of Evidence Any Emergency Room at a Bon Secours Hospital can provide an individual with a PERK (Physical Evidence Recovery Kit) Exam. St. Mary’s Hospital (804-281-8184) is the Richmond area hospital that is equipped around the clock to collect forensic evidence following a physical incident of domestic or dating violence. Individuals who are interested should call and ask for the forensic nurse. Whether or not you choose to prosecute, after an attack using physical force as part of domestic or dating violence, the physical evidence needed for a prosecution should be collected immediately, ideally within the first 24 hours and usually not later than 72 hours after the incident (3 days). In order not to destroy any evidence needed, it is important that you do not: • Bathe or shower • Brush or comb your hair • Douche • Change clothes • Eat or drink anything or brush or rinse your teeth if there was oral contact • Touch items at the scene of the assault • Put on makeup Clothing worn during the assault may be kept as evidence, however Bon Secours hospitals will provide a change of clothes. If you have changed clothes since the assault, take what you were wearing at the time with you in something other than a plastic bag. At the emergency room the nurse may collect hair samples and other evidence. With your permission, the police may be contacted to take possession of these samples.

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Actions to take when dealing with domestic violence and dating violence If you are a victim of sexual misconduct involving sexual intercourse or contact, we encourage you to do the following: Get to a safe place as soon as you can. If you believe you are in immediate danger, call the police at 911 (or 9-911 from an on-campus line). Explain why you feel your safety is in danger. Try to preserve all physical evidence; follow the instructions above on how to do so. Get medical attention as soon as possible. A medical examination will provide any necessary treatment and collect important evidence. Injuries may not be immediately apparent. It is important to seek immediate and follow-up medical attention for several reasons: - To assess and treat any physical injuries you may have sustained. - To gather evidence that may aid criminal prosecution. For emergency services assistance, including contacting law enforcement, emergency medical services or crisis response, contact Campus Safety 804-752-4710 (or x4710 from an on-campus phone). On campus, a blue light emergency phone will connect you directly to the Campus Safety Communications Officer Even if you choose not to have a hospital exam immediately, it is still important to get medical attention. An exam, in these instances, will include treatment of any physical problems. Any non-emergency treatment can be arranged on campus by calling the Student Health Center at (804) 752-3041 and making an appointment. Consider contacting the local law enforcement agency, the Ashland Police Department at 804-798-1227. Campus Safety may also assist in establishing contact with the Ashland Police Department. Talk with a counselor/ sexual assault responder, who will maintain confidentiality, help explain your options, give you information, and provide emotional support. On campus, you can call the Center for Counseling Services at 804-7527270. When the Center is closed, a counselor is on-call and may be reached through Campus Safety at (804) 752-4710 or through your Resident Assistant; you only need to say that you would like to speak with the sexual assault responder on-call. Also, the YWCA has a 24-hour Crisis Hotline available at (804) 643-0888. Contact someone you trust, such as a close friend, to be with you and support you. It may be helpful to get support from your friends and family. Although this is not an easy topic to share with your loved ones, asking for help is a assign of courage and strength. If you are comfortable, officially report the incident to the College, through Campus Safety, The Title IX Coordinator, the Office of Student Conduct or the Dean of Student’s Office. Also, any faculty or staff member can assist you in making a report. Consider contacting the local victims services agency, Hanover Safe Place, which can provide companion and advocacy services. Call 24 hours a day at : 804-752-2702 or 1-800-838-8238. Hanover Safe Place is an excellent resource which can connect you to other resources, help ensure you are aware of any legal processes and your rights under the law. Seek academic, living and working accommodations through the methods below. Consider obtaining a No-Contact Order through the College or a Civil Protection Order from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Follow up with the Student Health Services or Center for Counseling Services once you establish contact initially

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Emergency Procedures for Assisting Victims of Stalking Actions to take when dealing with incidents of stalking If you believing stalking is taking place that is directed towards you, we encourage you to do the following: If you believe you are in immediate danger, call the police at 911 (or 9-911 from an on-campus line). Explain what is causing you fear. File a report with the Office of Campus Safety. To do so, contact Campus Safety 804-752-4710 (or x4710 from an on-campus phone). On campus, a blue light emergency phone will connect you directly to the Campus Safety Communications Officer Consider contacting the local law enforcement agency, the Ashland Police Department at 804-798-1227 to file a report or make a complaint for criminal action. Campus Safety may also assist in establishing contact with the Ashland Police Department. Stalking is illegal in Virginia (see below). Take any threats seriously. If you are comfortable, officially report the incident to the College, through Campus Safety, The Title IX Coordinator, the Office of Student Conduct or the Dean of Student’s Office. Talk with a counselor, who will maintain confidentiality, help explain your options, give you information, and provide emotional support. On campus, you can call the Center for Counseling Services at 804-752-7270. When the Center is closed, a counselor is on-call and may be reached through Campus Safety at (804) 752-4710 or through your Resident Assistant; you only need to say that you would like to speak with the sexual assault responder on-call Seek out support from friendly, family, victims services and college professionals Seek academic, living and working accommodations through the methods below. Consider obtaining a No-Contact Order through the College or a Civil Protection Order from the Commonwealth of Virginia (both are described in detail below). If a stalker contacts you clearly communicate to that person only once that you want no further contact. Do not initiate any further communication with the stalker. Keep a log documenting every incident of contact with the stalker. Save all evidence of potential stalking including letters, phone messages, e-mails, Internet postings, and any other communication. Inform your friends, Resident Assistant, fellow employees and employer, so they will be aware of your situation. Consider developing a safety plan. The Office of Campus Safety can assist you with this. Consider contacting the local victims services agency, Hanover Safe Place, which can provide companion and advocacy services. Call 24 hours a day at: 804-752-2702 or 1-800-838-8238.

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College Offices The links below will connect you with various offices across campus that frequently interact with and provide support to students. Admissions

Institutional Research

Athletics

International Education

Bassett Internship Program

Library

Brock Sports and Recreation Center

Marketing & Communications

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Bystander Intervention and Effective Helping Strategies Peers are among the most crucial influences in our lives. We depend on our friends to encourage us when we need help and to cheer us on when we are excelling. As a friend and peer, you are, also, the best candidate to address concerns about the behaviors of those closest to you. It can be intimidating and scary. If you would like more training, contact Dean McGhee in the Office of Student Conduct at 804-752-3205 or studentconduct@rmc.edu. A Few Bystander Intervention Tips: Always address the emotion before addressing the content of your discussion.

The 5 Point Formula I Care Let the person know you care about him/her and that because of the significance of the relationship you need to discuss something very important. Both starting and ending the discussion with an emphasis that you are doing this out of genuine concern, caring and respect for the person, sandwiches the difficult feedback between strong positives. Choose words you are comfortable with and fit your style. I See Report/Review actual events with your friend, as you perceive them. Remember you are evaluating the behavior not the person. Try to limit your statements to observable, irrefutable facts. The more you have, the better. I Feel Tell the person your own feelings using “I statements� to reveal your feelings. I Want Tell the person what you would like to see happen. I Will Specify what you will or will not do. Only set ultimatums if you can, and will, stick to them. Adapted from University of Massachusetts, Amherst Health Services, Virginia Alcohol Safety Action Program, and The BACCHUS Network. 159


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Fishtales: Student Handbook 2016-2017