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May 2, 2013

Separation anxiety

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Summer adventures Options to keep everyone happy and productive

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Kids & the arts Nurturing their talents

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Helping your child thrive away from home


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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

Help your child thrive at camp

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t is important to prepare your child for a camp experience, whether it is for a one-week sleep-away camp close to home or a four-week camp out-of-state.

New York Hall of Science Don’t miss Design Zone and discover how video game developers, music producers, roller coaster designers and other creatives use math and science to design! Little Makers Sundays in May and June; 10:30am – 12:30pm Little Makers invites families with young children to tinker, design and create together. Join us and explore new materials, tools and processes. Preregistration recommended. Ages 18 mo+ Summer of the Stars May 18, June 8, July 13 and August 10; 12–4pm Join us for sports and star-related activities all summer long Bug Day June 29; 12–4pm Celebrate summer with – BUGS! We’ll have live bugs to observe, handle, learn from, eat and make Outdoor Play Spaces – NOW OPEN Play Rocket Park Mini Golf and climb on New York’s largest Science Playground! For more activities, events and 3D movies visit nysci.org

Here are some guidelines to help you and your child make the most of their camp stay. 1 Visit the camp, if at all possible, and meet the camp director. Talk to other families who have gone 2 to the camp in years past to familiarize yourself with what goes on. 3 Have your child spend a weekend with a friend. No phone calls. Talk about it with your child afterwards. How did your child feel the second night? 3 Go over the daily schedule with your child so there are no surprises. Learn as much as you can about camp life. Teach your child how to care for him/ 4 herself. Children need to know how to select appropriate clothing, make a bed with clean sheets, put clothes away, set a table, carry out chores, handle laundry, etc. 5 Problem solve with your child by using "what if" situations to prepare for unexpected events. What if you lose your baseball glove? What if you don't get along with another child? What if you don't feel well? Let your child brainstorm for solutions and make sure they know the "chain of command" at camp for handling problems. 6 Familiarize your child with the outdoors. Many children are unfamiliar with total darkness and country night sounds. Practice walking in the dark with a flashlight.

7 Homesickness is fairly common.

Missing home, parents, pets or friends is pretty normal. It is part of growing up and leaving home. Speak openly about it and your child will experience these feelings with less anxiety and more understanding. Camp staff is trained to help your child through these ups and downs. Discuss communication at camp. Does 8 your camp allow phone calls? Letters or postcards are best although now camps have fax and email. Give your child stamped envelopes and postcards already addressed. Practice letter writing. The more your child writes to others, the more mail he/she will receive! Communicate with camp officials. Let 9 them know if there are special circumstances or considerations regarding your child's well being or behavior. Send letters to your child before camp begins so mail is waiting when he/she arrives. Write daily keeping it simple. Send the sports or comics from the local newspaper, a cute card, a package with a word game, etc. Prepare yourself for your child going 10 off to camp. You have chosen the best camp for your child and he/she will have a wonderful summer full of fun, new friends, new songs and many exciting experiences.

DESIGN ZONE was produced and is toured by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. This exhibit was made possible by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant.

www.nysci.org 47–01 111th Street Ɓ Queens, NY

111th Street Ɓ Easy on-site parking.

Presentadtoreceive$5offpurchaseof2ormoregeneraladmissiontickets.CodeLIPARENT.Expires08/31/13 624995

Publishers CLIFFORD RICHNER STUART RICHNER Executive Editor JOHN C. O’CONNELL Section Editor KAREN BLOOM

Editorial Designer JEFFREY A. NEGRIN Vice President of Sales RHONDA GLICKMAN Account Executives AUDREY COHEN SUSANNE COLTEN ROBERT CUMMINGS

JANE FAIELLA NANCY FRIEDMAN ELLEN FRISCH JILL KAPLAN ALYSSA KUSSIN JOAN KURKOMELIS ROBIN REINER KAREN RESNICK

Parenting is an advertising supplement to the HERALD Community Newspapers. Copyright © 2013 Richner Communications, Inc. Published by Richner Communications, Inc. 2 Endo Blvd., Garden City, NY 11530 (516) 569-4000 • www.liherald.com

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hoosing a summer camp program for your child involves some important research. Because the camp experience will have significant impact on your child's life, it’s important for parents to learn to choose a camp wisely.

Some parents may send a child to a camp they attended without considering how the camp may have changed or the differences between the parent's and the child's needs and desires. In other cases, children go to a camp that a friend has enjoyed, assuming they will enjoy it too. All too often, this assumption proves wrong. What do you and your child want? Regardless of the age of your child, it is important that the ultimate selection of a camp accommodate all or some of the needs, interests, goals, and expectations of both parent and child. The parent must make an effort to understand what the child wants and why. A good way to begin is to sit down as a family and respond to the following questions: What do you and your child want to gain from the camp experience ? Learn new skills, develop more self confidence, improving proficiency in certain areas, become more independent? What are other expectations of the camp experience? What are the special interests that your child wants to explore? Are there any physical, intellectual, or social limitations that should be considered? What kind of emphasis will your child profit from the most? For example: Is a lot of structure desirable, is social interaction with members of the opposite sex important, or does your child need a place where he or she is encouraged to develop at their own pace? Sleepaway camps provide a summer residential program where campers enjoy daily and evening activities. Depending on the type of program chosen, a camp experience can range anywhere from one week to an entire summer. In considering sleepaway camp, parents should keep a few questions in mind: Is your child ready for a sleepaway experience? What is expected from the camp experience? What type of camp fits best with parent work schedules and family vacation times? What are the total costs of sleepaway camp? Take a moment to consider the type of camp that makes the most sense for your child and try to develop your reasons for those preferences. If your child is interested in camp, but you are not sure she is ready for nights away from home, a day camp is a great option. There are many camps nearby that offer families a wide range of activities to keep youngsters productively occupied throughout the summer, including those offered through your school district, recreation center and pre-schools, or consider what your child’s afterschool program has going on during the summer. Size Camps may vary in size from under 100 campers to more than 400. Smaller camps may foster a very special environment where campers and staff really get to know each other, and where individual needs can be quickly met. Large camps are often organized into small units thus making it possible to receive the same kind of attention offered by a smaller camp. This is a complex issue that will require special attention and investigation. In a good camp there may be little correlation between size and the quality of the total camp experience.

TOP 10 REASONS to send your child to sleepaway camp

By The Camp Connection

10 Disney was not joking. Michael D. Eisner, former CEO of Disney, shares that “camp is a guide to growing up, learning to rely on yourself as you work as a team, developing tools for leadership, competing to win but finding pride and growth in defeat.” That’s not Mickey Mouse stuff!

If you feel your child requires special attention in an area such as confidence building, it is probably more important to find out how a camp meets that need rather than getting hung up on size. Location Many parents limit their search for a camp by looking in one state or by choosing an arbitrary distance from home. More important than distance, according to camp advisors, are the related questions involving camp environment, security, medical facilities, and accessibility. In choosing a location you might also want to consider the cost for you to visit the camp, and the proximity to camps your other children are attending during the summer. Keep in mind that there are excellent camps in many states, and that if your child is having a good experience, distance will not make a great deal of difference. Programs and activities Today’s camps have all kinds of program offerings. Some camps may emphasize one activity while others will offer a wide array of programs. In specialty camps, staff and facilities are geared to provide an intensive experience in a single area such as tennis, horseback riding, gymnastics, sailing or wilderness. Naturally, these camps have other facilities and activities that provide campers with additional experiences. A more traditional camp program tends to be broader in terms of what it offers. Most general camps will provide programs in some team sports such as baseball and soccer, individual sports like tennis, and waterfront activities such as swimming and sailing, as well as some outdoor life options in hiking and canoeing. In making a decision about camp, it is vital that you and your child look into the total camp program and that you examine the quality of the staff and facilities available to support that program. Narrowing your selection At this stage of the decision process, your central task is to identify those camps which appear promising in terms of meeting your specifications. Perhaps you know other parents who send their children to camp. Get some camp names from them. Also, your child probably has friends who go to camp; you can pursue this source as well. Once you have developed a list of possibilities the most difficult task remains. That is, how do you compare camps so that you can narrow the possibilities to the one which makes the most sense for you and your child? The best way to proceed with your comparison and to narrow your choices is to take a careful look at some of the promising camps you have identified. Review the brochures and videos with your child. Then you can choose the ones you're most interested in and arrange to speak or meet with the camp directors or representatives. Involve your child in the selection process. Review your child's preferences and let you child ask questions too.

9 Me, myself and I. Sleepaway camp is the one place a child can make decisions and problem solve in a safe, caring environment without parents or teachers. At camp, children learn to manage conflict and different personalities. Campers come home with increased confidence and greater sense of independence. 8 All in the family. While joining together in cleaning their bunk, painting scenery, creating a skit and playing in tournaments, campers become part of a new team of friends and counselors (from all over the country and world) who become a family reuniting year after year.

7 A camp for every child. Each child is unique. Some sparkle when playing soccer or performing on stage while others yearn to be the next Best Baker. There is a camp for each child to explore various interests.

6 The best part of the day. Sleeping next to their best buddies, campers spend “flashlight time” sharing the day’s accomplishments, funniest moments and stories. Late night talks become one of the most bonding moments of camp. 5 Bragging rights. Sleepaway camp exposes children to activities that are new and unique. Camp is a motivating place for children to grow and succeed – whether it’s getting up on water-skis for the first time, cheering a Color War song or writing for the camp newsletter. When a child goes to camp, he/she will always have something grand to tell you about. 4 Hands are not just for texting and typing. At camp, children will rest their fingers from cell phones and computer keyboards. Camper’s fingers return to no-tech activities such as writing letters, whittling a wood bench and weaving a potholder. 3 Camp is not just for the camper. While their children are having fun-filled, action packed days away, parents get a reprieve from the fast paced daily routines of packing lunches, carpooling and laundry. Sending a child away for a few weeks allows couples to renew, rediscover and recharge their relationship.

2 What they enjoy. Without the pressure of homework and tests, campers discover what activities – NOT SUBJECTS – they enjoy and have fun doing. No one grades fun!

1 Winter, spring, summer and fall. Ask anyone who went away to camp. Camp friends are year-round, life-long friends. Camp creates memories that last a lifetime. Courtesy of Laurel and Norm Barrie, Melissa Barrie Cohen. For more information, visit www.thecampconnection.com or contact camp4u@thecampconnection.com

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

READY FOR CAMP Making a wise choice

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CHILDREN AND THE ARTS:

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A parent’s investment in joy By Dale Lewis

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s Director of Long Island’s Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts, I have the privilege of working with 1,500 arts majors every day.

ONGOING REGISTRATION for our

FUN SUMMER PROGRAM for 3, 4 and 5 year olds

LIMITED OPENINGS

in our 2, 3, 4 year old and KinderPrep programs for the 2013-2014 school year 516-536-6295

200 Hempstead Ave. Rockville Centre

www.stmarksnurseryschool.net Like us on Facebook

The Coolest Summer Ever! Adventure Travel Camp Exciting daily trips (ages 6-12 years)

Mini Travel One trip per week (entering kindergarten)

Cub Camp (ages 18 months-5 years)

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Ask us ho w to custom ize YOUR su mmer program !

Guided by a faculty of leading professionals, our students struggle with creative ideas, master artistic techniques, and build works of art one skill at a time. At Usdan, the happy result is seen on the faces of children boarding their buses following a fulfilling summer’s day of “work.�Theirs are smiles of achievement, the result of numerous moments of trial and triumph. We don’t guarantee that children will cross the finish line. We guarantee that they will learn, grow, and have fun approaching it. The joy, after all, is in the journey. Studies linking childhood study in the arts to lifetime skill in virtually every other pursuit have become ubiquitous, so Specialty camps are growing in popularity as a summer option for families. much so that they have Usdan’s 200-acre woodland campus in Wheatley Heights attracts over 1,600 come to trivialize an kids ages 6-18 to its varied arts programs – over 40 in all. important conversation journey, whatever its outcome. School is for parents. These studies cite the arts as havwhere the journey is supposed to begin, but ing a pivotal role in the development of 21st it may surprise some that teacher-inspired century skills, critical thinking, the experience journeys of achievement are often thwarted of working sequentially toward a goal, and by a system that eschews journeys with risk. improvement in a child’s academic achieveInstead, our system favors short paths toward ment. However, there is more. Children who immediate gratification, flawed paths that immerse themselves in the arts experience we now define as success. something more important than better Teachers know that a child's struggle to grades. They experience joy. learn, and to occasionally fail, is one of life's Children acquire knowledge over time, great learning experiences. In today's schools gradually building skills and assembling conin fact, teachers are the heroes and heroines in tent that allows each to see the possibility of a battle for standards that they shouldn't have success, and the skill needed to approach it. to wage. We have asked them to teach with In other words, the arts slow things down. hands tied behind their backs, as society Artistic study forces us to set goals, to work continued on page S5 toward them, and to experience joy in the

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Long Island Swim School is the teaching arm of the Long Island Aquatic Club, a USA Swimming National Program of Excellence.

BALDWIN 2856 MILBURN AVE

(516) 377-3337

Classes are held at our NEW Olympic size pool

www.tutortimebaldwin.com

750F Stewart Ave. Garden City

*Programs vary by school. See school for details. Tutor TimeÂŽ is an equal opportunity provider. Tutor Time is licensed and insured.

625284

(Behind Ethan Allan)



For more information please call

625338

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

SUMMER PROGRAM


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A PARENT’S INVESTMENT IN JOY continued from page S4

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

declares every child a winner. We have thus proclaimed the finish line to be our goal, certifying every child a victor before the starter's pistol has been fired. Perhaps we adults have forgotten how we learned – one skill at a time, one achievement at a time, even one failure at a time. The arts provide an ideal platform to restore rigor to our schools, for study in the arts demands skill, judgment, and patience. When a child leans to paint, skills are needed to fill the canvas with quality and expression. There is the study of color, of form, and of technique, and there are intangible elements that require critical thinking. These include the development of a painting’s concept, and the artistic language needed to convey it. Similarly, a child can’t play the clarinet in 10 minutes, days, or weeks. He must build skills that lead to a performance, and this takes time. That winter concert we enjoyed wasn’t put together in a week or a month. It was the result of a continuum of skills inspired by music teachers brave enough to swim upstream against declarations of success without expectations of achievement. Concerts are crafted by children who have mastered their art through hard work, skill building, and patience. They have concluded their journey, whether at the finish line or still approaching it, thanks to arts teachers who inspire success and are willing to teach their students to wait for it.

Dale Lewis is the Executive Director of Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts in Wheatley Heights. For more information, contact www.usdan.com.

The arts can be a lifetime companion and a summer arts program will help nurture that passion and personal growth.

Temple Am Echad RABBI STUART M. GELLER EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER

Formerly Temple Emanu-El of Lynbrook

DON’T MISS OUT! ENROLL NOW FOR 2013 EVERYONE WELCOME! SUMMER EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM

• Mommy & Me • 12 mos-18 mos • Flexible Schedule • 18 mos, 2 year, 3 year and 4 year old programs • Busing Available • Outdoor Playground • Fully Equipped Spacious Age-Appropriate Gym

One Saperstein Plaza • Lynbrook

599-7950 For Membership Information Call Lisa Burch - 593-4004

620542

Advanced Degrees in Early Childhood Elementary Education, Special Education, and Administration Supervision

625394

Call Barbara Goodman or Sue Chaplick (Early Childhood Directors)

NYS Certified Teachers Thematic, Age Appropriate Curriculum • Music & Movement • Enrichment Programs


May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

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CAMP & SCHOOL DIRECTORY Bright Star Country Day School & Camp Now in our 32nd season with a professional staff that will provide your child (ages 18 months – 7 years) with a safe and fun filled summer. Twinkles (2-yearolds) and Starlings (3-4 year olds) develop confidence, self expression and motor skills. The Starfish program (4 & 5 year olds) and Sunshine (6-7 year olds) swim at a local pool with private swim lessons on Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays. On Wednesday and Thursdays the Starfish campers have fun filled themed activities in camp, while the Sunshine campers have an exciting trip program. Families can design their own schedule by picking the days and weeks to fit your needs, for all programs. Bright Star Country Day School & Camp 516-766-5699

Camp Friedberg Our variety of summer programs provides your child with a safe, nurturing summer filled with non-stop fun and adventure! Our pre-school camps take place at our three community based sites in Oceanside, Long Beach and Merrick. Grades K – 4 are based at our beautiful campgrounds nestled in the woods of Long Island. New this summer! Extreme Specialties designed to meet your child’s interests. Grades 5 – 6 spend half the time at our campgrounds and half on trips. Grades 7 – 10 enjoy fantastic day and overnight trips, including Walt Disney World! Weekly sessions available. Affordable pricing. Camp Friedberg Barry and Florence Friedberg, JCC 516-766-4341 www.friedbergjcc.org

College Connection COLLEGE CONNECTION, Official Sponsor of College Admission Success™, offers comprehensive college planning and counseling. Guidance and support in choosing a college, getting in to college, and finding the money to pay for college, all while taking the stress, the worry, the frustration and the madness out of college applications and admissions. There is a difference between applying to college and getting in. That difference is COLLEGE CONNECTION! Call today for a FREE telephone consultation. College Connection 516-345-8766 - www.collegeconnect.info

Long Island Swim School Long Island Swim School provides swimming lessons for children ages 2 - 10. Children are taught their strokes right the first time. The small group environment makes learning to swim safe, easy, and fun. Our learning sequences are geared towards small logical progressions that allow the whole stroke to be developed. Children learn the safety skills they need by learning to swim correctly. We work on developing real swimming strokes, as opposed to developing a false sense of security derived by underwater swimming and dog paddling that ultimately may interfere with learning real swimming. When children learn to swim right the first time they learn to swim for life! We offer classes Monday - Friday afternoons between 3:30 and 6:30 pm and Saturday mornings between 9 am and 12:45. There are also classes during the school day Monday - Thursdays. Long Island Swim School is now an official Make a Splash Local Partner - an initiative of USA Swimming!! Long Island Swim School 516-378-8467

Mathnasium Flexible Summer Memberships (2nd - 12th grades). This program is a fantastic way for your child to catch up or get ahead in math throughout the summer. Based on an initial assessment, we create a customized learning plan that our students will work through when they come in for their Mathnasium sessions. We can also provide support with summer packets from school that need to be completed before the beginning of the new school year. You can choose a 10 or 16 hour package and schedule sessions from June 15th to September 1st. We always encourage consistent twice/week attendance whenever possible. Mathnasium 414 Central Avenue Cedarhurst - 569-1500 381 Sunrise Highway Lynbrook - 881-7997

New York Hall of Science

Community Nursery School of Baldwin

The New York Hall of Science features over 450 interactive exhibits and play spaces; including the award-winning Science Playground, Preschool Place, and Rocket Park Mini Golf. A visit to NYSCI is a handson, energetic educational experience where you can indulge your curiosity and nurture your creativity. Don’t miss all-new exhibit Design Zone, opening May 25, for a limited time only. For directions and more information, visit www.nysci.org or call 718-699-0005. New York Hall of Science - 718-699-0005

The goal of our program is to instill a love of learning in a non-competitive, hands-on setting. Children develop confidence and self-esteem while building a strong foundation for future learning. Reading, science & math readiness, art, music, drama, sign language, indoor & outdoor play, plus yoga, soccer and library time are integrated in a safe and nurturing environment. All of our teachers are totally committed to giving your child the personal attention and guidance he will need to learn as he relates to the world around him. Come to Community where learning is fun and fun is learning!. Community Nursery Of Baldwin 516-868-8406

Conveniently located in the heart of Rockville Centre, Rockville Racquet is a fully air conditioned facility with 7 courts, a pro-shop, locker rooms and a nursery that is available from 9-3, Monday-Friday. The club offers a junior development program, 10 and under tennis and adult learning leagues for all levels. There are men and women's leagues, seasonal court time and there is never a membership fee. Rockville Racquet Club - 516-764-5350 www.rockvilleracquet.net

Rockville Racquet Club

New York Institute of Technology

Sportset Heath & Fitness Club

B15 Studios

Sportset Kids is offering a 10-week Summer Sports Program for children ages 3-9. The program is hosted on our air conditioned, 5000 sq ft turf field located in the Sportset complex. The program runs Monday-Friday from 9 am-12 pm. The children will learn and play sports in a fun atmosphere. Peanut free snacks will be provided. Coach Erick Kacharaba and staff would like to see your child/children come to The Field this summer for a good time! Sportset Heath & Fitness Club 516-536-8700, 516-536-8743

B15 Studios, a 32-camera motion capture animation studio, in conjunction with the New York Institute of Technology, is offering a series of one-week videogame production workshops. This program will be held at NYIT’s Old Westbury campus during the summer of 2013. The workshops utilize industry-leading motion capture technology, which is used in movies, videogames, and scientific research. High school students with an interest in animation, visual effects for movies, television, commercials, pre-visualization, and videogames will gain insight into this industry. The program is taught by industry professionals who have worked at Disney, Acclaim Entertainment, and NASA. For more information…b15studios.com/summer_camp.html New York Institute of Technology B 15 Studios - 516 -686-1227

Oceanside Jewish Center Nursery School Baby & Me, Tots, Threes, Pre-K OJC offers a positive, safe, nurturing and non-pressured child centered environment. Our experienced professional staff provides a dynamic curriculum, encouraging inquiry, exploration and discovery in all aspects of growth and development. Our classes are small and structured and each age group will receive the tools they need to succeed. Our enhanced Pre-K program will prepare students to be Kindergarten ready. We celebrate all Jewish holidays and welcome Shabbat on Fridays. Enrichment classes are Music, Art, Yoga, Baking, Computers, and Torah study with Rabbi. Please inquire about our Summer Camp programs. Oceanside Jewish Center Nursery School Baby & Me,Tots,Threes,Pre-K 516-764-4213

Skudin Surf Skudin Surf brings the sport of surfing to adults and children ages 5 and up and all abilities in a fun, positive and safe environment. All instructors at Skudin Surf are CPR, First Aid, and Lifeguard certified and their school is Accredited by the National Surf Schools and Instructors Association. We offer a range of private instruction, group lessons, camps, stand up paddle, corporate events, and birthday parties for adults and children in the seaside town of Long Beach, Long Island and Rockaway Beach 67th Street. All lessons are available 7 days a week and surf camps run Monday through Friday starting at the end of June through August offering full week (5 days) and half weeks (3 days) surf camps between the hours of 9am 1pm. The Skudin family has been teaching surfing for over 30 years. Today both Skudin brothers, Cliff and Will, who are internationally ranked Big Wave World Tour competitors, run the surf schools. Skudin Surf - 516-318-3993 Skudinsurf.com

St. Mark’s Cooperative Nursery School St. Mark's Cooperative Nursery School, located in Rockville Centre, New York, is a non-profit organization owned and operated by its members - the parents. The school is registered with the New York State Department of Education. Our nursery school is special because we are a "cooperative." Our school is run by the families whose children attend classes. A Cooperative Nursery school represents the joint effort of parents and educators to provide young children with the best possible experiences for growth and development. There are many programs offered for 2,3,4 and 5 year olds as well as extended day enrichment opportunities and a summer camp program. St. Mark’s Cooperative Nursery School 516-536-6295

Temple Am Echad South Shore Reform Congregation Temple Am Echad provides a nurturing and loving environment as well as a well rounded early childhood education. The curriculum involves a basic exposure to Jewish culture and holidays. Temple Am Echad offers a variety of programs, including the toddler center for children one to two and a half years old, and a nursery school for three and four year-olds. A half day summer camp program is available for ages one to four. Programs include water play, arts and crafts, music, outdoor playground. Each week has a different theme, such as circus or cooking. Our gym is air conditioned and our qualified teachers are our counselors. Temple Am Echad Rabbi Stuart M. Geller / Early Childhood Center 516-599-7950

The Madison Theatre Summer Camp

Come join us for our Summer Music Intensive Programs! With three exciting Programs, we will stimulate and excite your creativity and talent! PreProfessional Summer Music Intensive, students will study a variety of musical forms for orchestra including classical, chamber, music for dance, Broadway, and movie scores. Musical Theatre Intensive explores performance techniques to help you communicate with the audience, learn audition techniques, and how to get a deeper connection with the material. Featuring workshops with Broadway performers and choreographers! Film Production Camp, Students learn and develop film techniques and produce their own short film that premiers at the Madison Theatre. The Madison Theatre Summer Camp 516-678-5000 ext. 7713


Helping children deal with separation anxiety By Anne Marie Albano, Ph.D.

CAMP & SCHOOL DIRECTORY Tutor Time of Baldwin

Waldorf School of Garden City

Tutor Time of Baldwin, a state licensed childcare program, is housed in a state-of-the-art facility. The center has indoor and outdoor playgrounds. The CPR certified staff provides a caring and stimulating environment throughout the year. We offer three distinct camp programs. Our Cub Camp provides children 18 months to 3 years with a wide variety of hands-on thematic based experiences. Petting zoos, pony rides, magicians, puppet shows and other enrichment activities add to the fun. Our Mini-Travel Camp provides our pre-kindergarten students with weekly trips in addition to the basic Cub Camp program. Our Adventure Travel Camp is available for 2,4, 6, 8, or 10 week sessions for children 6-12 years old. Campers in this program go on different exciting trips each day, including Atlantis Marine World, Circle Line Cruises, Deep Sea Fishing, and The Air and Space Museum, to name a few. Several enrichment programs are also offered, including foreign language instruction, gymnastics and piano lessons. Full and part time programs are available. Tutor Time is open 12 months, 6:30 a.m.6:30 p.m. Tutor Time of Baldwin - 516-377-3337

Celebrating its 65th year, The Waldorf School of Garden City is an independent, coeducational, college-preparatory day school for students age three through twelfth grade. We are dedicated to providing a rigorous, liberal arts education that focuses on the development of the whole human being. Emphasis is placed on a multidisciplinary approach to learning through a curriculum that balances the physical, artistic, social and intellectual needs of our students. Our nurturing environment and diverse community enable our students to excel as educated and compassionate individuals whose lives are enriched by their lifelong passion for learning. The program includes: 12 year sustainable living curriculum, natural toys, on-site vegetable gardens, extended 240 acre farm campus in New Hampshire, organic homemade lunch, hands-on and project-based learning, fiber arts, woodworking, visual arts, movement, dramatic arts, music, college preparatory curriculum. Waldorf School of Garden City 516-742-3434 www.waldorfgarden.org

Twin Oaks Country Day School & Camp Twin Oaks, at 459 Babylon Turnpike, in Freeport, has been a leader in camping for all ages for over 35 years. From tots to teens, we offer progressive programming including sports, crafts, swimming, drama and a full summer of special events, which are sure to make each child cheer with excitement. As our campers grow, so does their program. From our youngest “Barney” campers to our “Gemini” Adventure and Gemini Teen travelers, Twin Oaks is the perfect place for your child to spend the summer. Enroll early for fantastic savings. For more information, call 516-6234550 or visit www.twinoaksdaycamp.com. Twin Oaks Country Day School & Camp 516-623-4550 twinoaksdaycamp.com

Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts Usdan is the nation’s preeminent nonprofit arts day camp. TimeOutNY/Kids declared Usdan a “Best Of” camp, and Usdan has been profiled in The New York Times and Time Magazine. Each day, 1,600 students, ages 6 -18, travel to Usdan’s Wheatley Heights campus from all LI neighborhoods. Usdan offers 40 programs in Music, Art, Theater, Dance, Writing, Chess, and Nature and Organic Gardening. Usdan is chartered by the NY State Regents. Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts 631-643-7900 www.usdan.com

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hy does my child become anxious about sleepovers or going to camp?

Anxiety is a normal feeling for children about to start sleepovers or leave for camp, whether it will be the first time or even if they have done these things several times before. This uneasiness or apprehension can occur for many reasons. For the majority of children, it is a mingling of excitement and a little fear of the unknown. These children usually are easily reassured and attend a sleepover or enter camp with minimal upset. For other children, the “fear factor” is larger than the excitement, and tends to take on a life of its own. In this situation, the child could be questioning everything about the upcoming separation experience: “What if I get sick?” What if no one likes me?” “What if the (other parents) counselors are mean?” “What if something happens to you (Mom and Dad) while I’m gone?” What does it feel like? Some children experience physical symptoms when anxious including butterflies, cold or clammy hands, headaches, nausea, being hot or cold, or feeling faint. Others report feeling like they want to cry and hide. The thoughts that accompany anxiety tend to center around what can go wrong, which leads the child to worry more and potentially feel more physical symptoms. What can a parent do? Consider these practical first steps. Allow your child to express his or her concerns, and answer the “What if” questions in a calm, coping-focused manner: “This is your friend who wants you to sleepover. You like each other.”“You’ve made friends at school, so I’m sure the camp will help with meeting friends while there.” “The counselors are chosen because of their good work with kids.” “The camp people work with hundreds of kids each year. They know exactly what to do and also how to get in touch with us if you need us.” Make sure your child is informed about

the camp and its activities. Focus your child on the camp activities he or she enjoys, such as swimming or baseball. Attend any sessions with your child offered by the camp, prior to start of the session. Engage your child in the fun aspects of preparing for camp such as shopping for new clothes and picking out camp gear. Make appropriate communication easy on your child. Pack pre-addressed, stamped envelopes for your child to mail letters to you and others, such as grandparents and friends. Help your child rehearse. Children can practice being away from home by sleeping over at the homes of friends and relatives. What should parents avoid doing? Avoid giving excessive reassurance, such as repeatedly saying, “You’ll be fine!” Too much reassurance causes anxious children to seek to discredit the parent’s opinion. Avoid telling your child exactly what to do. It is more useful to ask your child to come up with a realistic plan for how to meet new friends and find fun activities. Successful completion of the plan enhances the child’s feeling of control and accomplishment, and this will decrease anxiety. Don’t ignore the problem by hoping it will go away by itself. What to should parents do if a child is homesick? Let the counselors know prior to the beginning of camp that your child is anxious about being away from home and may become homesick. Set an expectation for phone calls, that they will be focused on the ways your child is trying to cope and have fun at camp, and not focused on crying and begging to come home. Anne Marie Albano, Ph.D. is Recanati Family Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU.

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

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=FLIFE<$N<<BGIF;L:K@FENFIBJ?FGJ8M8@C89C< DFE;8P#ALCP(,$=I@;8P#8L>LJK0#)'(* Are you a high school student with an interest in animation? Are you interested in the production of visual effects for movies and video games?

Come explore a fun and exciting career path in the one-week Motion Capture and Animation Course at B15 Studios, located on NYIT’s Old Westbury campus. • Direct scenes where motion will be captured on 32 high-speed near-infrared cameras • Edit and alter these movements in 3-D programs such as Maya and use them in video game programs such as Unity • Create and keep your own video-game level • Taught by industry professionals who have worked with companies such as Disney, Acclaim Entertainment and NASA

DFK@FE:8GKLI<sK<:?EFCF>PsM@;<F>8D<J Tuition and Fees: $550 (lunch+$35 per week) Session 3: Monday, July 29 - Friday Aug. 2 Session 4: Monday, August 5 - Friday Aug. 9

For more information, contact Professor Peter Voci at 516.686.1227, or at pvoci@nyit.edu. Also visit b15studios.com/summer_camp

nyit.edu



Time: 9a.m. - 1p.m. Location: Midge Karr Fine Arts Center, Old Westbury, NY 11568 [Transportation is available]

"Summer camp is more than a vacation for children," says Bruce Muchnick, Ed.D., a licensed psychologist who works extensively with day and resident camps. "As a parent, there are a few things to consider to increase the opportunity for a rewarding camp experience for your child." Some helpful suggestions provided by Dr. Muchnick and the American Camping Association include: Consider camp as a learning experience. This is an opportunity for your child to explore a world bigger than his/her neighborhood and a chance for you and your child to practice "letting go." Letting go allows children to develop autonomy and a stronger sense of self, make new friends, develop new social skills, learn about teamwork, be creative, and more. This time also allows parents an opportunity to take care of themselves so that they will feel refreshed when their child returns home. Prepare for camp together. Decisions about camp - like where to go and what to pack - should be a joint venture, keeping in mind your child's maturity. If your child feels a part of the decisionmaking process, his/her chances of having a positive experience will improve. Talk about concerns. As the first day of camp nears, some children experience uneasiness about going away. Encourage your child to talk about

these feelings rather than acting on what you think his/her feelings may be. Communicate confidence in your child's ability to handle being away from home. Have realistic expectations. Camp, like the rest of life, has high and low points. Not every moment will be filled with wonder and excitement. Encourage your child to have a reasonable and realistic view of camp. Discuss both the ups and downs your child may experience. Your child should not feel pressured to succeed at camp, either. The main purposes of camp are to relax and have fun.

3 LOOK WHAT WE ARE ALL ABOUT!

OPEN HOUSE MAY 5, 11,19 11-3 BARNEYS & TOOTSIES: 20-30 months

624274

Session 1: Monday, July 15 - Friday, July 19 Session 2: Monday, July 22 - Friday, July 26

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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

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he New York Hall of Science has come along since the 1964 World’s Fair. From its beginnings as one of the iconic World’s Fair pavilions, the New York Hall of Science has evolved into the region’s premiere hands-on science and technology center.

Since 1986, NYSCI has served over seven million children, parents and teachers, carrying on its mission to convey the excitement and understanding of science and technology to everyone by galvanizing their curiosity and offering them creative, participatory ways to learn. Summer is a particularly exciting time to visit NYSCI. Its new exhibit, “Design Zone,” opens May 25, and runs through. Sept. 1. The interactive exhibit involves three areas, at which visitors can learn how videogame developers, music producers, roller coaster designers and other creative problem solvers use math and science to meet their design challenges. Music – Hear It! examines math in the music while you explore relationships between length and pitch in musical instruments, ratios and rhythms, and visual representations of sound. Exhibits include: Drum Machine. Be a DJ and pick the sounds and the number of repeats for a two-beat track, a three-beat track, and a four-beat track. Then see if you can get all tracks to end on the same beat. Music Mix. Try out your music production skills by putting together music samples. Pick your best song and email it to your friends. Turntables. Practice your DJ skills on simulated turntables. Sound Graph. Talk, sing or whistle into a microphone and

Keep young minds active this summer with a visit to the New York Hall of Science.

see the sound displayed on a real-time graph of pitch over time. Whack-a-Phone. Hit tubes of different lengths to make music.

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

MORE THAN JUST PLAY AT THE NEW YORK HALL OF SCIENCE

Slide-a-Phone. While a friend beats on the S9 drumhead, slide the tube to play different notes. Digital Strings. Adjust the lengths of eight virtual strings and then hear your musical pattern. In the second area, Art – See It!, find out how visual designers use scale, pattern, coordinate grids, equality and slope to turn ideas into reality. See the math behind visual creativity as you design your own 2-D and 3-D art. Exhibits include: Mirror Multiplier. Explore reflectional symmetry using colorful geometric pieces and a hinged pair of mirros. Picture Calculator. Take a picture of yourself and manipulate the values of the pixels to transform your photo. Then, in Action – Move It!, discover the math and physics behind anything that moves. Build a custom digital roller coaster, design your own skate park, and race your bike to the finish line. Exhibits include: Roller Coaster Hills. Roll a ball down a ramp from a certain height and find out how far it flies off the end of the ramp. Fast Tracks. Assemble your track to create and test your own roller coaster course using a giant magnet wall. Design a Roller Coaster. Design and test virtual roller coaster tracks in this computer graphing simulation. Bike Race. Choose from three bike stations – two recumbent bicycles or a hand crank bike – and experience a full-body bike race. NYSCI is located in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens. For more information, visit www.nysci.org.

Time to think about

summer camp! Open House

For information please call:

516.742.3434 ext. 327 225 Cambridge Avenue, Garden City, NY 11530 www.waldorfgarden.org

Camp in session:

Monday, July 1 through Friday, August 9 . 3-13 .Ages Enrollment .Flexible Program for 14 – 16 year olds .CIT Optional aftercare to 6:00 p.m.

625060

Saturday, May 11th 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.


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A guide to a successful summer May 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

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ver 10 million children go to summer camp each year. For most, it's a fun and rewarding experience full of challenges and excitement. In addition to physical and athletic activities, kids learn about independence, cooperation, competition and teamwork. They also learn that they can survive away from home. For many children, summer camp is also a time of significant emotional growth, development and transition. Parents often note that their children come home seeming older or more mature than before they left. Although most children are excited about going to summer camp, for some, it can be a scary or anxiety provoking experience. In general, parents should not push or force kids to go to camp if they feel frightened or uncomfortable. The following tips are designed to help parents prepare their kids for summer camp and deal with issues that may arise: Choose a camp that is suited to your child's personality, temperament and interests. If your child likes music, art or horseback riding, it makes sense to pick a camp with strengths in that area. At the same time, there is nothing wrong with encouraging kids to try new things or to have a variety of experiences. In general, it is best not to force kids to do things at camp that they really dislike or simply cannot do. Repeated negative experiences can have a

significant effect on a child's self-esteem. Involve your child in choosing the camp. Review brochures, videos and websites together. Ask for the names of other families you and your child can talk to about the camp. Don't push kids to go to camp at too early an age. The "right" age will vary from child to child. Some kids are "ready" for "sleep away" camp at five or six, while others would not even consider the idea at 14 or 15. If a child doesn't seem ready for a full summer away, consider a camp which has one-month sessions. It may be an easier transition and a more positive experience. If your child is shy, consider a camp where they know and like at least one other person their own age. Having one friend makes it easier to meet other kids. If you choose a camp that is driving distance, consider an off-season visit to help familiarize your child with the setting. It's not unlike visiting a new school with your child. Encourage kids to bring favorite toys, books, music or other reminders of home such as photos or even favorite foods, if allowed by the camp. If kids have issues or problems with other campers, encourage them to try to work things out themselves before intervening. Suggest that they ask a counselor or the camp director for help or suggescontinued on page S11

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Enrichment classes in all of our programs: Computers â&#x20AC;˘ Library & Librarian â&#x20AC;˘ Music & Movement Art â&#x20AC;˘ Yoga â&#x20AC;˘ Baking â&#x20AC;˘ Three Outdoor Playgrounds Indoor Tumbling Room

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For more information, please contact: Norma Harwood- Early Childhood Director nursery@oceansidejewishcenter.org





STARTS JUNE 24TH

80 N. Centre Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Rockville Centre rockvilleracquetclub@gmail.com

624946

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JUNIOR CAMP

Early Child Programs: â&#x20AC;˘ Baby & Me â&#x20AC;˘ Toddler Program  â&#x20AC;˘ Three Year Old Program â&#x20AC;˘ Pre-K Program


S11

A guide to a successful summer

from summer camp. Plan times for them to get together with kids who live nearby. For friends who live at a distance, letters, phone calls and e-mail can help them maintain contact during the school year.

Helping to Navigate the Road to College &2035(+(16,9(&2//(*(3/$11,1* &2816(/,1* 6833257 Ă?&ROOHJH0DWFKLQJ Ă?$GPLVVLRQ6WUDWHJLHV Ă?$SSOLFDWLRQ(QKDQFHPHQW Ă?(VVD\'HYHORSPHQW Ă?6FKRODUVKLSDQG )LQDQFLDO$LG6RXUFLQJ

Morning Sessions/ Afternoon Sessions Available for 3 & 4 yr. Olds 623631

516-345-8766

www.collegeconnect.info 6XFFHVV:LWKRXW6WUHVV)UHH7HOHSKRQH&RQVXOWDWLRQ

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â&#x20AC;˘ 18 months - 7 years old â&#x20AC;˘ Toddler Program: 18 mo. - 4 years old â&#x20AC;˘ Trips to local pool and parks for 4 - 7 year olds â&#x20AC;˘ Extended Hours

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3161 Royal Ave. Oceanside (516) 766-5699 Country Day School & Camp BrightStarSchoolAndCamp.com

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Each Child Experiences: Art â&#x20AC;˘ Music â&#x20AC;˘ Drama â&#x20AC;˘ Yoga Language Arts â&#x20AC;˘ Math & Science Indoor & Outdoor Play Areas Storytelling â&#x20AC;˘ Sand & Water Play Blocks â&#x20AC;˘ Cooking & Dramatic Play Sign Language

Toddler Time: Separation Program 7911)68,)1)*6-)2(7 for youngsters who will turn 2 yrs. by Dec. 1st -2 %6392(;%8)6 Starting June 24th 624838

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Dr. Fassler is a board certified child and adolescent psychiatrist.

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College Connection

Customized Plans for Every Student and Every Budget

Most kids enjoy camp. They often look forward to returning year after year. However, careful camp selection, preparation and planning can increase the likelihood of a positive experience.

Tuesday & Thursday Morning Sessions

717 St. Lukes Place, Baldwin â&#x20AC;˘ (516) 868-8406 www.cnsofBaldwin.com

625227

tions. Remember, part of camp is about learning how to deal with new people and different situations. Don't be surprised if your child gets "homesick". It's a normal reaction to being away from family and friends, especially for the first time. Don't criticize a child who feels homesick at camp. Telling them to "buck up" can sometimes make them feel worse. Instead, be supportive, reassuring and consistent. Tell them you understand that it's hard to be away from home, and that you miss them, too. Try to focus on intermittent goals, like Visiting Day or special camp events. Regular, scheduled and predictable phone contact may also be helpful. For most kids, episodes of homesickness pass within a few days. If homesickness persists or seems severe, or if your child seems truly unhappy, talk to the camp director. Is your child having a particular problem with another child or a counselor? Is there an activity or expectation that is causing difficulties? Are they being pushed to do things beyond their level or capacity, like long distance swimming or extended hikes? Or is it just the wrong setting for your child? In the end, trust your instincts. If you are convinced it's just not working out, do not be afraid to let your child come home. It's not the end of the world for you or for your child, and it's better than being truly miserable or unhappy for an entire summer. Help children keep in touch with friends

May 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

continued from page S10


PRE-PROFESSIONAL SUMMER MUSIC

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MUSICAL THEATRE

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is to train our students to become first-class performing artists. We help cultivate talents in a wide range of orchestral and musical disciples to better prepare attendees for a versatile professional career. Pre-Professional Summer Music Intensive July 8th â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 4th $1500 Musical Theatre Intensive July 8th â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 3rd $1250

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625235

Molloy College Madison Theatre 1000 Hempstead Ave Rockville Centre, NY 11571 www.madisontheatreny.org 624350

DATES: JUNE 24th - AUGUST 26th AGES: 3-9 YRS (AGE APPROPRIATE SPLIT) TIME: 9:00-12:00pm DAY RATES: 10 days $36 per day All different sports and activities! 11-15 days - $34 per day Peanut free snacks and 16-20 days - $32 per day beverages will be provided. 21-25 days - $30 per day 26-30 days - $28 per day FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE 31-35 days - $26 per day Pick days and weeks you want! 36-40 days - $24 per day 41-50 days - $22 per day 50% deposit to reserve your spot today. Ongoing registration throughout the summer.

P l e a s e v i s i t t h e F i e l d â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s w e b s i t e t o r e g i s t e r o r c a l l 5 1 6 - 5 3 6 - 8 4 5 1

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May 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

S12


May 2, 2013

Away from home

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Summer adventures Options to keep everyone happy and productive

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Kids & the arts Nurturing their talents

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Is your child ready for sleepaway camp?


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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

Help your child thrive at camp

II 625404

t is important to prepare your child for a camp experience, whether it is for a one-week sleep-away camp close to home or a four-week camp out-of-state.

M@;<F>8D<GIF;L:K@FE N@K?DFK@FE:8GKLI< =FLIFE<$N<<BGIF;L:K@FENFIBJ?FGJ8M8@C89C< DFE;8P#ALCP(,$=I@;8P#8L>LJK0#)'(* Are you a high school student with an interest in animation? Are you interested in the production of visual effects for movies and video games?

Come explore a fun and exciting career path in the one-week Motion Capture and Animation Course at B15 Studios, located on NYIT’s Old Westbury campus. • Direct scenes where motion will be captured on 32 high-speed near-infrared cameras • Edit and alter these movements in 3-D programs such as Maya and use them in video game programs such as Unity • Create and keep your own video-game level • Taught by industry professionals who have worked with companies such as Disney, Acclaim Entertainment and NASA

DFK@FE:8GKLI<sK<:?EFCF>PsM@;<F>8D<J Tuition and Fees: $550 (lunch+$35 per week) Session 1: Monday, July 15 - Friday, July 19 Session 2: Monday, July 22 - Friday, July 26

Session 3: Monday, July 29 - Friday Aug. 2 Session 4: Monday, August 5 - Friday Aug. 9

For more information, contact Professor Peter Voci at 516.686.1227, or at pvoci@nyit.edu. Also visit b15studios.com/summer_camp

nyit.edu



Time: 9a.m. - 1p.m. Location: Midge Karr Fine Arts Center, Old Westbury, NY 11568 [Transportation is available]

Here are some guidelines to help you and your child make the most of their camp stay. 1 Visit the camp, if at all possible, and meet the camp director. Talk to other families who have gone 2 to the camp in years past to familiarize yourself with what goes on. 3 Have your child spend a weekend with a friend. No phone calls. Talk about it with your child afterwards. How did your child feel the second night? 3 Go over the daily schedule with your child so there are no surprises. Learn as much as you can about camp life. Teach your child how to care for him/ 4 herself. Children need to know how to select appropriate clothing, make a bed with clean sheets, put clothes away, set a table, carry out chores, handle laundry, etc. 5 Problem solve with your child by using "what if" situations to prepare for unexpected events. What if you lose your baseball glove? What if you don't get along with another child? What if you don't feel well? Let your child brainstorm for solutions and make sure they know the "chain of command" at camp for handling problems. 6 Familiarize your child with the outdoors. Many children are unfamiliar with total darkness and country night sounds. Practice walking in the dark with a flashlight.

Publishers CLIFFORD RICHNER STUART RICHNER Executive Editor JOHN C. O’CONNELL Section Editor KAREN BLOOM

Editorial Designer JEFFREY A. NEGRIN Vice President of Sales RHONDA GLICKMAN Account Executives AUDREY COHEN SUSANNE COLTEN ROBERT CUMMINGS

7 Homesickness is fairly common.

Missing home, parents, pets or friends is pretty normal. It is part of growing up and leaving home. Speak openly about it and your child will experience these feelings with less anxiety and more understanding. Camp staff is trained to help your child through these ups and downs. Discuss communication at camp. Does 8 your camp allow phone calls? Letters or postcards are best although now camps have fax and email. Give your child stamped envelopes and postcards already addressed. Practice letter writing. The more your child writes to others, the more mail he/she will receive! Communicate with camp officials. Let 9 them know if there are special circumstances or considerations regarding your child's well being or behavior. Send letters to your child before camp begins so mail is waiting when he/she arrives. Write daily keeping it simple. Send the sports or comics from the local newspaper, a cute card, a package with a word game, etc. Prepare yourself for your child going 10 off to camp. You have chosen the best camp for your child and he/she will have a wonderful summer full of fun, new friends, new songs and many exciting experiences.

JANE FAIELLA NANCY FRIEDMAN ELLEN FRISCH JILL KAPLAN ALYSSA KUSSIN JOAN KURKOMELIS ROBIN REINER KAREN RESNICK

Parenting is an advertising supplement to the HERALD Community Newspapers. Copyright © 2013 Richner Communications, Inc. Published by Richner Communications, Inc. 2 Endo Blvd., Garden City, NY 11530 (516) 569-4000 • www.liherald.com

Cover Design JEFFREY A. NEGRIN


C C

hoosing a summer camp program for your child involves some important research. Because the camp experience will have significant impact on your child's life, it’s important for parents to learn to choose a camp wisely.

Some parents may send a child to a camp they attended without considering how the camp may have changed or the differences between the parent's and the child's needs and desires. In other cases, children go to a camp that a friend has enjoyed, assuming they will enjoy it too. All too often, this assumption proves wrong. What do you and your child want? Regardless of the age of your child, it is important that the ultimate selection of a camp accommodate all or some of the needs, interests, goals, and expectations of both parent and child. The parent must make an effort to understand what the child wants and why. A good way to begin is to sit down as a family and respond to the following questions: What do you and your child want to gain from the camp experience ? Learn new skills, develop more self confidence, improving proficiency in certain areas, become more independent? What are other expectations of the camp experience? What are the special interests that your child wants to explore? Are there any physical, intellectual, or social limitations that should be considered? What kind of emphasis will your child profit from the most? For example: Is a lot of structure desirable, is social interaction with members of the opposite sex important, or does your child need a place where he or she is encouraged to develop at their own pace? Sleepaway camps provide a summer residential program where campers enjoy daily and evening activities. Depending on the type of program chosen, a camp experience can range anywhere from one week to an entire summer. In considering sleepaway camp, parents should keep a few questions in mind: Is your child ready for a sleepaway experience? What is expected from the camp experience? What type of camp fits best with parent work schedules and family vacation times? What are the total costs of sleepaway camp? Take a moment to consider the type of camp that makes the most sense for your child and try to develop your reasons for those preferences. If your child is interested in camp, but you are not sure she is ready for nights away from home, a day camp is a great option. There are many camps nearby that offer families a wide range of activities to keep youngsters productively occupied throughout the summer, including those offered through your school district, recreation center and pre-schools, or consider what your child’s afterschool program has going on during the summer. Size Camps may vary in size from under 100 campers to more than 400. Smaller camps may foster a very special environment where campers and staff really get to know each other, and where individual needs can be quickly met. Large camps are often organized into small units thus making it possible to receive the same kind of attention offered by a smaller camp. This is a complex issue that will require special attention and investigation. In a good camp there may be little correlation between size and the quality of the total camp experience.

TOP 10 REASONS to send your child to sleepaway camp

By The Camp Connection

10 Disney was not joking. Michael D. Eisner, former CEO of Disney, shares that “camp is a guide to growing up, learning to rely on yourself as you work as a team, developing tools for leadership, competing to win but finding pride and growth in defeat.” That’s not Mickey Mouse stuff!

If you feel your child requires special attention in an area such as confidence building, it is probably more important to find out how a camp meets that need rather than getting hung up on size. Location Many parents limit their search for a camp by looking in one state or by choosing an arbitrary distance from home. More important than distance, according to camp advisors, are the related questions involving camp environment, security, medical facilities, and accessibility. In choosing a location you might also want to consider the cost for you to visit the camp, and the proximity to camps your other children are attending during the summer. Keep in mind that there are excellent camps in many states, and that if your child is having a good experience, distance will not make a great deal of difference. Programs and activities Today’s camps have all kinds of program offerings. Some camps may emphasize one activity while others will offer a wide array of programs. In specialty camps, staff and facilities are geared to provide an intensive experience in a single area such as tennis, horseback riding, gymnastics, sailing or wilderness. Naturally, these camps have other facilities and activities that provide campers with additional experiences. A more traditional camp program tends to be broader in terms of what it offers. Most general camps will provide programs in some team sports such as baseball and soccer, individual sports like tennis, and waterfront activities such as swimming and sailing, as well as some outdoor life options in hiking and canoeing. In making a decision about camp, it is vital that you and your child look into the total camp program and that you examine the quality of the staff and facilities available to support that program. Narrowing your selection At this stage of the decision process, your central task is to identify those camps which appear promising in terms of meeting your specifications. Perhaps you know other parents who send their children to camp. Get some camp names from them. Also, your child probably has friends who go to camp; you can pursue this source as well. Once you have developed a list of possibilities the most difficult task remains. That is, how do you compare camps so that you can narrow the possibilities to the one which makes the most sense for you and your child? The best way to proceed with your comparison and to narrow your choices is to take a careful look at some of the promising camps you have identified. Review the brochures and videos with your child. Then you can choose the ones you're most interested in and arrange to speak or meet with the camp directors or representatives. Involve your child in the selection process. Review your child's preferences and let you child ask questions too.

9 Me, myself and I. Sleepaway camp is the one place a child can make decisions and problem solve in a safe, caring environment without parents or teachers. At camp, children learn to manage conflict and different personalities. Campers come home with increased confidence and greater sense of independence. 8 All in the family. While joining together in cleaning their bunk, painting scenery, creating a skit and playing in tournaments, campers become part of a new team of friends and counselors (from all over the country and world) who become a family reuniting year after year.

7 A camp for every child. Each child is unique. Some sparkle when playing soccer or performing on stage while others yearn to be the next Best Baker. There is a camp for each child to explore various interests.

6 The best part of the day. Sleeping next to their best buddies, campers spend “flashlight time” sharing the day’s accomplishments, funniest moments and stories. Late night talks become one of the most bonding moments of camp. 5 Bragging rights. Sleepaway camp exposes children to activities that are new and unique. Camp is a motivating place for children to grow and succeed – whether it’s getting up on water-skis for the first time, cheering a Color War song or writing for the camp newsletter. When a child goes to camp, he/she will always have something grand to tell you about. 4 Hands are not just for texting and typing. At camp, children will rest their fingers from cell phones and computer keyboards. Camper’s fingers return to no-tech activities such as writing letters, whittling a wood bench and weaving a potholder. 3 Camp is not just for the camper. While their children are having fun-filled, action packed days away, parents get a reprieve from the fast paced daily routines of packing lunches, carpooling and laundry. Sending a child away for a few weeks allows couples to renew, rediscover and recharge their relationship.

2 What they enjoy. Without the pressure of homework and tests, campers discover what activities – NOT SUBJECTS – they enjoy and have fun doing. No one grades fun!

1 Winter, spring, summer and fall. Ask anyone who went away to camp. Camp friends are year-round, life-long friends. Camp creates memories that last a lifetime. Courtesy of Laurel and Norm Barrie, Melissa Barrie Cohen. For more information, visit www.thecampconnection.com or contact camp4u@thecampconnection.com

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

READY FOR CAMP Making a wise choice

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ESTABLISHED 1972

A parent’s investment in joy

DAY SCHOOL & CAMP • • • • • •

By Dale Lewis

A A

SWIMMING ARTS & CRAFTS DANCE • MUSIC GYMNASTICS SOCCER ENTERTAINMENT AND TRIPS

s Director of Long Island’s Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts, I have the privilege of working with 1,500 arts majors every day.

8 Wk. • 6 Wk. • 4 Wk. Sessions

Celebrating

41

Transportation and extended hours available

YEARS

CAMP: JULY 1ST - AUGUST 23RD www.alphabetlanddayschool.com

1775 Newbridge Road North Bellmore

516-826-9339

AGES: 6 weeks12 years

Brookside School 1260 Meadowbrook Rd. North Merrick

516-867-7484

623493

TWO LOCATIONS:

Licensed by NYS & Dept. of Health

Guided by a faculty of leading professionals, our students struggle with creative ideas, master artistic techniques, and build works of art one skill at a time. At Usdan, the happy result is seen on the faces of children boarding their buses following a fulfilling summer’s day of “work.” Theirs are smiles of achievement, the result of numerous moments of trial and triumph. We don’t guarantee that children will cross the finish line. We guarantee that they will learn, grow, and have fun approaching it. The joy, after all, is in the journey. Studies linking childhood study in the arts to lifetime skill in virtually every other pursuit have become ubiquitous, so much so that they have come to trivialize an important conversation for parents. These studies cite the arts as having a pivotal role in the development of 21st century skills, critical thinking, the experience of working sequentially toward a goal, and improvement in a child’s academic achievement. However, there is more. Children who immerse themselves in the arts experience something more important than better

Specialty camps are growing in popularity as a summer option for families. Usdan’s 200-acre woodland campus in Wheatley Heights attracts over 1,600 kids ages 6-18 to its varied arts programs – over 40 in all.

grades. They experience joy. Children acquire knowledge over time, gradually building skills and assembling continued on page S5

TENDER TALES of East Meadow

123 Merrick Ave

Near Hempstead Tpke and Meadowbrook Parkway

NURSERY SCHOOL & SUMMER CAMP Our Camp offers a happy, creative environment featuring singing, playing, cooking, rhythm and motion. Specials, plus more fun.... Fully Air-Conditioned, with bathrooms in classrooms, New Fenced outside playing area.

516-661-8451

tendertalesnurseryschool@yahoo.com

Celebrating Our 58th 9 Year!

624908

Affordable priced • Offering all pre-school age groups Two to Six week program A place where children learn, play, and grow together.... For More Information and a tour of our warm, happy environment MissyC470@aol.com

Classes are held at our NEW Olympic size pool

750F Stewart Ave. Garden City (Behind Ethan Allan)

OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE Saturday, SUN., MAY 5TH March 17th March 31st SAT., MAY 18TH April 21st 12 -- 2:00 PM 12 2:00 PM

Basketball • Handball • Baseball • Hockey • Lacrosse • Fencing • Rock Climbing • Archery • Horseback Riding • Woodworking • Rocketry • Dance • Science • Gymnastics • Night Activities • Theme Parties • LI Ducks • Swim Instruction • Fishing • Water Slide • Hot Lunch • Ice Cream • Transportation • & A LOT MORE FUN, FUN, FUN!! 622708

233269N0314

Long Island Swim School is the teaching arm of the Long Island Aquatic Club, a USA Swimming National Program of Excellence. 

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

ALPHABETLAND


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A PARENT’S INVESTMENT IN JOY continued from page S4

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

The arts can be a lifetime companion and a summer arts program will help nurture that passion and personal growth.

technique, and there are intangible elements that require critical thinking. These include the development of a painting’s concept, and the artistic language needed to convey it. Similarly, a child can’t play the clarinet in 10 minutes, days, or weeks. He must build skills that lead to a performance, and this takes time. That winter concert we enjoyed

CHABAD CENTER FOR JEWISH LIFE PRESENTS...

GAN ISRAEL Day Cam

REGISTR ATION NOW OP EN SUMMER FOR 2013! Several p options b rogram etween Jun e 24 - A ug. 16

in Merric k, NY

wasn’t put together in a week or a month. It was the result of a continuum of skills inspired by music teachers brave enough to swim upstream against declarations of success without expectations of achievement. Concerts are crafted by children who have mastered their art through hard work, skill building, and patience. They have concluded

their journey, whether at the finish line or still approaching it, thanks to arts teachers who inspire success and are willing to teach their students to wait for it. Dale Lewis is the Executive Director of Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts in Wheatley Heights. For more information, contact www.usdan.com.

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content that allows each to see the possibility of success, and the skill needed to approach it. In other words, the arts slow things down. Artistic study forces us to set goals, to work toward them, and to experience joy in the journey, whatever its outcome. School is where the journey is supposed to begin, but it may surprise some that teacher-inspired journeys of achievement are often thwarted by a system that eschews journeys with risk. Instead, our system favors short paths toward immediate gratification, flawed paths that we now define as success. Teachers know that a child's struggle to learn, and to occasionally fail, is one of life's great learning experiences. In today's schools in fact, teachers are the heroes and heroines in a battle for standards that they shouldn't have to wage. We have asked them to teach with hands tied behind their backs, as society declares every child a winner. We have thus proclaimed the finish line to be our goal, certifying every child a victor before the starter's pistol has been fired. Perhaps we adults have forgotten how we learned – one skill at a time, one achievement at a time, even one failure at a time. The arts provide an ideal platform to restore rigor to our schools, for study in the arts demands skill, judgment, and patience. When a child leans to paint, skills are needed to fill the canvas with quality and expression. There is the study of color, of form, and of

p 2013

Mini G an Ages 1 5mos. -4 & Junior Prog Ages 5 ram -7!

GYMNASTICS! FANTASTIC TRIPS! SHABBAT PARTIES! MUSIC & MOVEMENT! SWIMMING! SPORTS! CREATIVE ARTS! HOT KOSHER LUNCHES & SNACKS! • SAFE & WARM ENVIRONMENT! • AND MUCH, MUCH MORE

To Request More Info call Chanie at 516-833-3057 or visit our website www.CampGi.com

620542

• • • • • • • •


May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

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CAMP & SCHOOL DIRECTORY Alphabetland Day School & Camp Alphabetland offers a variety of licensed programs in a clean, safe environment under the direction of quality, licensed teachers. The Infant Program (ages six weeks – 17months) provides a home away from home, with each baby having his own crib and supplies. Equipment is geared towards developing large motor and sensory skills. The Toddler Program (18-30 months) helps young children develop motor and verbal skills. In the Nursery and Pre-Kindergarten programs, children engage in activities that teach colors, shapes, letters and numbers. Our camp session provides swimming, music, arts and crafts, soccer and trips. Extended hours and full, half and mini-days are offered. Transportation is available. Alphabetland Day School & Camp 516-826-9339 – 516-67-7484

Big Chief At Big Chief day camp (ages 6wks-13yrs), your child is an individual, not a number. They offer a program that will stimulate your child both physically and mentally in a safe, loving environment which is carefully supervised by the owners. Programs include, music, computers, art, science and nature, red cross swim instruction and free swim. Sports include, basketball, soccer, baseball, volleyball, handball and many more. Air conditioned facilities, lunch, afternoon snack and transportation all included. Call for all programs and prices. Big Chief - 516-781-3900 www.bigchiefschoolandcamp.com

Camp Friedberg Our variety of summer programs provides your child with a safe, nurturing summer filled with non-stop fun and adventure! Our pre-school camps take place at our three community based sites in Oceanside, Long Beach and Merrick. Grades K – 4 are based at our beautiful campgrounds nestled in the woods of Long Island. New this summer! Extreme Specialties designed to meet your child’s interests. Grades 5 – 6 spend half the time at our campgrounds and half on trips. Grades 7 – 10 enjoy fantastic day and overnight trips, including Walt Disney World! Weekly sessions available. Affordable pricing. Camp Friedberg Barry and Florence Friedberg, JCC 516-766-4341 www.friedbergjcc.org

College Connection COLLEGE CONNECTION, Official Sponsor of College Admission Success™, offers comprehensive college planning and counseling. Guidance and support in choosing a college, getting in to college, and finding the money to pay for college, all while taking the stress, the worry, the frustration and the madness out of college applications and admissions. There is a difference between applying to college and getting in. That difference is COLLEGE CONNECTION! Call today for a FREE telephone consultation. College Connection 516-345-8766 www.collegeconnect.info

Camp Connection If you haven’t finalized plans for your children for the Summer of 2013, The Camp Connection provides a free advisory service for sleepaway camps, teen tours, pre-college program, community service, outdoor adventure and language immersion. Thinking of sleep sway camps for next year , consider visiting camps this summer. Let us assist you in planning personalized visits to a few camps prior to summer enrollment. We will make recommendations to you based on your child’s interests, have literature sent to you; set up your travel iitinerary on these programs, including maps and a full set of directions; recommend appointment times, offer you accommodations choices and make available our extensive years of camping expertise to personally discuss any queries you may have regarding the selection of camp – All Free of charge. We represent over 600 summer programs that have been personally visited and referenced. Thinking of sleep sway camps for next year , consider visiting camps this summer. Call Laurel and Norm Barrie or Melissa Barrie Cohen at the number below. Camp Connection 1800-834 –CAMP (2267) www.the campconnection.com

Chabad of Merrick Camp Gan Israel Camp Gan Israel of Merrick, is a great ‘first camp’ experience for young children ages 15 months-4, now offering a new track for children ages 5-7, as well as a 15% off discount for new families. Camp Gan Israel is part of the largest network of Jewish day camps in the world and enjoys a well-earned reputation as a trendsetter with innovative ideas and creative programs. Gan Israel is an affordable, comprehensive program designed to provide your child with a summer of fun, friendship and meaningful educational experiences. Campers will enjoy an array of activities, exhilarating theme days and an end-of-season bar-b-q. Gan Israel's talented staff is handpicked for their experience, love and dedication to children of all backgrounds and levels of observance. Chabad of Merrick Camp Gan Israel (516)833-3057- 631-656-6240 www.campgi.com - info@campgi.com

FasTracKids JEI Learning Center Expanding on last year’s success, we’re adding to this year’s camp by providing bus services, lunch, extended hours and more. Our mission: Provide children from 5 to 13 with a safe, fun learning environment that provides a strong academic curriculum as well as fun physical fitness. Our morning session includes: Math, English (Reading & Writing), Science, Social Studies, and Art. While our afternoon is packed with fun activities such as basketball, soccer, softball, swimming, gymnastics and Tea Kwon Do. FasTracKids / JEI Learning Center 224-3177

Future Stars Summer Camp Future Stars Summer Camps offer the finest weekly specialty day camps at two convenient locations, The College at Old Westbury and Farmingdale State College. Summer 2013 camps run from June 24 through August 16. Weekly Camps are Monday to Friday 9am-4pm. Programs are directed by experienced and qualified teachers and coaches who share a passion for working with children. Programs include Baseball, Basketball, Cheerleading, Circus Arts, Dance, Drama, Football, Golf, Horseback Riding, Lacrosse, Magic, Multimedia, Multi-Sports, Soccer, Swim, Tennis, and Volleyball. Lunch Included. Transportation Available. Future Stars Summer Camp 876-3490 - www.fscamps.com

Grace Lutheran PreSchool Grace Lutheran Preschool is a community school run by Grace Lutheran Church for over 35 years. The school welcomes two, three, and four year old children of all faiths and backgrounds. At Grace Lutheran Preschool, children will learn and play. The school provides guidance and direction while encouraging cooperation, resourcefulness, creativity, curiosity and the love of God in a safe and respectful atmosphere. Morning and afternoon sessions are available as well as a two week summer camp. Monthly tuition rates are reasonable. For more information give us a call Grace Lutheran PreSchool – 516-409-5188 www.gracelutheranbellmore.org

Carefree Racquet

I.L Peretz Jewish School

Where can you find a tennis clinic high- lighting the excitement of competition,individualized instruction and plenty of playtime fun? At Carefree Racquet complete with 7 indoor tennis courts, 2 racquetball courts, a cozy lodge, and 2 basketball courts. The Summer Camp program at Carefree Racquet includes stroke production ladder matches, indoor play competition and lots of fun. A knowedgeable and caring staff includes counselors who are professional college players who were also trained at Carefree Racquet. Camp hours are 12-5pm with full-time time camp available 5 days a week and part-time camp available once or twice a week. Transportation is also available for Carefree campers. Children who show an interest in this healthy, social sport can't miss out on Carefree's unique programs! Call or stop by for a brochure! Carefree Racquet 516-489-9005

At the I. L. Peretz Jewish School, conveniently located in East Meadow, WE BUILD JEWISH IDENTITY. Through our dynamic faculty & innovative curriculum we actively engage children in a meaningful, child-centered Jewish education that culminates in Bar/Bat Mitzvah. Serving the community for more than 50 years, we provide a family-friendly educational environment that features celebrations of all major Jewish holidays & a music program that includes an instrumental ensemble & chorus. Teens stay connected through our cuttingedge teen program, & pre-schoolers are welcomed into our exciting Building Blocks program. All students participate in our Social Action & Community Service Program, & adult ed classes are available for parents. Our tuition is remarkably affordable & the Jewish education & identity building that we provide to our students is unparalleled. Call us at 794-0506. I.L Peretz Jewish School 516-794-0506

Ilene M. Rubin Nursery School and Child Care Center Ilene M. Rubin Nursery School and Child Care Center is a unique early childhood program for Jewish families. A warm and nurturing staff provides state of the art care in a newly renovated environment. The student to teacher ratio is excellent and our teachers are all trained and experienced professionals. Our developmentally appropriate educational program based on Jewish values supports families during the all important early years. When children move up from the Ilene Rubin Nursery School, they do so as creative, independent learners fully prepared for the next stage of school and life Ilene M. Rubin Nursery School and Child Care Center - 516-489-3415 nurseryemjc@gmail.com

Long Island Swim School Long Island Swim School provides swimming lessons for children ages 2 - 10. Children are taught their strokes right the first time. The small group environment makes learning to swim safe, easy, and fun. Our learning sequences are geared towards small logical progressions that allow the whole stroke to be developed. Children learn the safety skills they need by learning to swim correctly. We work on developing real swimming strokes, as opposed to developing a false sense of security derived by underwater swimming and dog paddling that ultimately may interfere with learning real swimming. When children learn to swim right the first time they learn to swim for life! We offer classes Monday - Friday afternoons between 3:30 and 6:30 pm and Saturday mornings between 9 am and 12:45. There are also classes during the school day Monday - Thursdays. Long Island Swim School is now an official Make a Splash Local Partner - an initiative of USA Swimming!! Long Island Swim School 516-378-8467

Skudin Surf Skudin Surf brings the sport of surfing to adults and children ages 5 and up and all abilities in a fun, positive and safe environment. All instructors at Skudin Surf are CPR, First Aid, and Lifeguard certified and their school is Accredited by the National Surf Schools and Instructors Association. We offer a range of private instruction, group lessons, camps, stand up paddle, corporate events, and birthday parties for adults and children in the seaside town of Long Beach, Long Island and Rockaway Beach 67th Street. All lessons are available 7 days a week and surf camps run Monday through Friday starting at the end of June through August offering full week (5 days) and half weeks (3 days) surf camps between the hours of 9am 1pm. The Skudin family has been teaching surfing for over 30 years. Today both Skudin brothers, Cliff and Will, who are internationally ranked Big Wave World Tour competitors, run the surf schools. Skudin Surf - 516-318-3993 Skudinsurf.com


Preparing for an enjoyable summer experience

DIRECTORY New York N Y k Hall H ll of Science The New York Hall of Science features over 450 interactive exhibits and play spaces; including the award-winning Science Playground, Preschool Place, and Rocket Park Mini Golf. A visit to NYSCI is a hands-on, energetic educational experience where you can indulge your curiosity and nurture your creativity. Don’t miss all-new exhibit Design Zone, opening May 25, for a limited time only. For directions and more information, visit www.nysci.org or call 718-699-0005. New York Hall of Science - 718-699-0005

New York Institute of Technology B15 Studios B15 Studios, a 32-camera motion capture animation studio, in conjunction with the New York Institute of Technology, is offering a series of one-week videogame production workshops. This program will be held at NYIT’s Old Westbury campus during the summer of 2013. The workshops utilize industry-leading motion capture technology, which is used in movies, videogames, and scientific research. High school students with an interest in animation, visual effects for movies, television, commercials, pre-visualization, and videogames will gain insight into this industry. The program is taught by industry professionals who have worked at Disney, Acclaim Entertainment, and NASA. For more information…b15studios.com/summer_camp.html New York Institute of Technology B 15 Studios - 516 -686-1227

The Rock Underground The Rock Underground is a full service, all ages music school that offers its students the opportunity to perform live on stage in addition to taking 45 minute traditional music lessons. The Rock Underground offers monthly memberships, rents school instruments and has a recording studio. All Musicians regardless of age and proficiency will benefit a curriculum that focuses on the development of music theory, performance, ear training, recording arts and more. The Rock Underground - 516-221-7625(rock)

Sweet Tots Creative Child Care Center Sweet Tots Creative Child Care Center, in North Bellmore, is the perfect “home away from home” for your child. Owned and operated by Karen and Tommy, and licensed by New York State, Sweet Tots is seriously committed to caring for children from six weeks to five years old. Open year round, the center provides itself on being able to offer a warm, friendly setting in a pre-school environment. With a ratio of one adult to every four children, our qualified, professional staff ensures that each child receives the care and attention he/she deserves. Each age-appropriate room is filled with learning activities made fun. Communication with parents is the center's number one priority. Parents are urged to maintain a school-family connection. Sweet Tots Creative Child Care Center 516-221-1511 www.sweettotscreativechildcare.com

T d Shepherd Tender Sh h Nursery School & Learning Center For the last 30 years, Tender Shepherd Nursery School has worked to prepare children with knowledge and skills for their next level of education. In addition to our Nursery School program geared towards students ages 2-4, we are now offering a Kindergarten Enrichment program that follows the New York State guidelines for kindergarten education. The teachers and assistants at Tender Shepherd want to be on your child's team! Our staff works to equip children with guidance and direction so that they may continue to grow into bright, cheerful and well adjusted students. We provide a safe and secure environment where learning opportunities are fun, playtime promotes development and skill sets that aim to help children and parents take learning beyond the classroom. For more information, call 516-2280902 or visit www.facebook.com/tender-shepherd Tender Shepherd Nursery School & Learning Center - 516-228-0902

Tender Tales Nursery School Tender Tales Nursery School/Camp is located in East Meadow our motto is a place where children “Play Learn and Grow Together. We are member of NCAEYC, and Nassau Childcare Council. Tender Tales is committed to caring for children two years old to five and offer Kindergarten Enrichment program and a six week summer program. Our highly-qualified teachers are committed to working within each child’s comfort zone to ensure optimal social emotional and educational results. Our School seeks to provide a learning experience in an atmosphere of caring, acceptance, warmth and understanding to establish a solid foundation for future educational experiences. A place where “Learning is Fun, and Fun is learning. Tender Tales Nursery School - 516-661-8451 tendertalesnurseryschool@yahoo.com www.tendertalesnurseryschool.com

The Madison Theatre Summer Camp Come join us for our Summer Music Intensive Programs! With three exciting Programs, we will stimulate and excite your creativity and talent! PreProfessional Summer Music Intensive, students will study a variety of musical forms for orchestra including classical, chamber, music for dance, Broadway, and movie scores. Musical Theatre Intensive explores performance techniques to help you communicate with the audience, learn audition techniques, and how to get a deeper connection with the material. Featuring workshops with Broadway performers and choreographers! Film Production Camp, Students learn and develop film techniques and produce their own short film that premiers at the Madison Theatre. The Madison Theatre Summer Camp 516-678-5000 ext. 7713

Twin Oaks Country Day School & Camp Twin Oaks, at 459 Babylon Turnpike, in Freeport, has been a leader in camping for all ages for over 35 years. From tots to teens, we offer progressive programming including sports, crafts, swimming, drama and a full summer of special events, which are sure to make each child cheer with excitement. As our campers grow, so does their program. From our youngest “Barney” campers to our “Gemini” Adventure and Gemini Teen travelers, Twin Oaks is the perfect place for your child to spend the summer. Enroll early for fantastic savings. For more information, call 516623-4550 or visit www.twinoaksdaycamp.com. Twin Oaks Country Day School & Camp 516-623-4550 www.twinoaksdaycamp.com

Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts Usdan is the nation’s preeminent nonprofit arts day camp. TimeOutNY/Kids declared Usdan a “Best Of” camp, and Usdan has been profiled in The New York Times and Time Magazine. Each day, 1,600 students, ages 6 -18, travel to Usdan’s Wheatley Heights campus from all LI neighborhoods. Usdan offers 40 programs in Music, Art, Theater, Dance, Writing, Chess, and Nature and Organic Gardening. Usdan is chartered by the NY State Regents. Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts 631-643-7900 www.usdan.com

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ummer camp is more than a vacation for children," says Bruce Muchnick, Ed.D., a licensed psychologist who works extensively with day and resident camps.

"As a parent, there are a few things to consider to increase the opportunity for a rewarding camp experience for your child." Some helpful suggestions provided by Dr. Muchnick and the American Camping Association include: Consider camp as a learning experience. This is an opportunity for your child to explore a world bigger than his/her neighborhood and a chance for you and your child to practice "letting go." Letting go allows children to develop autonomy and a stronger sense of self, make new friends, develop new social skills, learn about teamwork, be creative, and more. This time also allows parents an opportunity to take care of themselves so that they will feel refreshed when their child returns home. Prepare for camp together. Decisions about camp - like where to go and what to pack - should be a joint venture, keeping in mind your child's maturity. If your child feels a part of the decision-making process, his/her chances of having a positive experience will improve. Talk about concerns. As the first day of camp nears, some children experience uneasiness about going away. Encourage your child to talk about these feelings rather than acting on what you think his/her feelings may be. Communicate confidence in your child's ability to handle being away from home. Have realistic expectations. Camp, like the rest of life, has high and low points. Not every moment will be filled with wonder and excitement. Encourage your child to have a reasonable and realistic view of camp. Discuss both the ups and downs your child may experience. Your child should not feel pressured to succeed at camp, either. The main purposes of camp are to relax and have fun.

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

CAMP & SCHOOL

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he New York Hall of Science has come along since the 1964 Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair. From its beginnings as one of the iconic Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair pavilions, the New York Hall of Science has evolved into the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere hands-on science and technology center.

Since 1986, NYSCI has served over seven million children, parents and teachers, carrying on its mission to convey the excitement and understanding of science and technology to everyone by galvanizing their curiosity and offering them creative, participatory ways to learn. Summer is a particularly exciting time to visit NYSCI. Its new exhibit, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Design Zone,â&#x20AC;? opens May 25, and runs through. Sept. 1. The interactive exhibit involves three areas, at which visitors can learn how videogame developers, music producers, roller coaster designers and other creative problem solvers use math and science to meet their design challenges. Music â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hear It! examines math in the music while you explore relationships between length and pitch in musical instruments, ratios and rhythms, and visual representations of sound. Exhibits include: Drum Machine. Be a DJ and pick the sounds and the number of repeats for a two-beat track, a three-beat track, and a four-beat track. Then see if you can get all tracks to end on the same beat. Music Mix. Try out your music production skills by putting together music samples. Pick your best song and email it to your friends. Turntables. Practice your DJ skills on simulated turntables. Sound Graph. Talk, sing or whistle into a microphone and

Keep young minds active this summer with a visit to the New York Hall of Science.

see the sound displayed on a real-time graph of pitch over time. Whack-a-Phone. Hit tubes of different lengths to make music.

Slide-a-Phone. While a friend beats on the drumhead, slide the tube to play different notes. Digital Strings. Adjust the lengths of eight virtual strings and then hear your musical pattern. In the second area, Art â&#x20AC;&#x201C; See It!, find out how visual designers use scale, pattern, coordinate grids, equality and slope to turn ideas into reality. See the math behind visual creativity as you design your own 2-D and 3-D art. Exhibits include: Mirror Multiplier. Explore reflectional symmetry using colorful geometric pieces and a hinged pair of mirros. Picture Calculator. Take a picture of yourself and manipulate the values of the pixels to transform your photo. Then, in Action â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Move It!, discover the math and physics behind anything that moves. Build a custom digital roller coaster, design your own skate park, and race your bike to the finish line. Exhibits include: Roller Coaster Hills. Roll a ball down a ramp from a certain height and find out how far it flies off the end of the ramp. Fast Tracks. Assemble your track to create and test your own roller coaster course using a giant magnet wall. Design a Roller Coaster. Design and test virtual roller coaster tracks in this computer graphing simulation. Bike Race. Choose from three bike stations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; two recumbent bicycles or a hand crank bike â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and experience a full-body bike race. NYSCI is located in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens. For more information, visit www.nysci.org.

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is to train our students to become first-class performing artists. We help cultivate talents in a wide range of orchestral and musical disciples to better prepare attendees for a versatile professional career.

OPEN REGISTRATION 1373 BELLMORE RD. NORTH BELLMORE 516.221.1511

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Molloy College Madison Theatre 1000 Hempstead Ave Rockville Centre, NY 11571 www.madisontheatreny.org

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College Connection

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S9

May 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

The Ilene M. Rubin Nursery School

By David Fassler, M.D.

Are You Looking For An Educational Preschool With A Jewish Soul? Register Now for our 2013-2014 School Year â&#x20AC;˘ Recenty Renovated Classrooms â&#x20AC;˘ Excellent child ratio with Experienced teachers â&#x20AC;˘ Curriculum promotes Independence, Creativity and Jewish Values â&#x20AC;˘ Ages 18 months to 5 years old â&#x20AC;˘ Kindertime Half Day program with busing from local school â&#x20AC;˘ Summer Program July 1st to August 23rd â&#x20AC;˘ Hours: 7:30am-6:30pm, Mini day 9am-1pm, Full Day 9:00am-3:00pm, Attention Working Families New Extended Houes: 7:30am-6:30pm

For More Information: 516-489-3415 or nurseryemjc@gmail.com Affiliated with the East Meadow Jewish Center

www.eastmeadowjc.com 1430 Prospect Ave, East Meadow, New York

continued on page S10

RESEARCH HAS FOUND THAT THE OVERNIGHT CAMP EXPERIENCE PROMOTES AND BUILDS: Self-esteem ConďŹ dence and Independence Coping and Social Skills Lifetime Friendships! All without the Internet & cellphone

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familiarize your child with the setting. It's not unlike visiting a new school with your child. Encourage kids to bring favorite toys, books, music or other reminders of home such as photos or even favorite foods, if allowed by the camp. If kids have issues or problems with other campers, encourage them to try to work things out themselves before intervening. Suggest that they ask a counselor or the camp director for help or suggestions. Remember, part of camp is about learning

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ver 10 million children go to summer camp each year. For most, it's a fun and rewarding experience full of challenges and excitement. In addition to physical and athletic activities, kids learn about independence, cooperation, competition and teamwork. They also learn that they can survive away from home. For many children, summer camp is also a time of significant emotional growth, development and transition. Parents often note that their children come home seeming older or more mature than before they left. Although most children are excited about going to summer camp, for some, it can be a scary or anxiety provoking experience. In general, parents should not push or force kids to go to camp if they feel frightened or uncomfortable. The following tips are designed to help parents prepare their kids for summer camp and deal with issues that may arise: Choose a camp that is suited to your child's personality, temperament and interests. If your child likes music, art or horseback riding, it makes sense to pick a camp with strengths in that area. At the same time, there is nothing wrong with encouraging kids to try new things or to have a variety of experiences. In general, it is best not to force kids to do things at camp that they really dislike or simply cannot do. Repeated negative experiences can have a significant effect on a child's self-esteem. Involve your child in choosing the camp. Review brochures, videos and websites together. Ask for the names of other families you and your child can talk to about the camp. Don't push kids to go to camp at too early an age. The "right" age will vary from child to child. Some kids are "ready" for "sleep away" camp at five or six, while others would not even consider the idea at 14 or 15. If a child doesn't seem ready for a full summer away, consider a camp which has one-month sessions. It may be an easier transition and a more positive experience. If your child is shy, consider a camp where they know and like at least one other person their own age. Having one friend makes it easier to meet other kids. If you choose a camp that is driving distance, consider an off-season visit to help


A guide to a successful summer

RACQUET CLUB

continued from page S9

PRE CAMP PROGRAM MAY 20TH - JUNE 17TH

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not the end of the world for you or for your child, and it's better than being truly miserable or unhappy for an entire summer. Help children keep in touch with friends from summer camp. Plan times for them to get together with kids who live nearby. For friends who live at a distance, letters, phone calls and e-mail can help them maintain contact during the school year. Most kids enjoy camp. They often look forward to returning year after year. However, careful camp selection, preparation and planning can increase the likelihood of a positive experience. Dr. Fassler is a board certified child and adolescent psychiatrist.

ARE YOU JEWISH BUT NOT RELIGIOUS?

Where children Learn & Play ...

Serving the community for over 36 years

how to deal with new people and different situations. Don't be surprised if your child gets "homesick". It's a normal reaction to being away from family and friends, especially for the first time. Don't criticize a child who feels homesick at camp. Telling them to "buck up" can sometimes make them feel worse. Instead, be supportive, reassuring and consistent. Tell them you understand that it's hard to be away from home, and that you miss them, too. Try to focus on intermittent goals, like Visiting Day or special camp events. Regular, scheduled and predictable phone contact may also be helpful. For most kids, episodes of homesickness pass within a few days. If homesickness persists or seems severe, or if your child seems truly unhappy, talk to the camp director. Is your child having a particular problem with another child or a counselor? Is there an activity or expectation that is causing difficulties? Are they being pushed to do things beyond their level or capacity, like long distance swimming or extended hikes? Or is it just the wrong setting for your child? In the end, trust your instincts. If you are convinced it's just not working out, do not be afraid to let your child come home. It's

For Registration Information Call: (516) 794-0506 574 East Meadow Ave., East Meadow, NY 11554 www.arbeterring.org email: sdcsw@aol.com



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f you went to camp, you probably didn't serve yourself lunch from a salad bar. Times have changed!

Now the majority of camps offer salad bars â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just one sign that camps' menus are reflecting families' changing tastes. This is one of many updated ways camps are encouraging the longstanding tradition of healthy behavior â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in the dining hall as well as on the playing field or at the swimming pool. Camps are doing much to help address concerns about kids eating the right foods, as one of the healthy ways to promote wellbeing. Thoughtful menu planning â&#x20AC;&#x201C; along with physical exercise â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is helping stem problems of weight gain among children. A summer camp experience can provide the structure and activity needed to keep kids healthy year-round. According to research conducted by the American Camp Association (ACA), 63 percent of children who learn new activities at camp tend to continue engaging in these activities after they return home. What are some of the things camps are offering? More menu choices. Over two-thirds of all camps accredited by ACA say that they've started serving more fruits and vegetables. About four in ten have explicitly reduced the use of fried foods and sweets or sugary foods. Some offer low or no-fat options. Cooking with olive oil, adding flax, avoiding partially hydrogenated oils, making food from scratch â&#x20AC;&#x201C; these are all ways for children to eat healthier that camps are incorporating into their menu plans. Even in the camp canteen, the trend is toward healthier choices and less candy or "junk food." Allergen-free foods. Many camps provide choices that address specific allergy issues. The peanut-free option is provided often, with nearly 40 percent of all camps saying they offer this choice, potentially including items like soy nut butter. Some camps are completely peanut-free, while others set up a no-nuts table at mealtime. Camp directors also report being more attuned to children who have sensitivity to gluten. Special diets. Meals that are kosher, calo-

rie controlled, or designed for diabetic campers are some of the options at camp. Parents can ask the director of the camp they're considering what special foods are offered. Awareness of eating disorders. In ACA's survey of camps, one camp reports that its staff is trained to watch for indicators of any eating disorders and shown how to model good eating behaviors for the campers. Camp health staff is there to watch out for children, and aware camp nurses can keep a trained eye on campers for any special problems or behaviors. Recently, one camp's program theme was from the "Inside Out." Their intent was "to help the campers become physically, personally, and socially healthier on the inside so that they could more positively impact their outside worlds." Interactive programs. Another camp reports offering special programs for fifth grade-age campers and older where the campers experiment with doing their own cooking. The same camp offers programs on natural therapies and de-stressing for campers seventh grade and up. Camps have always placed an emphasis on health and fitness. Today, the activities and food options they provide â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the healthy behaviors they teach â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are more important than ever.

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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

summer2013

17

at College at Old Westbury at Farmingdale State College

Registration Day MAY 4 weekly sessions

Since 1980

Boys & Girls

Grades K - 12

fscamps.com

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TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE

516.876.3490

New York Hall of Science

3

Don’t miss Design Zone and discover how video game developers, music producers, roller coaster designers and other creatives use math and science to design! Little Makers Sundays in May and June; 10:30am – 12:30pm Little Makers invites families with young children to tinker, design and create together. Join us and explore new materials, tools and processes. Preregistration recommended. Ages 18 mo+ Summer of the Stars May 18, June 8, July 13 and August 10; 12–4pm Join us for sports and star-related activities all summer long

LOOK WHAT WE ARE ALL ABOUT!

OPEN HOUSE MAY 5, 11,19 11-3 BARNEYS & TOOTSIES: 20-30 months

Bug Day June 29; 12–4pm Celebrate summer with – BUGS! We’ll have live bugs to observe, handle, learn from, eat and make Outdoor Play Spaces – NOW OPEN Play Rocket Park Mini Golf and climb on New York’s largest Science Playground! For more activities, events and 3D movies visit nysci.org

DESIGN ZONE was produced and is toured by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. This exhibit was made possible by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant.

111th Street Ɓ Easy on-site parking. 624274

www.nysci.org 47–01 111th Street Ɓ Queens, NY

Presentadtoreceive$5offpurchaseof2ormoregeneraladmissiontickets.CodeLIPARENT.Expires08/31/13 624995


May 2, 2013

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Kids & the arts Nurturing their talents

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Helping your child thrive away from home


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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

Help your child thrive at camp

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t is important to prepare your child for a camp experience, whether it is for a one-week sleep-away camp close to home or a four-week camp out-of-state.

New York Hall of Science Don’t miss Design Zone and discover how video game developers, music producers, roller coaster designers and other creatives use math and science to design! Little Makers Sundays in May and June; 10:30am – 12:30pm Little Makers invites families with young children to tinker, design and create together. Join us and explore new materials, tools and processes. Preregistration recommended. Ages 18 mo+ Summer of the Stars May 18, June 8, July 13 and August 10; 12–4pm Join us for sports and star-related activities all summer long Bug Day June 29; 12–4pm Celebrate summer with – BUGS! We’ll have live bugs to observe, handle, learn from, eat and make Outdoor Play Spaces – NOW OPEN Play Rocket Park Mini Golf and climb on New York’s largest Science Playground! For more activities, events and 3D movies visit nysci.org

Here are some guidelines to help you and your child make the most of their camp stay. 1 Visit the camp, if at all possible, and meet the camp director. Talk to other families who have gone 2 to the camp in years past to familiarize yourself with what goes on. 3 Have your child spend a weekend with a friend. No phone calls. Talk about it with your child afterwards. How did your child feel the second night? 3 Go over the daily schedule with your child so there are no surprises. Learn as much as you can about camp life. Teach your child how to care for him/ 4 herself. Children need to know how to select appropriate clothing, make a bed with clean sheets, put clothes away, set a table, carry out chores, handle laundry, etc. 5 Problem solve with your child by using "what if" situations to prepare for unexpected events. What if you lose your baseball glove? What if you don't get along with another child? What if you don't feel well? Let your child brainstorm for solutions and make sure they know the "chain of command" at camp for handling problems. 6 Familiarize your child with the outdoors. Many children are unfamiliar with total darkness and country night sounds. Practice walking in the dark with a flashlight.

7 Homesickness is fairly common.

Missing home, parents, pets or friends is pretty normal. It is part of growing up and leaving home. Speak openly about it and your child will experience these feelings with less anxiety and more understanding. Camp staff is trained to help your child through these ups and downs. Discuss communication at camp. Does 8 your camp allow phone calls? Letters or postcards are best although now camps have fax and email. Give your child stamped envelopes and postcards already addressed. Practice letter writing. The more your child writes to others, the more mail he/she will receive! Communicate with camp officials. Let 9 them know if there are special circumstances or considerations regarding your child's well being or behavior. Send letters to your child before camp begins so mail is waiting when he/she arrives. Write daily keeping it simple. Send the sports or comics from the local newspaper, a cute card, a package with a word game, etc. Prepare yourself for your child going 10 off to camp. You have chosen the best camp for your child and he/she will have a wonderful summer full of fun, new friends, new songs and many exciting experiences.

DESIGN ZONE was produced and is toured by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. This exhibit was made possible by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant.

www.nysci.org 47–01 111th Street Ɓ Queens, NY

111th Street Ɓ Easy on-site parking.

Presentadtoreceive$5offpurchaseof2ormoregeneraladmissiontickets.CodeLIPARENT.Expires08/31/13 624995

Publishers CLIFFORD RICHNER STUART RICHNER Executive Editor JOHN C. O’CONNELL Section Editor KAREN BLOOM

Editorial Designer JEFFREY A. NEGRIN Vice President of Sales RHONDA GLICKMAN Account Executives AUDREY COHEN SUSANNE COLTEN ROBERT CUMMINGS

JANE FAIELLA NANCY FRIEDMAN ELLEN FRISCH JILL KAPLAN ALYSSA KUSSIN JOAN KURKOMELIS ROBIN REINER KAREN RESNICK

Parenting is an advertising supplement to the HERALD Community Newspapers. Copyright © 2013 Richner Communications, Inc. Published by Richner Communications, Inc. 2 Endo Blvd., Garden City, NY 11530 (516) 569-4000 • www.liherald.com

Cover Design JEFFREY A. NEGRIN


C C

hoosing a summer camp program for your child involves some important research. Because the camp experience will have significant impact on your child's life, it’s important for parents to learn to choose a camp wisely.

Some parents may send a child to a camp they attended without considering how the camp may have changed or the differences between the parent's and the child's needs and desires. In other cases, children go to a camp that a friend has enjoyed, assuming they will enjoy it too. All too often, this assumption proves wrong. What do you and your child want? Regardless of the age of your child, it is important that the ultimate selection of a camp accommodate all or some of the needs, interests, goals, and expectations of both parent and child. The parent must make an effort to understand what the child wants and why. A good way to begin is to sit down as a family and respond to the following questions: What do you and your child want to gain from the camp experience ? Learn new skills, develop more self confidence, improving proficiency in certain areas, become more independent? What are other expectations of the camp experience? What are the special interests that your child wants to explore? Are there any physical, intellectual, or social limitations that should be considered? What kind of emphasis will your child profit from the most? For example: Is a lot of structure desirable, is social interaction with members of the opposite sex important, or does your child need a place where he or she is encouraged to develop at their own pace? Sleepaway camps provide a summer residential program where campers enjoy daily and evening activities. Depending on the type of program chosen, a camp experience can range anywhere from one week to an entire summer. In considering sleepaway camp, parents should keep a few questions in mind: Is your child ready for a sleepaway experience? What is expected from the camp experience? What type of camp fits best with parent work schedules and family vacation times? What are the total costs of sleepaway camp? Take a moment to consider the type of camp that makes the most sense for your child and try to develop your reasons for those preferences. If your child is interested in camp, but you are not sure she is ready for nights away from home, a day camp is a great option. There are many camps nearby that offer families a wide range of activities to keep youngsters productively occupied throughout the summer, including those offered through your school district, recreation center and pre-schools, or consider what your child’s afterschool program has going on during the summer. Size Camps may vary in size from under 100 campers to more than 400. Smaller camps may foster a very special environment where campers and staff really get to know each other, and where individual needs can be quickly met. Large camps are often organized into small units thus making it possible to receive the same kind of attention offered by a smaller camp. This is a complex issue that will require special attention and investigation. In a good camp there may be little correlation between size and the quality of the total camp experience.

TOP 10 REASONS to send your child to sleepaway camp

By The Camp Connection

10 Disney was not joking. Michael D. Eisner, former CEO of Disney, shares that “camp is a guide to growing up, learning to rely on yourself as you work as a team, developing tools for leadership, competing to win but finding pride and growth in defeat.” That’s not Mickey Mouse stuff!

If you feel your child requires special attention in an area such as confidence building, it is probably more important to find out how a camp meets that need rather than getting hung up on size. Location Many parents limit their search for a camp by looking in one state or by choosing an arbitrary distance from home. More important than distance, according to camp advisors, are the related questions involving camp environment, security, medical facilities, and accessibility. In choosing a location you might also want to consider the cost for you to visit the camp, and the proximity to camps your other children are attending during the summer. Keep in mind that there are excellent camps in many states, and that if your child is having a good experience, distance will not make a great deal of difference. Programs and activities Today’s camps have all kinds of program offerings. Some camps may emphasize one activity while others will offer a wide array of programs. In specialty camps, staff and facilities are geared to provide an intensive experience in a single area such as tennis, horseback riding, gymnastics, sailing or wilderness. Naturally, these camps have other facilities and activities that provide campers with additional experiences. A more traditional camp program tends to be broader in terms of what it offers. Most general camps will provide programs in some team sports such as baseball and soccer, individual sports like tennis, and waterfront activities such as swimming and sailing, as well as some outdoor life options in hiking and canoeing. In making a decision about camp, it is vital that you and your child look into the total camp program and that you examine the quality of the staff and facilities available to support that program. Narrowing your selection At this stage of the decision process, your central task is to identify those camps which appear promising in terms of meeting your specifications. Perhaps you know other parents who send their children to camp. Get some camp names from them. Also, your child probably has friends who go to camp; you can pursue this source as well. Once you have developed a list of possibilities the most difficult task remains. That is, how do you compare camps so that you can narrow the possibilities to the one which makes the most sense for you and your child? The best way to proceed with your comparison and to narrow your choices is to take a careful look at some of the promising camps you have identified. Review the brochures and videos with your child. Then you can choose the ones you're most interested in and arrange to speak or meet with the camp directors or representatives. Involve your child in the selection process. Review your child's preferences and let you child ask questions too.

9 Me, myself and I. Sleepaway camp is the one place a child can make decisions and problem solve in a safe, caring environment without parents or teachers. At camp, children learn to manage conflict and different personalities. Campers come home with increased confidence and greater sense of independence. 8 All in the family. While joining together in cleaning their bunk, painting scenery, creating a skit and playing in tournaments, campers become part of a new team of friends and counselors (from all over the country and world) who become a family reuniting year after year.

7 A camp for every child. Each child is unique. Some sparkle when playing soccer or performing on stage while others yearn to be the next Best Baker. There is a camp for each child to explore various interests.

6 The best part of the day. Sleeping next to their best buddies, campers spend “flashlight time” sharing the day’s accomplishments, funniest moments and stories. Late night talks become one of the most bonding moments of camp. 5 Bragging rights. Sleepaway camp exposes children to activities that are new and unique. Camp is a motivating place for children to grow and succeed – whether it’s getting up on water-skis for the first time, cheering a Color War song or writing for the camp newsletter. When a child goes to camp, he/she will always have something grand to tell you about. 4 Hands are not just for texting and typing. At camp, children will rest their fingers from cell phones and computer keyboards. Camper’s fingers return to no-tech activities such as writing letters, whittling a wood bench and weaving a potholder. 3 Camp is not just for the camper. While their children are having fun-filled, action packed days away, parents get a reprieve from the fast paced daily routines of packing lunches, carpooling and laundry. Sending a child away for a few weeks allows couples to renew, rediscover and recharge their relationship.

2 What they enjoy. Without the pressure of homework and tests, campers discover what activities – NOT SUBJECTS – they enjoy and have fun doing. No one grades fun!

1 Winter, spring, summer and fall. Ask anyone who went away to camp. Camp friends are year-round, life-long friends. Camp creates memories that last a lifetime. Courtesy of Laurel and Norm Barrie, Melissa Barrie Cohen. For more information, visit www.thecampconnection.com or contact camp4u@thecampconnection.com

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

READY FOR CAMP Making a wise choice

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Temple Israel

A parent’s investment in joy

140 Central Avenue • Lawrence, NY

By Dale Lewis

Religious School Classes Will be Held at the Beautiful Lawrence-Woodmere Academy

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s Director of Long Island’s Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts, I have the privilege of working with 1,500 arts majors every day.

• One Day a Week Religious School for all Grades Tuesday 4:00PM - 6:00PM • Hands On Individualized Bar/Bat Mitzvah Preparation by Rabbi and Cantor • Special Sunday Holiday Events at our Beautiful Temple • Free Kindergarten • First Time Enrollment for 1st & 2nd Grade Free • 50% Discount on Hebrew School Tuition for all New Enrollments 3rd Grade • 50% Discount on First Year Congregational Dues for New Enrollments • Our Renowned High School Program Monday 6:00PM - 7:45PM at Temple Israel • Participate in the North American Board of Rabbis International Student Exchange Program

FOR MORE INFORMATION – CALL TEMPLE OFFICE at

239-1140 We are growing and building for the future of our children

Rabbi, Jay Rosenbaum President, James Rotenberg Cantor/Dir. of Education, Galina Makaveyev

624912

A Warm and Caring Congregation That Puts You and Your Family’s Needs First

SUMMER CLASS SCHEDULE SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY SATURDAY

Hip-Hop Zumba Break Dancing Intro to Dance Beg. Modern Zumba w/Ms. Ali w/Miss Alexa w/Paige w/Miss Twist w/Miss Beth w/Paige ADULT 8-12 yrs old 2-3 yrs old 8-12 yrs old 9-11 yrs old ADULT 9:30-10:30am 4:00-5:00pm 4:00-5:00pm 4:00-5:00pm 4:00-5:00pm 9:30-10:30am Zumba Pre-Ballet Intro to Dance Jazz Funk Hip-Hop w/Yitti w/Mr. Serge w/Miss Jess w/Miss Lori w/Mr. Chris 3-4 yrs old 7-9 yrs old TEENS/ADULTS 12-15 yrs old 2-3 yrs old 8:00-9:00am 4:00-5:00pm 4:00-5:00pm 4:00-5:00pm 5:00-6:00pm Modern Hip-Hop Tumbling Beg. Ballet w/Ms. Jodi w/Miss Beth w/Miss Ali w/Miss Alexa 12 & older 13-16 yrs old 8-12 yrs old 3-4 yrs old 6:00-7:00pm 5:00-6:00pm 5:00-6:00pm 5:00-6:00pm

Summer Dance Camp 10am-3pm

Tap Hip-Hop Boys Hip-Hop Teen Ballet w/O’neil w/Mr. Serge w/Miss Jess w/Miss Lori 13 & older 7-9 yrs old TEEN 6-8 yrs old 6:00-7:00pm 5:00-6:30pm 5:00-6:00pm 6:00-7:00pm

Monday through Friday

Adv. Ballet Tap Jazz Funk Tumbling w/Mr. Chris w/Ms. Jodi w/Miss Beth w/Miss Ali 5-7 yrs old 14 yrs & older 10-12 yrs old 12 & older 7:00-8:00pm 6:00-7:00pm 6:00-7:30pm 6:00-7:00pm

Camp Includes Classes In: Ballet • Tap • Jazz Tumbling • Hip Hop Breakdancing • Lyrical Leaps and Turns • A Trip To North Woodmere Park • A Broadway Show • A Trip To Broadway Dance Center • Lessons on How To Apply Stage Makeup • Choreography The Last Friday of Each Session, Dance Express will host a Carnvial Session 1 June 24th - July 19th Session 2 July 22nd - August 16th

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Toning Leaps & Turns Video w/Mr. Chris w/Mr. Dwayne w/Miss Ali ADULT TEEN TEEN 7:00-8:00pm 7:30-8:30pm 8:00-9:00pm

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Tap Hip-Hop Video w/Mr. Dwayne w/Miss Lori w/Miss Alexa TEEN ADULT ADULT 8:00-9:00pm 7:00-8:00pm WOMEN ONLY Ballet Barre 8:00-9:00pm Zumba

Mon

w/Yitti w/Miss Ali TEENS/ADULTS ADULT 8:00-9:00pm 8:30-9:30pm

www.DanceXpressNY.com

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FULL DAY TRIPS!

th

. June 2 "PAY AS YOU GO"

Birthday Parties

Mommy & Me STARTS Wed. June 12-Aug. 16

1032 Broadway (Rear Entrance) Woodmere, NY 11598

516-295-2800

GYMNASTIC ACADEMY

LONG ISLAND

Tap Lyrical Hip-Hop Leaps & Jumps w/Mr. Serge w/Miss Jess w/Miss Lori w/Mr. Chris 10-12 yrs old TEEN TEEN ADULT 7:00-8:00pm 6:30-8:00pm 6:00-7:00pm 7:00-8:00pm

Last week of Summer Dance Intensive August 26th - August 30th

Guided by a faculty of leading professionals, our students struggle with creative ideas, master artistic techniques, and build works of art one skill at a time. At Usdan, the happy result is seen on the faces of children boarding their buses following a fulfilling summer’s day of “work.”Theirs are smiles of achievement, the result of numerous moments of trial and triumph. We don’t guarantee that children will cross the finish line. We guarantee that they will learn, grow, and have fun approaching it. The joy, after all, is in the journey. Studies linking childhood study in the arts to lifetime skill in virtually every other pursuit have become ubiquitous, so Specialty camps are growing in popularity as a summer option for families. much so that they have Usdan’s 200-acre woodland campus in Wheatley Heights attracts over 1,600 come to trivialize an kids ages 6-18 to its varied arts programs – over 40 in all. important conversation journey, whatever its outcome. School is for parents. These studies cite the arts as havwhere the journey is supposed to begin, but ing a pivotal role in the development of 21st it may surprise some that teacher-inspired century skills, critical thinking, the experience journeys of achievement are often thwarted of working sequentially toward a goal, and by a system that eschews journeys with risk. improvement in a child’s academic achieveInstead, our system favors short paths toward ment. However, there is more. Children who immediate gratification, flawed paths that immerse themselves in the arts experience we now define as success. something more important than better Teachers know that a child's struggle to grades. They experience joy. learn, and to occasionally fail, is one of life's Children acquire knowledge over time, great learning experiences. In today's schools gradually building skills and assembling conin fact, teachers are the heroes and heroines in tent that allows each to see the possibility of a battle for standards that they shouldn't have success, and the skill needed to approach it. to wage. We have asked them to teach with In other words, the arts slow things down. hands tied behind their backs, as society Artistic study forces us to set goals, to work continued on page S5 toward them, and to experience joy in the

• Mommy & Me, 12 Months - 3 Years • Pre-Nastics, 3 - 4 Years • Girls & Boys, 5 - 17 Years • Girls USAG Competitive Team • USAG Safety Certified

10%

SIBLING DISCOUNT

569-5115 • 565 Willow Ave., Cedarhurst



10% Early Bird Discount for Enrollments by June 15, 2013



May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

“Strengthening Liberal Judaism in the Five Towns”


S5

A PARENTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INVESTMENT IN JOY continued from page S4

May 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

declares every child a winner. We have thus proclaimed the finish line to be our goal, certifying every child a victor before the starter's pistol has been fired. Perhaps we adults have forgotten how we learned â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one skill at a time, one achievement at a time, even one failure at a time. The arts provide an ideal platform to restore rigor to our schools, for study in the arts demands skill, judgment, and patience. When a child leans to paint, skills are needed to fill the canvas with quality and expression. There is the study of color, of form, and of technique, and there are intangible elements that require critical thinking. These include the development of a paintingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concept, and the artistic language needed to convey it. Similarly, a child canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play the clarinet in 10 minutes, days, or weeks. He must build skills that lead to a performance, and this takes time. That winter concert we enjoyed wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put together in a week or a month. It was the result of a continuum of skills inspired by music teachers brave enough to swim upstream against declarations of success without expectations of achievement. Concerts are crafted by children who have mastered their art through hard work, skill building, and patience. They have concluded their journey, whether at the finish line or still approaching it, thanks to arts teachers who inspire success and are willing to teach their students to wait for it.

Dale Lewis is the Executive Director of Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts in Wheatley Heights. For more information, contact www.usdan.com.

The arts can be a lifetime companion and a summer arts program will help nurture that passion and personal growth.

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The Coolest Summer Ever!

Are you a high school student with an interest in animation? Are you interested in the production of visual effects for movies and video games?

Come explore a fun and exciting career path in the one-week Motion Capture and Animation Course at B15 Studios, located on NYITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Old Westbury campus.

Adventure Travel Camp

â&#x20AC;˘ Direct scenes where motion will be captured on 32 high-speed near-infrared cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Edit and alter these movements in 3-D programs such as Maya and use them in video game programs such as Unity â&#x20AC;˘ Create and keep your own video-game level â&#x20AC;˘ Taught by industry professionals who have worked with companies such as Disney, Acclaim Entertainment and NASA

Exciting daily trips (ages 6-12 years)

Mini Travel One trip per week (entering kindergarten)

Cub Camp (ages 18 months-5 years)

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Tuition and Fees: $550 (lunch+$35 per week)

131 MAIN STREET

Session 3: Monday, July 29 - Friday Aug. 2 Session 4: Monday, August 5 - Friday Aug. 9

(516) 596-1010

For more information, contact Professor Peter Voci at 516.686.1227, or at pvoci@nyit.edu. Also visit b15studios.com/summer_camp

nyit.edu



Time: 9a.m. - 1p.m. Location: Midge Karr Fine Arts Center, Old Westbury, NY 11568 [Transportation is available] www.tutortimeeastrockaway.com *Programs vary by school. See school for details. Tutor TimeÂŽ is an equal opportunity provider. Tutor Time is licensed and insured.

625278

Session 1: Monday, July 15 - Friday, July 19 Session 2: Monday, July 22 - Friday, July 26


May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

S6

CAMP & SCHOOL DIRECTORY Brandeis School

Dance Express

At the Brandeis school our mission and vision are firmly grounded in our successful past. More than eighty years ago, our founder, Rabbi Irving Miller, declared the need for a curriculum that fully integrated Jewish and American values and ideals as a foundation for a successful contemporary life. The continued success of the Brandeis School lies in our ability to achieve the highest standards of academic excellence while ensuring a thorough Judaic education geared to kindling the eternal light of Judaism and learning in each child from generation to generation. We strive to give our students a superior General and Judaic education that meets or exceeds the standards of the best schools in our neighboring school districts. Our goal is to inspire each child to: develop a life-long love of learning and intellectual curiosity, achieve the highest level of academic excellence of which they are capable; build the skills required to be analytic and independent thinkers; and become knowledgeable and proud of our rich religious, and cultural heritage. For more information, call 516-4747 ext 302 or visit our website www.TheBrandeisSchool.org. Brandeis School - 516-371-4747 www.TheBrandeisSchool.org

With over 80 years of combined dance education Miss Jaime Lynn (Director), Miss Julie Milack (Director) and staff are proud to share with the community their teachings in all styles of dance - ballet, lyrical, jazz, hip-hop, tap, ballroom and more. We welcome dancers of all levels, from beginners to professionals, and we feel no one is ever too young or too old to learn how to dance. Our mission at Dance Express is to provide students of all levels more than just dance classes, but a unique dance experience in which the student can grow both mentally and physically as a dancer. We look to provide our students with not only classes, but performance and other opportunities that willprovide them with the tools they need to become better dancers and immerse themselves in the culture of dance. Finally, we look to give all of our students the proper environment to learn dance with smaller class sizes, more personalized, one-on-one attention to the students, and professional instruction that is very affordable. The student, the learning experience, and dance will always be the first priority to us. Dance Express will have a full summer dance program beginning Monday June 24th. To register call 516-295-2800 or stop in during office hours Monday - Thursday 4-8pm. Dance Express - 295-2800

Camp Connection

HASC, Woodmere

If you haven’t finalized plans for your children for the Summer of 2013, The Camp Connection provides a free advisory service for sleepaway camps, teen tours, pre-college program, community service, outdoor adventure and language immersion. Thinking of sleep sway camps for next year , consider visiting camps this summer. Let us assist you in planning personalized visits to a few camps prior to summer enrollment. We will make recommendations to you based on your child’s interests, have literature sent to you; set up your travel iitinerary on these programs, including maps and a full set of directions; recommend appointment times, offer you accommodations choices and make available our extensive years of camping expertise to personally discuss any queries you may have regarding the selection of camp – All Free of charge. We represent over 600 summer programs that have been personally visited and referenced. Thinking of sleep sway camps for next year , consider visiting camps this summer. Call Laurel and Norm Barrie or Melissa Barrie Cohen at the number below. Camp Connection – 1800-834 –CAMP (2267) www.the campconnection.com

College Connection COLLEGE CONNECTION, Official Sponsor of College Admission Success™, offers comprehensive college planning and counseling. Guidance and support in choosing a college, getting in to college, and finding the money to pay for college, all while taking the stress, the worry, the frustration and the madness out of college applications and admissions. There is a difference between applying to college and getting in. That difference is COLLEGE CONNECTION! Call today for a FREE telephone consultation. College Connection 516-345-8766 www.collegeconnect.info

For summer 2013 HASC Woodmere, a not-for-profit preschool program and CPSE evaluation site, provides an all-inclusive, integrated preschool program for children with and without special needs. Multicultural programs are held in a warm, nurturing and safe environment where highly trained staff provide the latest innovative early childhood techniques. Children ages 3 to 5 years learn and grow in a variety of full day class sizes. Your children experience the benefits of low student-teacher ratios in center-based classes. In addition to a language based preschool curriculum, classes participate in gym, music, class trips and special events. The school has a team of dedicated and highly qualified professionals including certified teachers, speech/language pathologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, psychologists, social workers and a full-time nurse. If you are looking for a caring and supportive preschool that can offer your child a well rounded program, look no further than HASC! HASC, Woodmere – (516)295-1340

Hewlett/East Rockaway Jewish Centre Going to school for the first time is one of the most important milestones in a child's life. At the Hewlett/ East Rockaway Jewish Centre Nursery School and Summer Day Camp, we create a happy, healthy environment where 2, 3 and 4 year olds can grow emotionally, cognitively and physically. The nursery school also adds a Judaic dimension which seeks to develop faith in God, a love for things Jewish and involvement in the mitzvoth of the Torah. The air-conditioned pre-school classrooms, gymnasium and outdoor playground feature state-of-the-art equipment. Mommy and Me classes for children 1-21 months are also available. Call Cheryl Karp at 5991169 for more information. NEW: Bussing to Atlantic Beach now available. Hewlett/East Rockaway Jewish Centre 516-599-1169

Long Island Gymnastics Academy Long Island Gymnastics Academy has been providing gymnastics instruction to the children of the community since 1975. The 7,200-sq. ft. air-conditioned facility features bars, vaults, trampolines, beams, a tumble trak, and a 42 sq. ft. competition spring floor. All equipment meets USAG and FIG specifications for maximum safety. Programs include Mommy and Me (12 months-3 years), Prenastics (3-4 years old), Transitions (5 years old), and Recreational (6 to 17 years). Birthday parties and summer camp are also available. Registrations are being taken now. Long Island Gymnastics Academy 516-569-5115

Mathnasium Flexible Summer Memberships (2nd - 12th grades). This program is a fantastic way for your child to catch up or get ahead in math throughout the summer. Based on an initial assessment, we create a customized learning plan that our students will work through when they come in for their Mathnasium sessions. We can also provide support with summer packets from school that need to be completed before the beginning of the new school year. You can choose a 10 or 16 hour package and schedule sessions from June 15th to September 1st. We always encourage consistent twice/week attendance whenever possible. Mathnasium 414 Central Avenue Cedarhurst - 569-1500 381 Sunrise Highway Lynbrook - 881-7997

New York Hall of Science The New York Hall of Science features over 450 interactive exhibits and play spaces; including the award-winning Science Playground, Preschool Place, and Rocket Park Mini Golf. A visit to NYSCI is a handson, energetic educational experience where you can indulge your curiosity and nurture your creativity. Don’t miss all-new exhibit Design Zone, opening May 25, for a limited time only. For directions and more information, visit www.nysci.org or call 718-699-0005. New York Hall of Science - 718-699-0005

New York Institute of Technology B15 Studios B15 Studios, a 32-camera motion capture animation studio, in conjunction with the New York Institute of Technology, is offering a series of one-week videogame production workshops. This program will be held at NYIT’s Old Westbury campus during the summer of 2013. The workshops utilize industry-leading motion capture technology, which is used in movies, videogames, and scientific research. High school students with an interest in animation, visual effects for movies, television, commercials, pre-visualization, and videogames will gain insight into this industry. The program is taught by industry professionals who have worked at Disney, Acclaim Entertainment, and NASA. For more information…b15studios.com/summer_camp.html New York Institute of Technology B 15 Studios - 516 -686-1227

Resnick Reading Center Established in 1968, Resnick Reading Center has helped students become successful, competent and confident individuals. For director Diana Resnick Nahoum, the goal is clear – make your child independent by helping him succeed on his own. We take a personalized approach and design an individualized program for each student. PSATs/SATs, SAT IIs and ACTs preparation is aimed at helping each student achieve his best possible score. Tutoring is available in all subject areas and students are well prepared for Regents, APs, GEDs, and all standardized exams including GREs, MCATs, LSATs, and RCTs. Your child’s success is our most important goal. Day and evening and summer sessions are available. Resnick Reading Center - 516-374-5998

Skudin Surf Skudin Surf brings the sport of surfing to adults and children ages 5 and up and all abilities in a fun, positive and safe environment. All instructors at Skudin Surf are CPR, First Aid, and Lifeguard certified and their school is Accredited by the National Surf Schools and Instructors Association. We offer a range of private instruction, group lessons, camps, stand up paddle, corporate events, and birthday parties for adults and children in the seaside town of Long Beach, Long Island and Rockaway Beach 67th Street. All lessons are available 7 days a week and surf camps run Monday through Friday starting at the end of June through August offering full week (5 days) and half weeks (3 days) surf camps between the hours of 9am 1pm. The Skudin family has been teaching surfing for over 30 years. Today both Skudin brothers, Cliff and Will, who are internationally ranked Big Wave World Tour competitors, run the surf schools. Skudin Surf - 516-318-3993 Skudinsurf.com

Temple Am Echad South Shore Reform Congregation Temple Am Echad provides a nurturing and loving environment as well as a well rounded early childhood education. The curriculum involves a basic exposure to Jewish culture and holidays. Temple Am Echad offers a variety of programs, including the toddler center for children one to two and a half years old, and a nursery school for three and four year-olds. A half day summer camp program is available for ages one to four. Programs include water play, arts and crafts, music, outdoor playground. Each week has a different theme, such as circus or cooking. Our gym is air conditioned and our qualified teachers are our counselors. Temple Am Echad Rabbi Stuart M. Geller / Early Childhood Center 516-599-7950

Temple Israel Religious School “The philosophy of Temple Israel’s Religious School is to teach our children about Judaism, its history and culture, to instill a sense of pride in their heritage and to make them feel more Jewish. We accomplish this through hands-on personalized instruction, involving our students in every aspect of Jewish life, from the classroom to the Pulpit. Therefore, on the day of their Bar/Bat Mitzvah, our students feel comfortable, confident and at home as members of an extended “Temple Family". We are now offering a 10% Early Bird Discount for all who are enrolled by June 15, 2013. Temple Israel Religious School - 516-239-1140


S7

Tutor Time of East Rockaway

Waldorf School of Garden City

Tutor Time of East Rockaway, a state licensed childcare program awarded â&#x20AC;&#x153;Center of Excellence,â&#x20AC;? is housed in a state-of-the-art facility. The center has indoor and outdoor playgrounds. The CPR certified staff provides a caring and stimulating environment throughout the year. We offer three distinct camp programs. Our Cub Camp provides children 18 months to 3 years with a wide variety of hands-on thematic based experiences. Petting zoos, pony rides, magicians, puppet shows and other enrichment activities add to the fun. Our Mini-Travel Camp provides our pre-kindergarten students with weekly trips in addition to the basic Cub Camp program. Our Adventure Travel Camp is available for 2,4, 6, 8, or 10 week sessions for children 6-12 years old. Campers in this program go on different exciting trips each day, including Atlantis Marine World, Circle Line Cruises, Deep Sea Fishing, and The Air and Space Museum, to name a few. Several enrichment programs are also offered, including foreign language instruction, gymnastics and piano lessons. Full and part time programs are available. Tutor Time is open 12 months, 6:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Tutor Time of East Rockaway - 516-596-1010

Celebrating its 65th year, The Waldorf School of Garden City is an independent, coeducational, college-preparatory day school for students age three through twelfth grade. We are dedicated to providing a rigorous, liberal arts education that focuses on the development of the whole human being. Emphasis is placed on a multidisciplinary approach to learning through a curriculum that balances the physical, artistic, social and intellectual needs of our students. Our nurturing environment and diverse community enable our students to excel as educated and compassionate individuals whose lives are enriched by their lifelong passion for learning. The program includes: 12 year sustainable living curriculum, natural toys, on-site vegetable gardens, extended 240 acre farm campus in New Hampshire, organic homemade lunch, hands-on and project-based learning, fiber arts, woodworking, visual arts, movement, dramatic arts, music, college preparatory curriculum. Waldorf School of Garden City 516-742-3434 www.waldorfgarden.org

Twin Oaks, at 459 Babylon Turnpike, in Freeport, has been a leader in camping for all ages for over 35 years. From tots to teens, we offer progressive programming including sports, crafts, swimming, drama and a full summer of special events, which are sure to make each child cheer with excitement. As our campers grow, so does their program. From our youngest â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barneyâ&#x20AC;? campers to our â&#x20AC;&#x153;Geminiâ&#x20AC;? Adventure and Gemini Teen travelers, Twin Oaks is the perfect place for your child to spend the summer. Enroll early for fantastic savings. For more information, call 516-6234550 or visit www.twinoaksdaycamp.com. Twin Oaks Country Day School & Camp 516-623-4550 twinoaksdaycamp.com

Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts Usdan is the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preeminent nonprofit arts day camp. TimeOutNY/Kids declared Usdan a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Ofâ&#x20AC;? camp, and Usdan has been profiled in The New York Times and Time Magazine. Each day, 1,600 students, ages 6 -18, travel to Usdanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wheatley Heights campus from all LI neighborhoods. Usdan offers 40 programs in Music, Art, Theater, Dance, Writing, Chess, and Nature and Organic Gardening. Usdan is chartered by the NY State Regents. Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts 631-643-7900 www.usdan.com

Helping to Navigate the Road to College &2035(+(16,9(&2//(*(3/$11,1* &2816(/,1* 6833257 Ă?&ROOHJH0DWFKLQJ Ă?$GPLVVLRQ6WUDWHJLHV Ă?$SSOLFDWLRQ(QKDQFHPHQW Ă?(VVD\'HYHORSPHQW Ă?6FKRODUVKLSDQG )LQDQFLDO$LG6RXUFLQJ Customized Plans for Every Student and Every Budget

516-345-8766

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Sportime SPORTIME Lynbrook includes 5 hard court tennis courts, a 7,000 square foot multi-sport gymnasium, a 6,000 square foot indoor turf field, group exercise studio and full service health club with the latest in cardiovascular and strength training equipment. We offer a wide variety of programs for children and adults, a warm and helpful staff and all the amenities to make your experience at SPORTIME unforgettable! Call and ask about our Summer Camps and School Break Camps! Sportime â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 516-887-1330 www.sportimeNY.com/Lynbrook

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DIRECTORY

Many camps offer "camperships" â&#x20AC;&#x201C; partial or total scholarships and financial assistance. Parents shouldn't assume their income doesn't qualify. In fact, 90 percent of camps report offering financial assistance, and over 55 percent of camps award $10,000 or more in scholarships annually.

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May 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

CAMP & SCHOOL

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; no question that camp can be expensive, but there are ways to get assistance. Camps offer special discounts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for everything from early registration, full-season, or multiple enrollments from one family. More than 30 percent of camps award more than $10,000 in discounts annually, according to the American Camp Association.


S8

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leads the child to worry more and potentially feel more physical symptoms.

hy does my child become anxious about sleepovers or going to camp? sleepover or enter camp with minimal upset. For other children, the “fear factor” is larger than the excitement, and tends to take on a life of its own. In this situation, the child could be questioning everything about the upcoming separation experience: “What if I get sick?” What if no one likes me?” “What if the (other parents) counselors are mean?” “What if something happens to you (Mom and Dad) while I’m gone?”

Anxiety is a normal feeling for children about to start sleepovers or leave for camp, whether it will be the first time or even if they have done these things several times before. This uneasiness or apprehension can occur for many reasons. For the majority of children, it is a mingling of excitement and a little fear of the unknown. These children usually are easily reassured and attend a

What does it feel like? Some children experience physical symptoms when anxious including butterflies, cold or clammy hands, headaches, nausea, being hot or cold, or feeling faint. Others report feeling like they want to cry and hide. The thoughts that accompany anxiety tend to center around what can go wrong, which

What can a parent do? Consider these practical first steps. Allow your child to express his or her concerns, and answer the “What if” questions in a calm, coping-focused manner: “This is your friend who wants you to sleepover. You like each other.” “You’ve made friends at school, so I’m sure the camp will help with meeting friends while there.”“The counselors are chosen because of their good work with kids.” “The camp people work with hundreds of kids each year. They know exactly what to do and also how to get in touch with us if you need us.” Make sure your child is informed about the camp and its activities. Focus your child on the camp activities he or she enjoys, such as swimming or baseball. Attend any sessions with your child offered by the camp, prior to start of the session. Engage your child in the fun aspects of preparing for camp such as shopping for new clothes and picking out camp gear. Make appropriate communication easy on your child. Pack pre-addressed, stamped envelopes for your child to mail letters to you and others, such as grandparents and friends. Help your child rehearse. Children can practice being away from home by sleeping

over at the homes of friends and relatives. What should parents avoid doing? Avoid giving excessive reassurance, such as repeatedly saying, “You’ll be fine!” Too much reassurance causes anxious children to seek to discredit the parent’s opinion. Avoid telling your child exactly what to do. It is more useful to ask your child to come up with a realistic plan for how to meet new friends and find fun activities. Successful completion of the plan enhances the child’s feeling of control and accomplishment, and this will decrease anxiety. Don’t ignore the problem by hoping it will go away by itself. What to should parents do if a child is homesick? Let the counselors know prior to the beginning of camp that your child is anxious about being away from home and may become homesick. Set an expectation for phone calls, that they will be focused on the ways your child is trying to cope and have fun at camp, and not focused on crying and begging to come home. Anne Marie Albano, Ph.D. is Recanati Family Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU.

Temple Am Echad RABBI STUART M. GELLER EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER

Formerly Temple Emanu-El of Lynbrook

DON’T MISS OUT! ENROLL NOW FOR 2013 EVERYONE WELCOME! SUMMER EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM

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Call Barbara Goodman or Sue Chaplick (Early Childhood Directors)

MULTI-SPORT CAMPS | PRESCHOOL CAMPS | TENNIS & SPORTS CAMPS Call 516/887-1330 and schedule a tour. Ask about our amazing SUMMER CAMP SPECIALS!

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NYS Certified Teachers Thematic, Age Appropriate Curriculum • Music & Movement • Enrichment Programs

599-7950 For Membership Information Call Lisa Burch - 593-4004

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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

Helping children deal with separation anxiety


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he New York Hall of Science has come along since the 1964 World’s Fair. From its beginnings as one of the iconic World’s Fair pavilions, the New York Hall of Science has evolved into the region’s premiere hands-on science and technology center.

Since 1986, NYSCI has served over seven million children, parents and teachers, carrying on its mission to convey the excitement and understanding of science and technology to everyone by galvanizing their curiosity and offering them creative, participatory ways to learn. Summer is a particularly exciting time to visit NYSCI. Its new exhibit, “Design Zone,” opens May 25, and runs through. Sept. 1. The interactive exhibit involves three areas, at which visitors can learn how videogame developers, music producers, roller coaster designers and other creative problem solvers use math and science to meet their design challenges. Music – Hear It! examines math in the music while you explore relationships between length and pitch in musical instruments, ratios and rhythms, and visual representations of sound. Exhibits include: Drum Machine. Be a DJ and pick the sounds and the number of repeats for a two-beat track, a three-beat track, and a four-beat track. Then see if you can get all tracks to end on the same beat. Music Mix. Try out your music production skills by putting together music samples. Pick your best song and email it to your friends. Turntables. Practice your DJ skills on simulated turntables. Sound Graph. Talk, sing or whistle into a microphone and

Keep young minds active this summer with a visit to the New York Hall of Science.

see the sound displayed on a real-time graph of pitch over time. Whack-a-Phone. Hit tubes of different lengths to make music.

May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

MORE THAN JUST PLAY AT THE NEW YORK HALL OF SCIENCE

Slide-a-Phone. While a friend beats on the S9 drumhead, slide the tube to play different notes. Digital Strings. Adjust the lengths of eight virtual strings and then hear your musical pattern. In the second area, Art – See It!, find out how visual designers use scale, pattern, coordinate grids, equality and slope to turn ideas into reality. See the math behind visual creativity as you design your own 2-D and 3-D art. Exhibits include: Mirror Multiplier. Explore reflectional symmetry using colorful geometric pieces and a hinged pair of mirros. Picture Calculator. Take a picture of yourself and manipulate the values of the pixels to transform your photo. Then, in Action – Move It!, discover the math and physics behind anything that moves. Build a custom digital roller coaster, design your own skate park, and race your bike to the finish line. Exhibits include: Roller Coaster Hills. Roll a ball down a ramp from a certain height and find out how far it flies off the end of the ramp. Fast Tracks. Assemble your track to create and test your own roller coaster course using a giant magnet wall. Design a Roller Coaster. Design and test virtual roller coaster tracks in this computer graphing simulation. Bike Race. Choose from three bike stations – two recumbent bicycles or a hand crank bike – and experience a full-body bike race. NYSCI is located in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens. For more information, visit www.nysci.org.

Time to think about

summer camp! Open House

For information please call:

516.742.3434 ext. 327 225 Cambridge Avenue, Garden City, NY 11530 www.waldorfgarden.org

Camp in session:

Monday, July 1 through Friday, August 9 . 3-13 .Ages Enrollment .Flexible Program for 14 – 16 year olds .CIT Optional aftercare to 6:00 p.m.

625060

Saturday, May 11th 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.


OVERNIGHT CAMP EXPERIENCE PROMOTES AND BUILDS: Self-esteem Confidence and Independence Coping and Social Skills Lifetime Friendships! All without the Internet & cellphone SEE WHAT CAMP CAN DO FOR YOUR CHILD

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ummer camp is more than a vacation for children," says Bruce Muchnick, Ed.D., a licensed psychologist who works extensively with day and resident camps.

"As a parent, there are a few things to consider to increase the opportunity for a rewarding camp experience for your child." Some helpful suggestions provided by Dr. Muchnick and the American Camping Association include:

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theca www.

Call for FREE: Personal Guidance Videos Brochures ~ on ~ Teen Tours Sleep Away Camps Pre-College Programs Community Service Programs

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Consider camp as a learning experience. This is an opportunity for your child to explore a world bigger than his/her neighborhood and a chance for you and your child to practice "letting go." Letting go allows children to develop autonomy and a stronger sense of self, make new friends, develop new social skills, learn about teamwork, be creative, and more. This time also allows parents an opportunity to take care of themselves so that they will feel refreshed when their child returns home.

For more information call Laurel and Norm Barrie or Melissa Barrie Cohen

Prepare for camp together. Decisions about camp - like where to go and what to pack - should be a joint venture, keeping in mind your child's maturity. If your

Over 25 years of experience! Over 600 programs represented! 625331

child feels a part of the decision-making process, his/her chances of having a positive experience will improve.

The HASC - Woodmere Early Childhood Learning Center

Talk about concerns. As the first day of camp nears, some children experience uneasiness about going away. Encourage your child to talk about these feelings rather than acting on what you think his/her feelings may be. Communicate confidence in your child's ability to handle being away from home.

All Young Children Are Not The Same ......................... All Nursery Schools Are Not The Same ........................ HASC can provide your child with a developmentally appropriate, language based, learning experience with a strong emphasis on having fun in an integrated setting of eight typically developing children and seven children with special needs.

Have realistic expectations. Camp, like the rest of life, has high and low points. Not every moment will be filled with wonder and excitement. Encourage your child to have a reasonable and realistic view of camp. Discuss both the ups and downs your child may experience. Your child should not feel pressured to succeed at camp, either. The main purposes of camp are to relax and have fun.

****

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Resnick

Reading Center

Full Day Program 8:45 ~ 2:15

Est. 1968

We Treat Each Student As An Individual

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Lois Hofflin, Program Director 321 Woodmere Blvd. Woodmere (516)295-1340 HASC is a licensed day care facility.

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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

S10 RESEARCH HAS FOUND THAT THE

516-374-5998 All Certified Instructors Day • Evening • Summer • Sessions

Director - Diana Resnick Nahoum, BA, MS LIC. Psychologist on Staff 625182


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S11

f you went to camp, you probably didn't serve yourself lunch from a salad bar. Times have changed! all camps accredited by ACA say that they've started serving more fruits and vegetables. About four in ten have explicitly reduced the use of fried foods and sweets or sugary foods. Some offer low or no-fat options. Cooking with olive oil, adding flax, avoiding partially hydrogenated oils, making food from scratch – these are all ways for children to eat healthier that camps are incorporating into their menu plans. Even in the camp canteen, the trend is toward healthier choices and less candy or "junk food." Allergen-free foods. Many camps provide choices that address specific allergy issues. The peanut-free option is provided often, with nearly 40 percent of all camps saying they offer this choice, potentially including items like soy nut butter. Some camps are completely peanut-free, while others set up a no-nuts table at mealtime. Camp directors also report being more attuned to children who have sensitivity to gluten. Special diets. Meals that are kosher, calo-

rie controlled, or designed for diabetic campers are some of the options at camp. Parents can ask the director of the camp they're considering what special foods are offered. Awareness of eating disorders. In ACA's survey of camps, one camp reports that its staff is trained to watch for indicators of any eating disorders and shown how to model good eating behaviors for the campers. Camp health staff is there to watch out for children, and aware camp nurses can keep a trained eye on campers for any special problems or behaviors. Recently, one camp's program theme was from the "Inside Out." Their intent was "to help the campers become physically, personally, and socially healthier on the inside so that they could more positively impact their outside worlds."

Interactive programs. Another camp reports offering special programs for fifth grade-age campers and older where the campers experiment with doing their own cooking. The same camp offers programs on natural therapies and de-stressing for campers seventh grade and up. Camps have always placed an emphasis on health and fitness. Today, the activities and food options they provide – and the healthy behaviors they teach – are more important than ever.

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Now the majority of camps offer salad bars – just one sign that camps' menus are reflecting families' changing tastes. This is one of many updated ways camps are encouraging the longstanding tradition of healthy behavior – in the dining hall as well as on the playing field or at the swimming pool. Camps are doing much to help address concerns about kids eating the right foods, as one of the healthy ways to promote wellbeing. Thoughtful menu planning – along with physical exercise – is helping stem problems of weight gain among children. A summer camp experience can provide the structure and activity needed to keep kids healthy year-round. According to research conducted by the American Camp Association (ACA), 63 percent of children who learn new activities at camp tend to continue engaging in these activities after they return home. What are some of the things camps are offering? More menu choices. Over two-thirds of

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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

Encouraging kids to make positive choices


THE BRANDEIS SCHOOL

3

• Nursery-8th Grades

LOOK WHAT WE ARE ALL ABOUT!

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25 FROST LANE • LAWRENCE, NY 11559 (516) 371-4747 • FAX (516) 371-1572 www.TheBrandeisSchool.org

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May 2, 2013 — PARENTING - HERALD COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

S12


May 2, 2013

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Summer adventures Options to keep everyone happy and productive

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Kids & the arts Nurturing their talents

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Is your child ready for sleepaway camp?


˜ž¡™§š£–£™©š–§©¨ A parent’s investment in joy By Dale Lewis

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s Director of Long Island’s Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts, I have the privilege of working with 1,500 arts majors every day.

New York Hall of Science Don’t miss Design Zone and discover how video game developers, music producers, roller coaster designers and other creatives use math and science to design! Little Makers Sundays in May and June; 10:30am – 12:30pm Little Makers invites families with young children to tinker, design and create together. Join us and explore new materials, tools and processes. Preregistration recommended. Ages 18 mo+ Summer of the Stars May 18, June 8, July 13 and August 10; 12–4pm Join us for sports and star-related activities all summer long Bug Day June 29; 12–4pm Celebrate summer with – BUGS! We’ll have live bugs to observe, handle, learn from, eat and make Outdoor Play Spaces – NOW OPEN Play Rocket Park Mini Golf and climb on New York’s largest Science Playground! For more activities, events and 3D movies visit nysci.org

DESIGN ZONE was produced and is toured by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. This exhibit was made possible by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant.

www.nysci.org 47–01 111th Street Ɓ Queens, NY

111th Street Ɓ Easy on-site parking.

Presentadtoreceive$5offpurchaseof2ormoregeneraladmissiontickets.CodeLIPARENT.Expires08/31/13 624995

Guided by a faculty of leading professionals, our students struggle with creative ideas, master artistic techniques, and build works of art one skill at a time. At Usdan, the happy result is seen on the faces of children boarding their buses following a fulfilling summer’s day of “work.” Theirs are smiles of achievement, the result of numerous moments of trial and triumph. We don’t guarantee that children will cross the finish line. We guarantee that they will learn, grow, and have fun approaching it. The joy, after all, is in the journey. Studies linking childhood study in the arts to lifetime skill in virtually every other pursuit have become ubiquitous, so much so that they have come to trivialize an important conversation for parents. These studies cite the arts as having a pivotal role in the developSpecialty camps are growing in popularity as a summer option ment of 21st century skills, critical think- for families. Usdan’s 200-acre woodland campus in Wheatley ing, the experience of working sequen- Heights attracts over 1,600 kids ages 6-18 to its varied arts programs – over 40 in all. tially toward a goal, and improvement in a child’s academic achievement. The arts provide an ideal platform to However, there is more. Children who restore rigor to our schools, for study in the immerse themselves in the arts experience arts demands skill, judgment, and patience. something more important than better When a child leans to paint, skills are needed grades. They experience joy. to fill the canvas with quality and expression. Children acquire knowledge over time, There is the study of color, of form, and of gradually building skills and assembling contechnique, and there are intangible elements tent that allows each to see the possibility of that require critical thinking. These include success, and the skill needed to approach it. the development of a painting’s concept, and In other words, the arts slow things down. the artistic language needed to convey it. Artistic study forces us to set goals, to work Similarly, a child can’t play the clarinet in toward them, and to experience joy in the 10 minutes, days, or weeks. He must build journey, whatever its outcome. School is skills that lead to a performance, and this where the journey is supposed to begin, but takes time. That winter concert we enjoyed it may surprise some that teacher-inspired wasn’t put together in a week or a month. It journeys of achievement are often thwarted was the result of a continuum of skills by a system that eschews journeys with risk. inspired by music teachers brave enough to Instead, our system favors short paths toward swim upstream against declarations of sucimmediate gratification, flawed paths that cess without expectations of achievement. we now define as success. Concerts are crafted by children who have Teachers know that a child's struggle to mastered their art through hard work, skill learn, and to occasionally fail, is one of life's building, and patience. They have concluded great learning experiences. In today's schools their journey, whether at the finish line or still in fact, teachers are the heroes and heroines in approaching it, thanks to arts teachers who a battle for standards that they shouldn't have inspire success and are willing to teach their to wage. We have asked them to teach with students to wait for it. hands tied behind their backs, as society Dale Lewis is the Executive Director of Usdan declares every child a winner. We have thus Center for the Creative and Performing Arts proclaimed the finish line to be our goal, certiin Wheatley Heights. For more information, fying every child a victor before the starter's contact www.usdan.com. pistol has been fired. Perhaps we adults have forgotten how we learned – one skill at a time, one achievement at a time, even one failure at a time. Publishers CLIFFORD RICHNER STUART RICHNER Executive Editor JOHN C. O’CONNELL Section Editor KAREN BLOOM

Editorial Designer JEFFREY A. NEGRIN Vice President of Sales RHONDA GLICKMAN Account Executives AUDREY COHEN SUSANNE COLTEN ROBERT CUMMINGS

JANE FAIELLA NANCY FRIEDMAN ELLEN FRISCH JILL KAPLAN ALYSSA KUSSIN JOAN KURKOMELIS ROBIN REINER KAREN RESNICK

Parenting is an advertising supplement to the HERALD Community Newspapers. Copyright © 2013 Richner Communications, Inc. Published by Richner Communications, Inc. 2 Endo Blvd., Garden City, NY 11530 (516) 569-4000 • www.liherald.com

Cover Design JEFFREY A. NEGRIN


Š¤¼Â&#x2020;Â&#x2026;§Â&#x161;Â&#x2013;¨¤£¨ to send your child to sleepaway camp

By The Camp Connection

10 Disney was not joking. Michael D. Eisner, former CEO of Disney, shares that â&#x20AC;&#x153;camp is a guide to growing up, learning to rely on yourself as you work as a team, developing tools for leadership, competing to win but finding pride and growth in defeat.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not Mickey Mouse stuff! 9 Me, myself and I. Sleepaway camp is the one place a child can make decisions and problem solve in a safe, caring environment without parents or teachers. At camp, children learn to manage conflict and different personalities. Campers come home with increased confidence and greater sense of independence.

8 All in the family. While joining together in cleaning their bunk, painting scenery, creating a skit and playing in tournaments, campers become part of a new team of friends and counselors (from all over the country and world) who become a family reuniting year after year.

7 A camp for every child. Each child is unique. Some sparkle when playing soccer or performing on stage while others yearn to be the next Best Baker. There is a camp for each child to explore various interests.

6 The best part of the day. Sleeping next to their best buddies, campers spend â&#x20AC;&#x153;flashlight timeâ&#x20AC;? sharing the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accomplishments, funniest moments and stories. Late night talks become one of the most bonding moments of camp. 5 Bragging rights. Sleepaway camp exposes children to activities that are new and unique. Camp is a motivating place for children to grow and succeed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting up on water-skis for the first time, cheering a Color War song or writing for the camp newsletter. When a child goes to camp, he/she will always have something grand to tell you about. 4 Hands are not just for texting and typing. At camp, children will rest their fingers from cell phones and computer keyboards. Camperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fingers return to no-tech activities such as writing letters, whittling a wood bench and weaving a potholder.

3 Camp is not just for the camper. While their children are having fun-filled, action packed days away, parents get a reprieve from the fast paced daily routines of packing lunches, carpooling and laundry. Sending a child away for a few weeks

allows couples to renew, rediscover and recharge their relationship.

2 What they enjoy. Without the pressure of homework and tests, campers discover what activities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOT SUBJECTS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they enjoy and have fun doing. No one grades fun! 1 Winter, spring, summer and fall. Ask anyone who went away to camp. Camp friends are year-round, life-long friends. Camp creates memories that last a lifetime.

Courtesy of Laurel and Norm Barrie, Melissa Barrie Cohen. For more information, visit www.thecampconnection.com or contact camp4u@thecampconnection.com

M@;<F>8D<GIF;L:K@FE N@K?DFK@FE:8GKLI< =FLIFE<$N<<BGIF;L:K@FENFIBJ?FGJ8M8@C89C< DFE;8P#ALCP(,$=I@;8P#8L>LJK0#)'(* Are you a high school student with an interest in animation? Are you interested in the production of visual effects for movies and video games?

Come explore a fun and exciting career path in the one-week Motion Capture and Animation Course at B15 Studios, located on NYITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Old Westbury campus. â&#x20AC;˘ Direct scenes where motion will be captured on 32 high-speed near-infrared cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Edit and alter these movements in 3-D programs such as Maya and use them in video game programs such as Unity â&#x20AC;˘ Create and keep your own video-game level â&#x20AC;˘ Taught by industry professionals who have worked with companies such as Disney, Acclaim Entertainment and NASA

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DFK@FE:8GKLI<sK<:?EFCF>PsM@;<F>8D<J Tuition and Fees: $550 (lunch+$35 per week) Session 3: Monday, July 29 - Friday Aug. 2 Session 4: Monday, August 5 - Friday Aug. 9

624852

Session 1: Monday, July 15 - Friday, July 19 Session 2: Monday, July 22 - Friday, July 26

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For more information, contact Professor Peter Voci at 516.686.1227, or at pvoci@nyit.edu. Also visit b15studios.com/summer_camp

nyit.edu



Time: 9a.m. - 1p.m. Location: Midge Karr Fine Arts Center, Old Westbury, NY 11568 [Transportation is available]

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Temple Am Echad RABBI STUART M. GELLER EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER

Formerly Temple Emanu-El of Lynbrook

DON’T MISS OUT! ENROLL NOW FOR 2013 EVERYONE WELCOME!

CAMP & SCHOOL DIRECTORY Future Stars Usdan Center for the Creative and Summer Camp Future Stars Summer Camps offer the finest weekly Performing Arts specialty day camps at two convenient locations, The

New York Hall of Science The New York Hall of Science features over 450 interactive exhibits and play spaces; including the award-winning Science Playground, Preschool Place, and Rocket Park Mini Golf. A visit to NYSCI is a handson, energetic educational experience where you can indulge your curiosity and nurture your creativity. Don’t miss all-new exhibit Design Zone, opening May 25, for a limited time only. For directions and more information, visit www.nysci.org or call 718-699-0005. New York Hall of Science - 718-699-0005

New York Institute of Technology B15 Studios

B15 Studios, a 32-camera motion capture animation studio, in conjunction with the New York Institute of Technology, is offering a series of one-week videogame production workshops. This program will be held at NYIT’s Old Westbury campus during the summer of 2013. The workshops utilize industry-leading motion capture technology, which is used in movies, videogames, and scientific research. High school students with an interest in animation, visual effects for movies, television, commercials, pre-visualization, and videogames will gain insight into this industry. The program is taught by industry professionals who have worked at Disney, Acclaim Entertainment, and NASA. For more information…b15studios.com/summer_camp.html New York Institute of Technology B 15 Studios - 516 -686-1227

Usdan is the nation’s preeminent nonprofit arts day camp. TimeOutNY/Kids declared Usdan a “Best Of” camp, and Usdan has been profiled in The New York Times and Time Magazine. Each day, 1,600 students, ages 6 -18, travel to Usdan’s Wheatley Heights campus from all LI neighborhoods. Usdan offers 40 programs in Music, Art, Theater, Dance, Writing, Chess, and Nature and Organic Gardening. Usdan is chartered by the NY State Regents. Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts 631-643-7900 www.usdan.com

• Mommy & Me • 12 mos-18 mos • Flexible Schedule • 18 mos, 2 year, 3 year and 4 year old programs • Busing Available • Outdoor Playground • Fully Equipped Spacious Age-Appropriate Gym

Call Barbara Goodman or Sue Chaplick (Early Childhood Directors) Advanced Degrees in Early Childhood Elementary Education, Special Education, and Administration Supervision

Waldorf School of Garden City Celebrating its 65th year, The Waldorf School of Garden City is an independent, coeducational, college-preparatory day school for students age three through twelfth grade. We are dedicated to providing a rigorous, liberal arts education that focuses on the development of the whole human being. Emphasis is placed on a multidisciplinary approach to learning through a curriculum that balances the physical, artistic, social and intellectual needs of our students. Our nurturing environment and diverse community enable our students to excel as educated and compassionate individuals whose lives are enriched by their lifelong passion for learning. The program includes: 12 year sustainable living curriculum, natural toys, on-site vegetable gardens, extended 240 acre farm campus in New Hampshire, organic homemade lunch, hands-on and project-based learning, fiber arts, woodworking, visual arts, movement, dramatic arts, music, college preparatory curriculum. Waldorf School of Garden City 516-742-3434 www.waldorfgarden.org

NYS Certified Teachers Thematic, Age Appropriate Curriculum • Music & Movement • Enrichment Programs

One Saperstein Plaza • Lynbrook

599-7950

625394

College at Old Westbury and Farmingdale State College. Summer 2013 camps run from June 24 through August 16. Weekly Camps are Monday to Friday 9am-4pm. Programs are directed by experienced and qualified teachers and coaches who share a passion for working with children. Programs include Baseball, Basketball, Cheerleading, Circus Arts, Dance, Drama, Football, Golf, Horseback Riding, Lacrosse, Magic, Multimedia, Multi-Sports, Soccer, Swim, Tennis, and Volleyball. Lunch Included. Transportation Available. Future Stars Summer Camp 876-3490 - www.fscamps.com

SUMMER EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM

For Membership Information Call Lisa Burch - 593-4004

summer2013

17

at College at Old Westbury at Farmingdale State College

Registration Day MAY 4 weekly sessions

Temple Am Echad South Shore Reform Congregation

Since 1980

Boys & Girls

Grades K - 12

TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE

fscamps.com

516.876.3490

625078

Temple Am Echad provides a nurturing and loving environment as well as a well rounded early childhood education. The curriculum involves a basic exposure to Jewish culture and holidays. Temple Am Echad offers a variety of programs, including the toddler center for children one to two and a half years old, and a nursery school for three and four year-olds. A half day summer camp program is available for ages one to four. Programs include water play, arts and crafts, music, outdoor playground. Each week has a different theme, such as circus or cooking. Our gym is air conditioned and our qualified teachers are our counselors. Temple Am Echad Rabbi Stuart M. Geller / Early Childhood Center 516-599-7950


MORE THAN JUST PLAY AT THE NEW YORK HALL OF SCIENCE

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he New York Hall of Science has come along since the 1964 World’s Fair. From its beginnings as one of the iconic World’s Fair pavilions, the New York Hall of Science has evolved into the region’s premiere hands-on science and technology center.

Since 1986, NYSCI has served over seven million children, parents and teachers, carrying on its mission to convey the excitement and understanding of science and technology to everyone by galvanizing their curiosity and offering them creative, participatory ways to learn. Summer is a particularly exciting time to visit NYSCI. Its new exhibit, “Design Zone,” opens May 25, and runs through. Sept. 1. The interactive exhibit involves three areas, at which visitors can learn how videogame developers, music producers, roller coaster designers and other creative problem solvers use math and science to meet their design challenges. Music – Hear It! examines math in the music while you explore relationships between length and pitch in musical instruments, ratios and rhythms, and visual representations of sound. Exhibits include: Drum Machine. Be a DJ and pick the sounds and the number of repeats for a two-beat track, a three-beat track, and a four-beat track. Then see if you can get all tracks to end on the same beat. Music Mix. Try out your music production skills by putting together music samples. Pick your best song and email it to your friends. Turntables. Practice your DJ skills on simulated turntables. Sound Graph. Talk, sing or whistle into a microphone and

Keep young minds active this summer with a visit to the New York Hall of Science.

see the sound displayed on a real-time graph of pitch over time. Whack-a-Phone. Hit tubes of different lengths to make music.

Slide-a-Phone. While a friend beats on the drumhead, slide the tube to play different notes. Digital Strings. Adjust the lengths of eight virtual strings and then hear your musical pattern. In the second area, Art – See It!, find out how visual designers use scale, pattern, coordinate grids, equality and slope to turn ideas into reality. See the math behind visual creativity as you design your own 2-D and 3-D art. Exhibits include: Mirror Multiplier. Explore reflectional symmetry using colorful geometric pieces and a hinged pair of mirros. Picture Calculator. Take a picture of yourself and manipulate the values of the pixels to transform your photo. Then, in Action – Move It!, discover the math and physics behind anything that moves. Build a custom digital roller coaster, design your own skate park, and race your bike to the finish line. Exhibits include: Roller Coaster Hills. Roll a ball down a ramp from a certain height and find out how far it flies off the end of the ramp. Fast Tracks. Assemble your track to create and test your own roller coaster course using a giant magnet wall. Design a Roller Coaster. Design and test virtual roller coaster tracks in this computer graphing simulation. Bike Race. Choose from three bike stations – two recumbent bicycles or a hand crank bike – and experience a full-body bike race. NYSCI is located in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens. For more information, visit www.nysci.org.

Time to think about

summer camp! Open House

For information please call:

516.742.3434 ext. 327 225 Cambridge Avenue, Garden City, NY 11530 www.waldorfgarden.org

Camp in session:

Monday, July 1 through Friday, August 9 . 3-13 .Ages Enrollment .Flexible Program for 14 – 16 year olds .CIT Optional aftercare to 6:00 p.m.

625060

Saturday, May 11th 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Parenting - April 27, 2013  

Herald Community Newspapers

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