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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

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Richmond Review · Page 3

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition Friday, Feb. 24, 2012

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helped to found such causes as the Richmond Christmas Fund. During World War II and the internment of citizens of Japanese ancestry, Tibbits spoke out about this injustice, giving Richmond residents plenty to think about through her edgy, insightful and always thoughtprovoking editorials. Even today, we continue to strive to fulfill 2 Tibbits’ vision through excellence in reporting, advertising and community involvement, with the Ethel Tib-

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When Bill Carruthers produced the first edition of The Richmond Review on April 1, 1932, little did he know that his four-page effort would 80 years later earn and maintain the reputation as this city’s newspaper of record, providing all the latest news, sports, arts and cultural information. Or that the sleepy agricultural suburb of Vancouver would grow into a bustling urban centre with one of the most ethnically-diverse populations on the planet.

During the earliest days of The Review, editor Ethel Tibbits was a firebrand who championed social justice and raised the bar for what a community newspaper should be. Her efforts remain today’s measuring stick for excellence in reporting. She was committed to fairness for all Richmondites, recognizing that a newspaper should take a leadership role in the community. To that end, she

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bits Women of Distinction Awards one of the annual highlights, having raised more than $150,000 since its inception in 1994. As stewards of the community, and to some extent one of its guardians, The Richmond Review and its team of reporters takes great pride in their responsibility to bring issues that affect the lives of local residents to their attention and passionately champion the causes of those who would otherwise have no voice. That remains The Review’s bread and butter, something we bring to the table of every home in Richmond each Wednesday and Friday. Reporting on the news and helping businesses get their message across has been our please for 80 years. We sincerely appreciate the community’s support.


Page 4 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Ethel Tibbits’ fight for justice Newspaper editors don’t get remembered for writing editorials such as “government did the right thing in cutting taxes.” In the long run, it’s editors who showed an incredible amount of courage in fighting against injustices, sometimes even those supported by a majority of public opinion, that are remembered. While Ethel Tibbits has been memorialized as the namesake of Richmond’s women of the year awards, she will be always remembered for far more than that. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii in 1941, the Canadian government ordered the internment of Canadians of Japanese descent. Many Japanese-Canadians, including those who had fought for Canada in the First World War, were forcibly removed from Steveston to internment camps in the B.C. Interior. “In this demand are they really considering public safety, or are they merely seizing upon this situation as an opportunity to oust from their midst a people whose presence they have long resented? Is their cry of patriotism or of prejudice?” Before joining The Richmond Review, Tibbits (nee Burnett) had worked as a reporter for The Province, and came out to Richmond and married Orland Delos Tibbits on Dec. 25, 1926. In 1932, she started working at the new paper, then owned

City of Richmond archives photo Blundell Grocery, headquarters of The Richmond Review back in the early days.

by W.R. Carruthers. Within the year, she purchased the paper and continued to write most of the content that went into it. Her husband worked as circulation manager, and they ran the business at her husband’s store, Blundell Grocery, located at the corner of Railway and Blundell. “She was a newspaperwoman from the get-go,” Meda Alcock, who lived kitty corner to the Tibbits, told The Richmond Review in 2002. “She knew this island from the word go.” Tibbits distinguished herself as an editor to be reckoned with from her first day at the paper. It was the darkest days of the

Depression, and her writings explored the daunting issues of the day. She criticized the big banks, which boasted of profits while many citizens struggled to get by. She offered insightful analysis of global trends, such as the mechanization of the workplace, and the resulting losses of labour-related jobs. But her greatest achievement was a series of editorials she wrote in early 1942, criticizing proposals to intern B.C.’s Japanese-Canadian residents. Tibbits was also an active part of the Richmond community and helped establish the Richmond Christmas Fund. Christine (Teeney) McKinney

remembers Tibbits’ editorials and the response they provoked in her family. “My dad used to get so mad at her he wouldn’t buy her paper,” McKinney told The Richmond Review in 2002. “But he’d take it out of somebody else’s mailbox.” Tibbits’ hair was often messed up, sticking straight up, and she had a reputation for being a “bit queer sometimes,” McKinney said. Tibbits was born in Walters Falls, Ont., but was taken West as an infant and given her early education in the rural school of Pomeroy, Manitoba, and later her parents came out to Nanton, Alberta. Tibbits stayed at The Richmond Review until 1948, and in 1953 her book, titled On to the Sunset: The Lifetime Adventures of a Spirited Pioneer, was published. Her husband died in 1946 and, in 1956, she married John Woolstone. She died in 1960, and had no children.

Ethel Tibbits, pioneering editor of The RIchmond Review.

Ethel Tibbits didn’t suffer fools gladly She seemed always on a mission, recalls long-time local Olive Bassett by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter It was the summer of 1937, in the midst of the “dirty thirties” and the Great Depression, when Olive Bassett first met the female firebrand behind The Richmond Review. Still a teenager, Bassett and her family had just moved to Lulu Island after receiving an invitation from Bassett’s uncle, Jack Marshall, who lived on McCallan Road, near Blundell Grocery. “Uncle Jack had written Dad and said, ‘If you are going to starve come on out here, at least you won’t freeze to death doing it,” Bassett told The Richmond Review this week. And while they waited for the house they were going to rent to become available, and for the time being stayed with Bassett’s uncle, her cousin, Ronnie, introduced Bassett to a girl who lived across the street: Bea Hamson.

Bassett and Hamson struck up a friendship that would prove to endure a lifetime. Bassett recalled how Hamson invited her along to fold newspapers for the owner of The Richmond Review. Back in those days, newspapers were folded so carriers could toss them onto porches. “You knew the paper had arrived when it hit the front door with a bang,” Bassett said. “(She) did this (folding) every Wednesday (I think it was Wednesday) and she asked me to come and help her, which I did.” And that’s where she met Ethel Tibbits. “Ethel Tibbits was one woman I won’t easily forget. I didn’t realize at the time she was such an amazing person,” Bassett said. “To me, as a young teenager one summer, folding papers with my girlfriend Bea Hamson, she was a bit scary and you never quite knew how she would be feeling: angry, disgusted or sympathetic. “If she was talking about those ‘idiots that run things’ she was definitely disgusted; if it was the poor, she was both angry and sympathetic.” While she now refers to her as Ethel, at the time she called her Mrs. Tibbits, of course. “She had absolutely no time for fools and she called them ‘strutting whimps’ in Ottawa.” Tibbits always seemed to be in a hurry, and was rushing everywhere. “I remember her talking to us about school

and she felt they didn’t teach us enough about our own history. I think it must be from her that I grew up thinking the editorials and letters to the editor are the most important parts of a newspaper.” Tibbits was a bit eccentric too. “I’m afraid Bea and I used to laugh when we thought she wasn’t looking, because she wore men’s overalls, carpet slippers inside, boots out, but always a ladies hat. Even to feed the chickens, then she would come through to where we were and say ‘more foolin’ than foldin’ goin’ on in here if I’m not mistaken.’ “She didn’t miss much,” Bassett said. “She was also very kind and I remember she was very involved in helping those in need.” Bassett recalls how Tibbits’ husband, Orlan, looked after their store, The Blundell Grocery. “She would get upset if her husband...had to go to Vancouver and she had to look after it. Years after, I remember my daughter coming home from school had stopped to get an ice cream and said, ‘Mr. Tibbits is away I guess ‘cause Mrs. Tibbits was in the store, she wasn’t happy.’” And Bassett recalls how Tibbits gave her a bit of insight into Tibbits’ husband. “Orlan had a method in his madness. He married her on Christmas Day so he would never forget their anniversary and only had to buy one present.”

Jennifer Larsen and Olive Bassett, with a portrait of Ethel Tibbits.

Olive and the Ethels •Olive Bassett has been an active volunteer in Richmond since her days working for Ethel Tibbits. In March, she was recognized for her efforts along with her good friend Jennifer Larsen at the 19th annual Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards.


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review ¡ Page 5

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

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by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter Some jest that newspapers are little more than ďŹ sh wrap or birdcage liner, but those eco-conscious uses often come long after serious issues are brought out from the shadows and exposed to the light of public scrutiny. Over the decades, The Richmond Review has won countless local, provincial and national awards for its news, sports and arts coverage. But beyond the accolades from its peers is the behind-the-scenes work that The Review does to support local businesses, organizations, and causes. For nearly 20 years, The Review has supported Nova House, a domestic violence shelter. Joan Cowderoy, executive director of

Rob Newell photo Richmond Review publisher Mary Kemmis and CHIMO Crisis Services executive director Joan Cowderoy at this year’s Ethel Tibbits Awards.

CHIMO Crisis Services which runs the shelter, said The Review’s support has been huge. “Not only the ďŹ nancial support, but the material that comes out in the paper, prior to and following. That helps everyone in the community know the importance of these services in the community,â€? she said. “Local papers like The Review particularly that are so connected in the community, that help from the ground up raise issues or work with people to understand those issues, or support people to deal with those issues, help to make this such a great community.â€? Aside from casting the spotlight on Nova

House through newspaper coverage, The Review started the Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards in 1994, with the fundraising luncheon celebrating women’s achievements while contributing to the support of the women’s shelter. The Review has also established strong ties in the sports community, supporting and or helping to present several annual events including the Nations Cup Soccer Tournament, PaciďŹ c International Cup curling

championships, and The Richmond Sports Awards in co-operation with Richmond Sports Council and the City of Richmond. Then there’s the Richmond Christmas Fund, which The Review has championed for decades. In fact, Ethel Tibbits helped found it. And the annual Const. Jimmy Ng Memorial Street Hockey tournament which The Review has been a proud supporter of since its inception following Ng’s street-racing related death in 2002.

City Board Asphalt paving advisory April 25 to 27, 2012 The City of Richmond has contracted Imperial Paving Ltd. to grind and pave the following location in Richmond from April 25 to 27: • 3,000 block Moncton Street o Milling on April 25 and 26: 7:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m. o Paving on April 27: 8:00 p.m.–3:00 a.m. Traffic will be reduced to single-lane alternating at times, and may be subject to temporary lane closures. Delays may occur. The use of an alternate route is strongly encouraged. Residents are asked to not park vehicles in the immediate area during paving. This work is weather dependent and dates are subject to change without notice. Questions may be directed to Wasim Memon, Supervisor, Engineering Inspections, at 604-276-4189, or visit the City’s paving program webpage at www.richmond.ca (City Services > Roads, Dykes, Water & Sewers > Construction Projects > 2012 Paving). City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

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Page 6 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

We’ve come a long way together

Interurban tram at Steveston Station, [ca. 1932] City of Richmond Archives #1978 31 65

Old Town Centre, aerial view from Sea Island, [ca. 1930] City of Richmond Archives #1985 166 3

Although Richmond has changed a lot in the past 80 years, two constants over the decades have been the City of Richmond and the Richmond Review. Each continues to serve the residents, businesses and visitors of Richmond with great responsibility and pride. Congratulations to the Richmond Review on its 80th anniversary. City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 7

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Martin van den Hemel photo While technology has changed the newspaper industry, what remains at the core is the same, says Richmond Review publisher Mary Kemmis.

creative and distribution teams are among the best in the business. In terms of our place in the community, we continue to play a vital role in not only reporting the news, but supporting and, in some cases initiating, community enterprises that ensure Richmond continues to evolve and remain an economic and social leader.” But while change is inevitable, much about the newspaper hasn’t. “On a localized level, while technology and structure have changed, community newspapers like The Richmond Review remain an integral part of our social fabric.

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by Martin van den Hemel The fast-paced change in technology has forced businesses to evolve with the times for survival, and the newspaper industry is no different. “The internet is giving the newspaper industry the opportunity to increase our relevance in peoples lives by allowing our readers to access us anytime from anywhere in the world,” said Richmond Review publisher Mary Kemmis, who began her newspaper career as a journalist before transitioning into sales. “Our print product still plays a very significant role in the lives of people of all ages and will for the foreseeable future: the internet just gives us something else to bring to the table. Kemmis said the newspaper has become more sophisticated in how it conducts business. “Our reporting, sales,

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Our readers turn to us for the hyper-local community news and advertising that they can’t get on the radio, television or the web.” Under the direction of parent company Black Press, Kemmis said The Review is fortunate to have leadership that “recognizes the uniqueness of every community and has the business acumen to guide us through economic conditions that have seen other businesses falter.” She added: “Everyone at The Richmond Review is incredibly proud to work at a place that is so much a part of the social and

economic fabric of our community. We’re also very proud of the fact that The Richmond Review remains a viable and relevant business that continues to evolve with the community it serves.” Kemmis said growing up reading community newspapers helped to shape her appreciation for the important role they play in our everyday lives. She added the opportunity to experience different roles in the papers she has worked for have combined to “give me a broad perspective of how community newspapers contribute to the fabric of our communities.”

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The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

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REVIEW #1 - 3671 VIKING WAY, RICHMOND, B.C. V6V 2J5 • 604-247-3700 • FAX: 604-247-3739 • RICHMONDREVIEW.COM TWITTER.COM/RICHMONDREVIEW • FACEBOOK.COM/RICHMONDREVIEW

PUBLISHER MARY KEMMIS, 604-247-3702 publisher@richmondreview.com

EDITOR BHREANDÁIN CLUGSTON, 604-247-3730 editor@richmondreview.com STAFF REPORTERS MATTHEW HOEKSTRA, 604-247-3732 mhoekstra@richmondreview.com MARTIN VAN DEN HEMEL, 604-247-3733 martin@richmondreview.com SPORTS EDITOR DON FENNELL, 604-247-3731 sports@richmondreview.com City of Richmond Archives photo Geraldine Wray (bottom right), with her brother Gil (front left), siblings Evelyn and Iris and grandparents.

ASSISTANT ADVERTISING MANAGER ELANA GOLD, 604-247-3704 elanag@richmondreview.com SALES ROB AKIMOW, 604-247-3708 roba@richmondreview.com COLLIN NEAL, 604-247-3719 collinn@richmondreview.com LESLEY SMITH, 604-247-3705 lesley@richmondreview.com TORRIE WATTERS, 604-247-3707 torrie@richmondreview.com JAMES TENG, 604-247-3714 jamest@richmondreview.com

CIRCULATION MANAGER RACHAEL FINKELSTEIN, 604-247-3710 circulation@richmondreview.com CIRCULATION JR TUAZON, ROYA SARWARY, 604-247-3710 circulation@richmondreview.com

CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER JAANA BJORK, 604-247-3716 jaana@richmondreview.com CREATIVE DEPARTMENT GABE MUNDSTOCK, 604-247-3718 gabe@richmondreview.com PETER PALMER, 604-247-3706 peter@richmondreview.com JAMES MARSHALL, 604-247-3701 james@richmondreview.com The Richmond Review is a member of the B.C. Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the council. Write (include documentation) within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org Published every Wednesday and Friday by Black Press Ltd.

Richmond: a snapshot of life in 1932 Depression was taking hold, as municipal workers take 10 per cent pay cut, teachers 33 per cent by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter In 1932, the sport of horse racing was king in Richmond. Lulu Island’s two race tracks would draw hordes of spectators and gamblers—so many, the equivalent of double the town’s 8,182 population was trackside at big races. “I can remember mom training the first horse they put on the track,” remembers Richmond’s Geraldine Wray, whose family bred horses at the time. “One of the best horses that came from our farm was called Ruffian, and he broke his leg at Lansdowne. We couldn’t find a vet to put him out of his misery. Provincial police used to attend (the races). One of them just took out his gun and shot him to put him out of his misery.” Wray, sister to the late former mayor Gil Blair, was five years old in 1932, when the first Richmond Review published and when races at Brighouse and Lansdowne tracks would pack interurban tram cars and fill ferries to Steveston. Boxing was also popular, as was lacrosse—the Milkmaids won the women’s B.C. lacrosse title that year—but horse racing was always

a sure bet in Richmond. “There were no lotteries, no casinos. The only form of legal public gambling was at the races,” said Bill Purver, archivist at the City of Richmond Archives. “People got all dressed up. It was a huge social event as well. It was a combination of a legitimate social event with an opportunity to legally gamble.” Richmond was a fast-growing city 80 years ago. Bridges had been built, the Vancouver airport on Sea Island was a year old and farming and fishing were the backbones of the local economy. But the community was feeling the effects of the Great Depression, set in motion around the world following a stock market crash in 1929. The town and its people were getting by thanks to a pennypinching local government, whose employees and politicians took a 10 per cent pay cut, and good old fashioned neighbourliness. “It was a kinder, gentler place where you’d know your neighbours,” said Wray, who remembers a childhood of school at Bridgeport, helping on the family farm and cycling to the tram to catch a movie in Marpole. Wray remembers Ethel Tibbits— who took the reins of The Review by year’s end—for her singing at South Arm Church. Ruth Yuswack, a fellow Friends of the Richmond Archives director, also remembered Tibbits and her opinions that would make her father jump up and down. “Ethel Tibbits would write things that my parents would get really mad about,” she said. “She liked to flare people up.” Yuswack, who is 85 this year,

“Ethel Tibbits would write things that my parents would get really mad about. She liked to flare people up.” - Geraldine Wray

was five when the year the paper started. She grew up close to Steveston and went to a school where Japanese students greatly outnumbered others. Her house was near the electric railway used by the tram, which would shuttle everyone from farmers and their goods to the Saturday night crowds heading to and from Vancouver theatres. Most of the town’s population was in Steveston, but farmers and fishermen lived throughout the islands, which have naturally changed since 1932. At the time, Mitchell Island was three separate formations in the river, Steveston Island was a much-smaller version of itself and Duck Island—now the site of a proposed mega-development—was actually an island. Farm crops were varied and included the loganberry, a fruit that spurred business for two local and short-lived wineries. Much of the agriculture was on Sea Island, in South Richmond and on Daniels Arm—a swath of land in East Richmond whose fertile land was once another arm of the Fraser River. At city hall, Rudy Grauer served as reeve (known as mayor today)

and five councillors were elected through a ward system. So unbalanced was the population that one ward had just 86 eligible voters in 1932, while others had hundreds. It was a time when voters were required to be British subjects and own land in Richmond. Businesses were given the right to vote, as were churches. Among the 2,125 people on the list in 1932 were Arthur Laing and Cora Brown, and reading it is like perusing a who’s who of Richmond pioneers: Trites, Grauer, Boyd, Tait, Gilmore, Brighouse, Cook. Council had built up a reserve account to keep the city somewhat comfortable during the Depression, while other towns, like Burnaby, went bankrupt. Richmond also found a financial boost in approving construction of the Canada Rice Mill along the South Arm, an operation that would bring new taxes and jobs to the city the following year. But managing the Depression wasn’t easy. Besides the 10 per cent pay cut taken by municipal workers and council, teachers salaries were cut by one-third, and according to Richmond: Child of the Fraser author Leslie Ross, two teachers even offered their entire salaries to help ease the financial stress being felt in schools. Ruth Yuswack remembers those days, and despite the financial hardship, still longs for them. “It was the Depression, we didn’t have anything and it was hard times, but it was a better life then than now,” she said. “You had your neighbours and you all cared about each other. Now you don’t even know the person next door.”


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 9

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

1932: The Richmond Review introduces itself The following appeared in the first edition of The Richmond Review, on April 1, 1932. WE MAKE OUR BOW! Richmond, a municipality some seventy-two square miles in area of about six thousand population, set down at the foot of a great Dominion and lapped by waters that lead out over the blue Pacific to the Orient, Richmond is a little kingdom of its own, water-girt, isolated from the mainland by the enfolding arms of the river. By its very situation Richmond is a little different to any other municipality in British Columbia. The fact that it is rich delta land, the formation of centuries of wash from the Fraser River and as flat as the mainland behind it is mountainous, makes it primarily an agricultural area, while the fact of its miles of water frontage available to deep set vessels and new served by two railway lines,

promise Richmond an industrial future unrivaled by any other segment of Canadian territory. And because this little kingdom down by the sea has a heritage peculiar to itself and a future which even the most skeptical victim of the hard times bugaboo cannot fail, if honest, to recognize, there is every justification for a “vox populi” for Richmond, a mouthpiece through which the residents of the community may voice their needs, their grievances and their opinions, as well as a medium through which Richmond may make known to the world and to her own residents just what is going on in this little land’s-end community, and what possibilities lie here for the agriculturist, the manufacturers and the exporter. It is with this conviction that the promoters and supporters of this publication present their first issue, the Richmond Review makes its vow to the Richmond residents

in the belief that such a publication will find a ready welcome; and the kindly assurance already received from numerous of Richmond’s business men, municipal officials and from representatives of the majority population, the farmers, that such a periodical as the Review promises to become will fill a real need on the Islands, has given the managing editor much encouragement and assurance. Especially gratifying has been the support already proffered from those who are to be the Review’s advertisers. The fact that the business men of the municipality have readily responded to this, the first appeal for their patronage and have filled the advertising columns of this issue from their varied seats of activity proves that the commercial leaders of the district are ready to

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back and employment is not as bad as at this time last year. The tide will turn here also. Meanwhile, there is nothing to do but to carry on, and the Review is willing to cast its lot in with the other enterprises which are breasting and

adverse times of the present,believing that the service which it will be able to render to the community will justify its appearing at this period. This publication is only made possible by the support of the merchants. By patron-

izing the merchants who advertise in its columns you are supporting it. And this is all the editor asks of the Richmond public, give to the Richmond Review only the support, but all the support that the Richmond Review merits.

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Page 10 ¡ Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Experience crazy wet fun at

Watermania!

Reporter Martin van den Hemel, sports editor Don Fennell, reporter Matthew Hoekstra and editor Bhreandain Clugston in The Richmond Review newsroom.

Community helps newsroom thrive Open Daily. Schedule details at www.richmond.ca/watermania 14300 Entertainment Blvd, Richmond 604-448-5353 City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

Ask anyone in the newsroom what’s the single most important aspect of their job, and they’ll tell you it’s maintaining a strong reputation in the community. Under the guidance of longtime Richmond Review editor Bhreandain Clugston, the newspaper’s news team has done exactly that. Whether it’s veteran sports editor Don Fennell, whose connections

with leaders at local schools and sports teams have been forged over more than two decades of sports coverage, or city hall and arts reporter Matthew Hoekstra, the reputation of the news team is No. 1. Crime and court reporter Martin van den Hemel has forged a reputation as someone who can be trusted to report the facts without embellishment, and who does his

research. A newspaper is only as strong as the information it gets from its sources. And that means being unafraid to forge relationships with community partners, both individuals and organizations. Clugston, who has been at the helm of The Richmond Review since 2000 and followed in his father’s footsteps.

Richmond Go Karts: Then and Now

The more things change; the more the GOOD THINGS stay the same.

Left photo: Racing the track in the 70's. | Right photo: Racing the track 2012 | Inset: Jimmy Pappajohn in 1998. Photo by DanToulgoet

This family owned business has been a staple

In early 1960's, Richmond Go Karts opened

their Dad and Jack Picken, a long-time

of the Richmond community for over 50

its door to racing and auto enthusiasts here

family friend, runs the track on a day-to-day

years. It's ability to stay successful stems

in the City of Richmond. It is now seeing

basis. These guys and the rest of the

from the one basic philosophy that Jimmy

many generations of patrons coming back to

Richmond Go Kart crew work hard to ensure

Pappajohn, who bought the track in the early

the track enjoying a race and reminessing

that everyone who comes to the track has a

70's, believed in; "If it ain't broke; you don't

about the good old days, the fun they had here

fun and memorable time.

Âż[LW6LPSOHDIIRUGDEOHIDPLO\IXQ7KDW V

and the fun that they are still having today.

what Richmond Go Karts was and continues

The track is still owned and operated by the

more safety and comfort, but the half mile

to be to this day... and THAT is the secret to

Pappajohn family. Tony, John and Tom

WUDFN UHPDLQV WKH VDPH FRQÂżJXUDWLRQ

it's success.

(Jimmy's three sons) have taken over from

allowing people of all ages and gender to

Today's karts may be different, providing

HQMR\DJUHDWRXWGRRUH[SHULHQFHRQWKH mile track. There is nothing like coming home to 5LFKPRQG *R .DUWV DQG H[SHULHQFLQJ WKH past as well as enjoying the day. Richmond Go Karts is located at 6631 6LGDZD\ 5RDG 5LFKPRQG %& :H UH KDOI D block south of the Richmond Auto Mall. Call XV DW  RU ÂżQG XV RQOLQH DW richmondgokarts.com Richmond Anniversary Feature


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 11

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Advertising team committed to helping businesses Unrivaled knowledge and experience help businesses raise their profiles by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter Economic times have been tough around the world for the past few years, but The Richmond Review’s advertising team has helped local businesses navigate these rough patches with strategies borne of their unrivaled knowledge and experience. Competition for consumers’ disposable dollars has never been stronger, and under those pressures, businesses have to think twice about how to spend their shrinking advertising budget. Under the leadership of assistant sales manager Elana Gold, firms are finding a light at the end of the tunnel partnering with The Review. Gold’s sales team includes advertising consultants Lesley Smith, Rob Akimow, Collin Neal, Torrie Watters and James Teng. Together, they work closely with local business owners and organizations seeking

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Martin van den Hemel photo The Review’s advertising team, including clockwise from bottom right, assistant manager Elana Gold, Rob Akimow, Collin Neal, James Teng, Lesley Smith and Torrie Watters.

to remain front and centre. “Ensuring local residents shop where they live is increasingly a focus of Richmond businesses and, thanks to The Richmond Review’s advertising team, many are enjoying a surge in new customers.” When it comes to selecting a realtor, dentist, doctor, grocery store, or bakery what’s top of mind for a con-

sumer can make all the difference. But it’s not just local business owners who can benefit from the advertising team’s experience. Organizations seeking to solicit donations or volunteers, such as churches or the local food bank, can effectively reach out the community through Richmond’s community newspaper of record.

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Page 12 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

It’s Our 25th Anniversary but the services, selection and savings are all for you! Since 1987 Blundell Centre has proudly served the Richmond community with a diverse array of 47 shops, services and restaurants conveniently located at the corner of No. 2 Road and Blundell.

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 13

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Review’s founder knew he was leaving paper in good hands Bill Carruthers founded paper before selling it to Ethel Tibbits Richmond in 1932 was no different than anywhere else in North America at the time. The Great Depression was in full swing and legions of young men wandered the province looking for work. One of those men was W.R. (Bill) Carruthers, an unemployed typesetter who hadn’t had a steady job since 1929. Carruthers decided to fight his way through the Depression by founding his own paper. He and retired Columbian co-owner Ben Stone Kennedy thought Richmond might be a good place for a community newspaper. “We decided to case the joint. There wasn’t such a thing,” Carruthers said in a 1982 interview with thenReview editor Terrence O’Neill. “A smattering of merchants and the

Bill Carruthers in the 1930s (left) and in 1982 (right).

odd garage. So we canvassed all the merchants and they said they were definitely interested in getting some sort of voice for Richmond.” Kennedy had a heart attack, so Carruthers forged ahead alone. “I didn’t have any money, that was the problem. I didn’t have any backing...It was basically a make-work project for me.” The first issue rolled off the press on April 1, 1932. Front page stories included “Mrs. Hedwig Tompsett, Wife of For-

mer Reeve of Burnaby, Dies,” “J.W. Miller Reelected Pres. Board of Trade,” and “St. Alban’s Dramatic Club to Stage 3-Act Comedy April 6 & 8.” An editorial, “WE MAKE OUR BOW!”, set the tone for what the paper would continue to do week after week for 75 years: “a medium through which the residents of Richmond may make known to the world and to her own residents just what is going on in this little land’s-end community.” Initially, Carruthers did

all the writing, selling and layout. He would then drive to New Westminster to typeset and print the paper himself. “I wasn’t making any money, just meeting expenses, but it was work,” Carruthers recalled. Soon, the fledgling paper was to add stringers: James Case was the Brighouse correspondent and Ethel Tibbits was the Steveston scribe. Before the year was over, Carruthers sold the paper to Tibbits for $50, a “tidy sum” in those days. Carruthers worked 35 more years in newspapers, most of it at The Vancouver Sun. It was his vision and courage that got the ball rolling; it was Tibbits who picked up the ball and ran with it. “I’ve always been a supporter of once a paper is started, there is only way to go— ahead. And Mrs. Tibbits was a fighter, so I knew I was leaving it in good hands.”

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Page 14 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Hospital has given our family the gift of health. Now it’s time to give back. The doctors and nurses at Richmond Hospital have become like

We were taken in right away and

family to us these past few months.

efficiently. After a number of tests, they

The care they have given my wife and

determined Linda needed a permanent

me has been exceptional, and we are

pacemaker, so they moved her to the

so very grateful.

Intensive Care Unit.

My name is Gary Gilmore. My wife

The excellent service continued. It was

Linda and I have lived in Richmond

my first time in intensive care, but I

all of our lives. A few months ago,

couldn’t have been more impressed.

Linda started feeling sick. The doctor

Sometimes, with the people you love,

The nurses cared for Linda like she was family – and made sure

you just know. And I was right; when

I was comfortable and not getting too

Linda’s test results came back they told

anxious myself. Before, during, and

saw the head doctor from intensive care as well as a vascular surgeon. Everything happened smoothly and

thought it was just a virus, but I was worried it was something more serious.

us to go straight to the Emergency

Gary and Linda Gilmore

Department at Richmond Hospital.

after her surgery, I felt confident my wife was in the best possible hands.

I was scared, there’s no denying that. We are in our 70’s, and can’t take our health

Thank you to all the doctors, nurses, and medical team members and to the medical equipment made possible by generous donors, Linda and I are back on the path to

for granted. But I was reassured by the excellent care we

good health. We are looking forward to getting back on our

received from the moment we walked through the doors

tandem bike so we can stay active and enjoy the beauty of

at Richmond Hospital.

our community.

I can’t stress enough how important it is to support our Community Hospital. With your generous donations, Richmond Hospital will be able to provide the excellent quality of care we have come to rely on. Please donate today so this care can continue for your family, RIGHT here in our community.

GIVE THE GIFT OF HEALTH To donate please contact: www.richmondhospitalfoundation.com | info@richmondhospitalfoundation.com Richmond Hospital Foundation | 7000 Westminster Highway, Richmond, BC V6X 1A2 | 604.244.5252


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 15

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Did you hear the one about the comic that used to deliver the paper? See page 16

Martin van den Hemel The front office team, including receptionist and ad controller Shaena Furlong, circulation manager Rachael Finkelstein, and district manager Roya Sarwary, are the face the newspaper that the public first sees when visiting The Review’s office at 1-3671 Viking Way.

Carriers keep the news coming to local doorsteps snow and high winds, the challenge becomes keeping the newspaper dry, and ensuring the carriers aren’t injured under the adverse weather conditions.

oice Ch fo

's

r 80

Ye a r s

For all the hard work done by the reporters to write the stories, and the advertising reps to sell the ads that pay for the paper’s free distribution and the creative team to come up with eye-catching designs, all this work is for naught without the people who really do deliver the news. From young children earning pocket money through their first jobs, to teens paying for guitar lessons and their first car, to adults seeking a little extra cash while getting some exercise and being neighbourly, they’re all valued members of The Richmond Review team of carriers. Every Wednesday and Friday, more than 47,000 copies of The Richmond Review are delivered to The Review’s warehouse, at 1-3671 Viking Way. From there, under the supervision of manager Rachael Finkelstein and her team of district supervisors, J.R. Tuazon and Roya Sarwary, the circulation team ensures that newspapers bundled into groups of up to 50 papers, are dropped off at the homes of The Review’s unrivaled group of dedicated carriers. From there, the carriers deliver the newspaper and sometimes additional flyers and other promotional products to the doorsteps of local residents.

gets their newspaper is a logistical challenge each week. And that’s under ideal, dry conditions. When it’s rainy, or worse yet when there’s

d

Staff Reporter

And while it may sound like a simple process, considering there are more than 500 separate routes and more than 450 carriers to manage, ensuring every resident

Richmo n

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Page 16 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

I Remember When... Before Shachi Kurl delivered The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Seniors Share Memories of Richmond

the news, she delivered the paper by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter

by Sandra Barr COURTYARD GARDENS

The staff in Courtyard Gardens feels privileged to be able to learn about Residents’ lifetime experiences which are rich with memories of Richmond’s history.

Donna Donna, a Richmond resident of 53 years, came to Courtyard Gardens four years ago, and almost daily shares with staff and visitors how much “I love living here.” Donna lived in Steveston for 50 years, and worked in the Steveston General Store for 17 years prior to retiring. She remembers Steveston as “completely a fishing village I can still remember hanging the drapes on the line outside - I could smell the herring smoke.” She loves Steveston now with the “new stores and waterfront” and with a smile says, “I like it better.” Her friendly and caring disposition seems to have touched many lives over the years, as her popularity and the ripple effect of her customer service background is evident as she seems to know and greet many visitors who walk into Courtyard Gardens. “You’ll love it here” she often

Courtyard Gardens Resident, Olive, shares her experiences in living in Richmond and Courtyard Gardens.

greets visitors with. “I’ve been here for 4 years, and the staff is so wonderful, the activities are great and the food is good.” She is the Resident Ambassador, taking great pride in welcoming new residents with a welcome gift, smile and often a helping hand. Her kindness, to the delight of a newcomer, makes a real difference in the first days of settling in.

swept into the ocean, but here we are, still here” she smiles. She grew up on 10 acres of land and attended Bridgeport School. “I remember as a kid hardly anyone living here. My father worked for the Richmond municipality and he helped build the roads.” Raised as one of six children, she reflects how Richmond was a great place to raise kids. “It was as great place to ride my bicycle- no Olive hills! I used to ride my Born 1924 in Rich- bike to Kerrisdale to mond and raised in visit my grandparents. Richmond, Olive counts I worked one summer her blessings to be liv- to buy my bike and ing in Courtyard Gar- had to ride my bike to dens. “It’s marvelous– school.” warm, cozy, clean and She reminisces, the food is good.” She “When school finished, shares her experience you could pick strawin seeing the changes in berries, blueberries, Richmond over the past raspberries and logan 88 years. “They figured berries all summer the island would be long…I picked enough to earn a bike.” Olive smiles pointing at her walker, “I’m still on wheels as you can see.” Richmond also had “the best rapid transit in the world from Steveston to Vancouver, one hour on the tram,” she recalls. “I worked at Grauer General Store on Sea Island. We would service the tugboats. I was the first girl in there, mostly men worked there.” Olive likes to relax in her favourite chair near the fireplace in The Fireside Lounge, and looks forward to when her son visits. She reflects that Richmond is “not like it was when I was Donna, a Resident Ambassador, takes pride in a kid, but it’s still nice.” welcoming new residents with kindness and a She smiles, “I’d rather be here than anywhere helping hand. else.”

ADVERTORIAL

Shachi Kurl still remembers her part in delivering the headlines of the day, including the heated Terra Nova debate of the late 1980s. But this was long before her career began as a journalist, and dated back to her elementary school days, when she attended Mitchell Elementary School. While her very first job was delivering flyers from door to door in her Cambie neighbourhood— where her parents still live— she switched to The Richmond Review when the boy who had previously delivered the route took up another job. By the end of her delivery route, she recalls with a chuckle how her hands were often black from all the ink, and consequently there were black fingerprints all over the family home. On occasion, she would bring her white Maltese poodle with her on her route, and pop him in her carrier bag when he was just a puppy. Asked why she began delivering newspapers, Kurl said it was the sense of independence it gave her. And it might have infected her with the journalism bug was well, as she began to read the headlines and got a glimpse at

Shachi Kurl is with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. She used to deliver The Richmond Review.

the inner workings of the newspaper business. “I still read The Review,” said Kurl, who following a 12-year-career in journalism that included stints with CBC Radio and Global Vancouver, now works as the B.C./Yukon director for provincial affairs for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. It’s a non-profit, non-partisan political action organization with a national membership of more than 100,000 small and mediumsized businesses, including 10,000 in B.C. Kurl still visits her parents a couple of times per week in the family house where she grew up with her older sister, and she

Other famous carriers... They all share one thing in common: at one point they delivered The Richmond Review. Former Richmond Colts basketball great Pasha Bains, who runs Drive Basketball, and one of Canada’s best-ever swimmers, recently retired Olympian Brian Johns, both delivered The Richmond Review as youngsters. “It totally had a good impact,” Bains said of his time as a carrier. “It teaches you hard work early on and to get work done.” For Brian Johns, he delivered The Review alongside his older brother Kevin, who delivered the paper for pocket money and to learn a little responsibility, their mother Barbara said. Television comedian Ryan Stiles, best known for his work on network TV’s The Drew Carey Show and Whose Line is it Anyway?, also delivered The Review as a youngster. “The dogs would chase me all the

makes a point of bringing The Review in with her. “It’s helped me keep a pulse of what’s going on in the community,” Kurl said, from the Olympics to the Richmond Olympic Oval and the controversies surrounding land use, to the jet fuel pipeline battle and airport expansion. And she remembers the paper’s special sections too, from the colouring contests to the Ask an Expert feature, to regular supplements. Kurl graduated from Richmond High, and remembers how The Review featured the Colts boys basketball team during its heyday. “The paper has really kept me connected to the community.” Kurl delivered the paper for more than two years, and stopped only when a more lucrative gig presented itself: babysitting. And that meant no more delivering on rainy days, or carrying those hefty flyer-laden issues around the block. Kurl has been with the Canadian Federal of Independent Business for nearly a year, and says her new job enables her to continue the advocacy work she’s been passionate about for so long. “I love sticking up for small business people and helping them navigate through government.”

time. That really put me off delivering. I didn’t like getting up early either. I guess that’s why I got into show business.” Singer Amalia Townsend used her paper route earnings to pay for her singing lessons which cost $40 per session. She and her brother Alex delivered nine routes for about two years. “It’s a lot of fun and good exercise.” Former U.S. college track star Ryan Hayden used his newspaper delivery earnings to pay for sports trips. And as his career began to take off, he became a little more diligent in dropping off the paper. “I was delivering my own article, so I was doing a really careful job, laying them down on the stops so people could read them,” said Hayden, who later worked in The Review’s circulation department. Comedian Ryan Stiles.

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 17

Leading With Excellence in Seniors Housing: Defining Quality of Life for Older Adults Both Courtyard Gardens and Gilmore Gardens Retirement Residences have been honoured and proud to serve the seniors of Richmond since 1990 and 1999. The first of their kind to offer Assisted and Independent Living Housing in Richmond, these residences have changed the landscape of seniors housing options by enhancing the quality of life of hundreds of seniors and their families. Both offer the highest standards of care and safety, a sense of community, and tasteful environments. Considered pioneers, both retirement residences have earned reputations of excellence over the years among families, healthcare professionals and community organizations, creating a special place to live, work and volunteer.

Where Life Blossoms! When Courtyard Gardens first opened its doors in 1990, Assisted Living Housing was a new concept in the Richmond community, and was met with curiosity. Offering varying sizes of apartments with hospitality services including home cooked meals, 24 hour snack kitchen, weekly housekeeping, social activities, bus trips and emergency care on site. Additional healthcare services can be customized to suit changing healthcare needs, such as medication reminders, bathing support and laundry service. The continuum care services support a resident’s success and individual independence. Convenient amenities available in house include hair salon, foot care, manicures, church services and bus trips helping one live as actively as one chooses. It has been a privilege to work with many long time Richmond residents and their families. Staff are caring, making Courtyard Gardens feel like home, just the way you would like it.

It’s all about Living! It’s all about Life! Gilmore Gardens first opened in 1999 and is a thriving residence offering apartments with hospitality services for active seniors. Residents embrace life in a community where lively social programs and entertainment, gourmet dinners and housekeeping services offer a carefree lifestyle. Our outstanding staff, volunteers and residents have created a sense of family. Gilmore Gardens has achieved many awards and recognition including the prestigious Georgie Award in 1999, Diversicare Home of The Year in 2007 and 2009-2010 and the BCSLA Seal of Approval Residents can feel assured with the knowledge that should their healthcare needs change, the sister residence Courtyard Gardens can offer the choice of continuum uum care in its 24-hour care residence. Both residences are operated atted e with highest standards by Diversicare Canada Management Services vices es Inc IInc., n ., a leader in the retirement housing industry, managing ing fo fortyy re retirement eti t rement residences across Canada and multiple award award recipient re eci c pie pien en e nt o off tthe h Canada Order of SService Se rvice Excellence A Award. ward rd..

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Page 18 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

The Richmond Review and Marpole

City of Richmond Archives photo The old Marpole Bridge between Sea Island and Vancouver.

On June 22, 1934, The Richmond Review became the MarpoleRichmond Review. For more than 20 years, the Marpole moniker remained in the name. Why Marpole? Back in Richmond’s early days, Sea Island, preairport, was filled with farms. There was also the Grauer store, the Eburne post office and Billy White’s blacksmith shop. It was also connected by a bridge to a spot also called Eburne on the other side of the river, which later became Marpole in 1916. Thanks to

Phil Gaglardi (second from left) and then-premier W.A.C. Bennett (second from right) were among the dignitaries who opened the Oak Street Bridge in 1957.

the bridge, Richmond residents were able to amble over to Marpole. While Marpole

became a part of Vancouver in 1929, the links with Richmond, and particularly Sea

Island, remained strong, so it made sense for The Review to expand its coverage north of the Fraser. As the 1950s progressed, the word Marpole began to shrink in the Richmond Review’s logo. In 1957, the Marpole Bridge was dismantled after the Oak Street Bridge opened nearby. The closing of the bridge prompted an economic downturn in Marpole for a while. Meanwhile, Richmond was growing rapidly and the Marpole moniker was soon dropped.

WƵďůŝĐŶŽƟĐĞ͗ƌŝƟƐŚŽůƵŵďŝĂhƟůŝƟĞƐŽŵŵŝƐƐŝŽŶ FORTISBC ENERGY UTILITIES INTEND TO AMALGAMATE NATURAL GAS SERVICE IN B.C. AND IMPLEMENT COMMON RATES On April 11, 2012, the FortisBC Energy Utilities applied to the British Columbia Utilities Commission to amalgamate their natural gas utilities across the province and to implement common rates and services across their service areas starting January 1, 2014. Currently, FortisBC Energy Utilities is made up of three separate natural gas companies, operating in six service areas. The companies have their own services, service agreements (tariffs) and rates. If approved, the application would combine the three companies into one, under a single tariff, with common rates for the various regions. This Application has different implications for customers in each service area. If approved, customers in the Vancouver Island and Whistler service areas will see rate decreases, while customers in the Lower Mainland, Columbia, Inland, and Fort Nelson service areas will see an overall rate increase. PUBLIC REVIEW PROCESS The Commission is initiating a review of FortisBC Energy Utilities’ Application. To view the timetable for this hearing and the Application go to www.bcuc.com select “Current Applications” under “Quick Links” and scroll to “FEU Common Rates, Amalgamation and Rate Design.” HOW TO GET INVOLVED If you wish to participate actively in the review process, you may register as an Intervener or an Interested Party with the Commission Secretary in writing, using the contact information at the end of this notice. All submissions and/or correspondence received from active participants or the general public relating to the Application will be placed on the public record and posted to the Commission’s website. If you wish to attend the Public Workshop or the Procedural Conference please register with the Commission Secretary using the contact information at the end of this Notice. FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER For more information please contact Ms. Alanna Gillis, Acting Commission Secretary at Commission.Secretary@bcuc.com or using the Commission contact information.

WORKSHOP FortisBC Energy will explain the Application and answer questions. Date

Time

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Monday, April 30, 2012

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Time

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 19

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

www.volunteerrichmond.ca

1972 2012

Celebrating 40 years of bringing people and services

together through community information and volunteerism.

As we mark our 40th anniversary, we’d like to congratulate

Martin van den Hemel photo The Creative Services team: James Marshall, Jaana Bjork and Peter Palmer (Gabrielle Mundstock not pictured).

Creative Services keeps Review’s juices flowing by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter Behind every advertisement is a story. At The Richmond Review, it’s the Creative Services Department that helps advertisers tell that story through words, photographs, illustrations and artistic design. Jaana Bjork, a 20-year employee, manages the department, whose graphic designers are Gabrielle Mundstock, Peter Palmer and

James Marshall. “Producing content for advertisers in-house is rewarding and offers clients made-in-Richmond designs,” said Bjork. Designers help retailers, service providers, wholesalers, charities and others promote themselves through display advertising— which appear throughout the newspaper. Ads are built for clients who know exactly what they want—along with those don’t know where to

The Richmond Review

on 80 years of brilliant reporting. As our agency’s media partner, The Review has offered us tremendous support, for which we’ll always be grateful.

Some may raise their eyebrows at the age difference,

but our partnership was just meant to be.

start. Once the advertisements are created and approved by clients, they’re prepared for publication. Bjork quarterbacks the production of the newspaper, liaises with other departments, co-ordinates ad placement and sketches the layout of each edition. And for each issue—no matter what’s thrown their way—The Review’s creative team puts its experience to work and gets the job done. Said Bjork: “It all boils down to teamwork.”

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Page 20 · Richmond Review Wednesday, April 25, 2012


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 21

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

The story behind the first colour photo and the phony nurse

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The first ever full-colour photograph in The Richmond Review was published on Feb. 23, 1966 to commemorate the opening of Richmond General Hospital. Editor Mickey Carlton’s cover photo showed a curvy redhead in a snug, white nurse’s uniform, cape and hat posing with a bouquet of roses in front of the hospital’s north side. The shot was sponsored by B.C. Packers as a community service.

However, not everyone was pleased with the photo.

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Mickey Carlton photo When Richmond General Hospital opened 41 years ago, The Richmond Review felt the significant occasion was newsworthy for its first ever colour photo. Trust Mickey Carlton to have come up with the subject matter.

The hospital’s first administrator, Hugh Ross, remembers that the nursing staff “wasn’t particularly pleased” with the photograph. “She wasn’t a nurse,” he said. “They certainly didn’t think much about it.” The newspaper published a letter March 9, 1966, from a Mrs. E. O’Sullivan, which said: “Is this your symbol of what a nurse should look like? Or does she happen to be the bunny girl who delivered your first copy to a life-long subscription to (Playboy) magazine?” O’Sullivan suggested that a more suitable picture be taken to “let your municipality know what real, hardworking dedicated nurses look like.”


Page 22 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Photographer snapped photos for 29 years

Mark Patrick in the 1980s at The Richmond Review.

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Richmond Review photographer Mark Patrick retired in 2010 after a memorable 29-year career at The Richmond Review. A graduate of the University of Victoria, Mark was hired in October 1981. He recalls the hours he spent waiting to photograph Princess Diana and Prince Charles when they visited Vancouver in May of 1986, during Expo 86. Then there was the largest crowd he’s ever seen in person, when Pope John Paul II came to Vancouver that very same year and filled B.C. Place to the rafters. He fondly recalls the time when Lillian Vander Zalm, wife of then B.C. premier Bill Vander Zalm, served him a cucumber sandwich first, before rock star Gino Vannelli who was sitting right beside him. “You may be a rock star but I got my cucumber sandwich first,” Mark said with a chuckle, adding that he formed a strong relationship with the Vander Zalm family over the years. He also remembers his brush with death, when a two-ton pipe in the process of being moved suddenly broke free and fell to the ground, missing him by inches. “That was one of my nine lives.” Mark also got to play the part of Bob Denver’s

Mark Patrick photo One of Mark Patrick’s classic photos of a Richmond Colts hoops victory.

Gilligan to Alan Hale Jr.’s Skipper a few years back. Hale, co-star on the 1960s TV hit Gilligan’s Island, drove Mark around the Quilchena Golf and Country Club in a golf cart

as he snapped photos. “He was a really nice guy. I was his little buddy.” Mark was one of a handful of people to have an almost private

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 23

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

The raid on Sin Hall

Steveston’s Community Pharmacy Steven Chang B.Sc. Pharm. Pharmacist/owner

How The Review joined a 1963 police raid by Bhreandáin Clugston Editor The “highlight” of Mickey Carlton’s first year at The Richmond Review was Dec. 4, 1963’s “RCMP RAID VICE PARTY,” in which Carlton and a crack team of reporters and photographers were on the scene of the “biggest vice party in Richmond history.” “In a lightning 1:08 a.m. surprise raid police streamed into the Sea Island Community Hall to break up a wild stag party attended by 150 local residents.” There were pictures of the police raid, including one of a “SIN SISTER NABBED,” who pled guilty to being an inmate of a bawdy house. “A statuesque blonde” faced indecency charges. There was also a hysterical sidebar by reporter Bob Groves. “Like most Richmond residents I never suspected there was organized vice in this community.” The occasion was a “Grey Cup Frolic,” as the innocent ticket read, but it was really “the admission card to a night of revolting debauchery in the Sea Island Community Hall.” The Review team, acting on a hunch (they were obviously tipped off by police), staked out the joint as detailed in Carlton’s story “The long wait that paid off.” “It was a long, cold wait in a secluded spot outside the Sea Island Hall Saturday night,” he wrote. Inside, a wild party was underway. There were card games,

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booze and shifty characters. “Games were started up all over the room...Sat down at a table of guys playing ‘Lowball.’ A couple looked like college students; others might have been millworkers; others bore the vacant-eyed expression of the lost.” Soon, beer bottles were being thrown about. Later, two comely dancers took to the stage. “Blondie” was the first to completely strip. “It was time for her companion to strut her stuff, but she didn't get a chance. 1:08 a.m. - Crrrrashin poured the RCMP's Flying Vice Squad.” Police had the place surrounded leaving “150 TRAPPED IN SIN HALL.” The Review was in on the raid, snapping photos.

As far as sensationalistic coverage, this would have to take the cake in terms of Review history. The issue did have an editorial, titled “An Unpleasant Duty.” “It is with considerable regret that we find ourselves called upon to publish details of the savory affair reported on page one of this week’s paper.” It was an odd contrast to the considerable relish shown in covering the event! The sleepy world Richmond and The Review were invaded by sensationalistic big city journalism. For all its faults, the sensationalism that Carlton brought to The Review was light years beyond what most staid community newspapers were doing at the time.

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Page 24 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

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How Mickey Carlton gave The Review some punch by Bhreandáin Clugston Editor During one week in 1963 the phrase “What a difference a week makes” was never truer. The Richmond Review of May 23, 1963 was a typical issue full of politeness. The lead story was “Richmond Days big success,” and the front page was peppered with snapshots of a toddler and dressmaker’s fashion show winner, and dotted with briefs such as “Visitors from Scotland” (about a pair of Glaswegians in town for

Steveston Seafood & Wine Festival

a three-month holiday), Cambie school’s honour roll and Dennis May’s 21st birthday. One week later, The Review’s lead story screamed “YOUNGSTER HURLED 20 FEET BY AUTO IMPACT” and a rather graphic picture of “battered and bleeding fiveyear-old Bobby” being attended to on the road (a picture that wouldn’t run in today’s Richmond Review). Take the aforementioned Little Bobby, for example. As lurid and, some would say, sensational as the story seemed, it did touch on pathos

and social commentary, for Bobby was a foster child, whose parents were deemed unfit to raise him. “He lay on the road crying, bleeding and hurt. Everything possible is being done to mend his pathetic little body. “But nothing can be done to mend the hurt in the heart of a little boy waiting in hospital for a mommy and daddy who will never come.” The clue to this sudden change in the paper’s tone is in the cutline: photo by Mickey Carlton.

See Page 25

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 25

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Congratulations ttoo tthe Congratulations he Richmond R Richmond Review eview on 880 on 0Y Years ears ooff delivering tthe delivering he llocal ocal nnews, ews, freshly ccaught! freshly aught!

Review’s circulation rose like the hemlines From Page 24 To backtrack briefly, the struggling paper was being sold by Robert Clements (who stayed on as assistant publisher) to Herbert Gates. Gates had been the circulation manager of the Vancouver Sun for 40 years and bought The Review as a retirement hobby. Newspapers are often accused of playing it too safe for fear of offending advertisers. But Gates, with his circulation background, understood that controversy sold papers. And his choice as editor made sure The Review would be an attention getter. Michael (Mickey) Carlton had worked his way across the country at a variety of daily newspapers. Never one to let the facts get in the way of a good story, Carlton edited a colourful newspaper. Graphic accident pictures, lurid prose, sensationalism and editorial opinion bordering on the libelous mingled with more community news, more people stories, superior photographs and a critical eye of local institutions. Soon, thanks to the cigarchomping Gates’ shrewd business sense and Carlton’s knack for getting attention, The Review’s circulation rose like the

hemlines of some of the “bathing beauties” Carlton photographed, jumping from 2,400 to 15,000 by decade’s end. Carlton also wrote a column called The Tatler, a mixture of folksy wit, reckless courage, libel and bad puns. “Readers were titillated and outraged as they subscribed to our paper,” recalled the late Jean Baker in a 1981 column, “then cancelled, then re-subscribed; bought the paper at newsstands, reviled it, then bought another the following week. Circula-

sive coverage of the local sports scene, a dedication that continues to this day. In 1969, The Review, which started the decade averaging four to eight pages a week, had added a Friday edition. The Wednesday edition was often three sections, running between 20 and 30 pages broadsheet.

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tion soared.” The “beauties” soon frequently began appearing on the front page later in 1963. The transition from long pants to short shorts to skirts with lots of leg (unheard of in The Review up to that point), took mere weeks. Watching The Review through the rest of the 1960s was like watching a strip tease; the suggestiveness of the poses kept pace accordingly. Cheesecake and sensationalism weren’t the only reason the paper gained in prominence. The paper’s quality of reporting improved greatly as the 1960s’ progressed, thanks to the addition of some talented reporters. The paper also began exten-

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Page 26 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 27

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Celebrating

Driving Mr. Gates

Contributor Publisher Herbert F. Gates was already in his late 70s when I first signed up as a young reporter at The Richmond Review in 1967, but he had lost none of his instincts about the newspaper business. As the legendary circulation manager at The Vancouver Sun, Herb teamed up with Hal Straight, the newspaper’s fire-breathing editor, to relegate The Province (the leading paper in those early days) to permanent second place in the city. Their success was a combination punch of ruthless circulation tactics and the creation of a stable of excellent reporters who became larger-than-life characters in their own right—people like Jack Webster, Jack Wasserman, Jack Scott and Penny Wise. Herb pioneered a carrier distribution system that is still employed

Former owner and publisher Herb Gates (left) and editor Stuart Clugston.

today and rewarded thousands of his little schoolboy foot soldiers with a free holiday at The Sun’s “Camp Gates” on Bowen Island. He was ahead of his time. After retiring from The Sun, Herb and Hal became the “The Golden Boys” of community newspapers with Hal purchasing the now-defunct North Shore Citizen and Herb (and Hal as a not very silent partner) purchasing the ailing Richmond Review. My favourite memories of Herb aren’t actually from the days we shared at The Richmond Review. Rather they are the many anecdotes he shared with me in the many car rides we had between Richmond and

the printing plant in North Vancouver and to his home in Vancouver. Herb was born in Oakley, Kansas, in a rural area where another future famous British Columbian was also growing up—Margaret “Ma” Murray. The two Kansans remained lifelong friends and lived near each other when they moved to Vancouver. His stories of Vancouver of the 1920s and 1930s were rich and colourful and though I heard them a hundred times, I always wanted to hear them one more time. So too were the tales about the many newspaper characters that he encountered during his years at The Sun. Herb always wore a three-piece suit and a

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Classic Breakfast Buy one Classic Breakfast a and a regular sized coffee a at the regular price & g get a second Classic kf ffor FREE. Save $5.59! Breakfast Breakfast served until 11 am.

FREE!

Code #0425 Available at locations below. Price plus tax. Not valid with any other promotional offer. No cash value. Valid until May 25, 2012

SEAFAIR CENTRE No. 1 Road & Francis

VANCOUVER INTL AIRPORT (2 locations)

Teen Burgers ®

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by Stuart Clugston

hat (even indoors) but his trademark was the ever-present cigar in his mouth. These weren’t just any cigar; these were really bad, cheap cigars with a white plastic tip—they cost less than a buck for five back in 1967. Hard of hearing and with vision failing, Herb eventually was ruled off the road as a driver. That’s when I volunteered to drive him home in my little Beetle. Many a night I tried to navigate the famous Richmond fogs on the outside and very thick blue cigar fog inside on those trips home. Herb would smoke the cigars down until the plastic would begin to melt and emit a ghastly, acrid smell. That’s when he would start stabbing around for the ash tray, often mistaking the radio or dashboard. My car was well branded by these misses. I was a handful for him as an editor but he was very patient with me and had a great deal of respect for editorial integrity. •Stuart Clugston was The Review’s editor from 1970 to 1974 after a couple of years as a photographer and reporter. He’s retired from working as vicepresident of corporate affairs for Catalyst and is now concentrating on photography again.

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SEAFAIR CENTRE No. 1 Road & Francis

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Bacon n' Egger

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Former owner brought business savvy to The Review

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Add 20¢ to substitute for sausage. Code #0425 Available at locations below. Price plus tax. Not valid with any other promotional offer. No cash value. Valid until May 25, 2012

SEAFAIR CENTRE No. 1 Road & Francis

VANCOUVER INTL AIRPORT (2 locations)

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/-RQHV‡:LOVRQ,QWHUQDWLRQDO3URGXFWV/WG‡:LQH.LW]‡:LQJ:DK-HZHOOHU\‡:LQJV(QJLQHHULQJ/WG‡:LQJWDW*DPH%LUG3DFNHUV‡:LQQHUV9DFDWLRQ,QF‡:ROII0DULQH6XSSO\ /WG‡:RQGHUEXFNV6WRUHV/WG‡:RQJ·V)LQH'U\FOHDQLQJ‡:RUOG&DUJR0DUNHWLQJ‡:RUOG,QVXUDQFH6HUYLFHV/WG‡;'+ROGLQJV/WG‡;'HVLJQ/LJKW6SHHG6RIWZDUH‡;LQTLDR(QWHUSULVHV,QFGED5LFKPRQG&HQWUH6KRH 6HUYLFH‡<DDUL3URMHFWV/WG‡<&<%HWWHU+HDOWK&HQWHU‡<LQJ7DL7&06XSSO\LQJ/WG‡<RX1HHG0H,1HHG<RX9LUWXDO$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ‡<XVHQ/RJLVWLFV &DQDGD ,QF‡=DEXUR+ROGLQJ/WG‡=VWDU(QWHUSULVHV,QF

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Page 28 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Back alleys don’t recycle unwanted electronics Environmental

Consumers and businesses in British Columbia have an environmentally sound recycling option.You can drop off a range of acceptable products at designated Collection Sites throughout the province without charge (see “Acceptable Products” list for details). The Electronics Products Recycling Association (EPRA) is a national, not-for-profit extended producer responsibility program. EPRA has contracted Encorp Pacific (Canada) to deliver the stewardship program under the Return-It™ Electronics brand in BC. The program works to recover and recycle all regulated electronics in a responsible, cost effective manner. The Return-It system also ensures BC’s unwanted electronics are collected and recycled in an environmentally and socially responsible manner by using the Recycler Qualification Program (RQP). Since 2007, the EPRA program, previously run by ESABC, has diverted over 70.6 million kilograms of electronics out of BC landfills and illegal export, while recovering precious metals and other materials for use in future products. How Electronics are Recycled: Electronics collected in BC are sent to approved recyclers in North America. The items are broken down using various manual and mechanical processes. The remaining products are separated into their individual components for recovery. Through a variety of refining and smelting processes, the

ACCEPTABLE PRODUCTS The following items can be recycled free of charge at any Encorp Return-It Electronics™ Collection Site: Display Devices Desktop Computers Portable Computers Computer Peripherals (Keyboards and Mice) Computer Scanners Printers and Fax Machines Non-Cellular Phones and Answering Machines Vehicle Audio and Video Systems (Aftermarket) Home Audio and Video Recording/Playback Systems Personal or Portable Audio and Video Recording/Playback Systems Find a full list of acceptable products at return-it.ca/ electronics/acceptable.

Those unwanted electronics in your basement contain valuable resources.

materials re-claimed from unwanted electronics are used as raw materials in the manufacturing of new products. It’s the Responsible Thing to Do: Those useless electronics in your basement contain valuable resources. Steel, leaded glass, copper, aluminum, plastic and precious metals can be extracted and recycled into new products. Province Wide Network: More than 125 permanent

Return-It Electronics™ Collection Sites cover over 97.4% of the province. Drop-off events are organized and held in convenient locations in the communities where Collection Sites have not yet been established. How to Find a Collection Site: There are over 125 convenient locations in BC. Find a Collection Site or drop-off event near you at return-it.ca/ electronics/locations

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 29

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Led Zeppelin lands...in The Richmond Review 1970 edition featured full coverage of band’s arrival

somewhat of a private person myself, I was never very comfortable ‘intruding’ on people’s space and I would never have made it as a member of the paparazzi. But as they approached they broke into big smiles and nudged each other in the ribs as if to say ‘Check it out, they do have cameras in Vancouver and they don’t wear skins after all.’ “That was very reassuring and so I stepped forward and said something brilliant like ‘Welcome to Vancouver.’” Later on, Clugston and reporter John Cosway went to a press conference at the Bayshore Inn in Vancouver. “One lasting impression I carried away was that these were pretty nice, ordinary guys who were serious about their music but were having fun with their new ‘fame.’ While there was an air of self-confidence, there was no ‘attitude’ and they clearly were not drunk with their own selfimportance.” After a half-hour, manager Peter Grant abruptly ended the press conference. But the fun had only just begun for The Richmond Review. “At the end of the conference, where I had been the only person taking photos, someone in the band management came up to me and said: “You were the guy at the airport right? Are you going to the concert tonight?” When I replied yes, he handed me a backstage pass and said I could shoot the performance,” Clugston recalls. “The concert at the Pacific Coliseum was a virtual sell-out and the crowd was pumped for the show...One memory that I still have however is how clean their sound was compared to other bands of the time—little distortion or gimmicks were employed except the use of a bow by Page on one number.”

For Led Zeppelin fans, the March 23, 1970 Richmond Review is as cherished as having a copy of the first album with the turquoise sleeve lettering or owning all six covers In Through the Out Door. That’s because that edition of The Richmond Review had prominent coverage as the band launched its 1970 North American tour in Vancouver. The band had recently released Led Zeppelin II and was rapidly becoming popular. As former editor, reporter and photographer Stuart Clugston recalls, reporters “were all poor and subsisted on miserable wages earned through very long hours. “One of the few perks we had (other than scamming restaurant owners into free meals in exchange for positive remarks about their food) was the opportunity to review books, records and concerts. We devoted huge space to these reviews...and slowly the paper got a reputation and a following because of them.” The daily newspapers in Vancouver, when not on strike, weren’t particularly interested in rock and roll at the time, so The Review decided to cover the band’s arrival. Since Led Zeppelin landed in Richmond, there was at least a local angle. “Our coverage started early in the day at the airport where we hung around waiting for the band’s arrival from London. I was able to get a good shot of Jimmy Page and Robert Plant, who were quite a bit ahead of the others in the party. Being

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Page 30 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Athletic roots started in childhood by Don Fennell Sports Editor Last Sunday, as they cycled through several subdivisions and past school grounds on a beautiful afternoon, Don Taylor and his wife Wendy noticed few children playing. It contrasted with his recollections of growing up in Richmond during the 1960s. “Every house had kids and families with three to six kids seemed to be common,” he said. “I was one of four, and we played all through the day. Mom or dad would call us in for dinner by blasting a whistle.” It was a simpler time and place. Schools and homes were being built at a rapid pace to keep up with the many new families choosing to settle on Lulu Island. It seemed, he said, like all the boys were playing soccer from September to March, and then baseball from April to June. Summers were long and games featured dozens of kids from throughout the neighbourhood. “What didn’t we play,” Taylor said. “And we didn’t have parents hovering around on our free after-school or weekend time. I have rich memories.” Taylor was seven years old when he started playing organized soccer, and still suits up with a local over-50s team. But the

future Richmond Sockeye, who was 17 when he joined the junior club in its first season in 1972, had to wait until he was 10 to play ice hockey— when Minoru Arena opened in 1965. “We were so excited when Richmond got its arena,” said Taylor, who learned to skate at an old aircraft hangar in nearby Delta. “Our teams were surprisingly good despite many of us not having played from early ages. But we had played hours and hours of hockey on our driveway on Francis Road with neighbourhood friends.” On Monday, Taylor played in the men’s playoff final in the Richmond Industrial Hockey League which debuted in 1966. Taylor said it’s unfortunate today’s kids don’t have quite the same freedom to play unorganized sport as in his generation, when there was also far less TV or computer games and as a result more of a desire to get out of the house to have fun. Former Canadian professional golfer Jennifer Wyatt, who played on the ladies’ tour for most of the 1990s, also has fond memories of growing up in Richmond. She started playing golf at an early age at the Quilchena Golf and Country Club but was also an avid hockey and softball player, participating in those sports

Rower Darcy Marquardt was inspired to continue her bid for Olympic gold this summer in London after watching speedskater Christine Nesbitt win the ladies’ 1,000-metre race at the Richmond Olympic Oval during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games.

well into her teenage years before concentrating on golf. “I am thankful those choices were there for my parents,” said Wyatt. While sports may be more organized than during her childhood, Wyatt said there are many excellent facilities today. “I see the registration signs around town throughout the year and always think, ‘Good, kids are paying sports on teams.’ It is such a good way to learn about life skills, getting along with others, discipline, commitment, following through and having fun. I remember sports being a great way to make friends and to build confidence and little successes in the arena or on the field were very rewarding.” Current and former Olympians also remember Richmond as being a great place to grow up and cut their teeth athletically. “I played in the Richmond Girls Softball Association for a number of years. So I remember a lot of ball tournaments played in the parks in and around Richmond,” said rower Darcy Marquardt, hoping to compete in her third Olympic Summer Games this July and August in London. “I remember the diamonds at McNair being the best in the city because they had an allsand diamond and sheltered dugouts. We would play several games over the course of a weekend, and there were so many volunteers helping put on the tournament. I only ever played in the house league, but I was impressed by how many people would come to help make the events possible. Just goes to show how Richmondites will pitch in when needed. “I also remember going to figure skating practices or swim lessons at the Minoru rink and aquatic centre. There was always something going on.” Alexa Loo, who competed for Canada in women’s snowboarding at the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games, remembers the luxury of being the daughter of a stay-at-home mom—as were many of her friends—during her childhood. “We would come up with our own games and mom would yell out the back window when it was

Recently-retired Richmond swimmer Brian Johns said the opening of Watermania, featuring a 50-metre pool in 1998, helped to give him a leg up prior to representing Canada in the 2000 Summer Olympic Games in Sydney. They were the first of three Games he competed in.

time to come in for dinner,” she said. “That never happens now. Parents pick up their kids from whatever and it seems all that creativity is led.” But Loo also has fond memories of participating in organized sport while growing up— everything from swimming with the Kigoos to the B.C. elementary track meet hosted annually by the Richmond Kajaks. Those experiences helped to not only shape the person she’s become, but taught her the importance of community. Today, she gives back as a volunteer coach in the Kajaks’ popular Track Rascals program which introduces kids to athletics. Brian Johns, who hoped to become the first Canadian Olympian to ever compete in four Summer Games this year in London before recently announcing his retirement from competitive swimming, recalls enthusiastically the steps that ultimately led to the opening of Watermania in 1998. “Before getting Watermania, which my dad was very involved in, we had two teams (Johns swam with both the Aquanauts and Racers from the age of six) training in a 25-metre pool,” he said. “Not only could we not host any meets in Minoru because it wasn’t long enough, but I remember also having to go to Burnaby to train for long

course. When we finally got a 50-metre pool and started hosting meets, that’s when we really understood its impact. I was able to train there for three years and I honestly believe it gave me a leg up for the 2000 Games and beyond.” A Richmond resident for five decades, current Richmond Sports Council chair Jim Lamond has seen—and often played a part—in the changing sports landscape locally. “When I first arrived it was like being in the

sports scene as a volunteer soccer coach, after his son expressed an interest in playing. “I wasn’t going to coach, but they were short and asked if I’d help,” he said. “There were over 3,000 boys playing soccer in this community then, too many for the district. So to ensure they could all play we formed four clubs and you played within your district boundary. I took a team through twice, from the ages of six and seven to 17 and 18. Most of the young athletes

The narrow defeat, by two per cent in a public referendum, that would have seen the Garden City Lands converted into a multi-sports complex is one of longtime Richmond sportsman Jim Lamond’s greatest disappointments.

country, a farming community with ditches everywhere,” he said. “But that was part of the charm.” In the 1960s and 1970s, sports played a big role in helping to shape what was then a youthful community of some 30,000 residents. Lamond began to make his mark on the

then played soccer in the winter and as soon as it was over switched the baseball.” Lamond, who later served as chairman of both the district and provincial soccer boards, said it was the vision of many individuals including the likes of Rick Henderson and Lance

Carey who helped foster the growth of sports in Richmond. It was also a shared vision among sports users, he said, that led to the forming of sports council. But Lamond has at least one great disappointment—the narrow two per cent defeat—of a public referendum that would have seen the Garden City Lands become a multi-sports complex and the centre piece of a Richmond bid to host the 1994 Commonwealth Games which were ultimately hosted by Victoria. “We proposed a stadium, an indoor velodrome, aquatics pool, everything,” he said. “It would have been one of the finest sports complexes in North America.” Taylor, Loo and Johns also have fond memories of waiting, as kids, for The Richmond Review to arrive at their doorsteps each week. “To get covered in The Review was a very big deal for a kid,” said Taylor. “I was Richmond soccer boy in 1967 and broke my leg in the final in overtime. It made for a good write-up and photo.” Loo remembers waiting anxiously for the results after each swim meet, while Johns said The Review’s sports coverage has always helped provide an insight and understanding of what’s going on throughout the world of sports.


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review ¡ Page 31

The Richmond Reviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 80th Anniversary Edition

Vox Pop: Terra Nova, pets and Mitzi Dupree One of the more interesting characters to appear in the The Review was Gordon McKay, author of Vox Pop and a voice of the people. Or at least some of them. Not popular with editorial types at the paper, former Review publisher Murray Poskitt once said McKayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s column was a much-needed tonic to â&#x20AC;&#x153;all those bandits who came out of SFUâ&#x20AC;? (Stuart Clugston, Wilf Hurd, Rick McGrath, etc., who gave the paper a left-leaning slant that Ethel Tibbits would have appreciated). His column ran in the late 1970s and most of the 1980s. Lest he be dismissed as a rabble-rouser, McKay was a strong spokesman for Mothers â&#x20AC;&#x153;THAT DOGGY IN THE WINDOWâ&#x20AC;?... NEARLY DIED...Two ladies doing stock taking in a deserted Lansdowne Mall last Tuesday evening were attracted by the cries of a Labrador pup at a nearby pet store who had somehow stuck his head thruâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the bars of his cage and was slowly, very slowly, strangling to death. As they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get into the store one of the ladies decided to phone her ďŹ re ďŹ ghter husband who contacted the men at No. 1 ďŹ rehall who promptly dispatched a team to the shopping centre. Gaining access to the pet store the men got the wee pup back thruâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the bars although at that moment its tongue was distended and it looked near death. However the pup has recovered... thanks to the men of Richmondâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No. 1 ďŹ rehall...this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Good Samaritans. * * * JUST WHAT WE NEED . . . another neighborhood pub . . . complete with parking for the drinking driver. And if the owners of this proposed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;watering hole,â&#x20AC;? get their way,

Against Drunk Driving and was a petlover supreme. And he was one of the biggest critics of the development of Terra Nova. He put his money where his mouth was on the Terra Nova and even ran for council (he lost, despite putting up a good ďŹ ght). While those on the editorial side frowned upon Vox Pop, his columns were entertaining. One column, which could have been misconstrued as implying that a certain segment of society was crooked, prompted a death threat from an offended reader, so McKay showed up at the ofďŹ ce the next day packing some heat, former business manager Cilla Bachop recalls.

it will lead to another drug related in-road into the lifestream of the community and another danger to young and old alike. Surely to God we have enough pubs and drinking establishments in order to satisfy the thirsts of those whose need to imbibe has to extend into our very neighborhoods. With a police force that is undermanned now . . . how in hell are they going to get the drinking driver off the street? This new proposed public house will be located at 9500 Cambie Road and their suggested hours are going to be from 9 in the morning till 11 in the evening. However if the local Municipal or Regional authorities approve, the closing hour could be extended to 2:00 a.m. And mark my words this is the time that all the rest of these pubs are striving for in order to compete for the Almighty buck . . . and their share of the drunk driving trade. * * * EQUAL PAY FOR EQUAL WORK . . . has some Mounties upset that their â&#x20AC;&#x153;fellowâ&#x20AC;? female ofďŹ cers are

receiving equal pay alright . . . but are deďŹ nitely not providing equal work. They cite cases where ONLY male ofďŹ cers are called upon to break up ďŹ ghts, etc., although the female ofďŹ cers may arrive on the scene after the trouble has been cleared up. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really expect the female constables to do this â&#x20AC;&#x153;jobâ&#x20AC;? but feel there should be a wage difference if true equality is to be measured by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;extraâ&#x20AC;? duties involved. As more female ofďŹ cers are lured to this service by the pay ($24,000 per year) you can expect more dissatisfaction within the force in the very near future. * * * COUNCILâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OBSESSION with Video Tape stores which rent movie tapes to local consumers is a bit puzzling. Fearful that these dens of inequity might end up selling pornography to an otherwise respectable and God-fearing community is a laugh. Especially when we have young ladies such as the infamous, â&#x20AC;&#x153;MITZIE,â&#x20AC;? to contend with. This now famous

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AUDITIONS WED., MAY 9TH, 2012 Richmond Secondary School 7171 Minoru Boulevard 4:00 PM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00 PM Do you want to ? â&#x20AC;Ś â&#x20AC;˘ perform in formal concerts â&#x20AC;˘ have fun rehearsing & making new friends â&#x20AC;˘ develop outstanding vocal conďŹ dence & technique â&#x20AC;˘ explore a wide range of musical styles For more information Website: www.richmondyouthhonourchoir.org Telephone: Heidi Epp at 604-277-2377 Email: info@richmondyouthhonourchoir.org

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gordon drove me crazy because he was everything a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;professionalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; journalist was supposed to disdain and I often had to clean up the problems he caused,â&#x20AC;? recalls Ted Townsend, who became editor in 1987. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even worse, people read his column religiously, especially those (mostly on council) who claimed never to read it... â&#x20AC;&#x153;Professional jealousies aside, Gordon was a good guy under all the bluster and he ďŹ t right into a business that attracts more than its share of eccentrics.â&#x20AC;? Below is a selection of some of his columns on pet topics, including pets, drunk drivers and the, er, dancer Mitzi Dupree.

lass who can do more with ping pong balls than most table tennis players, has sent this town into a tailspin as her antics at a local pub a couple of weeks ago will verify. Her act which includes playing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary had a little lamb,â&#x20AC;? on a ďŹ&#x201A;ute yet, is making history throughout the lower mainland which explains the absence of some of our young men who have been following her exploits with obvious enthusiasm . . . at other beer joints in other locales . . . causing local R.C.M.P. ofďŹ cers to view our present pornography laws as something reserved for visiting churchmen who may get caught in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;actâ&#x20AC;? at our local bathhouse . . . where all the boys hang out. The R.C.M.P. in the interior did arrest MITZIE once for having performed a lewd and lascivious act in a public house. This lustful, wanton creature with her, â&#x20AC;&#x153;inciting to lust,â&#x20AC;? routine was

found not guilty by a very understanding judge. Since that time MITZIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S act has been performed throughout every hamlet and town west of the Rockies followed by those gallant guys and gals in the scarlet and gold waiting for MITZIE to make just one mistake. But MITZIE isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about to destroy an act which nets for her . . . somewhere in the neighborhood of a couple of grand a week. So perhaps our duly elected aldermen should visit MITZIE next time sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in town . . . it might just change their minds about those VIDEO TAPE stores and make them just a little anxious at whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on around them . . . LIVE. * * * THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK...Next to automation... nothing beats a wastebasket...for speeding up work... and for this week... THATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THIRTY.

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Page 32 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Remembering Mary Gazetas by Bhreandáin Clugston Editor “All is good when I can get outside to do some gardening on these sunny October days. There are always lots of go-slow chores to do before the rains return and before the first killer frost arrives. Meaning the kind of frost that will finish off the annuals I’ve been reluctant to dig up to make room for tulip and daffodil bulbs that are still sitting in bags by the front door.” So begins a typical column by Mary Gazetas. Mary, who passed away last week at the age of 68, was a regular Richmond Review columnist from

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2002 until 2011. Mary moved to Richmond 30 years ago to take a job with the City of Richmond as a cultural planner. She quickly gained a reputation as someone who didn’t see obstacles, who could move mountains and inspire others. She deserves a lot of credit for saving Britannia Heritage Shipyard, which looked like a pile of firewood when she first saw it, but has been transformed into one of the Lower Mainland’s most impressive heritage sites. Mary was among the founders of the Richmond Fruit Tree Project, where surplus fruit from backyard trees were picked by volunteers and given to the food bank. This project grew into the Sharing Farm, which includes three acres in Terra Nova Rural Park and an orchard at the foot of Gilbert Road. The Sharing Farm has grown and distributed more than 200,000 pounds of produce in need. Mary was always sketching and jotting things down in notebooks. I think the genesis for her column, Folio One, came from some friends or family who liked her writing and suggested she write for a newspaper. Her first examples she brought for me were historical in nature, and I, being a history buff, couldn’t believe my good fortune in having this future columnist walk through my door. Mind you, with Mary’s enthusiasm, she could have written about turnip popsicles or ASCII code and I would have jumped at her column. While her first columns did have an historical bent, Folio One quickly broadened to span the mind of its creator. She would write about people, topical issues, windy days, kayaking in the Middle Arm and epic bike rides. Her column would sometimes consist of photographs and captions—“Postcards from the farm,” she called them. Mary could see art anywhere. After a windstorm, I, like most people, do a lot of sweeping. For Mary, sticks, leaves and pine cones were art materials. In one of her columns, she wrote about how she had all this surplus bamboo and came up with interesting ways of using it. Her column was all about everyday things. Some people didn’t “get” her column. But anyone who has ever strolled along the dike, paddled in a river or held a clump dirt in her hand would get what she was talking about. She had this ability to capture these “worlds” around her. Some of her family members were reading from her columns at her memorial. Much as she had a distinct speaking voice, Mary had such a distinct writing voice that I knew instantly who the author was. One of her most memorable columns was “On the long road back from ‘lost time’,” written after her hus-

An example of one of Mary Gazetas’ notebooks.

band had been hospitalized with a sudden illness back in 2004. (While her husband, Aristides, recovered, he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s a few years later.) Anyone who has had a loved one in intensive care at a hospital would nod their heads in agreement at what Mary was writing about. The column really captured that feeling of emerging from a fog after spending a long time by someone’s bedside. It evoked feelings of fear and uncertainty. “We’re learning about another world that’s foreign where days and nights pass with fade-in, fade-out worries. “Who would have imagined a month ago that this is where he’d be? “I’ve been driving by the Richmond Hospital for over 20 years. ‘Oh, that’s the hospital’ kind of thoughts going through my mind as I ignored it. It’s a place that up to now I’ve never had to really go inside. “It’s different now. “Getting lost in hallways. Finding out what ICU means. Sitting beside somebody you love in an acute situation in a room with no windows, has changed a lot of things... “I’m not telling him too much about what’s going on in the outside world right now. Instead we’re dealing with his world. A world where teams of wonderful nurses and doctors are helping him come through. “He and his family—we’re finding our way back through a hard time and lost days.” We all hoped that Mary would find her way back through a hard time and lost days. A few days before she died, she even got outside and spent some time with her beloved dog Hugo. But sadly, she didn’t make it. It’s a huge loss to the community. But Mary had such an ability to inspire others, so her legacy will live on in Richmond.

Congratulations to the Richmond Review on 80 Years of Success, Excellent News Coverage, and Supporting the Community.

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 33

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Columnists contribute greatly to The Richmond Review Columnists have always played an important role with The Richmond Review, often providing insight and expertise about the community. A succession of editors bent on hard-hitting news would often find they would get a greater public reaction if there was a typo in a Knit 1 Purl 2 column or a missing ingredient in one of Judith Mathews’ or Arlene Kroeker’s columns. In the early days of The Review, correspondents reported on the goings on in far off East Richmond and Steveston. Like most papers of the day, The Review had a society column, which reported about picnics, teas, marriages, visitors from former residents or relatives from Scotland and elsewhere and even the fact that “Mr. and Mrs. A. Blair, Sr. returned home Monday from a very enjoyable week’s holiday sojourn to Harrison Hot Springs.” Harold Steves, the longtime politician and descendant of a pioneering family, has been frequently quoted in this paper for 45 years. Steves wrote an informa-

tive column from 1984 huge library of cookto 1992 where he would books or reported on share his political insight. new restaurants. But as This is what he her health detehad to say about riorated, she had the election of to give up her colBill Vander Zalm umn and passed in the Oct. 24, the torch on to 1986 Richmond Arlene Kroeker. Review: “I once asked “Vander Zalm Judith Mathews has raised why she put my expectations name forward ARLENE even higher than as her successor KROEKER Dief or Pierre or to the column Brian. If he cannot pro(which she wrote for duce, his fall from grace 17 years). ‘I knew you could be just as dramatic liked people and food,’” and spectacular as his recalled Kroeker. rise to power.” Food for Thought was Definitely a great “I told born. Readers learned you so moment.” about Kroeker’s keenFormer mayor Greg ness for quinoa, the Halsey-Brandt also wrote benefits of blueberries a candid, insightful color other weekly food umn between his time tips. Kroeker was a was a as MLA and return to real people person, too, council. and her readers learned Another columnist who about many of the local started in the 1980s was chefs and servers in the Linda Moore (no, not the community. Kroeker curler). Moore covered wrote her last Food for the arts and was witness Thought earlier this year, to the huge growth in the but watch www.arlenekarts community. roeker.com for her curOne of the most rent activities. popular columnists of Shelley Civkin, the 1980s and 1990s Richmond Public Library’s was food writer Judith communications officer, Mathews. Each week, has penned more than she treated readers to 700 book review colrecipes culled from her umns in 14 years for The

Review. think I could stomach There’s nothing ivory the ‘before’ picture of tower about Civkin’s ‘textured soy protein reviews—she chunks.’”). reads the ficLast year, Civkin tion you want was honoured by to read with a the B.C. Library great sense of Association with humour. She the Merit Award writes about for Advocacy or popular ficMarketing for her tion, crime and column. thrillers, a little Arzeena Hamir SHELLEY romance and writes a weekly CIVKIN occasionally the column, which odd cookbook, including generally focuses on a memorable dissing of environmental issues a soy cookbook years in the community. And ago (“All I can say is, when it comes to opinthank goodness there ion, she’s no fence-sitter, are no pictures! I don’t whether it’s the slaugh-

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ter of the Stanley Park goats (“The majority of us are in denial that our meat comes from living creatures and we try to ‘protect’ our kids from the truth”) or the consequences of people ruining their surroundings (“Everyone pointed their fingers to water and blamed it for their suffering. Until the people learned to point their fingers towards themselves and correct their wrongs, they were doomed to relive the tale over and over.”) Andrea Phillpotts writes has written a bi-weekly

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Page 34 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 35

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Restaurant Mark Patrick photo Protestors turned up at The Richmond Review in 1999.

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Just minutes from Richmond situated in a heritage home. Serving the Finest in French Cuisine for 32 years.

by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter Nearly three dozen protestors picketed The Richmond Review on Thursday, April 8, 1999, voicing their opposition to the newspaper’s editorial stance on the controversial coming of a drug and alcohol and recovery facility to the Odlin Road area. Waving signs recycled from a protest outside City Hall weeks earlier, residents waved placards that read: “Our Votes Count”, “It’s Absurd to have a Recovery Home next to a Foster Home” and “You Cannot ignore 2,800 residents and many others who support them”. Resident Steven Lam told then-managing editor Ted Townsend that residents are dismayed by the paper’s stance and coverage of the issue. The newspaper was on record as supporting the recovery home through its editorials. “We read your paper and we see a lot of bias,” Lam said. “I would like you to be more fair to the situation.” Lam claimed that Odlin Road residents were being treated unfairly, and insisted the residents support the recovery home, just not its location in the midst of their residential homes, and next to a playground, park and foster home. Townsend defended the newspaper’s position. “I have some sympathy for your viewpoint, but at the end of the day, I don’t think it’s unrealistic for that facility to be in that neighbourhood...and that’s the opinion of the newspaper. It’s important for this location to be in a residential area because it’s helping them to re-adjust to society. I do not see these people as bad people.”

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Page 36 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition Holland Heineken House at Minoru Arenas (left) and the Richmond Olympic Oval during the 2010 Games competition.

Congratulations Richmond Review on 80 Years of enabling Richmond with Community News & Support!

Olympic inspiration leaves lasting legacy 2010 Games marks pivitol moment for island city by Don Fennell Sports Editor

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For 17 days in February 2010, Richmond shared the international sports spotlight. Squeezing into the spectacular new Richmond Olympic Oval, a humongous 33,750-square-metre facility on the banks of the Middle Arm of the Fraser River that served as the official host site of long track speed skating, residents joined visitors from around the world to cheer relentlessly as several Olympic records were smashed during the 2010 Winter Olympic Games— the biggest athletic spectacle in

the city’s 133-year history. To catch their breath or quench their thirst, Richmondites also joined an estimated half million visitors in celebrating the Olympic spirit in the Richmond O Zone, a 60-acre site in the heart of city centre that featured the popular Holland House, live entertainment and numerous displays. As Richmond’s lone winter Olympian at the 2010 Games, competing in women’s snowboarding, Alexa Loo didn’t have a chance to experience the speed skating or live celebrations in Richmond. But she was still able to observe and feel the unparalleled level of

excitement. “It inspired people and helped them gain a better of understanding of what it means to compete in the Olympics,” she said. “And I think for those watching events at the oval, and seeing local athletes competing and getting to meet them, makes people realize ‘Hey, I can do this too.’” For two-time Richmond summer Olympian Darcy Marquardt, the chance to watch the women’s 1,000 metres live was a defining moment in her decision to return to full-time training and a shot a third Olympic Games this summer in London. See Page 37

is delighted to congratulate the Richmond Review on reaching this, its 80th anniversary edition.

Congratulations to the Richmond Review on 80 Years of service to our community The Richmond Community Foundation is joining in to acknowledge this remarkable achievement.

Call 604.270.4483 today or visit www.richmondfoundation.org for more information.

Visit us at richmondfoundation.org

Our staff and drivers have truly enjoyed working together with the Review team for the past 8 years in our role of offering transportation services. Steve Holbrook, Regional Manager 10299 Grace Road Surrey B.C. | Ph: 604.582.7700


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 37

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

CELEBRATING OUR 30TH ANNIVERSARY

Olympian in swimming) and told him that I wanted (a gold medal). I have carried that moment with me over the past two years and now in three months time will have the chance to earn it on the race course in London.” Marquardt said hosting the long track speed skating during the 2010 Games was an opportunity to showcase the beauty and community togetherness that Richmond has to offer. “Hosting the Olympics is such a cultural experience for those in attendance and those competing, that it was a chance for Richmond to show how diverse but unified

the city has become,” she said. “Plus, the inspiration that comes from watching elite athletes compete in your hometown, whether in person or on TV, has the effect of promoting physical activity and healthy lifestyles that can’t help but rub off on the locals.” Today the oval, built for a cost of $178 million, has been converted to a multi-use sport facility used by both community and highperformance athletes. Among its features are two Olympic-sized ice rinks, eight hardwood ball-sport courts, a gymnasium and indoor track. There is also a sport medicine centre on site.

On this 80th anniversary of a great newspaper, we, the unionized workers of The Richmond Review, would like to thank the community for its support. We hope you will continue to make reading The Richmond Review an important part of your week.

Working for working people Communications, Energy & Paperworkers Union of Canada, Local 2000 B.C.’s Media Union

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From Page 36 “The crowd was absolutely electric and you couldn’t help but scream your head off as the wave cheering hit your section,” said Marquardt. “Anyone that was in the building that day knew when the Canadians were competing; the sound was unreal. When Christine Nesbitt had the skate of her life, I remember how we all held our breaths and turned to the scoreboard to see the No. 1 appear by her name, and the deafening applause that followed. As she skated her victory lap with the flag and received her gold medal, I grabbed my boyfriend, Rich, (also Canadian

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Clockwise from left: Denny Morrison competes at the Richmond Olympic Oval, entertainment at the Richmond O Zone and Richmond’s Alexa Loo, who snowboarded in parallel giant slalom in 2010.

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Page 38 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Creative cast of characters shared in Review’s storied history by Matthew Hoekstra MURRAY POSKITT

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Staff Reporter He was opinionated and among the last of the old time newspapermen rooted in the golden age of newspapers. The late former Review publisher Murray Poskitt was also committed to the community and worked to make Richmond a better place. “He taught me that a newspaper is a business, and as a business it needs to make money to survive and thrive, but beyond that...it’s important as a community institution that newspapers really give back to their community,” said former staffer Ted Townsend. “He really taught me the importance of community service. That was part of your job. That went on to become a defining point for me in terms of my career.” Townsend, now senior manager of corporate communications for the City of Richmond, is one of many former Review staffers carrying memories of working for the now 80-year-old newspaper. Townsend first came to The Review in 1983 as a news reporter—landing his job in the nick of time. “I applied and was fortunate to get the job, although not before I accepted a job in Inuvik (Northwest Territories). I travelled all the way to Inuvik, and on the day I was due to start my new job in Inuvik, the Review called and offered me a job. I was back on the plane again very shortly.” Townsend later became

Former staff have fond memories of the paper and the community it’s dedicated to editor and, after several years away from Richmond in the ‘90s, he returned until 2000. He covered the controversial removal of the Terra Nova lands from the Agricultural Land Reserve and the immigration boom of the ’90s. “I remember the first strip mall opening up in Richmond that catered primarily to a Chinese Canadian clientele, and writing a story about Richmond’s new Chinatown, based on that one little strip mall on Westminster Highway,” said Townsend. “We didn’t realize at that time the scope of what was to come. It was the beginning of a transformative era for Richmond.” Cilla Bachop worked with Townsend back in the 1980s as business manager. “The back shop (creative services) was still using paste up to put together each page – the equivalent of highly complex scrapbooking with intent,” she recalls. “Mark Patrick was at his peak as a photographer and fit in with the rest of the unfettered personalities. The publisher at that time was Murray Poskitt, an old school newspaperman who would start each day by denigrating the back shop as he made his way to the office. ‘You ------ couldn’t put a paper out if you ------ tried.’ Whether in spite of or because of, it all worked and the paper

hit the streets. “The ad department was headed by legendary Vox Pop columnist— Gordon McKay. Now Gordon was his own man –espousing many causes, a modern day wild west kind of guy but who championed the community as he saw it... “It was a great team with a lot of feeling for the community. When the paper came out there was a sense of having done something worthwhile. In terms of fun and meaning, the best job I’ve had.” Carlyn Yandle arrived as a business reporter in 1993—right after the long battle to save the Terra Nova lands from residential development was lost. Yandle, who rose to editor during her five-year tenure, also remembers the great change Richmond underwent in the ’90s. “This was an important time in Richmond history as the uncertainty that preceded changeover of Hong Kong from British rule led to sudden foreign residential and commercial investment from the other side of the Pacific Rim.” Terry O’Neill is another alumnus from the Review’s newsroom. O’Neill worked at the Review from 1979 to 1983, the first two years as assistant editor under the late Jean Baker, the final two as editor. O’Neill covered city hall in Richmond. He’s now a

Happy 80th Anniversary Richmond Review! CHIMO salutes your support of women and Nova Transition House through the Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards. www.chimocrisis.com Newcomer Assistance – Outreach & Advocacy Nova House - Counselling – Crisis Lines Community Engagement – Volunteering

Congratulations INCORPORATED 1946

INCORPORATED 1894

FROM ONE OLD TIMER TO ANOTHER. STEVESTON COMMUNITY CENTRE

4111 Moncton Street, Richmond Phone: 604-238-8080 stevestoncc@richmond.ca • stevestoncommunitysociety.com

city councillor in Coquitlam. “I actually loved the close-to-home, close-tothe-people responsibilities that council had, and I learned much about local government,” he said. “My experience in Richmond helped contribute to my decision to run here in Coquitlam.” One of his favourite memories at The Review was preparing the paper’s 50th anniversary edition. At the time it was widely believed Ethel Tibbits had founded the paper in 1932. But O’Neill discovered it was actually Bill Carruthers, who was still living in Cloverdale. “I tracked him down, and he told me he had founded the paper in the depths of the Depression as, essentially, a makework project. Little did he know that the paper would end up making work for hundreds if not thousands of people that would follow. We all owe him a debt of gratitude.” *** The paper has an equally storied list of publishers, the likes of whom included Lois Hourston, who served in the role from 1999 to 2004—arriving as the new city hall was under construction. “Being new to Richmond, I wanted the Review to give readers the same view I had of this new community centrepiece—seeing everything for the first time,” she said. “The staff at the paper grabbed the idea and ran with it. We published a 24-page section, with a wrap-around photograph of the building. It was a very proud moment for all of us. And it really reminded the city and council that The Review is a community leader in so many ways.” Her dad used to deliver the newspaper as a kid, and as publisher, Hourston couldn’t help feel as though she was part of something historic. “I love how the readers feel about The Review— as if it was theirs, and we were just the caretakers. And I think pound for pound, word for word, The Review is one of the best newspapers around. It was an honour being at the helm.” See Page 42


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 39

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Page 40 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Awards named after Review’s pioneering editor honour Richmond’s women of distinction Ethel Tibbits Awards have been held since 1994 by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter

W

hile brainstorming some new ideas for The Richmond Review to mark International Women’s Day, theneditor Miriam Sobrino came up with something that would prove to be community altering.

Why not build a section that celebrates the accomplishments of women, and dedicate it to the pioneering editor of The Richmond Review, Ethel Tibbits, Sobrino thought. And so it came to pass that The Richmond Review introduced the first annual Ethel Tibbits Awards Fundraising Luncheon, which was held on March 7, 1994 at the Delta Vancouver Airport Hotel and Marina. Much like this year’s Ethels, proceeds went to Nova House, a shelter for women and their children escaping domestic violence. Carlyn Yandle took over as editor of The Review in 1994, shortly after Sobrino came up with the idea, and as chair of a team of organizers comprising many of The Review’s female staff, helped quickly organize the event which drew about 120 people. Reached at her Vancouver home last week, Yandle fondly recalled the event’s humble origins, and how current Review publisher Mary Kemmis—who was then an assistant advertising manager—along with other female staff including Marilou Pasion, Brenda Collett and Ursula Grant, were the key figures behind the event. With 31 nominees during the first year, and a panel of volunteer judges that included MLA Linda Reid and Shelley Leonhardt, the event was widely considered a success. The inaugural speaker was Sally Abbott, who gave an entertaining talk to more than 200 women entitled “Exploding the military myth of management.” More than $1,000 was raised that afternoon.

Ethel Tibbits Awards winners 1994 Arts—Eva Baker Business— Georgina Evans Community—Arlene Lawson Sports—Camille Noel 1995 Arts—Jacquie Leeson Business—Priya Aswani Community—Norma SuarezJordan Sports—Carol Biely 1996 Arts—Agnes Thompson Business—Gail Terry Community—Charlotte Diamond Sports—Trish Nicholson 1997 Arts—Trudy Morse Business—Janice Barnes Community—Frances Clark Sports—Gayle Guest

Rob Newell file photo Oft-nominated Cherelle Jardine had a blast when she finally won the Ethel Tibbits Award in 2011, presented by Macey ter Borg.

In the years to come, organizers tried to regularly raise the bar. Former councillor and trustee Sue HalseyBrandt was the keynote speaker during the event’s second year, at Maple Garden Restaurant. Halsey-Brandt helped drive brisk ticket sales. For the third year, Dr. Jerrilynn Prior, a “huge name in the medical field,” was invited, Yandle said, explaining that organizers wanted to think outside the box and do something different, with the talk about a serious topic. Prior specializes in the effects of hormones on women’s health. “Everybody loved it,” Yandle said. In a special section dubbed Women Mean Business and dedicated to International Women’s Week, Richmond-East MLA Linda Reid—who then served as Opposition Critic to Health, Seniors, Skills and Training—wrote in an advertisment in 1994 how only 25 per cent of MLAs in the B.C. Legislature were women at the time. “We need more women in the upper levels of education, finance, business and industry. And in particular we need more women in government, sharing decisions that affect us and our

1998 Arts—Page Hope-Smith Business—Shelley Leonhardt Community—Lynne Bigg Sports—Dolly Des Rochers 1999 Arts—Audrey Coutts Business—Linda Shirley Community—Colleen Lobelsohn Sports—Julie Halfnights 2000 Arts—Eva Baker Business—Diane Dupuis Community—Elinor Ellis Sports—Bonnie Beaman 2001 Arts—Colleen Kason Business—Beverly Strench Community—Lin Richardson Sports—Cheryl Taunton 2002 Arts—Linda Shirley Business—Cynthia Chen

children, today and in the future. Women must reflect their numbers at all levels of society, participate equally or we have no real equality at all.” In a 1995 column explaining the event’s origins, Yandle wrote that organizers hoped the event would become a tradition. “The Review organizers were pleased they were able to pull off an event of that scale and grandeur, and they asked for written feedback by those who attended the function. The warm response has encouraged that same group to tackle the same event this year, with the hopes that the Ethel Tibbits Award for Women of the Year continues for years to come. “Organizing this year’s event was a labour of love for The Review staff...The support from the community for this worthwhile event has

“Women must reflect their numbers at all levels of society, participate equally or we have no real equality at all.” - Linda Reid

Community—Jennifer Larsen Sports—Cheryl Dunham 2003 Arts—Barb Mogan Community—Margaret Dixon Business—Cindy Chan Sports—Margaret Dragu Youth—Gillian Cooper 2004 Arts—Heather Webster Community—Dorothy Dawson Business—Lisa Fleischer Sports— Dr. Nancy Cochrane Youth—Jullin O’Scheaur 2005 Arts—Louise Hudson Community—Rosemary Mundigel Business—Elisabeth Van Hest Sports—Tammie Kruger Youth—Tamara Vishnakoff 2006 Arts—Janice Froese

Rob Newell file photo Olive Bassett got a surprise when she learned she and Jennifer Larsen were Pioneer Award winners.

been the major motivator for The Review’s Women of the Year Committee and we look forward to next year’s event.” The awards started out with four categories: Community, Arts, Business and Sports. A Youth category was added in 2003. In 2009, the Pioneer category was added to pay tribute to a long-serving member of the community. Unlike the other categories, there are no nominees and the winner is a surprise. The Pioneer winners to date have been Frances Clark, Lois Carson Boyce, Sally Houston, Olive Bassett and Jennifer Larsen. Today, the Ethels draws some 400 people annually to a celebration of women and fundraising luncheon at a local hotel, with upwards of 30 nominees each year. $18,000 was raised at this year’s luncheon. “The Richmond Review is proud of our long history in our community which goes above and beyond just reporting the news. In our 80 years we believe we have become part of the social fabric of the community,” publisher Mary Kemmis says. Next year marks the 20th annual Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards.

Business—Barbara Bell Community—Barbara Tuck Sports—Penny Talbot Youth—Kathleen Hodges 2007 Arts—Tamaka Fisher Business—Linda Shirley Community—Marielle Demorest Sports—Pat Morrison Youth—Caylee Raber 2008 Arts—Lennie Tan Business—Elizabeth Specht Community—Manninagh L’Abbe Sports—Stephanie Kennedy Youth—Nikki Avendano 2009 Arts—Melanie Pudlas Business—Ami McKay Community—Nina Graham Sports—Marilyn Gubb Youth—Prianka Dhir Pioneer—Frances Clark

2010 Arts—Suzanne Haines Business—Soo Wong Community—Rev. Margaret Cornish Sports—Kim Seaborn Youth—Ivy Wan Pioneer—Lois Carson-Boyce 2011 Arts—Cherelle Jardine Business—Carol Reichert Community—Judi Merrell Sports—Linda Strelau Youth—Perri Tutelman Pioneer—Sally Houston 2012 Arts—Adrienne Moore Business—Tiffany Kirk Community—Linda Reid Sports—Denise Coutts Youth—Maggie Kong Pioneer—Olive Bassett and Jennifer Larsen


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 41

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition Evelina Halsey-Brandt (then known as Vaupotic), Harold Steves and others protest the potential loss of farmland in Terra Nova in 1986. That part of Richmond was the subject of a contentious and ultimately successful rezoning and development. Ironically, thanks to the developer Milan Ilich, much of the Terra Nova lands have been preserved as a natural area, park—and farmland. Another piece of trivia: the story that accompanied the above photo on Oct. 22, 1986 was written by Iain McIntyre, who is now the Vancouver Canucks’ beat writer for the Vancouver Sun. Dave Freedman photo

Familiar faces from 1986

Bob Stradling photo Milan Ilich, who passed away in 2011, was frequently in the pages of The Richmond Review over the years for his philanthropy. Here he is in 1986 giving $10,000 to the Canadian Cancer Society’s Richmond Unit president. And doesn’t that fellow on the left look familiar?

Community Worship

UNITED

BAPTIST

STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH 3720 Broadway Street (at 2nd Ave.)

ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA St. Alban

Broadmoor Baptist Church

an Anglican parish in the heart of Richmond Services at 8:30 and 10:00 am Sunday School 10:00 am The Reverend Margaret Cornish 7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond 604-278-2770 • www.stalbansrichmond.org

A safe place to connect with God and fellow travellers on your spiritual journey

Rev. Rick Taylor

Please join us at 10am Sunday, April 29 for Worship Service and Sunday School 604-277-0508 • www.stevestonunitedchurch.ca A caring and friendly village church

8140 Saunders Road, Richmond, BC 604-277-8012 www.bbchurch.ca

SOUTH ARM UNITED CHURCH 11051 No. 3 Road, Richmond 604-277-4020 sauc@telus.net www.southarmunitedchurch.ca Minister of the Congregation - Rev. Dr. Gary Gaudin Children & Youth Team Ministry Music Ministry - Ron Stevenson Worship Service & Church School - 10:00 am ALL ARE WELCOME!

Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Sonshine Adventures for Kids Interim Pastor - Rev. Bob Bahr

ST. EDWARDS ANGLICAN

ˁ̂๗‫ݜ‬ʔ˥ʓ㼳૦䑄ਿ੬

10111 Bird Road, Richmond V6X 1N4 Phone/Fax: 604-273-1335 • www.stedward.ca Priest-in-charge: Rev. Gord Dominey

Richmond Baptist Church Love God…Love People

6640 Blundell Road, Richmond BC • 604-277-1939 office@richmondbaptist.com www.richmondbaptist.com

WORSHIP SERVICES 9:00 AM AND 11:00 AM

Richmond United Church

Promise Land (Children’s Church)

8711 Cambie Rd. (near Garden City Rd.) 604-278-5622 Minister: Rev. Neill McRae

Sunday Service: 8:30 &10:30 am Sunday School

St. Anne’s - Steveston Anglican Church 4071 Francis Road, Richmond, BC

Children ages 4-12 • Nursery available Teaching Series: GALATIANS

Come for 10am Sunday Worship and Children’s Sunday School and after-service coffee and fellowship. Founded 1888. Richmond’s Oldest Church

CHILDRENS GYM NIGHT Ages 7-12 FRIDAYS 7:00-9:00 pm at Blundell Elementary School (until June 15) Youth, Young Adult and Adult programs Call the church office for more information (604 277-1939)

CHRISTIAN REFORMED

BRIGHOUSE UNITED CHURCH

The Rev. Brian Vickers, Rector • 604-277-9626

Sunday 8:30 a.m. - Contemplative Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Family Eucharist with Church School Sanctuary open for quiet prayer 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. weekdays • www.stannessteveston.ca

PENTECOSTAL ASSEMBLIES OF CANADA RICHMOND PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

an evangelical congregation

RPC - A Place To Belong

8151 Bennett Road, Richmond, 604-278-7188 www.brighouseunitedchurch.org

9300 Westminster Hwy., Phone 604-278-3191 www.rpchurch.com

Sunday, April 29, 2012, 10:00 am Worship

SUNDAY MORNING SERVICES — 9:00AM & 11:00 AM

Minister: Rev. Stuart W. Appenheimer, B.A., M.Div. Home of Brighouse Nursery Pre-School and Brighouse United Church Daycare

Dr. C.A. Coats – Lead Pastor Evening Service – 6:00pm “Multiple Learning Opportunities” – Dr. C.A. Coats Elevate (High School/College) – Pastor Joseph Dutko

GILMORE PARK UNITED CHURCH 8060 No. 1 Road (corner of No. 1 & Blundell) 604.277.5377 www.gilmoreparkunited.org Rev. Scott Swanson & Rev. Jennifer Goddard-Sheppard

Where people of all needs find acceptance and encouragement. Lord Byng Elementary School – Gymnasium 3711 Georgia Street at No. 1 Road, Steveston Village www.Steveston.org Phone: 604.271.3786

Worship and Children’s Program Sundays, 10:30 am

Everyone is welcome!

Senior Pastor - Rev. Kevin Jamieson Sundays 10:30 am Worship, Coffee & Fellowship *Relaxed Setting* Contemporary Music* Children’s Sunday School *Home Bible Study: Wednesday and Thursday 7:30 pm

FOURSQUARE GOSPEL CHURCH OF CANADA Richmond Christian Fellowship Worship Time 10:30am Location MacNeill High School 6611 No. 4 Rd., Richmond phone 604-270-6594 www.rcfonline.com

REFORMED CHURCH (RCA)

Pastor Impam Moses

Fujian Evangelical Church

WHAT IS THAT TO YOU? YOU FOLLOW ME.

welcomes you to Sunday Worship Services

FILIPINO CANADIAN CHURCH

• • •

Apostolic Pentecostal Church Intl. Cambie Rd.

SEA ISLAND

12200 Blundell Road, Richmond, B.C., V6W 1B3 Phone 604-273-2757 • www.fujianevangelical.org

Brown Rd.

No. 3 Rd.

Rive

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• Apostolic Worship • Prayer for the Sick • Counselling and Home Bible Study

Hazelbridge Way

Be part of the new pioneering church in Richmond

Leslie Rd.

Sunday Service: 1:30pm-4:00pm Richmond Yacht Club 7471 River Rd., Richmond, BC, 604-277-9157

er Riv

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Alderbridge Way

INTERDENOMINATIONAL 10351 No. 1 Road (1 block South of Williams Road) Sunday Celebration, Sharing & The Word - 10:00 a.m. www.myecc.org 604-270-4685

Kids Sunday School Youth Activities Everyone Welcome

English Services: 9:00 & 10:30 a.m. Mandarin Service: 9:00 a.m. Minnanese Service: 10:30 a.m.

icrc7600@yahoo.ca

ADVENTIST

FILIPINO CHRISTIAN CHURCH

Richmond Seventh-Day ADVENTIST Church

CHRIST-CENTERED CHRISTIAN CHURCH

Worship Location and Time: Sat. 9:15 a.m. 8711 Cambie Road, Richmond www.richmondsda.org 778-230-9714

(Filipino Congregation) www.cccc-richmondbc.com COME AND JOIN US IN OUR CELEBRATION OF REDEMPTION! Worship Service 12:20 p.m. Sunday School 2:00 p.m. 8151 Bennett Road, Richmond tel: 604-271-6491


Page 42 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

2012 24th Annual Burnaby Rhododendron Festival

Sunday, May 6 | 9:30am–4pm

Free

garden tours

From leaky condos to pay parking in Steveston Newspaper brings meaningful issues to light

plant & artisan sales horticultural exhibits art activities silent auction musical entertainment Don’t miss children’s performances featuring Go Go Bonkers and The Trollsons!

B

reaking news stories that leave residents buzzing are the backbone of any newspaper.

People’s Choice Spring Bouquet Competition For more information please email info@brags.ca

8am | The Bird Life of Deer Lake Park Call 604-205-3003 to pre-register for this earlybird tour.

Help us go green!

Bring your own coffee mug to Encores Café and save $.50 on a cup of coffee.

Limited free parking in vicinity.

6450 Deer Lake Avenue | Burnaby, BC

Event info: 604-291-6864 | brags.ca | shadboltcentre.com

And over the years, The Richmond Review has brought many issues to the forefront, including in 1997, when the newspaper first declared that the water-problems that plagued Lower Mainland residential condominiums was a billion-dollar repair problem. The series of articles that exposed the plight of homeowners, the decades of warnings from government-led research, and the extent of the problem, came following a three-month investigation in which The Review worked closely with local engineer Pierre Busque. Despite criticism that the newspaper was misguided and

inaccurate, history has shown that the deficiencies in construction practices, ill-suited designs, and a lack of adequate government oversight actually cost homeowners billions of dollars in repairs. And even though it’s now 2012, it’s still commonplace to see both four-storey condos and high-rises wrapped in tarps and surrounded by scaffolding. For its coverage, The Review and reporter Martin van den Hemel won first place in the Canadian Association of Journalists open news/investigative journalism category, in which it competed against much larger newsrooms from daily newspapers across the country. Steveston’s Loren Slye, chair of the Steveston 20/20 Group, said a newspaper’s role is to help raise awareness of issues and spark debate. Most recently, the newspaper did exactly that with its coverage of a city-hall plan to introduce pay parking in Steveston. The coverage led to a debate which has prompted civic politicians to take a closer look. And when a city-approved

the richmond

richmondreview.com

Canucks jerseys: Getting the real deal, 3

REVIEW ESTABLISHED 1932

INSIDE

Engineers pumped about pumphouse Page 4

Pacific Int’l Cup berths up for grabs Page 19

Easter egg hunt Page 27

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 2012

Street Meet’s mobile food truck offered lunch last weekend from a city street by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter A food truck caused a stir in Steveston last weekend when it began selling Mediterranean style street food despite a bylaw that doesn’t allow mobile food vendors on city streets. Street Meet, a fast food business that operates from a bright yellow truck, set up shop on Bayview Street Saturday and Sunday, at one point parking in front of the vacant Esso marine site. Reviews on Twitter were mixed. One noted “it was so awesome” to have street food in Steveston, while others questioned how a food truck was allowed to operate while parked on one of Steveston’s busiest streets. “Support your local merchants, not the illegal food truck in Steveston,” read a tweet from the Steveston Merchants Association. Vince Morlet, owner of Tapenade Bistro, was one of several local restaurateurs who was asking questions on the sunny weekend. He said small eateries along the waterfront offering takeout would be most impacted by the addition of food trucks, which have the ability to avoid the slow, rainy days other taxpaying Steveston businesses must endure. “To have trucks just swoop in on the odd busy day come

photo courtesy of twitter.com/steveston The Street Meet food truck operating on Bayview Street Saturday.

in, I don’t know how it really adds to the community,” he said. “Our concern is one food truck today, and (later) we have 20 lined up.” City spokesperson Ted Townsend said food trucks, if licensed, can only operate on private property—not city streets—by agreement with the landowner. He said a bylaw allows only continually-moving mobile food vendors—which may stop to make a sale—such as ice cream trucks. Street Meet operators Alessandro Vianello and Mike Carter insist they have a li-

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cence and can legally sell food up to two hours on any street location in the city, provided they’re legally parked. After two hours, they must move 100 metres away, said Carter. But Townsend said Street Meet was given a mobile food vending licence “under the understanding they would be serving work sites and movie sites.” “They were not given permission to park on-street for any length of time,” he said. “There’s obviously a misunderstanding and miscommunication there and it’s obviously something we’ll be following

up on.” Staff at Richmond City Hall are looking into the possibility of allowing food vendors to operate more freely around Canada Line stations, but a report for city council hasn’t yet been prepared. Townsend said there’s been some increased interest in food trucks in Richmond due to the popularity in Vancouver, but interest is still “fairly small,” noting two or three food truck businesses have licences to operate in Richmond. Nonetheless, Carter said there’s demand for his food

truck, saying he sold out of food each day they operated in Steveston Village. “The demand was overwhelming and the feedback was amazingly positive,” he said. He said they plan to be back in Richmond Thursday at Saba and No. 3 roads serving lunch street-side to pedestrians near the Richmond-Brighouse Station of the Canada Line. “We set up shop in Richmond at 3 and Saba without really letting anybody know,” he said, referring to their opening day last Thursday, “and we had a lineup in 10 minutes.”

NOW OPEN

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Food truck causes a stir in Steveston

WWW.PRICKLYPEAR.CA 12311 NO. 1 ROAD, STEVESTON • 604-241-4717

NEWS@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM

OFFICE: 604-247-3700

SPRING HOURS WE ARE NOW OPEN TILL 9PM WEEKNIGHTS. LOTS OF NEW STUFF ARRIVING DAILY. OPEN 9 TO 9 MON TO FRI, 9 TO 6 SAT AND SUN

DELIVERY: 604-247-3710

CLASSIFIED: 604-575-5555

NEWSROOM: 604-247-3730

A food vendor parked on city streets was the talk of the town in Steveston recently.

mobile food vendor decided to park his vehicle in front of a Steveston eatery, coverage of that issue also prompted reconsideration. And when The Review revealed plans by the city to introduce a permitting process for those seeking to shoot videos in public places, including local parks and facilities, that plan was removed from the table due to unforeseen consequences exposed by the newspaper.

EDITION

ichmond

richmondreview.com

REVIEW ESTABLISHED 1932

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012

Chinese-American hoop p star is inspi spiiring iriing irin g locals ocal o ca cals Jeremy Lin’s unlikely success in Big Apple hasn’t gone unnoticed here y Matthew Hoekstra ff Reporter my Lin’s quick rise to stardom has hina by storm—and caught the of plenty of basketball fans in -born NBA player of ethtage helped lead the ve straight victories game in Toronto e in prac. Not

Former publisher remembers dedication of the community From Page 38 Josh O’Connor started in The Review’s sales departSTORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PR S BR S ST S CA S DE S BR S ST S CA S

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owne Centre sold his last piece off Jeremy Lin merchandise—a ro ookie card— ard rd last week. Although his carrds are popular, Weiss doesn’t stock much in N NBA apparel. But no retailers w would hav have a been prepared for Lin’s unlike ely success. cce c “I just talked to a friend wh ho just got back from New York an nd he said s sa every printing press that does T-shiirts rts, jerseys rt or what-have-you is goin ng da ay and night in New York to get stuff out the here,” said Weiss. Reports suggest peop ple in China are hosting viewing parties of o Kni Kn niccks games, while state TV adjusted d itss sc s hedule to broadcast New York’s win w n over Minnesota Sunday. In Toronto o, which w wh hosted the Knicks last night, th he Can Ca adian Chinese Youth Athletics A Asssoc ociation was offering discounted tickkets ets ts to members to “Catch the Linsanity.”” Lin’s name is even being talked about in churches, as the basketball star has been open about his faith and his favoupassage in the Bible. u, pastor at Revere church t

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ment in 2002 and left as publisher in 2006. He feels fortunate to have been a part of The Review’s history. “The dedication of The Richmond Review staff was impressive and humbling to be a part of. The staff understood and anticipated Richmond’s character and expectations, and always attempted to enhance the community’s comprehension of itself.” O’Connor is now vice-president of Sound Publishing’s East Sound Newspaper Operations. His fondest memories of Richmond were community events: activities organized by the Richmond Chamber of Commerce, events at Gateway Theatre, the Jimmy Ng Memorial Hockey Tournament, Salmon Festival, Chinese New Year celebrations, Richmond Night Market and Ethel Tibbits Awards. “What impressed me the most about Richmond was the countless community residents and business leaders that tireless dedicated their time towards making the community a great place to live and work,” said O’Connor. BEST BUY – Correction Notice We would like to clarify the activation credit advertised with this product: Virgin Mobile LG 230 Prepaid Cellular Phone (WebCode: 10143556) on the April 20 flyer, page 20. Please be advised that customers are eligible to receive the $30 activation credit ONLY when the customer's prepaid plan is activated online. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

• check out our eEdition online • flip through, as you would with a newspaper • zoom in on the text for a more detailed view • the e-edition is fully searchable • see an ad you like? click on it to check out the advertiser’s website

Save time, save money. the richmond

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Visit our other Black Press sites

FUTURE SHOP – Correction Notice On the April 20 flyer, page 22, this product: 250GB Xbox 360 Value Bundle (WebCode: 10182217) was advertised with an incorrect price and bonus offer. Please be advised that the two bonus games (Bioshock/Splinter Cell - WebCodes: 10125651/10125847) are NOT included with this console bundle, and the price of this product is in fact $249.99, Save $50. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 43

The Richmond Review’s 80th Anniversary Edition

Rview gives youth a voice in The Richmond Review Back in 2006, the goal was to give Richmond youth a voice in the community, where they could share their stories, opinions, interests and points of view with the broader community while learning the basics of newspaper journalism. Six years later, Rview can call amongst its alumna a number of successful students, including 24 Hours reporter Stephanie Ip, who served as the original editor, Sara Harowitz, who just completed her fourth and final year at Ryerson University, where she wrote for Off The Map Webzine, Zouch Magazine and Burner Magazine, and Jane Zhang, who along with Ip made The Richmond Review’s 30-under-30 list this year. Harowitz shared her STEPHANIE IP thoughts last September as she entered her final year of studies: “Once I graduate I’ll be looking for an internship or position at a magazine, with the hope of one day being a feature writer and/or editor. So the future is scary but, fingers crossed, bright!” Josh O’Connor, publisher at the time, and City of Richmond youth counsellor Mike Powar got the ball rolling in giving the community’s youth a chance to learn from the people who produce The Review twice every week. In 2006, Powar, fellow counsellor Erin Rochard and Richmond Review reporter Martin van den Hemel served as mentors to the first group of reporters. During the first year, there were more than 50 youth applicants, with a

Friday, March 30, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 35

OUR CITY ¦ OUR YOUTH ¦ OUR VIEW

Students get to showcase ideas πPage 36

Fighting to fit in πPage 37

The teenage hardships of hidden love

Marcie Anderson 604-270-8831

R O Y A L

by Alice Hou and Anushka Kurian Youth Reporters

To their classmates, David Wong and Fiona Wong seem like the perfect high school couple. The Grade 12 Richmond students have been dating since they were in Grade 9, and envision a shared future. Few people would guess that if you asked David and Fiona’s parents, they would have no idea of the existence of the relationship. “I have decided not to tell my parents about my relationship simply because they would not accept it,” said David, who has been in two previous relationships, both of which he did share with his parents. He added that in his past relationships “before listening to what I have to say, [my parents] would tell me that I shouldn’t be dating because it will ultimately affect my education.” Continued on Page 38

π Keeping a relationship hidden from parents can often be a stressful experience for many teen couples. MADYSON ADAMS PHOTO

Rview is written and edited by local youth.

team of a dozen becoming the inaugural group of youth reporters. Not only did they come up with the Rview name—Our Community, Our Youth, Our View—but they designed the newspaper banner, and then wrote all the stories, took the photos and composed the pages. Today, Steven Chua is the editor of Rview, and he’s also eyeing a career in journalism, having recently applied to Langara Col-

Not only did they come up with the Rview name—Our Community, Our Youth, Our View— but they designed the newspaper banner, and then wrote all the stories, took the photos and composed the pages.

lege’s journalism program. And Alice Hou, an original Rview reporter, still writes for Rview and helps mentor younger writers. Stephanie Ip was Rview’s volunteer editor from 2006 to 2010. “Rview was an awesome opportunity where I received basic hands-on journalism training and had the chance to put those newly learned skills into practice,” Ip said. “It was an experience that taught me about my own potential and gave me the confidence to pursue an exciting career that I absolutely love. It motivated me to seek out further training and even today, as a reporter for 24 Hours newspaper, I’m constantly reminded of tips and tricks that I learned while at Rview. “The people I met and the staff I worked with treated me as an equal and not as a young person, giving me chances to grow and learn.” In 2011, Cat Yelizarov, a Kwantlen graphic design student, redesigned Rview.

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Page 44 - Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . . . . . . 1-8 COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . 9-57 TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-76 CHILDREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80-98 EMPLOYMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-198 BUSINESS SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . 203-387 PETS & LIVESTOCK . . . . . . . . . . . 453-483 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE . . . . . . 503-587 REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-696 RENTALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-757 AUTOMOTIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804-862 MARINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903-920

7

OBITUARIES

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

Show & Sale Sat. April 28 10 AM - 5 PM Sun. April 29 10 AM - 4 PM Abby. Exhibition Park 32470 Haida Dr. in the Cadet Building â&#x20AC;˘ Adults $6 â&#x20AC;˘ Kids $4 â&#x20AC;˘ Children under 5 Free â&#x20AC;˘ Family $12 (2 adults & up to 3 kids)

AGREEMENT

Visit: www.bcreptileclub.ca (1)-604-836-6080

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. bcclassified.com cannot be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. bcclassified.com reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisment and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassified.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisment and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHT Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

Advertise across Advertise across the the Advertise across the Lower Mainland Mainland in Lower in lower mainland in the 18 best-read the 18 best-read thecommunity 17 best-read community community newspapers and newspapers and newspapers. dailies. 53 dailies. ON THE WEB: ON THE WEB:

COMING EVENTS

BC ARTS AND CULTURE WEEK is on until the 28th! Find out whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in your community and schools at: www.bcartsweek.org/events

33

INFORMATION

CRIMINAL RECORD? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540. LOOKING FOR WITNESSES February 10, 2012 At approx 06:45pm

Logue, Thomas Patrick Earl 06 Jul 1941 - 15 Apr 2012 On 15 Apr, Tom left this world to join his beloved wife Rada, mother Patricia, Nana and best friend Peter. He was born 06 Jul 1941 in Vancouverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital. He was proud to be a descendent of 2 Vancouver pioneering families. The McGuigans and Stewarts were known for their leadership in rebuilding the city after the fire of 1886. Tomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great grandfather, Tom Simpson was the last station agent in Steveston for BC Electric. Tom served his community through the Richmond Jaycees and Centenary Council of 1867 1967. He was pivotal in organizing the first Bath Tub Race from Nanaimo and treasured his Order of the Golden Plug. He went to Whitehorse where he started school and then to Richmond where he grduated with the class of 1959. After graduation he went to New Zealand and Australia with his buddy Raymond Kelly. Home again, then off to Europe. Whereever he went Tom easily made lifelong friends. Tom could and did many things, but his greatest joy was being a bartender, He worked at the Fraser Arms, the Ritz and the Blue Boy Hotels. As a bartender Tom was confidante, banker, entertainer and loyal friend to all he served. He spent his retirement gardening, fishing, enjoying life. He especially enjoyed being part of the Irish Mafia with his pal Bob Lyttle. He love his family and his little dog Dobie. Left to mourn are his sister Linda (Bob) Payer and many dear relatives and friends in B.C., Seattle, New Zealand, Australia, Ireland and Jugoslavia. No service or flowers. A Wake/Celebration will be held in Steveston at the Charthouse Restaurant on 24 May 2012 from 3-6 p.m. Come, raise a glass and share a story for Tom!

A collision occurred at the intersection of No.1 Road & Blundell Road. A blue SUV struck a sedan and then fled the scene. If you have any information please contact:Padee: - 604-269-8500 Hammerberg, Altman, Beaton & Maglio LLP

42

LOST AND FOUND

LOST: Puppy, Pitt Bull, tan, 4 mo., female. 4 harness. Burrows & No. 6 Rd. April 18th 604-442-1904 or 604-270-3336

CHILDREN 83

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

115

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AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783

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EDUCATION

APPLY NOW: Pennywise Scholarship For Women to attend Journalism certificate course at Langara College in Vancouver. Deadline May 30, 2012. More information: www.bccommunitynews.com

to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased bcclassified.com circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 115

114

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

EXPERIENCED B TRAIN DRIVERS required for seasonal work. Tanker experience preferred. Wages up to $ 25/hr. including bonus, benefit plan, training provided. All T800 Kenworths. Ideal job for semi-retired summer driver! Fax resume 604-520-6659 or email: rickmcarthur@telus.net

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

TRAIN TO BE AN Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456.

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114

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EXCLUSIVE â&#x20AC;&#x153;THINKBIGâ&#x20AC;? Mechanic Training. GPRC Fairview Campus. $1000. entrance scholarship. Paid practicum with Finning. High school diploma and mechanical aptitude. Write apprenticeship exams. 1-888999-7882; gprc.ab.ca/Fairview.

REGISTER NOW for September 2012 2 1/2 years to 5 years old

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 106

AUTOMOTIVE

EXPERIENCED SERVICE PROVIDER for Chrysler dealership in Salmon Arm. Strong customer satisfaction skills. Able to work in a fast paced environment. Excellent wage/benefit package. Fax resume 1 250 832 4545. email pat@brabymotors.com SERVICE MANAGER - Hanna Chrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta). Opportunity in a perfect family environment. Strong team, competitive wages, benefits, growth potential. Fax resume: 403-854-2845. Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

BBQ 11:00am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:00pm Immediate openings for experienced Professional Class 1 Highway Drivers! Exciting careers for an Operations Manager, Fleet Dispatcher & Driver Recruiter are also available! Our new home could be your new home too! Stop in to ďŹ nd out what makes Bison Transport the Right Choice for YOUâ&#x20AC;Ś

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

WE OFFER: â&#x20AC;˘ Excellent Equipment â&#x20AC;˘ Dedicated Dispatch Team â&#x20AC;˘ Safe Driving Reward Program â&#x20AC;˘ Referral Bonus Program â&#x20AC;˘ Rider Program â&#x20AC;˘ Great BeneďŹ ts and more!

$%%$!!"$&$ 0RESSMAN  $%%% !"  !$$%% 6AN0RESSHASANOPENINGFORA*OURNEYMAN WEB OFFSET PRESSMAN& WITH MINIMUM !!"$&!'$"  '$ +  YEARSEXPERIENCE0REFERENCEWILLBEGIVEN $$ )( &!&!%)& TO THOSE EXPERIENCE WITH 'OSS 33# *"$  WITH &"$ & +$ '%&$+ PRESSES 0ERRETTA 2'3 AND 4ECHNOTRANS '%&(&!)!$ !'$%&% SYSTEMS

+%)  "!$ "  -USTBEAVAILABLETOWORKGRAVEYARDSHIFT $ %$#'$'%&(!! PM AM DAYSWEEK ! ! % ' 2EFERENCESREQUIRED

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Recruit@BisonTransport.com www.bisondriving.com Bison Transport is committed to Employment Equity and Diversity

115

EDUCATION

115

EDUCATION

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9818 - 198B St., Langley

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. Sites in AB & BC. Hands on real world machine training. NO Simulators. Start any Monday. Funding Options. www.IHESchool.com 1-866-399-3853

)NTERESTEDAPPLICANTSSHOULDDROPOFF FAX OREMAILTHEIRRESUMETO

114

SATURDAY, APRIL 28TH 9:00am - 3:00pm

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EDUCATION

THE ONE AND ONLY Harley Davidson Technician Training Program in Canada. GPRC Fairview Campus. 15 week program. Current H-D motorcycle training aids. Affordable residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

HOME BASED BUSINESS We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

TIME TO PRESSURE WASH YOUR HOME? Browse through bcclassified.comâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business Service section in the 200-300â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Class 341 - Pressure Washing

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

(250)717-0412

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012 EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 125

Richmond Review - Page 45 EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

FOSTER/SOCIAL CARE

130

HELP WANTED

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 131

CONCRETE FINISHERS and Form Setters. Edmonton based company seeks experienced concrete finishers and form setters for work in Edmonton and northern Alberta. Subsistence and accommodations provided for out of town work; john@raidersconcrete.com. Cell 780-660-8130. Fax 780-444-7103.

Make it yours. Call 604-708-2628 www.plea.bc.ca

130

HELP WANTED

Please send your resume to: hr@organika.com or fax to: 604-247-0610, Attn. HR Manager.

$100-$400 CASH DAILY for Landscaping Work! Competitive, Energetic, Honesty a MUST!

T-MAR INDUSTRIES located in Campbell River is hiring for the position of a qualified Machinist. Position comes with a competitive benefit package and applicant must possess a valid driver’s license. Contact Tyson Lambert. Mail: 5791 Duncan Bay Road, Campbell River BC V9H 1N6 Fax: 250286-9502. Email:tysonlambert@t-mar.com

PropertyStarsJobs.Com Acan Transport Ltd. needs 1 perm. computer system analyst ($31.5/hr) in Surrey. University Degree in computer science or software engineering & over 3 yrs relevant exp. req. Chinese language capacity highly valued. Duties: custom design & implement IT system with full business solution, minimize security breaches, maintain performance. Please apply to: acantransport@yahoo.com.

is looking for Structural Steel Fabricators/Erectors with track record.

269

Wages: $16.04 per/hour E-mail: careers@ donaldsfinefoods.com or fax: 604.875.6031

SANDWICH ARTISTS

1320 - 56 St. Tsawwassen ALL SHIFTS, F/T & P/T No experience necessary. Uniform and training provided. 1 free meal included daily.

SUBWAY Call Hardeep 604-948-2888 Please No Calls Between 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Holbrook Dyson Logging Ltd Has vacancies in the following job: Heavy Duty Mechanic. Details can be seen at http://hdlogging.com/ Fax resume to 250-287-9259

BCCLASSIFIED.COM 130

160

HELP WANTED

Kids and Adults Needed Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either! Deliver 2x week, Wednesdays and Fridays, right in your neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.

Call JR 604-247-3712 or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com

Boundaries

Number of Papers

14100174

4000 Blk Steveston Hwy (includes townhomes)

93

14203135

Fairdell Cres

64

14201154

5000 blk Williams Rd

71

14203244

Bairdmore Cres

42

14901036

Turquoise Dr

50

14201121

Gander Dr, Crt, Pl, St Johns Pl

62

14201126

Cornerbrook Cres, St Brides Crt, St Vincents Pl, Crt

60

Kids and Adults Needed Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either! Deliver 2x week, Wednesdays and Fridays, right in your neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.

TRADES, TECHNICAL 5 Skilled Carpenters

163

Resume to: artsymillwork@hotmail.com

Commercial Transport Journeyman Mechanic - Truck Van-Kam Freightways Ltd. requires a full-time Commercial Transport Journeyman Mechanic with truck experience. This position is located at our Surrey Terminal (10155 Grace Road). Applicants should have related experience, a positive attitude and able to work in a team environment. This is a busy facility providing service to a large fleet of Company Owned Trucks and Trailers. Submit a detailed resume and email/cover letter to: careers@vankam.com or fax: 604-587-9889 or call Derek at 604-587-9818 (leave a message) Van Kam is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to Environmental Responsibility. Van Kam thanks you for your interest, however only those being considered will be contacted.

Number of Papers

15102996 2000 blk Shell Rd, River Dr 14302277 8000 Blk of Railway Ave 14301274 Cormorant Crt, Steveston Hwy 14401544 10000 Blk of No 4 Rd 14401714 9500-10800 Block Shell 14303522 9000 Blk of No 3 Rd 14401660 Ainsworth Cres, Moddocks Rd 14401611 Dennis Cres, Pl, Wilkinson Rd 14304042 Evancio Cres, Jaskow Dr, Gate, Pl, Pauleshin Cres 15102040 Baydala , Davies Crt, Pl, Finalyson Crt, Dr Gagnon Pl, Tait Crt 15102063 Beckman Pl, 9000 blk of Bridgeport 14500483 Ash St, Boyd Crt, Dolphin Ave, Crt 15101029 4000 Blair Dr, Fisher Gt, Howard St, Shepherd Dr 14302321 8220, 8240 No 2 Rd

55 24 52 60 64 62 85 110 144 133 96 101 193 51

Donald’s Fine Foods is a progressive and growing specialty meats processing and distribution company. We have an opening in our Maintenance Department for the following positions:

• Industrial Electricians • Millwrights To be considered candidates must have the following qualifications attributes: • 3-5 years previous exp. (food manufacturing plant an asset.) • Excellent troubleshooting and repair skills • Mechanically inclined refrigerant operators and/or Class 4 Power Engineer ticket would be an asset

• Industry Competitive Wages • Full-Benefits • Steady Full-Time Work

Fax resume 604.533.0896 or e-mail: careers@ donaldsfinefoods.com

FENCING 551

S & S LANDSCAPING & FENCING Factory Direct Cedar Fence Panels for Sale & Installation. 8291 No. 5 Road, Richmond. 604 275-3158

281

GARDENING

Always! Pwr. raking, grass cutting, fertilizing, hedging, pruning, Rubbish rem. Free Est. 604-230-0627

VOLUNTEER

Be part of our exciting, worldclass softball tournament, which takes place from June 30 - July 9 in Surrey, BC. We are looking for volunteers in areas such as: scorekeeping, security & parking, transportation, batgirls, tickets & gates, and more! We ask that each volunteer work a minimum of 20 hours. In exchange for your time, each volunteer will receive:

PERSONAL SERVICES 173E

HEALTH PRODUCTS

HERBAL MAGIC Look great for summer - 1st 9 weeks for $99. Lose Weight and keep it off. Results Guaranteed! Call NOW 1-800-8545176.

HOLISTIC LIFECOACHING Do you want to apply the book “The Secret” into your life but just don’t know how? Find out the things that blocking your way in manifesting the life you desire. www.createacharmedlife.ca 604-277-3591

182

551

MOVING Sale Steveston 3231 Broadway St April 29, 9:30 - 3:30 Furniture, Crystal, Glass Collectibles: Bells, Bears, Spoons, Salt & Peppers Household, Kitchen Wares Garden Tools MULTI-FAMILY Street Garage Sale, April 28th Pelican Crt, 9 - 2 (near Westwind Elem. school)

Richmond SWAP MEET & Bake Sale FUNDRAISER for the Canadian Cancer Society Westwind elem school gym 11371 Kingfisher Drive Sat. April 28th 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Tables available to rent $15 Contact Lisa marcoe@shaw.ca

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

329 PAINTING & DECORATING

353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

games you crave, you'll find

“ ABOVE THE REST “ Int. & Ext., Unbeatable Prices, Professional Crew. Free Est. Written Guarantee. No Hassle, Quick Work, Insured, WCB. Call (778)997-9582

something for the kid in you

A-TECH Services 604-230-3539

Whether it's comic books, dirt bikes or video

GUTTER Cleaning Service, Repairs Free Est, 20 yrs exp, Rain or shine. 7 days/week. Simon 604-230-0627

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

ADDITIONS, Renovations & New Construction. Concrete Forming & Framing Specialist. 604.218.3064 A face lift for your home-Selling or upgrade? Bthrms/Kitchens/Plumbing/Electrical/Drywall/Tex. ceilings/ doors. Big/Small. WCB, insured. Seniors Spec. Mike, 604-341-2681 HOWARD CONSTRUCTION LTD Licensed and Bonded, Commercial, Residential and Complex Maintenance, Home Repairs and Renovations, Decks, Fences, Painting. “No job is too Big, no job is too Small!” Serving Richmond Call for your Free Estimate.... 778 389-4332 MLG ENTERPRISES All Aspects Landscaping & Garden Solutions

OF Home (604)501-9290

Improvements,

3 rooms for $299, 2 coats any colour

338

PLUMBING

10% OFF if you Mention this AD! *Plumbing *Heating *Reno’s *More Lic.gas fitter. Aman: 778-895-2005 1ST CALL Plumbing, heating, gas, licensed, insured, bonded. Local, Prompt and Prof. 604-868-7062 $39 SERVICE CALL plumbing, heating, plugged drains. Big & sm jobs. Ironman Plumbing (604)510-2155

Gas Fitter ✭ Plumber Furnace Boilers, Hot Water Tanks Hot Water Heat, Plumbing Jobs. Furnace cleaning with truck mounted machine

604-507-4606 or 604-312-7674

Need STRESS relief? One easy payment makes that possible!

MIN. EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM Reasonable Rates 604-270-6338

www.debtgone.ca Licensed, Government Approved, Canadian Company.

188

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

RECYCLE-IT! • Estate Services • Electronics • Appliances • Old Furniture • Construction • Yard Waste • Concrete • Drywall • Junk • Rubbish • Mattresses & More!

On Time, As Promised, Service Guaranteed!

604.587.5865

CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSETS WITH OUR ”DOLLAR DEALS” bcclassified.com 604-575-5555

341 320

MOVING & STORAGE

1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING. Real Professionals, Reasonable. Rates. Different From the Rest. 604-721-4555. ABE MOVING - $35/Hr. Per Person *Reliable Careful Movers. *Rubbish Removal. *24 Hours. 604-999-6020

AFFORDABLE MOVING Local & Long Distance

$45/Hr

From 1, 3, 5, 7,10 Ton Trucks Licenced ~ Reliable ~ 1 to 3 Men Free estimate/Seniors discount Residential~Commercial~Pianos

HOME CARE

LEGAL SERVICES

RUBBISH REMOVAL

www.recycleitcanada.ca

MONEYPROVIDER.COM. $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877776-1660.

LOOKING for work as a live-in/out Caregiver/Companion for Seniors. Four years’ experience with clients of varying medical and social issues. The spunkier the better, is my motto. Prefer the Richmond area but willing to travel further. Contact Susan at 778-899-3364 or susandub@telus.net for further info. Have a great day.

356

JUNK REMOVAL Recycled Earth Friendly

Call FREE 1-877-220-3328

185

Jas 778-896-4065 Bell 604-339-2765

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Cloverdale Premium quality paint. NO PAYMENT until Job is completed. Ask us about our Laminate Flooring & Maid Services. www.paintspecial.com

NEED HELP MANAGING YOUR DEBT?

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

25 year of experience. Call for your FREE estimate.

PAINT SPECIAL

283 GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

287

New and Re-Roof Specialist Residential & Commercial. Shakes, Shingles and Duroid.

Running this ad for 8yrs

in the Classifieds!

FINANCIAL SERVICES

DROWNING IN DEBTS? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. AVOID BANKRUPTCY! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500

GARAGE SALES

NAHAL CONSTRUCTION

• FREE ADMISSION to all playing venues • 1 complimentary item of event apparel • 1 complimentary meal per volunteer shift worked! Call our office or visit our website for more info. 604-536-9287 or www.canadianopen fastpitch.com or Attend our next Volunteer meeting for more details. Tuesday, May 1 7:00 pm at the Sandman Signature Hotel, 8828 201 Street, Langley

GARAGE SALES

MOVING sale, lot’s of furniture etc. Saturday, April 28 10-2pm 8480 Ryan Rd.

RICHMOND 5931-Kittiwake Drive Apr 28 & 29, 9am-3pm Camping gear, furniture & misc hsehld NEB

AT THE SCOTIABANK CANADIAN OPEN FASTPITCH!

If you own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com

Boundaries

VOLUNTEERS

Artsy in Richmond Min. 5 yrs exp. Cab./ Carpentry. Read Blue print in Chinese. $23.50/Hr, 37.5hr/Wk, WCB

Call Roya 604-247-3710 Route

info@westeelfabrication.ca or Contact: 604-543-8016

MEDICAL/DENTAL

MEDICAL OFFICE - Part time receptionist required one to two days per week - also vacation coverage. Require mature individual. Will train computer billing. This job would be ideal for retired or semi-retired LPN or RN. Send resume with a handwritten note to Mailbox Rental #319-8155 Park Rd. Richmond, V6Y 1S9

Call Erica 604.777.2195

Route

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD SERVICES

Please send your resume to:

139

Paid weekly up to $20/hr Hiring 12 F/T positions Must be outgoing, motivated And dedicated!!!!! Students welcome!!!

ELECTRICAL

134

JOBS

APPLY NOW!!!

260

Westeel Fabrication Ltd.

BUTCHER

Richmond based health food and herbal manufacturing company requires a full-time Production personnel/Machine operator. Applicant must have a great attitude, be in good physical condition, accurate with numbers and paperwork, and possess good communication skills. Some heavy lifting is involved.

TRADES, TECHNICAL

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

Retail or wholesale (NOC: 6251) required for Donald’s Fine Foods. Immediate openings at our Richmond locations for 15 qualified / exp. Meat Cutters. Duties; Cut, trim and prepare cuts of meat, supervise other workers and provide training. Must speak English. Permanent / Full-time – 40 hours per week. Full Benefits after completion of probation.

PRODUCTION PERSONNEL Packaging

160

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

LIVE-IN CAREGIVER for elderly, F/T. Min. wage. Richmond area. Call Gloria, 604-275-5241.

.

Some great kids aged 12 to 18 who need a stable, caring home for a few months. Are you looking for the opportunity to do meaningful, fulfilling work? PLEA Community Services is looking for qualified applicants who can provide care for youth in their home on a full-time basis or on weekends for respite. Training, support and remuneration are provided. Funding is available for modifications to better equip your home. A child at risk is waiting for an open door.

HOME CARE/SUPPORT

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

604-537-4140 SPARTAN Moving Ltd. Fast & Reliable. Insured Competitive rates. Wknd Specials. Call Frank: (604) 435-8240

329 PAINTING & DECORATING AAA PRECISION PAINTING. Quality work. 778-881-6096.

PRESSURE WASHING

HOT + COLD Pressure Washing Sidewalks - Driveways - Parkades Res/ Comm/ Strata. 604-802-9033

POWER WASHING GUTTER CLEANING SAME DAY SERVICE AVAILABLE

Call Ian 604-724-6373 Pressure Washing, window cleaning, sidewalks, parking lots, driveways & gutters. WCB.604-833-1462

#1 AAA Rubbish Removal 21 Years Serving Rmd. Residential & Commercial Clean Courteous Service FREE ESTIMATES Joe 604-250-5481

bradsjunkremoval.com

Haul Anything... But Dead Bodies!! 604.

353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

JASON’S ROOFING All kinds of re-roofing & repairs. Free est. Reasonable rates. (604)961-7505, 278-0375

477

REVIEW

Serving The Lower Mainland Since 1988 bcclassified.com 604-575-5555

477

PETS

the richmond

220.JUNK(5865)

PETS

OF PET THE WEEK

“KELSEY” NEEDS A GOOD HOME WITH YOU!

“KELSEY”, ID#258041, SF, DMH, 1 YR 3MTHS (APPROX) Beautiful black tortoiseshell Kelsey came to the Abbotsford SPCA when her owner realized they couldn’t afford to properly care for a cat. Through the Drive for Lives Programme, she has made her way to Richmond where the staff and her foster mom (and namesake) quickly fell in love with her gentle temperament. She is a sweet and loving young girl who is active, very playful and has a beautiful, luxurious coat that will need regular brushing a few times a week. If you are looking for a calm, independent cat to make your family complete, come and meet Kelsey today!

TO ADOPT CALL 604-277-3100

SPCA Thriftmart 5400 MINORU BLVD • 604-276-2477

5431 NO. 3 RD. 604-276-2254

PROUD TO SUPPORT THE LOCAL SPCA


Page 46 - Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

the richmond

HOME SERVICE GUIDE LAWN CARE

24/7 HEATING & PLUMBING • Water Heaters • Hot Water Tanks • Plumbing, Drainage, Gas Plumbing • Fireplaces & Conversion to Gas • Furnace, Boiler Repairs & Installation

A DIVISION OF NOLAN YARD WORKS

• Regular Scheduled Cuts • Aerating •Lime & Fertilize • Hedge Trimming COMPLETE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Senior's Discount!

Licensed, Insured, Bonded • Same Day Service

5 MINUTE EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM PLUMBING SERVICES AT REASONABLE RATES CALL 604-270-6338

BILL GILLESPIE ** COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL ** KITCHEN & BATHROOM SPECIALIST PLUS TIDDLEY THINGS

604-272-2809 or cell: 604-841-2479

Call Darryn 604-339-5532

•Backhoes •Mini excavator (rubber track) •Bobcats (forks/buckets) •Dump trucks

To advertise in the Call 604-247-3700

or email admin@richmondreview.com MERCHANDISE FOR SALE 560

582

STORE EQUIPMENT/ FIXTURES

TOOLS

14” band saw - JWBS, like new, 10” bench drill press, Clark 4” belt/6” disc sander. (604)274-4976

604-787-5915, 604-291-7778 www.treeworksonline.ca treeworkes@yahoo.ca 10% OFF with this AD

REAL ESTATE 609

PETS 477

MISC. FOR SALE

BAKERY OVEN $3900. Horizontal cooler with working table on top, $2500. Almost new. (604)781-5679

587

APARTMENT/CONDOS

CONDO. Estate sale. N/W facing million $ view. 803-4160 Sardis St. Bby. 498 sf. 5 min. from Skytrain/bus. Strata fee $182.50. Many amenities. $182,000. Call Roger 604-274-8944.

PETS

Adorable Cocker Spaniel Puppies Only 4 left – purebred, no papers (604) 888-0832 asking $500 BLUE NOSE PITT BULLS, puppies, 1st shots, vet ✔, dewormed. $700. (604)530-0336

612 BUSINESSES FOR SALE

CAIRN Terriers. Shots, dewormed. Ready to go to good homes. Over 20 years of referrals. 604-807-5204, 604-592-5442 or 604-854-1978

Hair Salon for Sale in Steveston Strong clientele. Is Set up as a Unique Barber Shop as well as Women’s Hair Salon. Busy Loc. - Main St. Asking $35K

CANE CORSO MASTIFF, shots, dewormed, tails cropped, vet ✓ Call 604-826-7634. CATS GALORE, TLC has for adoption spayed & neutered adult cats. 604-309-5388 / 604-856-4866 CATS OF ALL DESCRIPTION in need of caring homes! All cats are Spayed, neutered, vaccinated and dewormed. Visit us at fraservalleyhumanesociety.com or call 1 (604)820-2977 CHIHUAHUA, male, very tiny tea cup, just 15oz at 3 mos old, vet checked, $900. (604)794-7347 Daschund X Border Collies, 6/wks, ready Apr 30, black, tan & white, $350. (604) 463-3245, 725-3007 GOLDEN RETRIEVER pups P/B 6 weeks old, 1st shots, dewormed & vet checked. $800. (604)850-3329 No Sunday calls please. NEED A GOOD HOME for a good dog or a good dog for a good home? We adopt dogs! Call 604856-3647 or www.856-dogs.com YELLOW LAB PUPS. Ready to go. 2 males left. Parents on site. $400. 604-852-6176 Abbts Yellow Labs,p/b, 5m, $500, obo.dewormed, vet chkd. Chwk. 604-7947633/604-997-3040 No Sun. calls.

(604)304-3253

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE 518

BUILDING SUPPLIES

DIY STEEL BUILDING DEALS! Many sizes and models. Make an offer on clearance buildings today and save thousands of dollars. FREE BROCHURE - 1-800-6685111 ext. 170.

LOOKING FOR NEW OR USED FURNITURE AT GREAT PRICES? Browse bcclassified.com’s “Furniture For Sale” under CLASS 548.

548

FURNITURE

615 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY SAWMILLS from only $3997 MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800566-6899 Ext:400OT.

627

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES! Older House • Damaged House Moving • Estate Sale • Just Want Out • Behind on Payments Quick Cash! • Flexible Terms! CALL US FIRST! 604-626-9647

660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE

MATTRESSES staring at $99 • Twins • Fulls • Queens • Kings 100’s in stock! www.Direct Liquidation.ca (604)294-2331

• New 4”, 5”, 6” Seamless Gutters & Downpipes • Leaf-Grate & Leaf Protection System • Gutter Repairs & Cleaning • Best Prices & Senior’s Discount • No HST - April, May, June • Customer Service Since 1968 & Fully Insured

Home Service Guide

RENTALS 736

HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS

www.dannyevans.ca

Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley

HOMES FOR RENT

Mike Stanley, Field Tech Richmond BC

TRANSPORTATION 810

AUTO FINANCING

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION 818

CARS - DOMESTIC

845

SUITES, LOWER

2008 Chrysler Sebring Convert. Grey/grey. Loaded, priced to sell. Please call Richard 778-222-0140.

821 CARS - SPORTS & IMPORTS 2001 BMW 330i 4 dr. sedan, blk. leather on blk. auto, local, 109k, sun. roof, all pwr. options. Very clean. $10,900 604.312.7415

Need A Vehicle! Guaranteed Auto Loan. Apply Now, 1.877.680.1231 www.UapplyUdrive.ca

RICHMOND #5 nr Bird Rd. 2 bdr in new home. Lndry. prkg. ns/np $950 incl util. Avail. now. Refs. 604214-0231 / 604-780-3793

830

RICHMOND, nr #2/Westminster. 1 Bdrm, sep entry. Immed. $750 incl utils. No w/d, np/ns. 604-319-7648

MOTORCYCLE HAULER, single or dble, large lockable utility box for all your gear. Wide easy load alum. ramp incl. $1250. 778-888-6805.

SUITES, UPPER

838

RICHMOND: 3 BDRM upper floor of duplex. f/p, 1-1/2 baths. Fenced yard. Share laund May1. $1200/mo 604-214-2957 or 604-263-8911

STEVESTON, Brand new 2 bdrm, side suite, granite cntr tops, SS appls, $1100 incl utils/cable. Immed. 778-239-7878.

752

TOWNHOUSES

RICHMOND central. 2Bdrm, 2bath, 1100s/f, new fridge,stove,lam.floors 2 cov’d prkg. Min 1yr lease, ns/np. $1400. Avail now. 604-729-9672. RICHMOND QUEENSGATE GARDENS Conveniently Located Close to schools & public transportation. Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm townhouses. 6 Appl’s., balcony, 2 car garage, 2 full baths, gas f/p. 1 Year lease required. No Pets. Professionally Managed by Colliers International Call 604-841-2665

Classified ads WORK! www.bcclassified.com

SCRAP BATTERIES WANTED We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 each. Free pickup anywhere in BC, Min. 10. Toll Free Call:1.877.334.2288 The Scrapper

2005 LEXUS RX330, 65,000 miles, no accid., 2nd owner, all pwr, very clean, $19,000. Call 604-722-4264.

RICHMOND: Furn’d ste, w/bath & kit, sep entr, $700/mo incl hyd/net. lndry. 778-829-0980, 604-278-9589

RICHMOND West. Lrg clean 3 bdrm upper house, 1.5 baths. Good area. NS/NP June 1. 604-277-1746.

Autos • Trucks • Equipment Removal FREE TOWING 7 days/wk. We pay Up To $500 CA$H Rick Goodchild 604.551.9022

2008 PONTIAC WAVE, 4 dr sedan, auto, high kms. runs/looks good, white, $3500 firm. 604-538-9257.

RICHMOND #4 & Williams. 2 Bdrm bsmt suite. Avail immed. Ns/np. Ref’s req’d. $850/mo incl utils. 604-275-2909 or 604-839-2958.

751

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

1995 MONTE CARLO fully loaded, almost new tires, good cond. Needs trans. $800 obo. (604)530-5014.

RICHMOND, Ironwood,Spac. 2BDRM. Richmond, Spac. 2 BDRM., np, ns, $1000 + 40% util. avail. immed. 604-2950131

Richmond, #5/Cambie. 1 bdrm suite. Incl laundry & cable. N/P. N/S. June 1. $825. 604-273-0972.

www.raincentre.com

(24/7)604-874-8158

1986 PONTIAC PARISIANNE, 1 owner, 186,500 km, no accidents. $1500. Call (604)860-4806

Richmond.Spac. newly reno 3 bdrm upper w/pri 3 bdrm ste dwn. f/p, 7 appls. w/w. enste. patio, strg. fncd. May 1. n/p. $2395. 604-833-2103.

750

• Tree & Stump Removal • Certified Arborists • 20 yrs exp. • 60’ Bucket Truck • Crown Reduction • Spiral Pruning • Land Clearing • Selective Logging ~ Fully Insured • Best Rates ~

Plumbing • Electrical • Woodwork • Drywall • Bathrooms • Painting • Handyman • Textured Ceilings • FREE Quotes Door Repairs: Patio • Pocket • Bi-folds • Shower Insured / WCB and I’m a Nice Guy! Mike Favel • 604-341-2681

•Backfilling/trenching •Ashphalt/concrete removal •Drainage •Retaining walls •Install concrete driveways/sidewalks

604-833-2103

Can’t Get Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1866-981-5991

Tree removal done RIGHT!

604-868-7062

M.S. MAINTENANCE & RENOVATIONS

778-895-0968 RMD

VIZSLA PUPS, PB, shots, vet✓ champion lines, $850. 604-8192115. vizsla@telus.net

Installed from $735 Licensed, Insured & Bonded Local Plumbers www.1stcallplumbing.ca

SSL ENTERPRISES INC

Free estimate and free design.

TREE SERVICES

HOT WATER TANKS

RENOVATIONS

We specialize in driveway, sidewalk, patio, foundation and retaining wall, all kinds of concrete jobs. We also do fencing jobs.

374

• Plumbing Service & Repairs • Boilers & Furnaces • Gas Work

EXCAVATION

WEST CONCRETE

CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSETS WITH DOLLAR DEALS 604-575-5555

PLUMBING & HEATING

Free estimates (fully insured)

CONCRETE SERVICE

Always! deliver Top soil, bark mulch, sand & gravel. 7days/wk. Simon 604-230-0627 will spread

• Pressure Washing

604-908-3596 6 04-9 -908-3 -3596

COMMERCIAL ~ RESIDENTIAL

CONSTRUCTION • RENOVATIONS

PETS

• Aeration / Power Raking

STEVESTON HOME SERVICES

RENOVATIONS

477

WCB & LIABILITY INSURED

• Hedge Trimming / Pruning

New fence installation • Gates & repair Roofing repairs • Powerwashing • Odd jobs • Renos • Gutters etc. Painting interior & exterior

RJ’S PLUMBING & HOME SERVICE

359 SAND, GRAVEL & TOPSOIL

FREE ESTIMATES

Call Sean 778-869-6901

• Edging

• Trimming

HANDYMAN

PLUMBING

PETS

• Residential / Commercial • Complete Fertilizing Programs • Rotary / Reel Cutting

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WITH OVER 10 YEARS EXPERIENCE

604-275-8464 or 778-869-6288

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

LAWN SERVICE

STEVESTON STUDENT LAWN CARE

HIGH EFFICIENCY FURNACE – $2499 installed

CALL WEST:

REVIEW

MOTORCYCLES

RECREATIONAL/SALE

847 SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

1997 FLEETWOOD 27’ Class A Motorhome, self-contained,sleeps 6 b.i. generator, TV, lots of storage. $13,900/obo. **Or Tade for Smaller Unit** 604-853-5528 Abbotsford.

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

GUARANTEED

Auto Loans or We Will Pay You $1000

All Makes, All Models. New & Used Inventory.

1-888-229-0744 or apply at:

1997 WILDWOOD 26’ 5th wheel, great cond., stored inside, new tires & fridge, incl. hitch, only $7,900. Phone 604-858-2949. 2011 WINDRIVER 230 RKS, loaded, used 2 short trips, brought Jul. 21/11,asking $26,000 obo. Must sell. Don (778)344-8047. BIG FOOT SIGHTINGS! New 2012 bigfoot Campers have arrived ony at Mike Rosman RV! 1-800-6670024 www.rosmanrv.com

845

2004 JEEP GRAND Cherokee Ltd. 4x4, auto, green, 126K, $6000 firm. Call 604-538-4883 2009 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER LTD Edition, top of the line. $38,900. Call: 604-781-5679.

851

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

TOP CA$H PAID TODAY For SCRAP VEHICLES!

TRUCKS & VANS

2001 Toyota 4 runner. One owner. Great condition. 262,000km. A/c, sunroof, 4x4, push bar, trailer hitch, immobilizer, etc. No major accidents. Asking $7800, 778-241-7019 2007 FORD F150 XLT 4 X 4, only 70 km, new tires & brakes, dark blue, excellent cond. $19,900. Phone 604-858-2949

MARINE

2 hr. Service www.a1casper.com (604)209-2026

www.greatcanadianautocredit.com Must be employed w/ $1800/mo. income w/ drivers license. DL #30526

912

ALUMINUM BOAT WANTED, 10’, 12’ or 14’, with or without motor or trailer, will pay cash, 604-319-5720

WANT A VEHICLE BUT STRESSED ABOUT YOUR CREDIT? Christmas in April, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-5936095.

818

CARS - DOMESTIC

1967 MUSTANG Conv auto, pb, ps, 289 V8, red on red, white top, GT frond end, exc cond. $29,500 obo. (604)535-0226.

BOATS

AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Minimum $150 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673 #1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE REMOVAL ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT $$$ PAID FOR SOME 604.683.2200

WITNESS NEEDED: If you witnessed a Hit & Run accident on March 25 2012 at No 5 Rd & Greenland Dr. Can you please call 604-314-7154 Thank you.


Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 47

> 16th annual Lead With Your Heart fundraising event

Around Town Amanda Oye

Fundraiser helps RTES Stories of courage and beating the odds inspired the guests of the 16th annual Lead With Your Heart fundraising event for the Richmond Therapeutic Equestrian Society at the Executive Airport Plaza Hotel held April 15. More than 100 people came out to help raise money for the programs run by RTES, which provide an opportunity for people with mental and physical disabilities to ride horses for therapy. “I have always believed in equal opportunity,” said Frances Clark, the RTES board chair and one of the program’s founders. “(Riding horses) becomes ego-lifting and an inspiring thing to do.” This was highlighted at the fundraiser when two riders gave speeches about their experiences with therapeutic riding, one of whom is currently part of RTES and is now “functioning at a level his family never expected him to reach,” said Clark. Clark has seen people be transformed throughout their time with RTES. “I knew what a program like this could do, especially for children,” she said. The fundraiser featured several ways for guests to contribute to RTES including silent and live auctions and a raffle— the grand prize of which was a trip for two from WestJet anywhere they fly. Amanda Oye covers the social scene. amanda.oye@telus.net.

LEFT: Dee Bowley and Andrew Cowan. ABOVE: Kate and Sarah Hansen. RIGHT: Ken, Jaden, Judy and Kylee Miller.

Shashi Engineer, Harpal Sandhu and Manjinder Mangat. Ashley Gowanlock, one of the speakers at the event who is on the Canadian para equestrian team.

Lucy Gnyp, a rider with RTES and Marie Murtagh, the parent fundraiser for RTES.

Kerri Haddow, Kim Emery, Kirby Graeme, Terry Tinkley and Rosa Cheston.

PUT YOUR HOCKEY SMARTS TO THE TEST

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Go to www.richmondreview.com and click on Contests s


Page 48 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Serving Richmond Since 1966. The Van Hest Family and the Staff at Art Knapps would like to thank you for your patronage over the last 46 years; as we have changed and added locations. Your support has allowed us to support many community programs! We would like to thank you with the following coupon event.

COUPON

20% OFF YOUR TOTAL PURCHASE Expiry date is April 30, 2012 Valid at 7780 Alderbridge Way or 11020 No. 4 Road, Richmond.

3

30%

$10 OR 10 FOR $30

$

18

25% OFF FERTILIZERS ART KNAPP WATER SOLUBLE 12-36-12

REG. $8.99

Still Lots to choose from

EACH

OR 3 FOR

10 FOR

REG. $13.99

PACKAGED LILY BULBS

$ 99

Make your own hanging or planter basket REG PRICE $1.99

1kg-20-20-20-20

Excludes bulk items and delivery.

PERENNIALS

BASKET STUFFERS

PLANT PROD

The first 80 customers on Saturday and Sunday will receive a 20% discount card, valid on all purchases through October 31, 2012.

OFF

REG. PRICE

NEW PRODUCT RAIN BARRELS

$

19999

EACH

SUPER SPECIAL ON 4” GERANIUMS 3 FOR $6.00 Reg $2.99 each

Congratulations to the Richmond Review for reporting on and supporting the community for the past 80 years.

No. 4 Road

Photo courtesy of City of Richmond archives. E

COLOUR SPOT

Steveston Hwy

Hours

9AM-6PM 7 DAYS A WEEK

N

Minoru Blvd.

PLANTLAND Two Richmond Locations to Serve You.

Alderbridge

11020 No. 4 Rd. at Steveston Hwy

+ Lansdowne Rd.

+

604 271-9581

HOME & GARDEN

No. 3 Rd.

604 278-9580

7780 Alderbridge Way. at Minoru Hours

9AM-6PM 7 DAYS A WEEK

WE DELIVER UP TO 3 YARDS SOIL AND BARK AND 1 YARD SAND. CALL 604-278-9580. *AVAILABLE AT ALDERBRIDGE LOCATION ONLY.


April 25, 2012 Richmond Review