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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

richmondreview.com

the richmond

REVIEW

Saluting Richmond’s women of distinction The Richmond Review’s 19th annual Ethel Tibbits Awards See Page B1 Rob Newell photo Jennifer Larsen and Olive Bassett were each winners of a Pioneer award at the Ethel Tibbits Awards.

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Page 2 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 3

Jet fuel pipeline proponent shelves review again

New solution floated to ease congestion at Massey Tunnel

Airlines to analyze effects of a spill; opponent rejects ‘constant moving of the goal posts’

Extending off-ramp would require Ministry of Transportation support by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter

by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter The B.C. Environmental Assessment Office has suspended a review of a jet fuel pipeline proposal for the second time. The Vancouver Airport Fuel Facilities Corporation made the request to allow more time to investigate potential effects of a spill. The suspension of the review began March 7. It could take up to 90 days to complete the new work, said project director Adrian Pollard, who said Environment Canada is requesting the further study. “This information will further the overall understanding of fuel behaviour and mitigation measures to be put in place,” said Pollard in a statement Monday. Pollard noted Environment Canada made the request for more information through Port Metro Vancouver—the authority representing the federal government in the environmental review. “This is all part of the joint provincial and federal review process and a good illustration that the process works.” One year ago the airlines

file photo Carol Day, chair of Vancouver Airport Pipeline Opposition for Richmond group (seen here with group member Otto Langer), says the review’s suspensions are a result of complaints raised by its members and other concerned residents.

consortium made a similar request of the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office, to plan an alternate pipeline route to connect an 80-million-litre tank farm in Riverport with the airport. If built as proposed, Panamax-class vessels would deliver fuel to a marine terminal on the Fraser River’s South Arm, and connect to a pipeline routed along either Highway 99, No. 5 Road or Shell Road. A group critical of the plan said the review’s suspensions are a result of complaints raised by its members and other concerned residents. “This latest suspension of

“This information will further the overall understanding of fuel behaviour and mitigation measures to be put in place.” - Adrian Pollard

the process could now make this 180-day review process into a multi-year review process as they attempt to patch up shortcomings in their proposal to make it appear more

palatable to the public,” said Carol Day. Day, chair of the Vancouver Airport Pipeline Opposition for Richmond group, or VAPOR, said instead of simply rejecting the project, the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office is allowing “constant moving of the goal posts.” VAPOR’s greatest concern is the possibility of tankers entering the Fraser River and spilling jet fuel into a sensitive estuary. The group is instead advocating for a pipeline linking the airport with local refineries, eliminating the need for Panamax-class vessels in the river.

Plug pulled on proposed natural park by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter In a vote decried by one critic as “irresponsible,” city council has moved to allow developers to take over an area previously designated as a natural park. Council voted 6-1 Monday to allow development on a 4.86 hectare (12 acre) site near Alderbridge Way and No. 4 Road— land designated in 2006 as a natural park. “I feel like I’ve been lied to or tricked in a way,” said Michael Wolfe, a lifelong resident of the West Cambie area, known as the Alexandra neighbourhood. “That vote shouldn’t have happened.” The land is still privately owned and occupied by single-family homes, but the city was prepared to spend at least $23.6 million on the land. Wolfe, who lives near the land, appealed to council Monday before the vote, saying he recently found reasons enough to preserve the land: a great blue

heron, hawks, a kestrel and ducks. “Why would you not take the option that consults the residents?” he said. “They’re saving this money, but what’s it going to be used for?” In recent years at least some of the 15 affected property owners have been anxiously awaiting the city to make a move on the land, according to city staff. But Wolfe is skeptical, noting none had publicly appeared before council. Coun. Chak Au, the lone councillor to vote against the move, said the land was designated park after numerous rounds of public consultation in 2006. Changing it now should require a similar process, he said. “There might be good reasons to change the plan, however, it cannot be done in a way that it appears to be making a shortcut,” he said. “We need to have an open consultation process.” Staff have said there will be public consultation on future use, but parkland is off

the table. They also suggested the cash set aside for the land can now buy natural parkland elsewhere, but Au said he wanted to see such an alternative proposal first. “This is just like asking to commit to something that I don’t know will happen,” he said. “This is just like asking me to sign a blank cheque.” He also noted new homebuyers in the redeveloping area would have put their faith in the area plan, which called for the natural park. “If you change it, it might be unfair to these people as well.” Development on the former parkland site could include townhouses, apartments or even an extension of a retail proposal anchored by Walmart. Councillors Linda Barnes, Derek Dang, Linda McPhail, Ken Johnston, Bill McNulty and Harold Steves voted in favour of changing the parkland’s designation. Mayor Malcolm Brodie and Coun. Evelina Halsey-Brandt were absent.

An idea from a Ladner resident to relieve congestion at the George Massey Tunnel is getting some consideration. Ladner resident Walt Lawrence wrote to Delta council suggesting the northbound pullout lane on the Richmond side of the tunnel be used to extend the Highway 99 offramp at Steveston Highway. “I see buses and other traffic, despite the speed bumps, use that to lessen their commute time,” wrote Lawrence. “(It) seems so obvious to me that this might be part of the traffic congestion answer.” The lane has long been reserved for vehicles visiting a tourist information centre, and is under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Transportation. At a Delta council meeting Monday, civic politicians decided to forward the letter to the ministry for review, and asked its own staff to investigate. Richmond Coun. Derek Dang, who said the tourist information centre has been around for decades, isn’t sure an off-ramp extension would improve traffic flow at the tunnel. The longtime councillor said Richmond discusses congestion with Ministry of Transportation officials each year, but has so far been left without a solution to relieve pressure right at the tube. “They thought they may have pacified us by giving us the Canada Line to Richmond, but the tunnel is still a sore point.” It’s likely traffic on the Steveston Highway overpass— and ramps connecting it with Highway 99—will only increase with approximately 450 new homes being built on the former site of Fantasy Gardens. Earlier this year, Delta Mayor Lois Jackson asked her staff to investigate possible solutions to congestion at the half-century-old tunnel. The counterflow lane system, introduced in 1989, is no longer enough, she said. “We have got to address the question of that tunnel,” Jackson told Black Press. “I’m not an engineer, I just know it’s a problem, and it’s just going to get bigger.”

Man shot multiple times behind Richmond restaurant A 41-year-old man is expected to survive multiple gunshot wounds following what police believe was a targeted shooting at a Downtown Richmond restaurant near city hall Saturday night. According to investigators, the victim was just leaving the restaurant near No. 3 Road and Anderson when he was shot by an unknown suspect. An employee at a neighbouring business believes the shooting occurred in the parking lot directly behind Bamboo Grove. Customers who had parked their vehicles in the lot were not permitted to leave as those vehicles were deemed part of a crime scene.

When police arrived, they found the victim suffering from multiple gunshot wounds. He was rushed to Vancouver General Hospital for non-life-threatening injuries. According to police, he was listed in serious but stable condition and was expected to make a full recovery. Richmond RCMP’s serious crimes unit is now investigating, and trying to determine whether this incident was gang related. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call the Richmond RCMP at 604-278-1212 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-2228477.


Page 4 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Canadian Tire* Look for Depot* these flyers in Home La-Z Boy* the richmond

REVIEW

London Drugs* Lowes* M&M Meats* Pharmasave* Rona*

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Join us for the City of Richmond’s annual spring series of talks about art in the city and its importance to creating connections between citizens and their communities.

Thursday, March 15 7:00 p.m.

Mark West

Limited seating. Please RSVP at lulu@ richmond.ca

SOFT AND WET: WHEN FABRIC HOLDS CONCRETE Can a cold, hard substance like concrete be transformed into something soft and sensual? Merging architectural, engineering and artistic practices, Mark West—founding director of the CAST Laboratory/Studio, University of Manitoba—has spent 20 years re-forming this material with flexible fabric sheets to create remarkably natural forms, suggesting an entirely new kind of architectural and structural “language.”

Man who tried to sneak $35,000 through YVR loses cash A man convicted of failing to report currency of more than $10,000 while trying to board a plan at Vancouver International Airport, has had to forfeit the $35,000 he was carrying to the Crown. Jianji Yang was leaving Canada from YVR on April 10, 2010 when he initially told border agents he was carrying $3,000. But following a secondary inspection, he was actually found to be carrying $35,000, and he couldn’t account for the origin of the money. Yang was charged and convicted, and the court ordered the cash to be turned over to the Crown. “Under the Proceeds of Crime Money Laundering and Terrorism Financing Act...people traveling into and out of Canada have to declare any sum of currency over $10,000,” said federal RCMP officer Sgt. Duncan Pound. “The intent of the law is to stop criminals from transporting illicit funds, gained through criminal activity, across the border.” People are permitted to carry more than $10,000 across the border, but must be able to produce documentation which demonstrates the legitimate source for the money. —by Martin van den Hemel

Men slapped with fines for not declaring watches Two men who failed to declare their pricey watches were recently slapped with hefty fines in Richmond provincial court. West Vancouver’s Chang Fen Lu returned to Canada from Hong Kong on Sept. 23 of last year, and failed to declare a $20,000 Chopard watch. He declared he was returning with $200 worth of goods. But during a secondary examination, officers found an invoice and certificate of origin relating to a Chopard watch, which they eventually found inside his jacket pocket, and was valued at $19,993. The watch was seized and criminal charges were laid. Lu pled guilty in Richmond provincial court last week, and was fined $3,518.77. In addition, Lu will have to pay a penalty of between 25 per cent and 80 per cent of the value of the watch in order to have it returned. On March 1, Vancouver’s Er Wei Liu was fined $15,399.08. in Richmond provincial court for failing to declare an $82,745 Patek Philippe watch—among other things—that officers found inside a wooden box marked Patek Philippe Geneve. Liu returned to Vancouver International Airport on Aug. 12, 2011 and failed to declare the designer watch, clothing, shoes and a briefcase. He pled guilty to one count of attempting to evade duty under the customs act. In order to have the items returned, he’ll have to pay an additional penalty of as much as 80 per cent of the value of the items seized.

OYSTERFEST!

Preceding this talk, actor/writer Thomas Jones will perform an excerpt from Woody Sed, about the life and music of Woody Guthrie.

ATTENTION! OYSTER LOVERS

Richmond City Hall Council Chambers, 6911 No. 3 Road at 7:00 p.m. FREE

www.richmond.ca/luluseries

Come & Enjoy Fresh West Coast Oysters at the Seafood House for only $1 each.

EDITION

ichmond

richmondreview.com

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012

Chinese-American hoop p star is inspi spiiring iriing irin g locals ocal o ca cals Jeremy Lin’s unlikely success in Big Apple hasn’t gone unnoticed here y Matthew Hoekstra ff Reporter my Lin’s quick rise to stardom has hina by storm—and caught the of plenty of basketball fans in -born NBA player of ethtage helped lead the ve straight victories game in Toronto e in prac. Not

owne Centre sold his last piece off Jeremy Lin merchandise—a ro ookie card— ard rd last week. Although his carrds are popular, Weiss doesn’t stock much in N NBA apparel. But no retailers w would hav have a been prepared for Lin’s unlike ely success. cce c “I just talked to a friend wh ho just got back from New York an nd he said s sa every printing press that does T-shiirts rts, jerseys rt or what-have-you is goin ng da ay and night in New York to get stuff out the here,” said Weiss. Reports suggest peop ple in China are hosting viewing parties of o Kni Kn niccks games, while state TV adjusted d itss sc s hedule to broadcast New York’s win w n over Minnesota Sunday. In Toronto o, which w wh hosted the Knicks last night, th he Can Ca adian Chinese Youth Athletics A Asssoc ociation was offering discounted tickkets ets ts to members to “Catch the Linsanity.”” Lin’s name is even being talked about in churches, as the basketball star has been open about his faith and his favoupassage in the Bible. u, pastor at Revere church t

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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 5

Once Upon a Time stars help fundraise at Ethel Tibbits Awards

FUTURE SHOP – Correction Notice On the March 9 flyer, page 18, please be advised that this promotion: “Free Rental on CinemaNow Included With The Adventures of Tintin Movie” (WebID: 2194695) was incorrectly advertised. We regret to inform you that the free rental offer is NOT valid, and will not be available with the movie. Also, on page 20, this product: AKG Foldable On-Ear Headphones – K403 (WebID: 10184517) shows an incorrect feature. Please be advised that

Two stars of the ABC TV fantasy series Once Upon a Time posed with guests and signed autographs at the 19th annual Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards at the Radisson Hotel Vancouver Airport on Friday. Jared Gilmore, who plays Henry, and Raphael Sbarge, who plays Jiminy Cricket and therapist Archie, took time out of their busy shooting schedule in Steveston to spend a couple of hours at Friday's awards luncheon. The ABC TV series is the brainchild of Lost executive producers Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis. Once Upon a Time chronicles the lives of fairy tale characters who are stuck in the real world without knowledge of who they really are. It’s set in the fictional New England town of Storybrooke. Moncton Street is frequently transformed into the main street of Storybrooke. For more on the Ethel Tibbits Awards, see page B1.

the headphones are NOT noise-cancelling. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

PROTECT YOUR

HOME or BUSINESS • • • • • •

Rob Akimow photo Once Upon a Time’s Jared Gilmore (centre) and Raphael Sbarge (second from right) with The Richmond Review’s Rachael Finkelstein, Martin van den Hemel and Reena Clarkson.

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Granny flats and coach houses in Burkeville and Edgemere The City of Richmond is proposing to enact Development Permit Guidelines to control the form and character of granny flats and coach houses in Burkeville and the portion of Edgemere with rear lanes, located between Williams Road, Wilkinson/Maddocks Roads, No. 4 Road and Shell Road. The City is also proposing to amend the Zoning Bylaw to permit and regulate granny flats and coach houses in Burkeville and Edgemere by Development Permit and Building Permit only (no rezoning) as part of its 2041 Official Community Plan update. We want to hear from every household in both neighbourhoods about these proposals at a Public Open House. Public Open Houses will be held: Burkeville Tuesday, March 27, 2012 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Sea Island Community Centre 7140 Miller Road, Multipurpose Room

Edgemere Thursday, March 29, 2012 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Thomas Kidd Elementary School 10851 Shell Road, Gymnasium

If you are a property owner in one of these areas, you will receive: • an invitation letter to the Public Open House • a survey form to complete and a copy of the proposed Development Permit Guidelines • highlights of the proposed Zoning Bylaw Amendment.

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES CENTRES Locations across B.C. Visit one near you. WorkBCCentres.ca 604.660.2421 TDD: 604.775.0303

Residents in these areas are invited to learn more about granny flats and coach houses in Burkeville and Edgemere by: • attending the Public Open House in your neighbourhood • viewing information on the City of Richmond’s website at www.richmond.ca or at www.letsTALKrichmond.ca. For more information, please email hburke@richmond.ca or jchristy@richmond.ca or call 604-276-4164 or 604-276-4188. City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.

www.richmond.ca


Page 6 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Notice of Public Hearing Monday, March 19, 2012 - 7 p.m. Council Chambers, Richmond City Hall

6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 Fax: 604-278-5139

TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the City of Richmond will hold a Public Hearing as noted above, on the following items: 1. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8812 (RZ 11-566870) Location/s:

9780 Alberta Road

Applicant/s:

Jaing Zhu

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/F)” to “Town Housing (ZT60) – North McLennan (City Centre)”, to permit the development of a six (6) unit Townhouse complex.

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Compact Single Detached (RC2)”, to permit a subdivision to create two (2) lots with vehicle access from the existing rear lane.

to “Coach Houses (RCH)”, to permit the property to be subdivided into two (2) lots, each with a principal dwelling and coach house above a garage, with vehicle access from a new rear lane.

City Contact: Erika Syvokas 604-276-4108 Planning and Development Department

City Contact: Erika Syvokas 604-276-4108 Planning and Development Department

BYLAW 8852

City Contact: David Johnson 604-276-4193 Planning and Development Department

BYLAW 8866

BYLAW 8812

4. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8863 (RZ 11-594451) Location/s:

10180/10200 Finlayson Drive

Location/s:

Applicant/s:

Yaseen Grewal, Balbir Randhawa, and Sarbjit Randhawa

9500, 9520 and 9540 Granville Avenue

Applicant/s:

Khalid Hasan

2. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8849 (RZ 11-594227) Location/s:

10580 River Drive

Applicant/s:

Jagtar and Shingara Kanola

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/D)” to “Single Detached (RS2/C)” in order to create two (2) new single-family lots. City Contact: Erika Syvokas 604-276-4108 Planning and Development Department

6. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8868 (RZ 11-581552)

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Two-Unit Dwellings (RD1)” to “Single Detached (RS2/B)”, to permit a subdivision to create two (2) single-family lots. City Contact: Erika Syvokas 604-276-4108 Planning and Development Department

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached, (RS1/F)” to “Medium Density Townhouses (RTM2)”, to permit the development of a 16 unit Townhouse Complex. City Contact: David Johnson 604-276-4193 Planning and Development Department BYLAW 8868

BYLAW 8863

BYLAW 8849

5. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8866 (RZ 11-587257) 3. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8852 (RZ 11-587549) Location/s:

11291 Williams Road

Applicant/s:

Robert Kirk

Location/s:

8631 Francis Road

Location/s:

4771 Duncliffe Road

Applicant/s:

Harbinder Bahd

Applicant/s:

Pacific Coastal Homes Ltd

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)”

City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

7. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8869 (RZ 11-577322)

Notice of Public Hearing continued on next page.


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 7

Mayor outspent his rival 20:1 Civic election candidates have until Monday to file campaign disclosures by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter Mayor Malcolm Brodie spent nearly 20 times more on his election campaign than his lone challenger, according to financial disclosure statements. Brodie, the incumbent, spent

$118,021 en route to a convincing win in the Nov. 19, 2011 civic election, while opponent Richard Lee spent $5,750. With Brodie’s 20,955 votes earned in the contest, he spent $5.63 per vote. Lee collected 9,054 votes at the polls, spending 64 cents per tally. Candidates have until the end of March 19 to file their campaign financial statements. Brodie raised the bulk of his cash from fundraising dinners he holds annually, and spent most of it on advertising, signs and flyers. His largest direct donation was $5,000 from Terminal Forest Products Ltd.

Lee’s largest contributor was himself, anteing up one-third of his total funds, which were largely spent on advertising. Seven of city council’s 17 candidates had filed their statements by press time yesterday, with Coun. Evelina Halsey-Brandt spending the most so far: $23,809. Half the independent councillor’s spending went to postage, the other half was spent on advertising and signs. She contributed half the cash herself, and Great Canadian Gaming Corporation was her largest donor, contributing $2,500 to the campaign. Of Richmond’s 10 school board candidates, three had filed state-

ments by press time, with trustee Kenny Chiu spending the most: $6,958. Three parties ran candidates in the campaign—Richmond First, Richmond Independent Team of Electors and Richmond Citizens Association. Only RITE has filed so far, disclosing expenses of $12,052, with each of its eight candidates contributing at least $1,000 to the cause. Candidates who file late, and before April 18, face a $500 fine. Those who don’t file won’t be permitted to run in the next election and, if applicable, could lose their seat in office.

2011 civic election spending For Mayor Malcolm Brodie: $118,021 Richard Lee: $5,750 For Council Evelina Halsey-Brandt: $23,809 Carol Day: $3,915 Harold Steves: $2,500 Linda Barnes: $2,400 Alexa Loo: $1,611 Peter Mitchell: $1,200 Cliff Wei: $0 For Board of Education Kenny Chiu: $6,958 Jonathan Ho: $4,789 Norm Goldstein: $160 –as of Tuesday

6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 Fax: 604-278-5139

Notice of Public Hearing continued Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Single Detached (RS2/A)”, to permit development of two (2) single family lots. City Contact: Edwin Lee 604-276-4121 Planning and Development BYLAW 8869

Sunday and Statutory Holidays and on June 30, 2014.

ending March 19, 2012, or upon the conclusion of the hearing.

Night market hours of operation shall be 7pm to midnight on Friday and Saturday and 6pm to 11pm on Sunday and Statutory Holidays with the exception that on Saturday during the months of July and August, event hours shall be 7pm to 1am.

• By Fax or Mail: Staff reports and the proposed bylaws may also be obtained by FAX or by standard mail, by calling 604-276-4007 between the hours of 8:15 am and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, except statutory holidays, March 9, 2012 and ending March 19, 2012

City Contact: Kevin Eng 604-247-4626 Planning and Development Department TU 11-595782

Participating in the Public Hearing process: The Public Hearing is open to all members of the public. If you believe that you are affected by the proposed bylaw, you may make a presentation or submit written comments at the Public Hearing. If you are unable to attend, you may send your written comments to the City Clerk’s Office by 4 pm on the date of the Public Hearing as follows: • By E-mail: using the on-line form at http://www. richmond.ca/cityhall/council/hearings/about.htm • By Standard Mail: 6911 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC, V6Y 2C1, Attention: Director, City Clerk’s Office • By Fax: 604-278-5139, Attention: Director, City Clerk’s Office

8. Temporary Commercial Use Permit Application (TU 11-595782) Location/s:

Applicant/s:

8351 River Road and Duck Island (Lot 87 Section 21 Block 5 North Range 6 West Plan 34592) Firework Productions Ltd.

Purpose: To permit a Temporary Commercial Use Permit to allow for the operation of a night market event at 8351 River Road and Duck Island (Lot 87 Section 21 Block 5 North Range 6 West Plan 34592) in 2012, 2013 and 2014. Periods of validity shall be between May 18, 2012 to October 8, 2012 (inclusive), May 17, 2013 to October 14, 2013 (inclusive) and May 16, 2014 to October 13, 2014 (inclusive). Days of operation shall be Friday, Saturday,

How to obtain further information: • By Phone: If you have questions or concerns, please call the CITY CONTACT shown above. • On the City Website: Public Hearing Agendas, including staff reports and the proposed bylaws, are available on the City Website at http://www. richmond.ca/cityhall/council/agendas/hearings/2012. htm • At City Hall: Copies of the proposed bylaw, supporting staff and Committee reports and other background material, are also available for inspection at the Planning & Development Department at City Hall, between the hours of 8:15 am and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, except statutory holidays, commencing March 9, 2012 and

City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

• Public Hearing Rules: For information on public hearing rules and procedures, please consult the City website at http://www.richmond.ca/cityhall/council/ hearings/about.htm or call the City Clerk’s Office at 604-276-4007. • All submissions will form part of the record of the hearing. Once the Public Hearing has concluded, no further information or submissions can be considered by Council. It should be noted that the rezoned property may be used for any or all of the uses permitted in the “new” zone. David Weber Director, City Clerk’s Office


Page 8 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

opinion the richmond

REVIEW #1 - 3671 VIKING WAY, RICHMOND, B.C. V6V 2J5 • 604-247-3700 • FAX: 604-247-3739 • RICHMONDREVIEW.COM TWITTER.COM/RICHMONDREVIEW • FACEBOOK.COM/RICHMONDREVIEW

PUBLISHER MARY KEMMIS, 604-247-3702 publisher@richmondreview.com

EDITOR BHREANDÁIN CLUGSTON, 604-247-3730 editor@richmondreview.com STAFF REPORTERS MATTHEW HOEKSTRA, 604-247-3732 mhoekstra@richmondreview.com MARTIN VAN DEN HEMEL, 604-247-3733 martin@richmondreview.com SPORTS EDITOR DON FENNELL, 604-247-3731 sports@richmondreview.com

ASSISTANT ADVERTISING MANAGER ELANA GOLD, 604-247-3704 elanag@richmondreview.com SALES ROB AKIMOW, 604-247-3708 roba@richmondreview.com COLLIN NEAL, 604-247-3719 collinn@richmondreview.com LESLEY SMITH, 604-247-3705 lesley@richmondreview.com TORRIE WATTERS, 604-247-3707 torrie@richmondreview.com JAMES TENG, 604-247-3714 jamest@richmondreview.com

EDITORIAL: Mother Nature drops hint about Garden City lands

I

n the coming years, there will be plenty of public debate about the vision for the future of the Garden City lands, once the legal issues have been put to bed with the Musqueam Indian band. Many local families would no doubt like to see some public use come from the vast green space, perhaps in the form of parks and athletic fields. But over the course of the last few weeks, Mother Nature has given us a glimpse—you could even say she’s dropped us a big hint—into one possible future for the vast 55-hectare downtown gem of real estate. The recent rains have flooded the Garden City lands, and have transformed the western half into a massive pond where ducks and other wildlife now gather. Wouldn’t a vast body of water, akin to Stanley Park’s Lost Lagoon, bring a special element to the property? One teeming with fish, and nurturing

Martin van den Hemel photo Ducks swim in the “lake” that has formed on the Garden City lands.

an eco-system of its own. Imagine a twisting body of water, complete with a fountain, a beach area, and even pedestrian bridges, perhaps an artificial waterfall and an observatory like at the Vancouver Aquarium to

look at the underwater flora and fauna. It could be like Queen Elizabeth Park and Stanley Park all rolled up into one. A water element has certainly added something special to another nearby

park. At Garden City Park, designers did a fabulous job of incorporating water features into the design of the popular children’s playground, as well as the man-made artificial pond that resonate nature and

tranquility year-round. Is this something you’d like to see? If so, let your politicians know, and if there’s enough local support for the idea, it will become a reality in the not-toodistant future.

Dealt a lousy hand, but made his own luck CIRCULATION MANAGER RACHAEL FINKELSTEIN, 604-247-3710 circulation@richmondreview.com CIRCULATION JR TUAZON, ROYA SARWARY, 604-247-3710 circulation@richmondreview.com

Guest Shot CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER JAANA BJORK, 604-247-3716 jaana@richmondreview.com CREATIVE DEPARTMENT GABE MUNDSTOCK, 604-247-3718 gabe@richmondreview.com PETER PALMER, 604-247-3706 peter@richmondreview.com JAMES MARSHALL, 604-247-3701 james@richmondreview.com The Richmond Review is a member of the B.C. Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the council. Write (include documentation) within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org Published every Wednesday and Friday by Black Press Ltd.

Nick Greenizan

‘H

ey, do you remember Kevin from across the street?” my brother asked me a few Fridays ago, during a late-night poker game with some of our friends.

“Sure,” I replied. It was only a partial bluff. I did remember him, though I had forgotten about him. It’s been years since our paths crossed. And to be honest, I expected the next sentence out of my brother’s mouth

to be bad news. Call me a pessimist if you must, but I saw a fair share of foster children come and go from that house across the street. Some stayed for a week, some for a month. And some left when they got into trouble. That’s just how it goes sometimes. Kevin was a foster child, too, but he was different. He stayed longer than most, becoming family to my neighbours—one of whom was a social worker—and a friend to all the neighbourhood kids, even though he used to drive a few of us crazy, me in particular. He was prone to making inappropriate comments at the worst possible time—like the time when he yelled at a police officer from the passenger window of my car as we drove by. “Why’d you do that?” I asked. “I dunno, I felt like it,” came the reply. Yes, he could be mad-

dening, and no, he didn’t always make the smartest decisions—personally, I make a point of not yelling at law enforcement, but maybe that’s just me. So imagine my surprise when my brother finished his sentence. “He’s a professional poker player now—Google him.” Turns out my brother was right. Good ol’ Kevin was, in fact, making a living playing cards—and a healthy one at that. Healthy enough, in fact, that after I figured out how many years I’d have to work at The Peace Arch News to equal what’d he’d made in the last 10 months, I took a second to reconsider my own career path. Then I looked down at my own quickly dwindling stack of chips and realized a World Series of Poker bracelet isn’t likely in my future. But maybe one day it’ll be in Kevin’s. And though poker has its

detractors—those who say it’s not a sport, or that no one should make an honest living by gambling— there’s something to be said for those who play professionally. It takes skill and intelligence, and the ability to read both people at the situation, often running mathematical probabilities and percentages through one’s head in the short time it takes to draw the next card. It also takes guts, and a real killer instinct—the ability to take chances and go all-in even if you’re not 100 per cent sure you’ve got the cards. Quite frankly, it’s not a skill I thought Kevin had. After all, I was standing just outside the sandwich shop where Kevin worked in high school—and where I mooched food for free— the night it was robbed by a man with nothing more than a small paring knife. As soon as the thief made his intentions known,

Kevin—a hulking teenager, who towered over the intruder—bolted for the back door, leaving the thief to figure out the cash register on his own. At the time, having seen too many Stallone movies, I wondered why he didn’t just take the guy down. Looking back, it was obviously the smartest move he could have made. Gotta know when to fold ’em, too, I guess. Back in my friend’s basement, with my chip stack whittled away to almost nothing, I sat ruing my poor cards. But I also thought again of Kevin. Didn’t make me feel much better about my lost cash, mind you. But I was still happy for him—an awkward but good-hearted lug who made his own luck, even if he wasn’t dealt the best hand in the first place. Nick Greenizan is the sports reporter at the Peace Arch News (Black Press).


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 9

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Olas de Vientos (Wind Waves) was removed from Garry Point Park last week.

Adios Wind Waves Editor: What a relief it is to walk around Garry Point Park and to find that the Big Red Blob (a.k.a. Wind Waves) has finally left us! Now our beloved park can be restored to its former wild beauty. It certainly does not need any public “art” to enhance it. However, I was very concerned to hear that more “art” is likely to be inflicted upon us in the near future. If this is the case, could we not have something with a more site-

appropriate theme, such as a boat/ ship sculpture, marine animals or sea birds? The ugly upside-down heads by Lansdowne or the shiny silver thing by Rona were totally inappropriate and bordering on obscene. Better still, why not put all that money required to install these sculptures to a more meaningful use, i.e. to support and sustain our local art and culture, something that would benefit the whole of Richmond? Carlie Holland Steveston

What’s best for kids Buyers haven Editor: Everyone says they want what’s best for children. If that’s so, then we’d demand better working conditions for teachers and a fairly negotiated wage. We’d appreciate and financially recognize stay-at-home parenting as a valid child care option. We’d prioritize more family time, reduce financial pressure on families, legislate paid emergency time off to care for children. If society truly put children’s needs first, then when teachers don’t teach, those innocents always caught in the middle could go home. But, obviously, fighter jets, more bridges and prisons, rich MP and MLA pensions and pay-hikes, environment-destroying mega-projects, and subsidizing the whiteelephant Richmond Olympic Oval are more important investments. Ruth Alsemgeest Richmond

Editor: Foreign investment speculators have learned what Canadian politicians and international con artists have always known: it is extremely easy to outwit the Canadian public and exploit the Canadian system. China implements rules that tightly control real estate speculation on the part of its citizens, so investors look to Canada where there are no constraints on how many properties non-citizens can buy. Meanwhile we dumbly stare at our navels and wonder why a small cadre of realtors are becoming very wealthy and houses are priced out of the reach of our own, hard-working young families. The true north strong and free? For whom? Ray Arnold Richmond

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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

arts & entertainment Theatre company offers free tickets to rehearsal

City Hall March 15 as part of the 2012 Lulu Series: Art in the City. West is founding director of the Centre for Architectural Structures and Technology, researching alternative construction and design methods—including the use of flexible fabric formwork for the production of reinforced concrete structures. West’s talk is Thursday, March 15 at 7 p.m. inside council chambers at city hall, 6911 No. 3 Rd. Thomas Jones will present an excerpt from his show, Woody Sed—chronicling the life and times of Woody Guthrie—before the lecture. Seats can be reserved at lulu@ richmond.ca.

true events. Tickets to Friday’s rehearsal are free, but only 50 are available. Call the cultural centre at 604247-8300 for more information. Next week Havana Theatre on Commercial Drive in Vancouver will host the play from March 21 to 31. Tickets, $15 to $20, available in advance through ticketstonight.ca, 604-684-2782 or at the door.

Tightrope Productions is opening the doors to the public on a Friday rehearsal of the company’s newest play. Spinning You Home, written by Sally Stubbs, will be presented at Richmond Cultural Centre March 16 at 7 p.m. Described as a celebration of storytelling, the play tells the story of legendary gold prospector John “Cariboo” Cameron and his child-bride Sophia. The play is set in 1951 and inspired by

Free lecture on architecture Mark West, professor of architecture at University of Manitoba, will offer a free lecture at Richmond

Nora Roberts and the joys of romance

Book Club Shelley Civkin

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Shelley Civkin is communications officer with Richmond Public Library. For other popular reading suggestions check out Richmond Public Library’s Web site at www.yourlibrary. ca/goodbooks. Follow Shelley’s blog at shelleysblog.yourlibrary. ca.

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Lizzy, she of the benign ghost variety. As Beckett woos Clare and her boys, readers know that their love is a done deal, but the path to bliss is littered with minor mishaps and a couple of scares, making the story all the more fun. In true 21st century style, Clare exerts her independence, while Beckett tries his hardest to lighten her load by doing things for her. Ever the gentleman and needing to feel needed, he declares: “You know, Clare, being able to do everything doesn’t mean you have to.” Sigh…. Anyway, The Next Always is a delightful read – light, satisfying and oh so romantic.

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ery brothers, their refurbishing of the old Boonsboro Inn, and of course, the ensuing romance between Beckett Montgomery and Clare Brewster. Beckett’s had a crush on Clare since high school but never acted on it. All of a sudden, she’s shown up on his radar again, but now she’s a young widow with three small boys. But never you mind – that’s no impediment to true and lasting love. And wouldn’t you know it—the bookstore she owns is directly across the street from the Boonsboro Inn! In the time honored tradition of romance novels, their love builds slowly and ends happily. Thrown into the mix are Clare’s friends, Avery, who owns the local pizza restaurant, their friend Hope, who comes to live in Boonsboro, and the other Montgomery brothers, Owen and Ryder. Their over-the-top mother features large, as does the town creep, Sam. A surprise guest is the Inn’s resident ghost

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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 11 Pre-K to Grade 12 Grammar

sports

Karate nationals begin Friday in Richmond Five locals to compete among Team BC’s 71 athletes through Sunday at oval by Don Fennell Sports Editor As Karate Canada prepares to hold its annual national championships this weekend at the Richmond Olympic Oval, it’s apparent the sport’s future is in good hands. “More and more I see the progress we’re making,” says Nicole Poirier, who this year became the first female coach to lead the B.C. high performance team in the 37-year history of Karate BC. “Martial arts in general are very popular, and it’s just a matter of us continuing to grow them. When it comes to spectators, we’ve also been working at that without sacrificing the quality of the art. At the world level they’ve adapted rules to make it more athletic and (appealing) to the eye, with more kicks, take downs and multiple combinations.” As a comTOSHI UCHIAGE petitive athlete, Poirier excelled by winning 20 medals at Canadian championships and golds at both the Pan-American championships and Pan-American Games. It’s a combination of that experience, and an ability to motivate others that appealed to Karate BC officials when it came to selecting

NICOLE POIRIER

a head coach, said Karate BC executive director Dan Wallis. “We’re very proud of Nicole and thrilled she has the interest and time to devote to our team,” he said. “She walks the walk and understands the needs of athletes.” “I’m very honoured to take on the role,” said Poirier. “It’s been a goal of mine for several years and I finally felt this year I had enough knowledge and strength to take it on. I always turned it down before for fear of not being ready.” Both Poirier and Wallis are pleased with the progress B.C.’s karate elite have made over the course of the last year. B.C. finished second to Quebec in aggregate points at last year’s championships. While the aggregate formula has been abandoned, Poirier still expects the 71 athletes that will represent the host province at this year’s tournament (Friday through Sunday) to contend for top honours again.

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Twenty-two B.C. communities will be represented on what is the largest-ever Team BC contingent at the nationals. They’ll compete against a field of more than 300 of Canada’s best. Wallis said having the championships in the Lower Mainland certainly offers local athletes a relief from travel. But equally important, the championships also provide a unique opportunity to showcase the sport. “It’s a chance for the community at large to come and see something pretty exciting,” he said. “And it allows our (5,000) members from around the province to upgrade their skills and see the best competitors.” Five Richmond athletes are expected to play lead roles for Team BC at the nationals, including brother and sister Toshi and Sumi Uchiage. Now 26 years old, Toshi at 17 became the youngest Canadian representative at the senior world karate championships and two years later earned a bronze medal to become the youngest ever Canadian to win a world medal. He won Canadian tiles in 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2011. Sumi, 24, won three gold medals in kata at the 2011 Canadian championships and a bronze in kumite. The 2012 Karate Canada National Championships are on from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday at the Richmond Olympic Oval. Tickets, available at the door, are $15 for a one-day pass ($10 for Karate Canada affiliates) and $40 for a threeday pass ($25 for Karate Canada affiliates).

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Page 12 ¡ Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

sports

Sockeyes, Hawks engage in another Tunnel Series Sockeye Sam Chichak and Ice Hawk Spencer Traher renew acquaintances in the Tom Shaw Conference playoff ďŹ nal this week. Don Fennell photo

Richmond-Delta playoff series resumes Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at Minoru Arenas by Don Fennell

Judd Lambert doesn’t believe either team has any signiďŹ cant edge. “It’s the same for both teams,â€? he says. “We’ve probably played each other upwards of 50 times over the last several years so there’s obviously a familiarity factor. Players may come or go, but the philosophies of each organization remain the same. Certainly each knows what the other is about and, as always, it comes down to what group wants to win more.â€? Delta general manager Peter Zerbinos agrees. “Each game is nervewracking because each team wants to get the win,â€? says Zerbinos. “But it’s also a lot of fun to watch from a spectators’ point of view when-

Sports Editor Settle in folks, this could be a good one. And a long one. The top two teams in the PaciďŹ c International Junior Hockey League during the regular season, the Richmond Sockeyes and Delta Hawks were tied at a win apiece heading into Game 3 of their semiďŹ nal playoff series Tuesday at the Ladner Leisure Centre. And like last year’s playoff series between the teams, which Richmond won with a 3-2 Game 7 win, the 2012 Tunnel Series could be just as lengthy and dramatic. Though Richmond (377-0) ďŹ nished 12 points ahead of Delta (29-11-3-1) during the regular campaign, Richmond coach

ever you get the top two teams playing off. The games are usually close and tight-checking because no one wants to allow the odd-man rush that might lead to the winning goal.â€? Richmond advanced to the Tom Shaw Conference ďŹ nal by defeating the North Vancouver Wolf Pack four games to one, while Delta needed all seven games to edge the North Delta Devils 4-3 in the other conference quarter-ďŹ nal. The Sockeyes took the opener in the best-ofseven playoff with the Ice Hawks 4-2 on home ice Saturday. Ice Hawk Anthony Brito opened the scoring late in the first period, but the Sockeyes took the lead on pair of second-

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Jerome Arena. They can thank their goalie Glenn Ferguson, who made 64 saves to earn ďŹ rst-star honours. “We needed a break and he held the fort for us and made some huge saves,â€? Zerbinos said. The Ice Hawks got goals from Alex Martin and Traher in the opening 10 minutes, before Hamaguchi cut the margin in half at 14:43 of the ďŹ rst period. After a scoreless second period, Richmond’s Justin Rai scored at 7:36 of

the third period to force overtime. Aaron Merrick set up Cody Smith for the winning goal at 18:02 of double overtime. Game 4 in the playoff series goes at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Minoru Arenas and Game 5 Friday at 7 p.m., also at Minoru Arenas. Game 6, if needed, will be played Sunday at 7:30 p.m. at the Ladner Lesiure Centre, with a deciding Game 7, if necessary, back at Minoru Arenas Monday at 7:30 p.m.

•The Aldergrove Kodiaks, fresh from a 4-2 quarter-ďŹ nal playoff series win over the Ridge Meadows Flames, took Game 1 of the Harold Brittain Conference ďŹ nal Monday. The Kodiaks defeated the Abbotsford Pilots 2-1. The Pilots swept the Port Moody Black Panthers in their quarter-ďŹ nal series 4-0. The winners of each conference series will face off for the league championship.

Richmond won ďŹ ve of six regular-season games

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period powerplay goals by Carter Popoff and Rudi Thorsteinson. Sam Chichak stretched the Sockeyes’ lead to 3-1 early in the third, before the Hawks’ Spencer Traher made things interesting with a goal at 5:22. Jeremy Hamaguchi’s emptynetter at 19:35 sealed the win for Richmond. Despite playing their third game in as many nights Sunday, Delta tied the series at 1-1 with a 3-2 double overtime win at North Vancouver’s Harry

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While regular-season success certainly doesn’t guarantee playoff success, the Richmond Sockeyes had more than their share against the Delta Ice Hawks during the 2011-12 campaign. On their way to ďŹ nishing 12 points up on the second-place Hawks in the Tom Shaw Conference, and the PaciďŹ c International Junior Hockey League overall, the Sockeyes won ďŹ ve of the six meetings between the two teams. Following is a recap of those games. Oct. 13—Delta 3 at Richmond 5 Captain Patrick Hunter scored twice, rookie Kevin Kilistoff had two assists, and goalie Jonah Imoo made 35 saves for the Sockeyes. Cody Smith scored twice and Spencer Traher had two assists for the Ice Hawks. Nov. 6—Delta 2 at Richmond 3 Clayton Wright, Troy Kaczynski and Carter

Don Fennell photo Richmond Sockeye Jeremy Hamaguchi enjoyed two multiple-point games against the Delta Ice Hawks during the regular season.

Popoff scored for the Sockeyes and goalie Imoo made 26 saves. Glenn Ferguson made 44 saves in net and John Proctor and Anthony Brito each had a goal and an assist for the Ice Hawks. Nov. 22—Richmond 5

at Delta 1 Rudi Thorsteinson scored twice, Kyzen Loo had a goal and two assists and Jeremy Hamaguchi had three assists for the Sockeyes, who got 32 saves from goalie Imoo.

Traher, Aaron Merrick and Cody Fidgett scored for the Ice Hawks, who got a 20-save effort from goalie Doug Birks. Dec. 15—Delta 1 at Richmond 2 No scoring until the third period, Popoff netted the winner for the Sockeyes at 16:35. Goalie Imoo made 33 saves for the Sockeyes and Alex Ahnert 40 saves for the Ice Hawks. Dec. 20—Richmond 2 at Delta 3 The Ice Hawks got two goals from Fidgett and two assists from Brito, while goalie Ahnert made 38 saves. Hamaguchi had a goal and an assist and goalie Kootenay Alder 31 saves for the Sockeyes. Feb. 14—Richmond 3 at Delta 1 Thorsteinson scored twice and goalie Alder made 26 saves for the Sockeyes. Ahnert made 28 saves in the Ice Hawks net. -by Don Fennell


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 13

sports

Ravens hosting provincial Peewee hockey finals

Fusion standout

Games begin Sunday at Minoru Arenas The Richmond Ravens Female Hockey Association is proud to be hosting this year’s Peewee BC Hockey Championships March 18 to 22 at Minoru Arenas. This event will feature the top Peewee female hockey players in the province. The host Ravens, along with the Surrey Falcons and North Shore Avalanche, are considered the favourites this year. “I would categorize us as a slight underdog,” said Ravens co-

head coach Tony Lindsay,” but we are definitely in the hunt. The Avalanche finished first in league play and the Falcons won the play-offs. We finished a close third in both and are looking forward to meeting both teams in provincials.” Other participants include South Vancouver Island, Prince George, Vernon, and RosslandTrail. The opening ceremonies will be held at Minoru Arenas on Sunday at 7:30, to be followed

by the Ravens game versus the South Vancouver Island at 8 p.m. The Ravens will play the Avalanche on Tuesday at 5 p.m. and faceoff against Surrey at 8 p.m. on Wednesday. The top two teams after the round robin will play in the championship game at 8 p.m. on Thursday. All games will be three 20-minute stop time periods, which Lindsay believes will play in the Ravens’ favour. “This is the hardest working team I have ever coached

and we are in great condition,” he said. “We stated at the beginning of the season that we wanted to be known as a team that is always relentless and our players have lived that motto in everything we do. “Quite frankly, we are a very tough team to play against because of our balance and exceptional work rate,” added Likndsay. “The girls are ready and I am very proud of all of them.”

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sports

McMath’s 8s wrap up special hoops season Sports Editor Richmond’s R.A. McMath Wildcats capped a successful first year of high school hoops on the weekend, placing third in the provincial Bantam girls’ tournament at Pitt Meadows. The Wildcats rather easily defeated Surrey’s Fraser Heights in the third-place game Saturday, after losing to the North

Shore’s Handsworth Royals 28-22 in Friday’s semifinal. It was the third meeting this season between the Wildcats and Royals, with the teams splitting the previous two. McMath defeated Handsworth 40-36 in the Vancouver and District semis before disposing of the Carson Graham Eagles in the championship game. “I thought if we held (Handsworth) to less than 39 we’d win the game,” said McMath

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coach Anne Gillrie-Carre. “We always tell the kids if they play good defence they stand a good chance of winning. But we also played a 2-3 zone (a defensive alignment which focuses on keeping the opposition to the outside), which we hadn’t played all year. That part of it worked, but it didn’t give us a lot of scoring opportunities. And I don’t know how many rim shots we had.”

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Community Worship

STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH 3720 Broadway Street (at 2nd Ave.) Rev. Rick Taylor

Please join us at 10am Sunday, March 18 for Worship Service and Sunday School 604-277-0508 • www.stevestonunitedchurch.ca A caring and friendly village church

SOUTH ARM UNITED CHURCH 11051 No. 3 Road, Richmond 604-277-4020 sauc@telus.net www.southarmunitedchurch.ca Minister of the Congregation - Rev. Dr. Gary Gaudin Children & Youth Team Ministry Music Ministry - Ron Stevenson Worship Service & Church School - 10:00 am ALL ARE WELCOME!

Richmond United Church

8711 Cambie Rd. (near Garden City Rd.) 604-278-5622 Minister: Rev. Neill McRae

Come for 10am Sunday Worship and Children’s Sunday School and after-service coffee and fellowship. Founded 1888. Richmond’s Oldest Church BRIGHOUSE UNITED CHURCH

BAPTIST

ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA St. Alban

Broadmoor Baptist Church

an Anglican parish in the heart of Richmond Services at 8:30 and 10:00 am Sunday School 10:00 am The Reverend Margaret Cornish 7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond 604-278-2770 • www.stalbansrichmond.org

A safe place to connect with God and fellow travellers on your spiritual journey

8140 Saunders Road, Richmond, BC 604-277-8012 www.bbchurch.ca Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Sonshine Adventures for Kids Interim Pastor - Rev. Bob Bahr

ST. EDWARDS ANGLICAN

10111 Bird Road, Richmond V6X 1N4 Phone/Fax: 604-273-1335 • www.stedward.ca Priest-in-charge: Rev. Gord Dominey

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Richmond Baptist Church Love God…Love People

Sunday Service: 8:30 &10:30 am Sunday School

6640 Blundell Road, Richmond BC • 604-277-1939 office@richmondbaptist.com www.richmondbaptist.com

St. Anne’s - Steveston Anglican Church

Services ApostolicWorship Pentecostal Church Intl. 9:00am and 11:00am

Promise Land (Children’s Church) Children ages 4-12 Nursery available Children, Youth activities, Young Adult and Adult events. Call the church office more more information 604-277-1939

4071 Francis Road, Richmond, BC

The Rev. Brian Vickers, Rector • 604-277-9626

Sunday 8:30 a.m. - Contemplative Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Family Eucharist with Church School Sanctuary open for quiet prayer 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. weekdays • www.stannessteveston.ca

FOURSQUARE GOSPEL CHURCH OF CANADA Richmond Christian Fellowship

CHRISTIAN REFORMED

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an evangelical congregation

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Sunday, March 18, 2012, 10:00 am Worship

Pastor Impam Moses

LET GO & LET GOD

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FILIPINO CHRISTIAN CHURCH

GILMORE PARK UNITED CHURCH

CHRIST-CENTERED CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Filipino Congregation) www.cccc-richmondbc.com COME AND JOIN US IN OUR CELEBRATION OF REDEMPTION! Worship Service 12:20 p.m. Sunday School 2:00 p.m.

8060 No. 1 Road (corner of No. 1 & Blundell) 604.277.5377 www.gilmoreparkunited.org Rev. Scott Swanson & Rev. Jennifer Goddard-Sheppard

Worship and Children’s Program Sundays, 10:30 am

Everyone is welcome!

8151 Bennett Road, Richmond tel: 604-271-6491

Lent Evening Prayer Wednesdays 7 pm – Feb. 29 to April 4

REFORMED CHURCH (RCA)

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Fujian Evangelical Church

RICHMOND PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

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FILIPINO CANADIAN CHURCH Apostolic Pentecostal Church Intl. Be part of the new pioneering church in Richmond

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Page 14 · Richmond Review


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 15

sports Jones an all-star, Zawada honourable mention as Wildcats take third From Page 14

“Both teams played well, they just made those few extra shots,” McMath associate coach Nathan Kishi said of Friday’s game against Handsworth. “(Handsworth) is a little taller than us, otherwise I think these are two very even teams. I think this experience was good for them and shows the possibilities that lay ahead.” Two Wildcats received tournament all-star honours. Jessica Jones was chosen to the first team and Jessica Zawada was

The R.A. McMath Wildcats Bantam (Grade 8) girls’ basketball team, coached by Anne GillrieCarre and Nathan Kishi, featured players Claire Reynolds, Julia Wilson, Jessica Jones, Jessica Folk, Mikayla Weissler, Justine McCaskill, Montana Leonard, Claire Siqueira, Jessica Zawada, Ellie Reid, Carmen Milne, Denise Su, Kyra Loat, Hannah Partridge, Stephanie Baron, Ali Burns, Kim German, Bonnie Leung, Delaney McBride and Jessica Tarnate.

an honourable mention, though her 20-plus points in three games suggested she perhaps deserved even greater recognition. Gillrie-Carre, who said this season was one of the most special of her lengthy coaching career, was also impressed by the strong parent support. “There were parents singing and banging on drums at the provincials,” she said. “Lots of others commented on what great fan support we had, and it only added to the experience for our girls.”

FUNDING FOR STUDENTS, NOT FOR WAGE HIKES. The BCTF is demanding a 15 per cent wage hike and other benefits that would cost $2 billion and raise taxes for BC families. Virtually all other public sector unions have settled for no wage increases. It’s unacceptable that schools are disrupted and that students and their families are inconvenienced over an unreasonable salary demand in difficult economic times. The union is making claims and demands that simply don’t add up.

BCTF CLAIMS AND DEMANDS

FACT

The union wants more paid time outside the classroom – sick leave for teachers on call, expanded bereavement and discretionary leave.

The government wants more time for teacher training and to ensure that Pro-D days really are for professional development.

The union says all teaching positions should be selected on the basis of seniority.

The government supports seniority but qualifications must also count so that math teachers teach math, and science teachers teach science.

The union says that teachers who perform poorly in evaluations will be dismissed – ‘one strike and you’re out’.

The government wants to support teacher improvement through a standardized evaluation process.

The union says that government refuses to negotiate.

There has been over a year of negotiations and 78 full bargaining sessions.

The union says that class size limits have been eliminated.

Class size limits will remain in place on all grades across BC.

The union says that BC has 700 fewer special needs teachers.

2100 new teaching assistants have been hired since 2001. And, with a new $165 million Learning Improvement Fund, we will hire more.

It’s time to focus on what matters most in education – BC’s students. That’s why we are focused on per-student funding which is at an all time high, not on wage increases. We all want to do more to make BC’s education system even better. It’s the driving force behind BC’s Education Plan that teachers, parents and students are helping to shape. Teachers care about their students. Parents care about their children’s future.

LET’S PUT STUDENTS BCEDPLAN.CA


Page 16 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

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e’ve all been there—looking in frustration at a jam-packed closet, thinking, “I have nothing to wear.” I uttered those very words just last month. So in an attempt to get a head start on my spring cleaning, I decided to reorganize my closet. Cleaning out your closet is about removing emotion and taking a rational look at your clothes. That’s when the “If you haven’t worn it in a year, toss it” rule comes in handy—a phrase that strikes fear into the hearts of sentimentalists everywhere. It’s important to prune your wardrobe at least once a year in order to maximize outfit potential and not appear like you’re auditioning for an episode of Hoarders. The closet, after all, is where you start your day. I turned to professional organizer and author of Clutter’s Dirty Secret, Alison Roberts, for tips. As a first step in organizing your wardrobe, she recommends trying everything on while keeping in mind what works for your lifestyle. “It’s not enough just to hold it up and think it will still fit, ” said Roberts. “If necessary, have a friend with you so that he or she can give a more objective opinion. No point hanging on to items that aren’t flattering. Keep the best and fling the rest!”

Go through and get rid of anything ripped, worn out or pilled. I made separate piles for items I wanted to keep, donate or take to the tailors to update for a better fit. There’s the additional option of selling your clothes at a consignment shop or on eBay if you think it may be worth it. For clothes you know you’ll never wear but are emotionally attached to, such as wedding or prom dresses, “archive” them by packing them away elsewhere, like the attic or storage closet. Roberts suggested another option for those difficult-to-let-go items. “Take a picture to remember it by, or write a short paragraph about why you love the item,” said Roberts. “Sometimes those actions will be enough to allow you to let it go. Or think of someone—a friend or family member—that might appreciate the item. Some people feel better knowing that the item is going to someone they know, instead of a stranger.” A good way to get more out of your closet space would be to pack away off-season

The result of my closet reorganization. Photo by Celia Leung

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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 17

clothing, such as bulky winter coats and heavy sweaters. Hold on to classic pieces that can be worn in the transition from winter to spring, like blazers or simple black skirts. Some of you may be tempted to hang onto items from previous trends in anticipation that they’ll be popular again, but I say only keep the ones which fit into your sense of style. Just because the bohemian look was all the rage a few years back doesn’t mean you’ll want to don that peasant skirt again if the trend re-emerges. Hang necklaces and bracelets off a bulletin board to keep them knot-free. Photo from: thefashionspot.com

Create your own Dewey Decimal system.

Photo from: thefashionspot.com

or fade as easily as when kept out in the open. After I finish reorganizing I’m left with two garbage bags full of clothes to donate and ideas on what to find for my wardrobe for the upcoming season. Hopefully you’ll realize you have some great items hidden away in your closet and become inspired to put together amazing new outfits for the warmer months ahead. An external rack is a great alternative for small closets. Photo from: ikea.ca There are a few ways to go about arranging your wardrobe, largely depending on your closet capacity. For those more visuallyinclined, like me, you can sort the clothes by colour. Most of my jackets, dresses, skirts, and tops which can’t be folded, hang on the rack according the colour spectrum, from red through to purple and the neutrals. A more efficient system, though, would be to sort your clothes by work and casual apparel. By separating office and play clothes, you’ll be spending less time coming up with outfits to wear in the morning. For accessories, try to display everything as visibly as possible. Keep belts, hats, scarves and jewelry in see-through containers or hang them on hooks and cork boards—you’re more likely to wear them if they’re in full view. Handbags, especially expensive ones, should be kept in dust bags and stuffed with cardboard, tissue paper, or even old T-shirts to help them keep their shape while they sit in your closet for a long period of time. For shoes, they’d ideally be in the box they came in, with a picture or description on the outside for easy reference once stacked. By being in a breathable container, leather shoes won’t crack

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Page 18 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

sports

Scrubb MVP in university basketball Richmond’s Philip Scrubb capped a dream season by leading the Carleton Ravens to the Canadian university men’s basketball championship this weekend in Halifax. The sophomore guard, who was

selected the top university men’s player in the nation this season, added tournament MVP honours to his personal trophy case by leading the Ravens in scoring in each of the final eight games, including 26 points in

Carleton’s 86-67 win over the Alberta Golden Bears in the championship game. Scrubb’s brother Thomas is also a member of the Canadian championship team at Carleton.

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Don Fennell photo Richmond Kajak Nick Fyffe competed as a member of the Vancouver College Fighting Irish at Saturday’s Province Grand Forza V indoor track meet at the Richmond Olympic Oval. With a leap of 2.98 metres, Fyffe finished second to Oak Bay’s Kalem Scott in the high school senior boys’ standing long jump event. The meet was presented by Telus. FUTURE SHOP – Correction Notice Please note on Popup page 3 of the March 9 flyer, the microwave advertised is limited in stock. This model is available while quantities last as it is being discontinued. No rainchecks will be issued. In the unfortunate event that this model is no longer available, we are pleased to offer the Sunbeam SBMW759W (WebCode: 10143370) as a substitute for the same price. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

Reason #28 Nothing beats being a part of a strong team.

STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PR PRO P RO R ODU DUC UC U CTS TS STO ST TO T ORES RE ES ES FL ERS FLY RS DE DEALS AL ALS A LS LS COUPO PONS S BRO BRO ROCH CHU C HUR RE RES ES CA ES CAT TA AL A OGU GUE GU ES S C CO CON ON O NTE TES TES ESTS TS PR PRO OD ODU DUCT DU UC CTS CT TS T STO ST S TO TORES RES ES FL FL FLY LY YER ERS E RS R S DE DEALS EALS ALS S CO COUPO OU UPO ON NS S BR B BRO RO ROCH CHU CHU HURE RES R E ES CAT CAT ATALO LOGU LO GU UE ES CON O ONT EST STS P ST PRO ODU DU UCTS S S ST TORE ORES OR RES FLY RE FLYER FL ERS ERS DE DEA D EA ALS S C COU CO OUPON O PONS ONS STOR TORES ES F FLY YERS ER RS D RS DEAL DE EAL AL ALS LS S CO COUPO PO ONS NS BR B BRO RO R OCH CHU C HU H U UR RES R ES CAT ES CAT CA TAL TALO AL ALOGU OGU GUES E CO CON ON O NTE NTES TES T E ES STS TS PR PROD OD ODU DUCTS DU ST S STO TO ORE RE RES ES S FL LY LY YERS ERS RS S D DE EA E AL A L CO C OUPO UP U PO P ON O NS NS BR BRO B ROC RO CH HU URES R CAT C AT TALO ALO OGU GUE UE U ES CON ES ONTEST ONT NTE N NT TES EST E S ST TS PR RO ODU OD DUCT DU CTS CTS TS S ST TO OR ORE RE RES F FLY LYERS LY ERS DEA ALS SC COU OU UPON UPON PONS BROC BROC ROCHUR OCHUR UR U RES ES CAT CAT TALO ALO OGU U

Our success has been a team effort on every level. When you are a part of the MEG team you feel valued and that your input is heard and welcomed.

NOW HIRING for exciting careers in engineering, operations, construction, supply chain management and more. Contracts Specialist Location: Edmonton Area

Contracts Lead, Phase 3A, Projects Location: Calgary, AB

Regulatory Engineer Location: Calgary, AB

Construction Engineer, Projects Location: Calgary, AB

Visit www.megenergy.com to apply today.

Click it, Share it, Shop it homedepot.ca/dreambook Visit our facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/flyerland.ca

Save time, save money.

Visit our other Black Press sites


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review - Page 19

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . . . . . . 1-8 COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . 9-57 TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-76 CHILDREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80-98 EMPLOYMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-198 BUSINESS SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . 203-387 PETS & LIVESTOCK . . . . . . . . . . . 453-483 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE . . . . . . 503-587 REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-696 RENTALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-757 AUTOMOTIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804-862 MARINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903-920

7

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

OBITUARIES

42

LOST - U CLAMP FOR BIKE along Westminster Hwy. Please call: (604)278-2252

TRAVEL 66

bcclassified.com cannot be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. bcclassified.com reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisment and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassified.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisment and box rental.

HEDDY, Lena (nee Fedoruk)

74

January 15, 1925 - March 9, 2012

Our loving mother and grandmother passed peacefully March

9 at Richmond Rotary Hospice House after a long struggle with leukemia. Lee was born in Fort Frances, Ontario and moved to Richmond as a child. She was predeceased by her parents; brothers Peter, William (RCAF), John, Mike, Steve, and her daughter Lynn. She is survived by her daughter Carol, grandchildren Jarrett and Brittany (Joshua), sistersin-law Elizabeth and Marion and ‘’best buddy’’ cousin Anne Beaver. Lee is also survived by numerous cousins, nieces and nephews. Her love of family, generous nature, humor and quick ‘’wit’’ will be missed by all. No service by request. Donations can be made to the Richmond Rotary Hospice House or the B.C. Kidney Foundation.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

21

COPYRIGHT Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

Advertise across Advertise across the the Advertise across the Lower Mainland Mainland in Lower in lower mainland in the 18 best-read the 18 best-read thecommunity 17 best-read community community newspapers and newspapers and newspapers. dailies. 53 dailies. ON THE WEB: ON THE WEB:

TIMESHARE

CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO Risk Program. STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call Us Now. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

75

TRAVEL

Bring the family! Sizzling Specials at Florida’s Best Beach! New Smyrna Beach, FL. See it all at: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166 CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO Risk Program. STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call Us Now. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248

CHILDREN 86

CHILDCARE WANTED

LIVE-IN CAREGIVER required for a 6year old child. F/T & live in. Wage is $9.50/hr. Secondary school or equivalent. req. 778-297-1310.

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

COMING EVENTS

Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

GETAWAYS

BRING THE family! Sizzling Specials at Florida’s Best Beach! New Smyrna Beach, FL. See it all at: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166.

AGREEMENT It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement.

LOST AND FOUND

LOST: Ladies glasses - clear frames, vicinity of Richmond Senior Centre/Library/City Hall on Fri March 9th afternoon. Pls call (604)277-3332

21st Century Flea Market. Mar18th, 10am-3pm. Croation Cultural Ctr. 3250 Commercial Dr,Vanc. Adm $5

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS

ENJOY a fun-filled evening and help Ducks Unlimited conserve Canada’s wetlands! Join our Delta/Richmond chapter for our annual fundraising banquet & auction. Saturday March 24th at the Vancouver Sheraton Airport Hotel. Our evening features a great meal, a live & silent auction and fantastic raffle packages. For tickets $70 each. Call Cam 604-290-2357

33

INFORMATION

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

FOR MEN OF GOOD CHARACTER Freemasonry is a fraternity open to all men regardless of ethnicity or religion. For more information:

Ian Biddlecombe

604-657-1365

041

PERSONALS

DATING SERVICE. LongTerm/Short-Term Relationships, FREE TO TRY!!! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1. Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1877-804-5381. (18+).

to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca BECOME SUCCESSFUL! Work From Home & Own Your Own Business! Earn Unlimited $$$$. Toll Free 1.877.880.8843 leave mess. EARN EXTRA CASH! - P/T, F/T Immediate Openings For Men & Women. Easy Computer Work, Others Positions Are Available. Can Be Done From Home. No Experience Needed. www.HWC-BC.com

HOME BASED BUSINESSWe need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 114

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 114

OWNER OPERATORS & CLASS 1 Company Drivers Surrey Terminal Van Kam Freightways’ group of companies requires Owner Operators and Class 1 Company drivers to be based out of our Surrey Terminal. Applicants must have winter and mountain driving exp./training. We offer above average rates and an excellent employee benefits package. Call Bev at 1-800-663-0900/ 604968-5488 or send a detailed rebcclassified.com sume and current driver’s abstract. (For owner operators, provide details of your truck) to: careers@vankam.com Fax, 604-587-9889 Van Kam is committed to Employment Equity and Environmental Responsibility. Thank you for your interest however only those of interest to us will be contacted.

DO YOU OFFER HOME SERVICES?

Home Improvements, Landscaping, Rubbish Removal, etc... Call today to place your ad bcclassified.com 604-575-5555

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

New container contract. Fax resume “N” abstract 1-888-778-3563 Ph: 604-214-3161or E-mail: jobs@bstmanagement.net Star Fleet Trucking HIRING!! DRIVERS, FARMERS, RANCHERS & RETIREES with 2003 or newer 1-Ton duallie, diesel; pickups & 8’box to deliver new travel trailers & fifth wheels from US manufacturers to Canadian dealers. Free IRP plate for your truck and low insurance rates! Prefer commercial Driver’s License. Top Pay! Call Craig 1-877-890-4523 www.starfleettrucking.com

EDUCATION

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1(877)818-0783. TRY A BCCLASSIFIED.COM CLASSIFIED AD. THEY ARE INEXPENSIVE AND THEY WORK HARD!

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Advertising Representative Burnaby NewsLeader New Westminster NewsLeader

DRIVER. Class 1 Drivers wanted. Offering top pay. Close to home. Home most weekends. Family comes first! 1 year flat deck exp. & border crossing a must. Fax resume & driver abstract to 604-853-4179.

RECRUITERS LIVE ON LOCATION:

LANGLEY SATURDAY, March 24th 9:00a.m. - 4:00p.m. SANDMAN SIGNATURE HOTEL BANQUET CENTER 8828 - 201 Street

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 115

EDUCATION

AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. Sites in AB & BC. Hands on real world machine training. NO Simulators. Start any Monday. Funding Options. www.IHESchool.com 1-866-399-3853

WE OFFER: -Top Notch Regional Premiums -Flexible Schedules And MUCH more!

See you there! Contact us! 1.800.476.4766 Email: recruit@ bisontransport.com Web: www. bisondriving.com

Bison Transport is committed to Employment Equity and Diversity.

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

This is a fantastic opportunity to develop a rewarding career in advertising and marketing. The Burnaby NewsLeader & New Westminster NewsLeader are divisions of Black Press Ltd., Canada’s largest independent newspaper company, with more than 180 community, daily and urban newspapers in B.C., Alberta, Washington State, Ohio and Hawaii, and extensive online operations with over 250 websites. Black Press is also Western Canada’s largest privately-held commercial printer with 14 printing plants. The NewsLeader is the recent recipient of the Suburban Newspapers of America 2009 First Place Best Community Newspaper, circulation 37,500+, plus has won or been nominated in eleven categories for the 2010 SNAs, CCNAs, and BCYCNAs, including winning a CCNA Blue Ribbon award. If you are a highly creative individual with an ability to multi-task in a fast-paced team environment and have good interpersonal and sales skills, we would like to meet you. To apply, please forward your resume with a cover letter to: Jean Hincks, Publisher 7438 Fraser Park Drive Burnaby, BC V5J 5B9 Email: publisher@burnabynewsleader.com publisher@newwestnewsleader.com Deadline for applications is: March 16, 2012

www.blackpress.ca

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

Required for

Prowest Transport

HOME BASED BUSINESS We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

114

114

OWNER OPS WITH A TLS

115 CLASSIFIED A D S MEAN MORE BUSINESS PHONE 604-575-5555

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

Join our growing team. We have the following positions available in our Surrey location:

SALES MANAGER – POSITIONING TECHNOLOGY This position covers the BC region and specializes in the sales team management of the most innovative Construction, Survey, Engineering/GIS and Agricultural Positioning Technologies. Sales management experience, knowledge of GPS, Networks, Total Stations, Mapping, Elevation and Leveling are considered assets.

SALES COORDINATOR Primary responsibilities include: inside sales, shipping and receiving, sales support and administration for the branch, inventory control, and pricing. Previous experience in the survey and construction industry would be an asset. As the exclusive Topcon Dealer in Western Canada, we are the best choice for GPS, Lasers, Total Stations, Machine Control Automation, GIS, and supplies. Brandt Tractor is a Platinum member of the Canada’s 50 Best Managed Companies Program. Find out more about our exciting career opportunities at www.brandtjobs.com or by calling (306) 791-8923. Email resume indicating position title and location to hr@brandttractor.com or fax (306) 791-5986.


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Page 20 - Richmond Review EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 115

EDUCATION

TRAIN TO BE AN Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456. WORK FROM HOME. Largest Medical Transcriptionist employer in Canada looks to CanScribe for 100 more MT’s. We need more students! Enroll Today! 1-800-4661535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com

125

FOSTER/SOCIAL CARE

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 130

HELP WANTED

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 134

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD SERVICES

CUSTOMER SERVICE REP. Aldergrove Company looking for a permanent full - time CSR. Position details include but are not limited to order entry, border paperwork, and various types of correspondence. Proficient exp. with Accpac, excel and word an asset. Benefits offered after 3 mths. Please e-mail your resume with cover letter stating wage expectation to mgratwicke812@gmail.com

MOVIE EXTRAS ! WWW.CASTINGROOM.COM Families, Kids, Tots & Teens!! Register Now Busy Film Season

CASALINGA Food Service located at 3847 Kingsway Burnaby, BC, is looking to hire a Executive Chef (Noc.6241), Permanent, F/T, shift, overtime, weekend, $20.00 dollars per hour, ASAP, Completion of College, 3 years exp. speak English. Specialties: Canadian, International, Italian, European, Vegetarian, Food Preparation, Specific Skills: Plan and direct food preparation and cooking activities, estimate food requirements, estimate food and labour costs, prepare and cook meals and specialty foods including dishes for customers with food allergies or intolerance. Please send you resume at trish564@shaw.ca

142 OFFICE SUPPORT/CLERKS

All Ages, All Ethnicities

Some great kids aged 12 to 18 who need a stable, caring home for a few months. Are you looking for the opportunity to do meaningful, fulfilling work? PLEA Community Services is looking for qualified applicants who can provide care for youth in their home on a full-time basis or on weekends for respite. Training, support and remuneration are provided. Funding is available for modifications to better equip your home. A child at risk is waiting for an open door.

Make it yours. Call 604-708-2628 www.plea.bc.ca

130

HELP WANTED

$100-$400 CASH DAILY for Landscaping Work! Competitive, Energetic, Honesty a MUST!

PropertyStarsJobs.Com An earthmoving company based in Edson Alberta requires a full time Heavy Duty Mechanic for field and shop work. We require Cat Dozer/Deere excavator experience. You will work a set schedule for days on and off. Call Lloyd @ 780723-5051

SOUTH ROCK has positions for road construction workers, BASE heavy equipment operators (Finish Grader Op). Asphalt - (paver, roller, screed, raker). Heavy Duty Mechanic (service truck). General labourers. Forward resume to: careers@southrock.ca Fax: 403-568-1327 www.southrock.ca Surdel Party Rentals & Sales Inc. needs 1 PERM FT MARKETING MANAGER ($23/hr) to establish distribution, conduct market research, explore new market, assist in product & service development, and direct marketing strategies. A diploma/degree combined with at least three years of relevant experience required. Fluent English and Chinese highly valued. Send resume surdel.career@gmail.com

UP TO $20/HR We need 12 CSR reps now!

PAID training. F/T Hours Benefits after 6 months Must be outgoing!!! ERICA @ 604-777-2195 LOOKING FOR NEW OR USED FURNITURE AT GREAT PRICES? Browse bcclassified.com’s “Furniture For Sale” under CLASS 548.

132

HOME STAY FAMILIES

.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO HOST International Students?

Please contact us at: homestayintl@gmail.com

115

EDUCATION

115

EDUCATION

EXP RECEPTIONIST req’d for Richmond financial firm. Data entry an asset Fax resume 604-273-3875

160

TRADES, TECHNICAL

CNC MACHINIST Trades qualified manual machining background an asset. Afternoon shifts available.

MANUAL MACHINIST Trades qualified with good skills. Boring mill experience an asset.

GRINDER Capable of precision grinding. Experience on internal, external and universal grinders.

HARD CHROMED PLATER Prefer experience in the hard chrome plating industry. Competitive Wages & Benefits Package including RRSP Plan. Wartsila Canada supports the Federal Contractors Program as it relates to Employment Equity for Women, Aboriginals, Visible Minorities and Persons with Disabilities. Send/email resume to: Bob.boudreau@wartsila.com 1771 Savage Rd, Richmond, B.C V6V 1R1 Fax: 604-244-1181 www.wartsila.com

SKILLED Labourer: Must have knowledge of water pump equipment and installation of water pump equipment. Must thrive working in a fast paced environment and willing to go the extra mile. Must have access to a vehicle. Send resume to: stormguard@telus.net

115

EDUCATION

REWARDING CAREERS ARE NEVER HANDED TO YOU. AT CDI COLLEGE, WE’LL HELP YOU EARN ONE. CDI College has been helping people like you launch successful careers for more than four decades. Choose from over 50 market-driven programs in Business, Art &

Design, Technology and Health Care. A new career can be in the palm of your hand. Call CDI College today! ING UNT LL O ACC AYRO ATOR & P STR many s of INI ram M AD st one r prog u - J s caree ollege. C ines u b s at CDI

Canada’s Leading Career Training Provider.

160

TRADES, TECHNICAL

DL Baker Construction Canada is looking for Journeymen Carpenters and Foremen in Kitimat. BC, Canada. Red Seal Preferred. Carpenters must have experience with installation of footing forms, slab on grade forms, build and install wall, column and elevated horizontal forms. Ability to layout work, off supplied control lines. And the ability to correctly rig and hoist material, ability to signal, rig and work safely with cranes. Project Terms is Project Based Wages are in accordance with Project Labour Agreement between Kitimat Modernization Employer Association and Coalition of British Columbia Building Trades for the Kitimat Modernization Project Please forward resumes to patton@bakerconcrete.com

DL Baker Construction Canada is looking for Laborers and Foremen in Kitimat. BC, Canada. Red Seal Preferred. Laborers will possess competency in assisting on the installation of all types of formwork, performing general labor work and placing concrete. Have the ability to correctly rig and hoist material, ability to signal, rig and work safely with cranes. Project Terms is Project Based Wages are in accordance with Project Labour Agreement between Kitimat Modernization Employer Association and Coalition of British Columbia Building Trades for the Kitimat Modernization Project Please forward resumes to patton@bakerconcrete.com

GAS MECHANIC for busy logging company in the Fraser Valley Area. Must have valid BC drivers licence and good work ethic. Ticketed mechanic’s are considered an asset.

Competitive Wages & Benefits After 3 mos. Please fax 604-796-0318 or e-mail: mikayla.tamihilog@shaw.ca

DRAGON FOOD Equipment Inc. is looking for a permanent ELECTRIC WELDER urgently in Richmond, $26/hr with WCB, 37.5 hrs/wk. Must be skillful in welding machine and flame-cutting equipment operation with min 5 years of welding exp. Must speak Mandarin/Cantonese. Please fax: 604-276-2310 or email: dragonfoodequip@gmail.com

To get started today, visit richmond.cdicollege.ca or call 1.800.370.5120

ffacebook.com/CDICollege t twitter.com/CDICollege Y youtube.com/CDICareerCollege m myspace.com/CDICollege

CALL 604-558-2278

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

WELDERS WANTED. Journeyman 2nd and 3rd year apprentices with tank manufacturing experience. Automated Tank Manufacturing Inc. Located in Kitscoty, Alberta. 20km West of Lloydminster is looking for 15 individuals that want long term employment and a secure paycheque. Journeyman wages $33. $37.50/hour. Wages for apprentices based on hours and qualifications. Benefits, training programs, full insurance package 100% paid by company, profit sharing bonus. Join a winning team. Call Basil or Blaine for an appointment or send resume to: blaine@autotanks.ca or production@autotanks.ca. 780-8462231 (Office), 780-846-2241 (Fax).

130

HELP WANTED

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 163

VOLUNTEERS

182

Volunteer Training For Hospice / Palliative Care starts April 17th Call 604-279-7140 for more information or registration Richmond Hospice Assn.

PERSONAL SERVICES 171

PERSONAL SERVICES

ALTERNATIVE HEALTH

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

287

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

320

MOVING & STORAGE

MONEYPROVIDER.COM. $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877776-1660.

188

LEGAL SERVICES

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

HERBAL MAGIC - With Herbal Magic lose up to 20 pounds in just 8 weeks and keep it off. Results Guaranteed! Start today call 1-800854-5176.

1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING. Real Professionals, Reasonable. Rates. Different From the Rest. 604-721-4555. ABE MOVING - $35/Hr. Per Person *Reliable Careful Movers. *Rubbish Removal. *24 Hours. 604-999-6020

GUITAR LESSONS

AFFORDABLE MOVING

Beginner-Intermediate 604-240-7918

Local & Long Distance

$45/Hr

HOLISTIC LIFECOACHING Do you want to apply the book “The Secret” into your life but just don’t know how? Find out the things that blocking your way in manifesting the life you desire. www.createacharmedlife.ca 604-277-3591

182

FINANCIAL SERVICES

AVOID BANKRUPTCY SAVE UP TO 70% OFF YOUR DEBT. One affordable monthly payment interest free. For debt restructuring on YOUR terms, not the creditors. Call 1-866-690-3328 or see web site: www.4pillars.ca DROWNING IN DEBTS? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. AVOID BANKRUPTCY! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500 GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com If you own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

242

130

260

SPARTAN Moving Ltd. Fast & Reliable. Insured Competitive rates. Wknd Specials. Call Frank: (604) 435-8240

329 PAINTING & DECORATING

ELECTRICAL

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

281

GARDENING

LAWN CUT, power raking, aerating, fertilizing, gardening, hedge trimming & yard clean-up. Senior discount, 25% off. 604-773-0075

“ ABOVE THE REST “ Int. & Ext., Unbeatable Prices, Professional Crew. Free Est. Written Guarantee. No Hassle, Quick Work, Insured, WCB. Call (778)997-9582

A-TECH Services 604-230-3539 Running this ad for 8yrs

HANDYPERSONS

283A

PAINT SPECIAL

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS new toilet, sink, bath tub, tiles. Best price, finest quality. 778-321-0309

287

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

ADDITIONS, Renovations & New Construction. Concrete Forming & Framing Specialist. 604.218.3064

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Cloverdale Premium quality paint. NO PAYMENT until Job is completed. Ask us about our Laminate Flooring & Maid Services. www.paintspecial.com

PLUMBING

1ST CALL Plumbing, heating, gas, licensed, insured, bonded. Local, Prompt and Prof. 604-868-7062

Bathrooms, Kitchens Additions, Carpentry Work, Painting. Refs.

Gas Fitter ✭ Plumber

Small Jobs

Spruce Bay Construction

604-613-1018

3 rooms for $299, 2 coats any colour

338

RENOVATIONS

130

HELP WANTED

604-537-4140

Call: Rick (604) 202-5184

Now get u p to $800k business or personal loan, with interest rate from 1.9%. Bad credit ok.

Call 1-866-642-1867

CONCRETE & PLACING

PLACING & Finishing * Forming * Site Prep, old concrete removal * Excavation & Reinforcing * Re-Re Specialists 32 Years Exp. Free Estimates.

LOOKING FOR BUSINESS, PERSONAL OR TITLE LOAN?

Apply now

From 1, 3, 5, 7,10 Ton Trucks Licenced ~ Reliable ~ 1 to 3 Men Free estimate/Seniors discount Residential~Commercial~Pianos

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

Furnace Boilers, Hot Water Tanks Hot Water Heat, Plumbing Jobs. Furnace cleaning Excellent price for h-w tanks

604-507-4606 or 604-312-7674

HELP WANTED

130

HELP WANTED

Kids and Adults Needed Kids and Adults Needed Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either! Deliver 2x week, Wednesdays and Fridays, right in your neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.

Call JR 604-247-3712 or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com Route Boundaries Number of Papers 14903072 14903051 14903073 14903050 14903070 14903063 14903089 14903071 14903076 14903064 14203135 14201154 14901020 14202262 14202041 14202045 14202023 14201121 14201126 14901209 14901175 14901216 14901214 14201115 14203244

Forsyth Cres Gamba Dr, Nicolle Pl, Tucker Ave Gibbons Dr, Tiffin Cres 5000 and 6000 Blk No 1 Rd Cornwall Dr, Pl, Crt Clematis Dr, Coltsfoot Dr, Larkspur Ave, Mariposa Crt 4000 blk River Rd (between No 1 & McCallan) Forsyth Cres, 4000 Blk Westminster Hwy 5000 blk Gibbons Dr, Westminster Hwy Riverdale Dr Fairdell Cres 5000 blk Williams Rd 2000blk River Rd, 2000 blk Westminster hwy 4000 Blk Francis Rd Mahood Dr Geal Rd, Groat Ave 9000 Blk No 1 Rd, Pendlebury Rd Gander Crt, Dr, Pl, St. Johns Pl Cornerbrook Cres, St Brides Crt, Pl, St Vincents Crt, Pl Comstock Rd 7000 Blk No 2 Rd Donald, Grandy, Udy Chatsworth, Cheviot Springthorne Cres Bairdmore Cres

47 60 66 62 115 115 23 59 38 50 64 71 40 20 48 49 88 63 61 77 65 79 45 79 42

Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either! Deliver 2x week, Wednesdays and Fridays, right in your neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.

Call Roya 604-247-3710 or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com

Route

Boundaries

Number of Papers

15000102

Catalina Cres, Lancaster Cres, Miller Rd (Burkeville)

99

15000104

Wellington Cres (Burkeville)

54

14500434

8000 Blk No 4 Rd

68

15102996

2000 blk Shell Rd, River Dr

55

14302277

8000 Blk of Railway Ave

24

14301274

Cormorant Crt, Steveston Hwy

52

14600555

Seagrave Rd, Seaton Crt,Pl, Rd, Seavale Rd

94

14600810

6000-8000 Blk of No 5 Rd

126

14402530

8000 Blk Saunders Rd

84

14301145

Hollymount Dr

63

14301143

Hollymount Dr, Hollymount Gate

59

14401544

10000 Blk of No 4 Rd

60

14402470

Bisset Dr , Bisset Pl

65

14401660

Ainsworth Cres, Moddocks Rd

85

14401611

Dennis Cres, Pl, Wilkinson Rd

110

14401714

9500-10800 Block Shell

64

14303563

Bamberton Crt, Dr, Barkerville Crt, Manning Crt

97

14402442

Gardencity Rd, Pigott Dr, pigott Rd

104

14303522

9000 Blk of No 3 Rd

62

14401535

8000 Blk of Williams Rd

99

14302311

Lucas Rd, Minler Rd, Mirabel Crt

96


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review - Page 21

the richmond

HOME SERVICE GUIDE 24/7 HEATING & PLUMBING

CONCRETE SERVICE

• Water Heaters • Hot Water Tanks • Plumbing, Drainage, Gas Plumbing • Fireplaces & Conversion to Gas • Furnace, Boiler Repairs & Installation

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374

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PETS 477

Classified Ads mean more BUSINESS for you! 477

CANE CORSO mastiff, shots, dewormed, tails cropped, vet✓ $1,000. Call 604-826-7634. CATS GALORE, TLC has for adoption spayed & neutered adult cats. 604-309-5388 / 604-856-4866

PETS

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BERNESE Mountain Dog Puppies. 3 females vet chckd, 1st shots. $950. Langley.778-241-5504

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CATS OF ALL DESCRIPTION in need of caring homes! All cats are Spayed, neutered, vaccinated and dewormed. Visit us at fraservalleyhumanesociety.com or call 1 (604)820-2977

PET WEEK OF THE

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SPCA Thriftmart

5431 NO. 3 RD. 604-276-2254

HOUSES FOR SALE

RICHMOND

1 & 2 Bdrms Available Immediately Located in central Richmond, close to all amenities & Kwantlen College. Rent includes heat and hot water.Sorry no pets.

709 COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL

750

SUITES, LOWER

838

RECREATIONAL/SALE

RICHMOND Ironwood. Reno’d 2 bdrm gr/lvl ste, nr all amens, avail Apr1st, ns/np, $925 incl utils, cable, & net. 604-377-6665, 604-916-0462 RICHMOND, nr #2/Westminster. 1 Bdrm, sep entry. Immed. $750 incl utils. No w/d, np/ns. 604-319-7648 RICHMOND. Spacious, 1 bdrm, private, bsmt suite. 4 appls, storage, lndry, fenced yrd, parking. N/P. April 1. $775/mo. 604-833-2103

1997 20 ft. Slumber Queen Class C Motorhome. Chev chassis, fully equipt. Many Extras. $15000. Call 604-796-0230

Richmond Steveston Hwy. across from Ironwood Mall. 3 bdrms, 1.5 baths. Cozy & clean. Laundry rm. Nr all amenits. Avail May 1. N/S N/P. $1500 incl utils. 604-721-3022.

845

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

751

2 hour Service from call. Professional staff and Member with A+ rating. Visit us on-line at www.a1casper.

SUITES, UPPER

RICHMOND. No 5/Cambie. Nice lg 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath. Nr shops/ school. $1150. Avail imm. 604-277-4194

752

TOWNHOUSES

RICHMOND EXCEPTIONAL LEASE RATE Located in downtown Vancouver Yukon/2nd Ave. where average rates for retail are $33 per foot giving a gross mthly lease rate of $12375.00 but this 4500 sf shop in this very prime location across from ICBC is avail. for $7500/mo net lease cost. A smaller 2500 sf shop is also avail. for $3500/mo net. Ray 778-999-0581

715

QUEENSGATE GARDENS Conveniently Located Close to schools & public transportation. Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm townhouses. 6 Appl’s., balcony, 2 car garage, 2 full baths, gas f/p. 1 Year lease required. No Pets. Professionally Managed by Colliers International Call 604-841-2665

Autos • Trucks • Equipment Removal

TRANSPORTATION

FREE TOWING 7 days/wk. We pay Up To $500 CA$H Rick Goodchild 604.551.9022

810

MISC. FOR SALE

SCRAP BATTERIES WANTED We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 each. Free pickup anywhere in BC, Min. 10. Toll Free Call:1.877.334.2288

www.bcclassified.com

CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991.

745

#1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE REMOVAL ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT $$$ PAID FOR SOME 604.683.2200

AUTO FINANCING

Classifieds, look us over!

• Twins • Fulls • Queens • Kings 100’s in stock! www.Direct Liquidation.ca (604)294-2331

AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Minimum $150 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

RICHMOND, SXS duplex, newly reno’d, 3 bdrm+ den, lrg yrd, NS/NP, $1595 net. May 1. 604-304-0091

FURNITURE

ROOM & BOARD

The Scrapper

FURNISHED room in family home in Sidney. Close to town and bus routes. $500.00 per month. (778) 426-3433 or email: trumanhmason@gmail.com

Can’t Get Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1866-981-5991

Need A Vehicle! Guaranteed Auto Loan. Apply Now, 1.877.680.1231 www.UapplyUdrive.ca

748 SHARED ACCOMMODATION FEMALE owner looking for female roommate. Sep. rm/bath. $399. Nr amenits. N/S. N/P. 604-278-7851.

566 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557 PEARL DRUM SET, $1000, receipts for $1000 in upgrades, located in Hope. Call 1 (604)869-7329

SAWMILLS from only $3997 MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800566-6899 Ext:400OT.

TRANSPORTATION

RENTALS

TOP CA$H PAID TODAY For SCRAP VEHICLES! vehicles. Local family owned and operated business. BBB com or call (604)209-2026

Visit our website: www.aptrentals.net

MATTRESSES staring at $99

560

APARTMENT/CONDO

Call 604-830-4002 or 604-830-8246

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

615 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

PROUD TO SUPPORT THE LOCAL SPCA

626

STANDARD SCHNAUZER pups. 17 - 19” / 30 - 35lbs full grown. $500. each. 604-826-5846 Mission.

REAL ESTATE

TO ADOPT CALL 604-277-3100

706

CONCRETE CONDO in Central Rmd: 700 sqft, 1 bdrm, den & balcony; amenities (indoor pool, gym, sauna, club house) underground parking & storage; $1400/month. 604-339-3719.

NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND pups. Dewormed, 1st vaccination. Ready March 15 - 21st. 604-823-2259 mitzvig@hotmail.ca

548

RENTALS

615 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

NEED A GOOD HOME for a good dog or a good dog for a good home? We adopt dogs! Call 604856-3647 or www.856-dogs.com

PIANO; APT SIZE Lowrey upright piano $750. Ph: 604-418-6274 or 604-531-1576.

Buck is a sweet young boy who was brought in as a stray from Quesnel. He takes a little while to warm up to strangers, but once he does he turns into a rumbling purr-machine. He’s a vocal cat and loves to tell stories. Buck would do well in a home without small children, as he is an affectionate cat but on his own terms and lets you know when he’s had enough. This sweet boy is awaiting his loving and calm forever home, so please give him his second chance!

5400 MINORU BLVD • 604-276-2477

Cocker Spaniels: Proud parents of 8 pups, born Feb 2. 1st shots, dewormed, vet chkd, tails/dews done. Ready Apr 1. Purebred, no papers. $600. 604-888-0832 Eves

Plumbing • Electrical • Woodwork • Drywall • Bathrooms • Painting • Handyman • Textured Ceilings • FREE Quotes Door Repairs: Patio • Pocket • Bi-folds • Shower Insured / WCB and I’m a Nice Guy! Mike Favel • 604-341-2681

STEEL BUILDINGS FOR ALL USES! Spring Deals! Make an offer on sell-off models at factory and save thousands NOW! Call for FREE Brochure - 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170. STEEL OF A DEAL - BUILDING SALE! 20X24 $4798. 25X30 $5998. 30X42 $8458. 32X58 $12,960. 40X60 $15,915. 47X80 $20,645. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

On Time, As Promised, Service Guaranteed!

#1 AAA Rubbish Removal

•Backfilling/trenching •Ashphalt/concrete removal •Drainage •Retaining walls •Install concrete driveways/sidewalks

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

PETS

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POWER WASHING GUTTER CLEANING

Local Plumbers

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SSL ENTERPRISES INC

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COMMERCIAL ~ RESIDENTIAL

CONSTRUCTION • RENOVATIONS

PRESSURE WASHING

HEATING SYSTEM SERVICE SPECIAL

EXCAVATION

RENOVATIONS

341

• Plumbing Service & Repairs • Boilers & Furnaces • Gas Work

STEVESTON HOME SERVICES

5 MINUTE EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM PLUMBING SERVICES AT REASONABLE RATES CALL 604-270-6338

MIN. EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM Reasonable Rates 604-270-6338

PLUMBING & HEATING

New fence installation • Gates & repair Roofing repairs • Powerwashing • Odd jobs • Renos • Gutters etc. Painting interior & exterior

RJ’S PLUMBING & HOME SERVICE

RUBBISH REMOVAL

Andy 604-908-3596

778-895-0968 RMD

HANDYMAN

PLUMBING

356

A+ LAWN & GARDEN

We specialize in driveway, sidewalk, patio, foundation and retaining wall, all kinds of concrete jobs. We also do fencing jobs.

604-275-8464 or 778-869-6288

PLUMBING

LAWN SERVICE

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HIGH EFFICIENCY FURNACE – $2499 installed

338

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627

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES The OLDER. The DIRTIER. The BETTER. Flexible Terms. Quick Closing. Call us First! 604.657.9422

660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS

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Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley

SUITES, LOWER

2 bedroom renovated bsmt suite in metrotown area. Shared laundry/ half utilities $1200. References REQUIRED!! 604-910-4528 E. RICHMOND, Hamilton area nr all amens. 1 Bdrm bsmt ste. $750 incl utils. Now. NP/NS 604-368-5150 RICHMOND #5/Nr BridgePort. 2 bdr in new home. Full bth. Lndry. prkg. ns/np refs req. $1000 inc util. Apr1. 604-214-0231/604-780-3793. RICHMOND, close to Cambie & # 5. Bachelor suite. All amenits cls by. Priv. ent. $525/mo. + 15% utils. Avail. March 15. 604-649-9367.

FREE CASH BACK WITH $0 DOWN at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or Bad credit call Stephanie 1-877-792-0599 www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309. Free Delivery. WANT A VEHICLE BUT STRESSED ABOUT YOUR CREDIT? Christmas in March, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-5936095.

821 CARS - SPORTS & IMPORTS 2003 CHEVY MALIBU 110,000 km, auto, V6, AirCared, good tires, $4000 obo. Call: (604)531-3251

847 SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

2004 ACURA NDX black on black 2nd owner, loaded. Asking $15,500. 604-805-7773 2004 JEEP GRAND Cherokee Ltd. 4x4, auto, green, 126K, $7000 firm. Call 604-538-4883

851

TRUCKS & VANS

2001 GMC SIERRA 4x4, ext’d cab, auto, green, 135K, $8000 firm. Call: (604)538-9257

Get immediate RESULTS! www.bcclassified.com


Page 22 ¡ Richmond Review

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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 23

> Sport B.C.’s Athlete of the Year Awards at River Rock

Around Town Amanda Oye

Athlete’s feats Trading their uniforms in for suits, ties and fancy dresses, the best of British Columbia’s athletes came together and were honoured at Sport B.C.’s annual Athlete of the Year Awards, presented by Telus at the River Rock Show Theatre last Thursday. “It was a huge success,” said Carey Summerfelt, Sport B.C.’s sponsorship and event manager. “Most of the recipients were in attendance, which was fantastic,” she said. Altogether 500 people came out and enjoyed the opening reception, dinner and awards ceremony. The purpose of the evening was to “acknowledge our best athletes, coaches and officials across the province,” Summerfelt said. Along with celebrating the finalists and winners, the evening featured music by the Odds and a three-part sport montage. “We tried to incorporate more sport into the production [this year] … it was great, it was well received,” Summerfelt said. There were many memorable moments throughout the evening, but Kathy Newman receiving the Daryl Thompson Award was particularly special. “That was a pretty special moment for everyone in the crowd,” Summerfelt said. The evening of celebrating the best of B.C. sports followed an earlier celebration of 43 sports volunteers who were recognized at the 18th annual Presidents’ Awards. Amanda Oye covers the social scene. amanda.oye@telus.net.

Reece Callies, Georgia Ellenwood, who won the high school female athlete category and Braedon Dolfo, who was a finalist in the athlete with a disability category. Ariadne Holness de Hiller, who won a presidents’ award, and Oderay Holness.

Brian Pound, the chair of the Burnaby Sports Hall of Fame, Eric Stepura, the manager of sports and community events with the City of Richmond and Jim Lamond, chair of the Richmond Sports Council.

Deborah and Preston Tucker, who won the college athlete category. Olga Kotelko and Roxanne Davies.

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Page 24 · Richmond Review Wednesday, March 14, 2012


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page B1

T

he contributions of women to Richmond were saluted at The Richmond Review’s 19th annual Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards held at the Radission Hotel Vancouver Airport on Friday, March 9.

Winners were named in five categories, with Richmond East MLA Linda Reid winning in the community category, Denise Coutts in sports, Tiffany Kirk in business, Adrienne Moore in arts and Maggie Kong came away as winner in the youth category. Olive Bassett and Jennifer Larsen were acknowledged for their 100 years of combined volunteer work in the community with the Pioneer award and a standing ovation. The Ethels has raised more than $200,000 for local women’s charities, including primary beneficiary Nova House, a shelter for women and their children escaping domestic violence.


Page B2 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

ENTiRE STORE REDUCED

10,000 SPRING DESIGNER ITEMS DRESSES

REG. PRICE

HIPE PRICE

5 DAY PRICE

REG. PRICE

HIPE PRICE

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HIPE PRICE

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$120

COATS

$110

JACKETS

$100

BLAZERS

$100

PANTS

$80

CAPRI

$80

SHORTS

$80

SWEATER SET CARDIGANS BLOUSES

$80

$70 $70

PRINTED T’S WRAPS

$50

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FASHION T’S

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$49.99 $49.99 $39.99 $39.99

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$24.99 $24.99 $19.99 $19.99

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$8 $8 $7

$7

$6 $5 $5 $4 $4 $4 $3 $3 $2

SALE STARTS TODAY Weds. 9:30-9

Thurs. 9:30-9

Fri. 9:30-9

Sat. 9:30-6

Sun. 12-6

5441 NO. 3 ROAD 604-278-0048

ACROSS FROM LANSDOWNE MALL Selected styles

Ethels raises more than $18,000 Record number of ticket sales and nominees for 19th annual luncheon by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter More than 360 people showed their support for CHIMO’s Nova House and local women’s charities by attending last Friday’s 19th annual Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards. The luncheon at the Radisson Vancouver Airport Hotel saw 43 women acknowledged for their contributions to the community in five categories: sports, arts, youth, community and business. Richmond Review publisher Mary Kemmis, who was the master of ceremonies for the March 9 luncheon, credited the local community and Richmond busi-

Rob Newell photo Once Upon a Time star Raphael Sbarge helped sell raffle tickets.

nesses with once again showing their support for a worthy cause. “The Richmond Review is proud of our long history in our community which goes above and beyond just reporting the news. In our 80 years we believe we have become part of the social fabric of the community,” she said.

“We want to congratulate all the nominees and winners for making Richmond the wonderful place it is to live, work and play.” The Ethels, named in honour of Ethel Tibbits, who was the editor and publisher of The Richmond Review back in the 1930s, is held each year during Internation-

al Women’s Week. The bulk of the proceeds from the event support Nova House, a shelter for women and their children escaping domestic violence. Proceeds also support the Richmond Women’s Resource Centre and the Ethel Tibbits Scholarship Fund.

Brenda Bartley-Smith Diversity and versatility are at the core of much of what goes on at Richmond Fire-Rescue. As first responders, fire crews must be prepared to deal with a variety of potential challenges, from helping stabilize people injured in car accidents to executing high angle rescues in a burning building. And so firefighters must be light on their feet, and ready to react to various scenarios, with the proper equipment at hand to execute what needs to be done. In much the same way, accountant Brenda Bartley-Smith must have a well-rounded understanding of the inner workings at the multi-faceted fire department in order to properly allocate the funding resources. In her role as an accountant for the Law and Community Safety department at City Hall, she looks after budgets and cost control, with Richmond Fire-Rescue being among her responsibilities. “The work is very rewarding because I realize that it makes such a difference to the citizens and the community of Richmond,” says Bartley-Smith. Having been with the City of Richmond for the past 13 years, Bartley-Smith credits her success this way: “I work with the end result of safety for the citizens and the community in mind, which makes everything worthwhile.” Brenda Bartley-Smith, a nominee in the Community category at this Year’s Ethel Tibbits Awards, has served on Richmond Nature Park Society’s volunteer Board of Directors since 1995 and has been president of the board since 2001. During her time working with the society, Bartley-Smith, a CMA, has led the park through difficult financial times, while always promoting education and a love and respect of nature. Working as the public face of the society, Brenda has fostered a successful relationship between the Richmond Nature Park Society and the City of Richmond, leading to many successes including a new public art program, as well as an award-winning wildlife garden. Contributing thousands of hours of her own time, Brenda Bartley-Smith has been instrumental in shaping Richmond Nature Park’s success and growth.


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review 路 Page B3

Olive Bassett and Jennifer Larsen are Pioneer winners It was a doubly great ending to the 19th annual Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards on Friday afternoon, as Olive Bassett and Jennifer Larsen were acknowledged for their decades of volunteer work in the community with the Pioneer award and a standing ovation. A volunteer in Richmond since the 1970s, and a champion for those with mental health issues, Larsen earned high praise from her peers for her dedication and hard work. Bassett recalled how her first volunteer job was folding newspapers back in the 1930s for then Richmond Review publisher and editor Ethel Tibbits, after whom the Ethels are named. In a video produced

Coast Capital Savings congratulates all of the nominees and winners of the 19th Annual Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards.

Rob Newell photo Olive Bassett (left) and Jennifer Larsen won the Pioneer Award.

by RF Productions and cinematographer Desy Cheng, Eva BusichVeloso, co-ordinator of Seniors Services for the City of Richmond,

no term contracts

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Page B4 · Richmond Review

Imagine if this basket were full of groceries for a homebound senior. With your help, it could be.

Find out how:

Call 604-279-7020 or visit

www.volunteerrichmond.ca/HelpSeniors

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Joan Cowderoy, executive director of CHIMO, receives a bouquet of flowers from Review publisher and emcee Mary Kemmis. Cowderoy turned 65 the same day of the event and is retiring later this year. CHIMO operates Nova House, the main beneficiary of the Ethel Tibbits Awards.

This giant cookie from Broadmoor Bakery was auctioned off for $275.

Olive Bassett (right) is surprised to be named one of the Pioneer Award winners. Eva Busich-Veloso (left) was in on the secret.

Rob Newell photos Mayor Malcolm Brodie addressed the crowd. BEST BUY – Correction Notice Please be advised that we received incorrect stock of this product advertised on the March 9 flyer, page 1: Dell Laptop featuring 2nd Generation Intel® Core™ i3-2350M Processor (i15RN-2545BK) WebCode: 10192631. The correct laptop will now be available (approximately) by the week of March 19. Customers who would like an immediate alternative option can purchase the Dell i15RN-4118DBK Laptop (WebCode: 10186486) for the same price. However, please note that this substitute offer is only available in-store, with limited quantities, no rainchecks. Customers who prefer the originally advertised laptop can be issued a raincheck upon request only for the duration of the current flyer period (Mar 9-15). We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page B5

Lynda Terborg As a realtor, Lynda Terborg’s job is to assist in making family moves safe, successful and as stress free as possible. Whether her clients are moving up, downsizing, or making that all important first home purchase Lynda is with them every step of the way. Her extensive experience, coupled with partner Macey ter Borg’s commitment and their assistant Norma Chan’s tenacious attention to detail makes this an

Linda Reid wins Community Award First elected as an MLA in 1991, Linda Reid has spent much of the past two decades helping community members and groups achieve their goals. She became a language therapist, teacher and school administrator at the Richmond School District after graduating from University of B.C., and routinely goes above and beyond to help others. Also nominated for the Community Award were: • Ahlay Chin—mental health interpreter who has championed mental health advocacy since 1994 as founder of Chinese Mental Wellness Association of Canada. • Arlene Kroeker— former food columnist who bridged the gap between Richmond’s eateries and the larger community. • Bal Sahota—founder of Lasting M.A.G.I.C. which helps provide sup-

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award winning dynamic group. Real estate market conditions are never static and have changed weekly for the last 20 years. Lynda provides “finger on the pulse” innovative marketing to meet those challenges. Most importantly she works to minimize the risks and maximize the returns. She gives each and every client her all and treats them like family. She provides a full service which can include home staging, decluttering and giving suggestions for presenting homes most attractively. As a community minded person, Lynda loves giving back to the community and has been a long time sponsor of the Ethel Tibbits awards. She feels the passion all the nominees bring to their work... the mentoring and example they provide... makes living in Richmond a vibrant and caring community, we are proud to call HOME!

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nurse who continues to care for people as an active community volunteer. • Brenda BartleySmith—has served on Richmond Nature Park Society’s volunteer board of directors since 1995, and been instrumental in

shaping the park’s success and growth. • Clara Chow—has been helping new immigrants integrate into Canadian society since 2003 as a member of the Richmond Chinese Community Society. See Page B6

604-250-8676 – Lterborg@shaw.ca – www.LyndaTerborg.com

Congratulations

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Page B6 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

The Richmond Review’s Collin Neal lends a hand for the 50/50 draw. Rob Newell photo

Community nominees

Capt. Jim Tempest 15th Field Director Music Entertainment by The Band of the 15th Field Artiliery Regiment, RCA and The Pipes and Drums of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada

A Yellow Ribbon tribute to Canada’s service men and women n

Deanne Young-Ting Hosting a party or celebration can be a daunting task, and that’s where Deanne YoungTing and her Coppersmith Plaza store Urban Value come in. Featuring carefully selected hand-picked items, the boutique store is a one-stop shop for everyone’s gifting needs and party celebrations. From party supplies to stylish home decor to the latest fashion and travel accessories, bath and body products, baby feeding supplies, Urban Value has it all. For Deanne Young-Ting, meeting new customers and helping them with their needs is its own reward. “It brings a smile to my face to see how they enjoy the products we showcase in the store,” she said. She said she doesn’t just sell her store’s wares; she believes in them. “These are brands/products which I believe in as a consumer and you can actually find in my home. I am continuously learning from clients feedback to see which items they would like to see and find useful in their daily lives.”

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From Page B5 • Debbie Tobin—a dedicated elementary school teacher who is a leader in fundraising for artistic causes, she founded and serves as artistic director of Richmond’s Children’s Arts Festival. • Janet Betteridge— a Zumba instructor at local community centres who has attracted the attention and affection of students and staff, with her enthusiasm and dedication to fitness and health. • Lois Hourston— a communications specialist who exudes positive energy, and motivates those people she works with, helping them to forge community connections. • Louise Young—she began volunteering in 1977 and has been instrumental in raising funds for the construction of Richmond Caring Place. • Mary Nedelak—a volunteer with the Richmond Carefree Society for 40 years, she helps special needs children and has taken on other roles with the society, including treasurer and a member of the board of directors. • May Ho—has supported many charitable organizations through her business and has helped raise more than $300,000 for local charities. • Melissa Hance—a volunteer with Dreams Take Flight charity, she was the driving force behind last year’s effort to bring 125 sick and underprivileged kids on a day-trip to Disneyland. • Zoe Lee—taught nearly 375 students to knit at Tomekichi Homma, and introduced school’s fruit and vegetable nutritional program.


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page B7

Rob Newell photo Maggie Kong accepts her Ethel Tibbits Award for Youth as Richmond Review publisher Mary Kemmis looks on.

Maggie Kong wins Ethel Tibbits Youth Award An excellent student and leader who has a passion for volunteerism, Maggie Kong is the chair of Financial Literacy for Youth. An inspirational figure among her peers, she’s volunteered with many groups, including the Interact Club, Richmond Student Leadership Conference and Zenith in Action competition. “She is an avid volunteer, leader and a true role model for the youth of today,” wrote her nominator. The other nominees were: • Amy Li—an honour roll student who is involved in numerous extra-curricular activities at A.R. MacNeill Secondary School and has emerged as a leader. • Amy Tso—president and founder of the school’s World Vision club, she excels in the International Baccaelaureate program. • Andrea Banzon—a young performer, volunteer and community organizer who wears many hats, she was honoured as an outanding youth with a City of

Richmond UROC award. • April Houweling— maintains a 4.42 GPA while juggling school and athletics as an athlete at the Richmond Olympic Oval’s Volleyball Centre of Excellence program and last year took a summer mission trip to Guatemala. • Dayah Johal—an active volunteer and school leader, she’s noted for her constantly warm smile, and man-

ages to maintain a high academic standing while volunteering at Hugh McRoberts. • Dini van Eck—an active student volunteer, she’s dedicated to helping the underprivileged and currently serves as president for Hugh Boyd student council. • Jennifer Liu—she’s chair of A.R. MacNeill’s student council and has a passion for volunteerism, community service

and humanitarian causes. • Maria Mohan—an outstanding student who volunteered more than 400 hours over the past two years as a recreation leadership student • Rowyn Neufeld—a well-rounded student and athlete, she was the training leader and junior counsellor at summer camp for many years.

To be inspired is great. To INSPIRE is INCREDIBLE. Congratulations to this year’s Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Award Nominees & Recipients.

You make us all proud!

Proud Ethel Tibbits Award Nominee, Christen, invites you to come in and enjoy her shop with the ever changing selection of high-end items for the whole family. The children’s play area is always popular too so shopping is made easier!

Follow the star to

Located at the Intersection of No. 2 Rd. & Blundell Road #140-12420 No. 1 Road, Steveston 604-271-6415 • www.kidsupply.ca or visit us on facebook.


Page B8 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Working to make Richmond a better place to

LIVE

|

WORK

|

LEARN

|

PLAY

Tiffany Kirk wins Ethel Tibbits Business Award A student at the University of B.C. and an entrepreneur, Tiffany Kirk runs Four Shapes Training, which focuses on physical fitness for women. Formerly a competitive dancer, she gives presentations in local schools in which she shows young girls they can be any shape they want through regular fitness and healthy eating.

The Children’s Art Festival filled the Richmond Arts and Cultural Centre and Library last month with lots of fun and learning through art in all it’s many forms. Many thanks for the grant from the Al Kronier Endowment Fund held at the Richmond Community Foundation. Congratulations to the organizers, teachers and participants in this exciting event.

Visit us at richmondfoundation.org

Patricia Cruz I am the founder/owner of Always There For You Home and Health Care Services Inc. I am committed to the cause of home care in British Columbia and have worked for 20 years for seniors. My degree in psychology allows me to match each client’s needs and personality with the strengths of a specific caregiver, making certain that they are psychologically compatible and that the caregiver best suited to the client’s needs is the one chosen. Always There For You began in a basement suite with one nurse, two caregivers, two cleaners, and two handymen. Thirteen years later, we have grown to become one of the largest home care agencies in Richmond with 80 awesome workers all of them sharing the same core values and love for seniors. When a senior becomes an ATFY client, they are welcomed into the ATFY family. ATFY is devoted to improving the lives of our clients by providing support for their independence, growth, security, and well-being. We offer a holistic approach to home care, caring for the body, mind and spirit of our clients by providing them with a wide range of services, from companionship to cooking and cleaning to handyman services and now Moving, assisting our seniors to move from their homes to facilities as easy and safe as possible. We provide a lot of community information in our office on 2nd Avenue in Steveston. Free seminars are offered every month on different topics to help seniors and their children. Parenting your Parents seminar is offered the last Tuesday of every month. Facebook, ChairYoga class designed for our clients’ overwhelmed children. We have several regular yearly events as well. Every July 1st, seniors are given transportation by ATFY volunteers to watch the Steveston Parade and after the parade ends, we provide a free lunch for all seniors in the community. On October 1st, ATFY celebrates the International Seniors Day and all seniors in the community are invited to the “Happy 80s Party.” Besides these official ATFY events, many of our employees volunteer at the Senior Link events, such as the Pink Tulip Tea event in May, the Out Town trip, The BBQ and Xmas event. Senior Link Independent Living Society publishes a quarterly newsletter that helps numerous isolated seniors find resources in the community. Today Senior Link has well over 200 members and is engaged with the local senior community in numerous ways. ATFY still sponsors the newsletter and supports the organization in numerous other ways. ATFY also sponsors 12 orphans from various impoverished communities through the SOS Children charity. What are the future plans for ATFY? To continue working whole hardheartedly for the seniors in our community, and to help the Richmond workers make their dreams come true. What does all this bring to myself... the joy of going to bed every night feeling good in the knowledge that I am making a difference in people lives. Always There For You Home and Health Care Services Suite 100 12031 2nd Ave., Richmond, BC V7E3L6

604-271-4427 • www.atfy.ca

Rob Newell photo Tiffany Kirk, a student at UBC who runs her own physical fitness company Four Shapes Training, was selected in the business category.

Sister Cecilia Hudec Sister Cecilia Hudec of the Sisters of Charity of Halifax is based at Richmond’s St Joseph the Worker church. Helping and building awareness in the wider community where there is an obvious need, and looking further to uncover hidden requirements is at the heart of so much she has accomplished. The Richmond Poverty Response Committee, Extreme Weather Shelter at St Alban and Faith Communities Housing Committee are some local organizations she has assisted with her work. Sister Hudec has been working at the Extreme Weather Shelter for 3 years and is in her second year as Co-Chair with Victor Farmer. When weather is below 0 degrees, the 16 bed overnight shelter for homeless men and women opens at Richmond’s St Alban’s Anglican Church. A nourishing supper and breakfast are also served. Donations for this program from members of the community are needed and can be sent to: The Extreme Weather Shelter in care of St Alban’s Church. Formerly with the Faith Communities Housing Committee as chair for 5 years, Sister Hudec worked with the local RCMP to do the homeless count last year “while most of the homeless prefer to remain below the radar, we were able to find over 50 people without proper shelter living in Richmond. There is a need” said Sister Hudec “and we were able to bring this to the attention of our City officials.” At the Richmond Poverty Response Committee for the past 7 years, Sister Hudec is part of a group that always asks: “What is falling through the cracks? Children? Transportation? Food? Housing?” “The questions and their answers keep us on track to do the most good” she explained “acknowledging poverty and need is vital and trying to help is satisfying. Seeing the need, examining it honestly, looking deeply to uncover yet further need and then addressing it in a respectful way is what needs to happen” Not only individuals, but by extension families and ultimately the whole community benefit when fundamental needs are addressed. This profile of Sister Hudec is sponsored by Richmond’s Touchstone Family Association.

Touchstone 604 279-5599 www.touchstonefamily.ca

The other nominees were: • Christen Haines— a Steveston merchant with a generous mandate, she's the owner of kids clothing consignment store Kid Supply which helps many low-income local families. • Glenda Harrison— founder of Salon Diva, she's an exceptional hairsylist who volunteers talents to breast cancer and a variety of other causes. • Janice Triffon— a Jazzercise group fitness instructor, she has helped raise more than $55,000 for the Canadian Breast Cancer Founation, Heart and Stroke Foundation, SPCA and Richmond Food Bank. • Jody Copple—a Richmond realtor, she firmly believes in giving back, and has participated in fundraisers that have collected more than $30,000 for the B.C. Cancer Agency. • Kim Kendrick—as the owner of Nurse Next Door in Richmond, she has a passion for helping people, and now operates one of the fasted growing locations in the company's history • Mary Jensen— she opened her photography studio in Richmond in 1986 and is considered an excellent communicator and educator who has made signifcant contributions to her professional association.


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page B9

Brandy Cook

Adrienne Moore wins Ethel Tibbits Award for Arts A champion of the arts for decades, Adrienne Moore realized the power of the arts to inspire while teaching at a school in Ireland. While she retired from teaching in 1997, she developed an arts program for children with special needs. Nominees: • Dawn Ewen—an accomplished ballet performer and choreographer, she’s a teacher at the Gateway Theatre Academy for the performing arts. • Elsa Rojas-Marquez—a performer and promoter of Latin music, she helps fundraiser for non-profit groups and is known for her artistic flair and personality. • Tara Nakano—an

Rob Newell photo Adrienne Moore (left) receives her award from presenter Lynda Terborg.

advocate for the arts who has volunteered at arts festivals, tutored children and served as the volunteer videogra-

pher at gala events. • Ying Wang—the founder and artistic director of the Richmond International Film and

Media Arts Festival, she brought her vision to quickly grow the event from its grass roots origins.

Denise Coutts wins in Sports Despite having to deal with the daily struggle of life with ulcerative colitis, Denise Coutts hasn’t allowed that to slow her down. She’s a champion of sports, and is incredibly active in the volunteer community. She has served on a staggering number of sport committees including Basketball BC, Squash BC, Badminton BC and BC Disability Sports. Nominees: • Bev Oldham—an active volunteer in the sports community since 1970, she serves on the Richmond Curling Club’s board of directors. • Casey Rodusek— as referee in chief for Richmond Ravens Female Hockey Association for the past six years, she’s described as independent, trustworthy, local and a good role model. • Val Skelly— organized a world record attempt for the longest hockey game by rallying together 40 women and raised $200,000 for Cystic Fibrosis

For more than 25 years, the Richmond Centre for Disability (RCD) has teamed up with other like-minded progressive agencies in supporting people with disabilities participate in the community and improve their quality of life. Brandy Cook, due to a spinal cord injury 17 years ago, knows firsthand about the critical work the RCD does to empower Richmondites who have disabilities. “Since I was injured over 17 years ago, I have had amazing support from my family. Back when spinal cord injury was not really well known, or spoken of, they rallied around me and helped me make the transition into the community,” Cook said. Now a married mother of a two-year old boy, Cook lives in a home she’s always dreamed of. When Cook is ready to participate fully in her life and the community, RCD plays a crucial role in enabling her to create a better life for herself. The support she received from the centre helps her to form a bigger dream. “This is where the RCD is great; people can have that transition time and get the support they need when it is so crucial. They are about self determination, skills building and take control of your life. I am happy to be part of the team.” RCD works closely with the City of Richmond’s Community Services, and a number of people in the community who have a disability, to build an accessible, inclusive and resilient society.

Richmond Centre for Disability 604-232-2404 www.rcdrichmond.org

Jody Copple

Denise Coutts (centre) receives her award from Richmond Review publisher Mary Kemmis and editor Bhreandáin Clugston.

Lisa Oppenheim For a teacher, there’s nothing more special than watching a young student gain self confidence and grow in their abilities. Lisa Oppenheim opened StageCoach Theatre Arts School in Richmond in 2010, after first getting involved in 2006 as a drama teacher with the largest performing arts network of its kind in the world, boasting 600 schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland, with 20 more in Canada and the United States. “It is incredibly rewarding to watch the gradual transformation of our students over time—often into bold and caring young leaders,” she said. “They not only learn skills in the performing arts, but perhaps more importantly, they learn to tap into the wealth of their imaginations to tackle whatever challenges may come their way.” 4071 Francis Road, Inside St. Anne’s Anglican Church

604-537-3669

www.stagecoachschools.ca/richmond

Lisa Oppenheim, Principal

Jody is very honored to be among the 2012 Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Award nominees and would like to congratulate all fellow nominees and award winners. She is proud to be listed alongside such an extensive and diverse list of inspiring Richmond women who have all contributed greatly to making Richmond a true community and one of the best places to live in the lower mainland and in her opinion all of Canada. Originally from Montreal, Jody moved to Richmond 35 years ago to raise her family. Her career in real estate spans over 25 years and she is still very passionate about helping people from all walks of life find the perfect home, from first time home buyers, to families looking to up size, to empty nesters looking to simplify. Her approach is fact-based and client focused, which has sustained her 25 plus years in the business and in 2009 earned her the Macdonald Realty Realtor of the Year award. In her spare time Jody enjoys participating in the community by attending classes at the Steveston Community centre including being a long term participant in the Sun Run in-training program. She also believes that being part of a community involves giving back, whether it is time or money, Jody believes each and every one of us has something to offer. Since its inception 8 years ago, Jody has participated in the 60k Weekend Walk to End Breast Cancer and with great support from the community, raised close to $50,000. 2011 was the last year for the walk in Vancouver and Jody hopes to continue her fundraising for this very worthwhile cause by doing the 60K walk in Montreal this summer. In addition, Jody has been involved with the Richmond-Vancouver Walk for ALS from 2009-2011 and is now putting her volunteer efforts into helping the senior community in Richmond.

MACDONALD REALTY WESTMAR 604.818.7957 www.jodycopple.com jody@macrealty.com


Page B10 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Remembering Ethel Tibbits Namesake of awards knew how to ‘get people riled up’

Ethel Tibbits joined The Richmond Review in 1932.

Brenda Brumwell Brenda J. Brumwell spends her days bringing her patients back to the audible world. Brumwell, a Registered Hearing Instrument Practitioner, manages Expert Hearing Solutions on No. 2 Road in Richmond, in business since 2008. There, Brenda performs hearing tests, prescribes hearing aids and counsels patients through hearing loss and prevention. This isn’t Brenda’s first career in the medical profession; she is a former chiropractor who has the experience, listening skills and patience to provide a deeper understanding of hearing loss and its care. The aspect she enjoys most about her practice is the “ability to watch the dramatic effects of aided hearing on patients and their families”. She also enjoys the rich life stories many of her patients share with her, feeling they can truly be heard. Brenda J. Brumwell, DC HIP Registered Hearing Instrument Practitioner 164 - 8180 No. 2 Road 604-271-4327 www.experthearingsolutions.com

Congratulations to the nominees of this year’s Ethel Tibbits Awards.

YOU ARE ALL WINNERS!

Anne Piché & Helen Pettipiece Sutton Group – Seafair Realty

Newspaper editors don’t get remembered for writing editorials such as “government did the right thing in cutting taxes.” In the long run, it’s editors who showed an incredible amount of courage in fighting against injustices, sometimes even those supported by a majority of public opinion, that are remembered. While Ethel Tibbits has been memorialized as the namesake of Richmond’s women of distinction awards, she will be always remembered for far more than that. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii in 1941, the Canadian government ordered the internment of Canadians of Japanese descent. Many Japanese-Canadians, including those who had fought for Canada in the First World War, were forcibly removed from Steveston to internment camps in the B.C. Interior. “In this demand are they really considering public safety, or are they merely seizing upon this situation as an opportunity to oust from their midst a people whose presence they have long resented? Is their cry of patriotism or of prejudice?” Before joining The Richmond Review, Tibbits (nee Burnett) had worked as a reporter for The Province, and came out to Richmond and married Orland Delos Tibbits on Dec. 25, 1926. “On Christmas Day, Mr. Tibbits carried her down to the church on Blundell just east of their house; they were married and then he carried her home again,” recalled Connie (Gibbard) Ezart in a 1982 letter to The Richmond Review. In 1932, she started working at the new paper, then owned by W.R. Carruthers. Within the year, she purchased the paper and continued to write most of the content that went into it. This is how Ethel Tibbits introduced herself to readers when the paper expanded to become The Marpole-Richmond Review on June 22, 1934: “The editor and owner—we have to apologize for being a woman. Yes, we know the position would carry more weight if filled by a man, but it so happens we cannot qualify on that ground and you will have to take us as we are. No, we are not fair, fat and forty—we are long skinny and forty-five....

“Our politics? We fear we are decidedly C.C.F. (the forerunner of the NDP)—until you can show us something better. Our policy is a ceaseless endeavour for something better in government than that which we now have now; and that job is plenty big enough to have any editorial staff on its toes for the next few years.” Her husband worked as circulation manager, and they ran the business at her husband’s store, Blundell Grocery, located at the corner of Railway and Blundell. “She was an active woman,” Meda Alcock, who lived kitty corner to the Tibbits, told The Richmond Review in 2002. Next to the store was a barn, chicken house and the house where the Tibbits lived. Tibbits was often seen in her favourite outfit: shirt, overalls and a hat. “She was a newspaperwoman from the get-go,” Alcock said. “She knew this island from the word go.” Tibbits distinguished herself as an editor to be reckoned with from her first day at the paper. The economist John Maynard Keynes once wrote that “words ought to be a little wild for they are the assaults of thought on the unthinking,” and Tibbits took Keynes’ words to heart, writing hardhitting, intelligent and incisive editorials week after week. It was the darkest days of the Depression, and her writings explored the daunting issues of the day. She criticized the big banks, who boasted of profits while many citizens struggled to get by. She offered insightful analysis of global trends, such as the mechanization of the workplace, and the resulting losses of labour-related jobs. And she expressed her doubts, in a 1933 editorial titled “European War-Pot Bubbling Again,” that England would be able to stay out of it. “It is questionable if her neighbours are to mix again in a hairpulling contest, if she can keep aloof,” she wrote. But her greatest achievement was a series of editorials she wrote in early 1942, criticizing proposals to intern B.C.’s JapaneseCanadian residents. “I remember her being with my parents and discussing this,” said Harold Steves, whose parents protested the internment. Her editorials were conversational in tone, but her arguments and analysis were clearly thought out. She was frustrated by the status quo and, like many of her day, expressed fatigue with the “old parties,” the Conservatives and Liberals. “Their system has outlived itself,” she wrote. With the birth of the CCF in the early 1930s, she was skeptical at first, but eventually embraced the new party’s (later the NDP) philosophy whole-heartedly, eventually devoting many of her editorials to the fledgling party.

When a letter writer criticized the CCF for trying to get their hands on people’s money, she wrote: “Somebody, we agree, has had his hand in the pockets of Canadians for some time now. The farmers money, for example...the Canadian workers...” Tibbits was also an active part of the Richmond community and helped establish the Richmond Christmas Fund. Christine (Teeney) McKinney remembers Tibbits’ editorials and the response they provoked in her family. “My dad used to get so mad at her he wouldn’t buy her paper,” McKinney told The Richmond Review in 2002. “But he’d take it out of somebody else’s mailbox.” Tibbits’ hair was often messed up, sticking straight up, and she had a reputation for being a “bit queer sometimes,” McKinney said. Many didn’t like her, she said, but McKinney wasn’t one of them. “She was a great old girl. I liked her a lot. She’d get people riled up.” “Ethel was a taller than average woman, slim and a little gangly looking,” recalled John E. Bouchard, who was one of the neighbourhood kids who used to pass by the Tibbits’ store. “Her voice was deep for a female and rather monotone. She was often asked to sing at gatherings and sang in a contralto voice. ‘I Love You Truly’ was a favourite at weddings. “She was a serious person that did not outwardly show a lot of affection but she did take every opportunity, where she could, to offer a helping hand. She was a socialist and a feminist.” Tibbits was born in Walters Falls, Ont., but was taken West as an infant and given her early education in the rural school of Pomeroy, Manitoba, and later her parents came out to Nanton, Alberta. Tibbits stayed at The Richmond Review until 1948, and in 1953 her book, titled On to the Sunset: The Lifetime Adventures of a Spirited Pioneer, was published. The book is her recollection of her father’s life and his journey following the path of the Canadian frontier as it spread west in the 1800s. The book was later reprinted by Fifth House Publishers. Although Tibbits received a letter in 1957 from Ryerson Press, her first publisher, to write another book, it appears she never did. Her husband died in 1946 and, in 1956, she married John Woolstone, a violinist and music teacher. The Woolstones used to travel to hospitals to entertain the sick. They moved to a home on McCallan Road. She died in 1960, and had no children. “I think the paper was her world,” said Alcock, who worked at the paper for three years under Tibbits. “There’s no two ways about that. She had the store... she didn’t care a hoot about it.”


Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page B11

Hon. Linda Reid, MLA

Linda Reid has been the MLA in Richmond East since 1991. She is currently the Deputy Speaker of the Legislative Assembly.

Rob Newell photo Parveneh Farajollahi receives a scholarship from Richmond Community Foundation’s Sylvia Gwozd.

“It is about the girls and women in our lives. My heartfelt congratulations to all the Ethel Tibbits recipients and nominees.”

Ethels scholarship winner announced Parveneh Farajollahi is the recipient of the 2012 Ethel Tibbits Scholarship, which will help her to enrol in courses as she pursues work in the customer service field. Farajollahi came to Canada from Iran in 2006, and has volunteered more than 300 hours for the Rich-

mond Women's Resource Centre where she has forged friendships and become part of the family. She says the scholarship will help make her dream of being financially and economically independent possible. The Ethel Tibbits endowment fund, established by The Rich-

mond Review through the Richmond Community Foundation, provides scholarships to women in support of life transitions. The scholarship is designed to assist women who require support due to family commitments, to upgrade their education and/or job skills.

Constituency Office 130-8040 Garden City Road. Richmond BC, V6Y 2N9 Phone: 604.775.0891 Fax: 604.775.0999 E-mail: www.linda.reid.mla@leg.bc.ca Facebook: www.facebook.com/lindareidmla www.twitter.com/MLAREID

Photo courtesy of ‘I Do’ Wedding Photography

Denise Halfyard When a person does something they truly love, it’s evident in the quality of their work. So it should be no surprise that Denise Halfyard feels fortunate to have made a career from something she’s so passionate about. An accomplished floral designer, event decorator and a First Nations business owner, Halfyard founded Halfyard Designs, a Richmond-based business which specializes in weddings, galas and other special events, including the Ethel Tibbits Women of Distinction Awards for the past two years. Halfyard is fluent in her craft: “Whatever you can imagine, we can create.” For the past four years, Halfyard has provided complimentary consultations by appointment only. She doesn’t believe in offering packages, as she’s not a fan of the cookie-cutter approach to design. In addition to custom floral, Halfyard Designs can take care of everything from delivery and set-up to decor removal so her clients are free to enjoy the event itself. “I do what makes me happy. I think if you are happy in what you do for a living, you will be successful,” said Halfyard, who was acknowledged with an Outstanding Achievement Award at the B.C. Aboriginal Business awards this year.

HALFYARD DESIGNS

604.812.3925 www.halfyarddesigns.com


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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Women in the RCMP IN 1974, 32 WOMEN MADE MOUNTIE HISTORY WHEN THEY WERE HIRED AS THE FIRST-EVER FEMALE RCMP CONSTABLES.

The RCMP recruits people from all walks of life. In fact, there’s never been a better time to apply. Due to retirements, the addition of new units such as the Emergency Response Team, and the addition of new detachments in growing The “Troop 17” women wore the traditional red communities, the demand for officers has increased. They plan to train hundreds of cadets serge with a skirt, high heels and a hand clutch as they kissed the bible and signed their names. each year. In previous years, 24% of new recruits have been women. A presiding officer welcomed them to the force Who are they looking for? People driven and wished them good luck. by core values – honesty, integrity, compassion, Since then, women have made considerable respect, accountability, and common sense. progress. In1981, the first female was Of those who apply and write the aptitude test, promoted to corporal and the first female 1 out of 8 successfully moves along to Depot served in the Musical Ride. The first female for 24 weeks of training. Physical fitness is served in a foreign post in 1987 and three an important aspect, deemed necessary to years later, the first female was appointed cope with the long hours and shift work and, detachment commander. In quick succession, while the work is demanding, it’s more about the first female officers were commissioned, fitness than muscles. Various backgrounds appointed Assistant Commissioner, Deputy and vocations are an asset, especially when Commissioner, and in 2006, Beverley Busson was appointed the first female Commissioner of considering the role of an undercover operator. A career with the RCMP offers many the RCMP. Commissioner Busson was one of avenues. A person can reinvent themselves the 32 women in “Troop 17”. several times over during their career with With over 130 years of tradition and opportunities ranging from general duty to service, the RCMP is Canada’s national police forensic services, VIP/Diplomatic Protection service and they recognize the significant to Drug Investigation, Aboriginal policing to contributions women have made to them over Economic crime. The job possibilities for the years, serving as wives, public servants, regular, civilian, or public service members civilian members and as regular members. are numerous and for those women who want Today, of the total 26,921 force members in all a challenging and exciting career, making a categories of the RCMP, 36.5% are female. In difference in their community, there’s no better Richmond, 55 women represent the total of 217 time than now to apply. officers, showing 25% of total strength. They For more information, visit the website also represent a cross section of ethnic groups at www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca and click on and a variety of rank levels, with four sergeants, career/recruiting. five corporals, and 46 constables.

Richmond RCMP Safe Homes, Safe Communities Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Gendarmerie royale du Canada

www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca


Although a relatively new sport, it has recently been short listed for inclusion in the Olympic Games!

Sport Climbing competitions are held on artificial structures around the world. From fun, recreational, local comps to the World Cup, sport climbing events welcome participants of all abilities and experience levels.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

COMPETITIONS

skills without the fear of injury, it is the perfect place for beginners.

tIt can be a good starting point for those who are new in the Climbing world. Practicing certain moves and developing their

tSport Climbing culture promotes inclusiveness, community and lifelong participation.

Sport Climbing is a real metaphor for life’s obstacles which will help improve self-esteem, self-reliance and provides opportunities to acquire some of the 40 developmental assets that are critical to successful, happy adulthood.

tYouth Participants can develop physical literacy in the areas of balance, co-ordination and spatial awareness.

It is a great addition to any fitness routine.

tSport Climbing is low impact, uses body weight as resistance and requires use of many core and stabilizing muscles.

tIt provides a full-body workout, developing the climber’s strength, stamina, and flexibility in every climb.

with other forms of climbing where the anchors must be placed while climbing.

tIt is one of the safest styles of Climbing. Sport routes are equipped with fixed anchor points, reducing the fear associated

Participation in Sport Climbing Worldwide is on the rise. Here are some reasons why more and more people are getting into sport climbing:

It is a style of climbing where form, technical (or gymnastic) ability and strength are more emphasized over exploration, self-reliance and the exhilaration of the inherent dangers involved in the sport.

WHAT IS SPORT CLIMBING?

The Oval’s new climbing wall is set for Opening Day on March 24. Climbing on the wall is included with your membership. If you are new to climbing, we recommend taking one of our Learn to Climb Courses that will prepare you to safely and confidently experience the thrill of sport climbing.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

SPORT CLIMBING IS AT THE RICHMOND OLYMPIC OVAL

Pre-register at richmondoval.ca/register to reserve your 30-minute session.

Are you curious about climbing and want to try it for the first time? Leave the rope handling to our trained staff and just climb! Exclusive sneak peeks are March 20, 21 and 23 from 5:00-9:00pm for members ages 5 and up.

MARCH 20, 21 AND 23 5:00PM – 9:00PM

MEMBER’S ONLY SNEAK PEEK

Pre-register at richmondoval.ca/register to reserve your 30-minute session.

Calling all youth ages 5-18! The Oval is offering you the opportunity to try rock climbing for free! Leave the rope handling to our trained staff and just climb!

MARCH 20, 21, AND 23 1:00PM – 3:00PM

YOUTH TIE AND TRY

We recommend taking transit or walking as parking will be limited.

3. On-sight Climbing Draws - Complete a climb without falling or resting on the rope. You receive one entry for each route you “On-Sight”. Draw prizes every hour.

2. Enter to be one of the first people to climb the Oval’s new climbing wall. One person will be selected to climb a route, plant a Canadian flag at the top of the route, and name that route. This contest is open to persons 14 years of age and older. The event is sponsored by the Richmond Review. Visit www.richmondreview.com to enter.

1. Free Climbing — Pre-register at www.richmondoval.ca/register to reserve your 60 minutes on the wall. Navigate the menu to Opening Day Climb. Belay checks will be mandatory. Minors 5-18 yrs of age are required to have a parent or guardian sign a waiver before climbing.

OPENING DAY FOR THE PUBLIC FEATURES FREE CLIMBING AND CONTESTS.

OPENING DAY MARCH 24. 10 – 4PM.

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WHAT ARE THE FEATURES OF THE OVAL’S NEW SPORT CLIMBING WALL? The Oval’s sport climbing wall features two wall sections that converge into a breathtaking corner spine that reaches 45 feet up towards the Oval’s expansive rooflines. The spine is sure to challenge top level climbers. The 6400 square foot structure also integrates some bouldering and state of the art Rocktopia© simulated granite rock features. The wall offers a European inspired, world class indoor climbing experience for new and seasoned climbers in the Oval Community.

A full range of instructional, day camps, birthday party, group and corporate team building programs are available.

HOW MUCH WILL IT COST TO CLIMB?

WHEN IS THE WALL OPEN FOR DROP-IN USE?

WHAT ELSE CAN I DO AT THE OVAL?

Access to the climbing wall is included with your Oval membership, monthly memberships, drop in or 10 visit passes. Equipment rental and instructional programs are extra. All users must complete a belay or lead check before climbing.

Check richmondoval.ca for drop-in schedule.

Your Oval membership or drop-in fee entitles you to a wide range of activities and amenities at the Oval. The fitness mezzanine, track, court and ice zones are at your disposal as schedules and availability permit. Speak to a Customer Service Representative for details.

Sponsored by

As the climbing wall is located within the track zone, certain events demand that we close the wall for safety reasons. Notices will be emailed to all registered climbers in advance to avoid inconvenience.

REGISTER TODAY!

778.296.1400 richmondoval.ca/register

Secure lockers are available in the change rooms on the main floor. There is no charge for locker use.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

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March 14, 2012 Richmond Review