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THE ADVOCATE The Official Quarterly Newsletter of SAPR Rhode Island

Welcome Aboard...TOGETHER we CAN end sexual violence

SUMMER 2011

RHODE ISLAND SAPR PROGRAM

COL Habershaw (J-1) CMSgt Lori. Ashness Ms. Olushola. Adebuga Maj Lynne. Hannon LtCol Bruce Fletcher SFC Amy Slater

In This Issue

National Guard

3

Sexual Assault Prevention & Response

How to protect

3

an incident from happening to you Resources Listing

3

ADVOCATE

4

Contest

Commanders

4

Corner

Sexual Assault

Volume 1, Issue 1

5

101/Bill of Rights

Life lessons Cafe

6

Amazing People

7

VA Listing

8

Welcome to the premiere issue of the Rhode Island Sexual Assault Prevention Response program’s newsletter, THE ADVOCATE. Sexual Assault is a serious issue affecting us and according to the Chief, National Guard Bureau during April’s Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), "DON'T Let Your Guard Down."One sexual assault affects not only the individual, but the entire National Guard Family by destroying our senses of trust in our Soldiers and Airmen. Leadership at all levels must remain diligent when it comes to this crime." Sexual assault continues to be the most underreported violent crime in our society. Your support underscores our goal to eventually eradicate this crime from our ranks. ―Hurts One. Affects All...Preventing sexual assault is everyone’s duty‖. An incident of sexual assault can reverberate throughout a unit and beyond, degrading mission readiness by harming the life of one of our own, and the military's ability to work effectively as a team.

Our mission not only involves national defense, but the protection and safety of our citizen soldiers who voluntarily risk their lives for our country. I encourage all RING members to participate in prevention activities and renew your pledge to fight against sexual assault. I am the Ocean State’s National Guard Sexual Assault Prevention Response Coordinator (SARC) and Ms. Shola Adebuga is the alternate. Our ongoing sexual assault awareness training and command support will help reduce obstacles to reporting sexual assaults and reinforced a climate of confidence that has encouraged victims to seek help. We are available to provide assistance and training requirements to commanders, as well as oversee victim care. At any time, any member or their family can call us at (401)4806028 for information or to report an assault. We look forward to working with you all. Cheers to everyone stepping up to become advocates for a sexual assault/violence FREE Community! CMSgt Lori Ashness Sexual Assault Prevention Response Coordinator

Lori.ashness@us.army.mil

.CLICK

.CALL

.TEXT

CLICK: www.safeHelpline.org allows users to receive live, one-on-one confidential help with a trained professional through a secure instant-messaging format. The website also provides vital information about recovering from and reporting sexual assault. CALL: Call the hotline (877-995-5247) to speak with trained SafeHelpline staff for personalized advice and support. SafeHelpline staff can also transfer callers to installation -based SARCs, civilian rape crisis centers or the Suicide Prevention Lifeline. TEXT: Text your location to 55-247 in the U.S and 202-470-5546 outside the U.S to receive automated contact info for the SARC at installations


JOINT FORCE HEADQUARTERS SEXUAL ASSAULT RESPONSE COORDINATOR 1051 North Main Street Providence, RI 02904 Phone: (401) 275-4340 (401)275-4315 Cell (401) 480-6028 24/7 Hotline (877) 995-5247 Email Email: lori.ashness@us.army.mil

olushola.o.adebuga@us.army.mil

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THE ADVOCATE

New JFHQ/SARC Alternate Shola Adebuga is the new RI SARC alternate. She is the founder of No More Pain Initiative (NMPI), an organization established to raise awareness on domestic abuse and sexual violence . She is gearing up to launch the premiere advocacy magazine called XCEPTIONAL WOMAN Monthly...a global voice against domestic violence. Since 2006, her areas of non-profit focus have included development, facilitation and evaluation of services for women & children here and abroad. She is thrilled to be joining the SAPR Program to grow and expand even further, particularly in the areas of prevention and Soldier/ Airman services. Shola Adebuga feels blessed to have the opportunity to serve her military family and to be blessed to be part of such a wonderful organization. She is a member of 1/126th Aviation Bn. Her passion for SAPR’s mission is evident, and we are extremely excited to have her on board.

The Advocate is brought to you quarterly by the Rhode Island Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program. Editor is Ms. Shola Adebuga– RI JFHQ/SARC Alternate. To contribute articles, announcements, please email the information to Olushola.o.adebuga@us.army.mil


GET HELP GET INFORMED GET INVOLVED Knowing your resources can empower you against violent crime and help you know what to do if it happens to you or someone you know. JFHQ Sexual Assault Response Coordinator 1051 N. Main Street Providence, RI 02904 TEL: 401-275-4340 Cell: 401-480-6028 DSN: 247-4340 FAX: 401-275-4323 JFHQ Alternate Sexual Assault Response Coordinator 1051 N. Main Street Providence, RI 02904 TEL: 401-275-4315 FAX: 401-275-4323 Safe Helpline TEL: (877) 995-5247 http://www.SafeHelpline.org Day One 100 Medway Street Providence, RI 02906-4402 Tel: 401-421-4100 Fax: 401-454-5565 www. DayOneRI.org Rhode Island Coalition against Domestic Violence 422 Post Road, Suite 102, Warwick, RI 02888-1524 TEL: 401.467.9940 FAX: 401.467.9943 www.ricadv.org National RAINN TEL:1800-656-HOPE (4673) www.rainn.org

THE ADVOCATE

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FRANK TALK : National Guard Sexual Assault Prevention & Response The National Guard Sexual Assault Prevention & Response Program is part of a Department of Defense-wide initiative to end sexual assault in the military and encourage Service members to protect and defend one another against unwanted sexual contact. Through preventative education, civilian partnerships, bystander intervention, and victim advocacy, SAPR empowers Service members to report incidents they’ve experienced, and recognize when they or someone they know may be in a dangerous situation. Most sexual assaults occur

DO YOU KNOW THAT…..

40% said it happened at their military or civilian work

4% indicated the unwanted sexual contact occurred in their home/ living quarters, 16% indicated it occurred in the home/living quarters of someone else, and 41% indicated it occurred at some other location

between people who know each other – friends, acquaintances, and even co-workers. Being on your guard depends on understanding the common factors of sexual assault, and recognizing that the person you associate with in your unit may present a greater threat than a stranger lurking in the alleyway.

may help determine risk factors that increase the likelihood of sexual assault (Defense Manpower Data Center, 2008, pg. 7): Note: Results from males are not reportable due to small numbers or unstable estimates – but given men’s common reluctance to report being victims of sexual as-

sault, these factors may still apply.

The “One Situation” In a 2008 survey on sexual assault in the Reserve components, female respondents who were victims of unwanted sexual contact revealed information about the ―one situation that affected them most‖ - information that

°

68% said it happened at a military installation

33% said it happened while activated, and 24% said it happened during deployment

49% said the alleged subject used force and/or threats to make them consent, and 28% indicated the alleged subject their authority improperly to coerce them to consent

34% indicated the alleged subject sexually harassed them before the incident, 2% indicated the alleged subject stalked them before the incident, and 22% indicated the alleged subject both sexually harassed and stalked them before the incident.

Many victims may never come forward to report what happened to them, but help is available even if the assault occurred a long time ago.

An astonishing 96% of respondents indicated their alleged subjects were part of the military community, including Service Members who used their higher rank or position to intimidate victims to consent to the unwanted sexual contact

How you can prevent an incident from happening to you?


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Volume 1, Issue 1

How you can prevent an incident from happening to you? Continuation from pg 3 1.

2.

3.

4.

Avoid alcohol and drugs, as they can impair your judgment and make sexual assault easier for an offender. Have your wingman/battle buddy nearby, and plan to arrive and leave with that person. Trust your gut - if you think it’s an unsafe situation, it probably is! Clearly communicate your desires/limits and don’t be afraid to assert yourself!

5.

Have an emergency contact you can call if you’re in a dangerous situation.

NEXT FRANK TALK’S TOPIC:

REPORTING AN INCIDENT Whether or not you’re not sure your experience qualifies as sexual assault, This information is for you. > Types of Reporting: > Your Sexual Assault Support Team:

… and much more!

THE ADVOCATE CONTEST Essay Contest

What are you doing to help end sexual violence? Write in not less than 300 words explaining what you are doing to help end sexual violence while making the world a better place for all. Send your entries to: SAPR Office 1051 N. Main Street Providence, RI 02904

For a chance to grace the cover of ―The Advocate‖ and receive a special certificate. Entries must be postmarked by August 5th, 2011. 

Winners names will be published in the next issue of ―The Advocate‖

COMMANDERS CORNER Air National Guard: Is Bystander Intervention Training on your FY11/FY12 calendar? Bystanders Intervention Training (BIT) will be provided as a ONE-TIME training event that must be completed between January 2011 and 30 June 2012. LtCol. Bruce Fletcher & MSgt Mayda George are now BIT trained and will be scheduling and conducting trainings for the RIANG. Contact them for more information.

Army National Guard : Has your unit had your mandatory annual Sexual Assault Prevention & Response (SAPR) training for FY11? If not, please contact the JFHQ/SARC at 401-2754340/480-6028 or email lori.ashness@us.army.mil. SHARP Update SHARP is currently not a part of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program. NGB is still tracking annual SAPR training for all states. Annual SAPR training will continue to be conducted by unit Victim Advocates and we are striving to have 100% trained by 30 September 2011. If you have not conducted your Annual SAPR training and would like to schedule it, please contact the JFHQ/ SARC or talk to your unit’s Victim Advocate. NGB Training in RI NGB Initial Victim Advocate (VA) Certification Training will be held right here in RI from 22—26 August 2011. ARNG M-day and Technicians can use SAPR funding to attend the course. ANG personnel should work through Maj Lynne Hannon for funding for all Air VA’s. Do you have a VA in your unit? If not, this is a prime opportunity to have a trained and certified VA who can be accessible for your Soldiers and Airman as well as conduct annual training for your units. Registration and enrollment can be accomplished up to 12 August 2011. Only 50 seats will be allowed and this course will be open to all states across the U.S. It is on a first-come, first-served basis. Army—AR600-20—Commanders will appoint on orders two UVAs per battalion level and equivalent units. Commanders will select qualified officers (CW2/1LT or higher), NCOs (SSG or higher), or DA civilian (GS–9 or higher). Air—Will be interviewed by Maj Lynne Hannon. Background check and letter of appointment must be accomplished prior to attendance. LOI will be out shortly and sent to all Commanders.


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THE ADVOCATE

ONE- ON-ONE : SEXUAL ASSAULT 101 What Constitutes Sexual Assault Sexual assault is a crime. It is defined as intentional sexual contact, characterized by use of force, physical threat or abuse of authority or when the victim does not or cannot consent. Sexual assault includes:

 

Our Strength is for

Defending: Readiness=Respect Take an active role in looking out for the welfare of friends and coworkers. Be ready and act in situations where people may be in jeopardy.

Rape Nonconsensual sodomy (oral or anal sex)  Indecent assault (unwanted, inappropriate sexual contact or fondling) or attempts to commit these acts. Sexual assault can occur without regard to gender or spousal relationship or age of victim. Absence of Consent

cion or when the victim is asleep, incapacitated (due to drugs, alcohol, or other foreign substances) or unconscious. Other sex-related offenses are defined as all other sexual acts or acts in violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) that do not meet the above definition of sexual assault, or the definition of sexual harassment as in DoD Directive 1350.2, Department of Defense Military Equal Opportunity. Examples of other sex-related offenses could include indecent acts with another Service member and adultery. For the specific articles of sexual assault offenses under the UCMJ, see the Manual for Courts-Martial:

DoD law enforcement and legal personnel directly engaged in the detection, investigation or prosecution of crimes are responsible for ensuring that victims of military-related crime are accorded the following rights: 

Be treated with fairness and respect for the victim's dignity and privacy.

Be reasonably protected from the accused offender.

Be notified of court proceedings

Be present at all public court proceedings related to the offense, unless the court determines that testimony by the victim would be materially affected if the victim heard other testimony at trial.

Confer with the attorney for the government in the case.

Receive available restitution.

Sexual assault occurs when  Article 120, consent is not given for sexual contact. Lack of consent  Article 125 can be assumed regardless of whether a victim resists  Article 134, physically. Consent is also To be continued in the next not given when a person uses edition!!! force, threat of force, coer-

SHOUTOUTS 

BILL OF RIGHTS

Birthdays * Promotions * Births * Weddings *Graduations * Deployments * Welcome Home * Retirements * Memorials * You name it!

☼ HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Shola Adebuga! Every June 19th is YOUR day.

☼ Happy birthday to SGT Timothy M. Ruel and Ms. Faith LaMunyan of the RI National Guard Family Assistance Center  ☼ Congratulations to the graduating class of 2011 across the state! Wishing you success in your future endeavors! ☼ Congratulations to MG Bray and Donna Bray on your retirement. We wish you health and happiness. ☼ Congratulation to MG McBride on his selection as the RING Adjutant General. ☼ Happy 236TH ANNIVERSARY of the founding of the U.S Army!

Be provided information about the conviction, sentencing, imprisonment and release of the offender.

☼ A Big Congratulations to Staff Sgt. Jersouk Touy-Myers of 972 Military Police Company, Mass National Guard on the Federal Asian Pacific American Counsel Award. We are PROUD of you!

Source: http://myduty.mil/


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THE ADVOCATE

LIFE LESSONS CAFÉ: Positive decisions ammo amid mental battlefield

Sexual assault prevention is part of YOUR duty, learn how YOU can prevent it from happening. Here are ways YOU CAN prevent it…

ASK If Your Friend Need Help

ACT When They Do

INTERVENE When You See Trouble

Many years ago I remember seeing a beautiful, blue-eyed young lady that caught my attention. I was fortunate because we attended the same school. Every day I would watch her walk past me as I would go to my classroom. Days and even weeks passed, but I never got the courage to declare my love to her. Suppose she leaves and I never get to see her again? Well today, that young lady is my spouse. However, I remember that on various occasions I was wanting to tell her of my feelings, but in my mind I felt that she was avoiding me. I would wait for her and then I would question myself whether to stop her or not to speak or not to speak. Would she reject me? Does she even know I exist or how I feel about her? It was a battle going on in my mind. Finally, I did stop her and we had meaningful conversation with each other. As a result of that decision, today we celebrate our 31st wedding anniversary. Our daily life is marked with the decision maker rule. Every second in our minds is a battle. Sometimes our

way of thinking limits us and don’t allow us to make a positive decision. Other times, it makes us feel guilty. Still other times the problems and/or situation hit us and torture us. It hammers the mind and distracts us from our daily routine. We fail to sleep, to eat, and it can drag us into a crisis mode. Our thoughts can confine us or give us the capacity to act positive or negatively. As we think, we are. The Scripture is clear, ―For as he thinks in his heart, so is he‖ (Proverbs 23:7). I have discovered in my life, when I change my way of thinking, my attitude changes with it and I get positive results. It is impossible to change ours lives unless we change our thoughts. So we have to subject our will to God’s will. We have to exercise our minds by ―mediating on and confessing God’s Word.‖ We have to discipline our minds to go through the right way. It takes time and sometime you can feel discouraged. Remember a good competitor is perseverant and constant in his training. While he is running, he just has one thing in mind…to win the competition. Written by Chap. (Capt.) Egrain Medina, 159th Combat Aviation Brigade The Fort Campbell Courier

Inspirational Quotes "A champion is someone who gets up, even when they can't"

- Natalie Rogers

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.” Ambrose Redmoon

www.SafeHelpline.org

“The credit belongs to those who are actually in the arena, who strive valiantly; who know the great enthusiasm, the great devotions, and spend themselves in a worthy cause; who at the best, know the triumph of high achievement; and who, at the worst, if they fail, fail while daring greatly, so that their place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.” -Theodore Roosevelt


THE ADVOCATE

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AMAZING PEOPLE : Sarah DeCataldo—Day One, Legal Advocacy Services Coordinator How did you become involve in sexual assault advocacy? I became interested in learning more about violence against women when a teacher in High School showed a video on international sexual assault. This video empowered me and I realized that I wanted to be involved in the movement and make a difference. In both High School and College I completed a few internships which solidified the fact that I wanted to be doing this type of work. After college, I was hired by Day One as a Law Enforcement Advocate, working directly with victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. Besides being a Legal advocacy services Coordinator, what is the most interesting career you have had? Being a Law Enforcement Advocate with the Warwick Police Department. I really enjoyed working side by side with police and learning more about how the police department and criminal justice system works. The Rhode Island National Guard has collaboration with Day One, what does that has to offer to soldiers? Yes, we have been collaborating with the National Guard since 2008 I believe. We are very proud of the relationships we have formed with them. We initially came into contact when Amy Slater reached out to us in regards to a case. Since then, we have met on a monthly basis, participated in fundraising events, assisted with military sexual assault cases and provided training for the victim advocates and veteran affairs staff. We are committed to serving the military community by providing services to anyone who is a victim of a sexual assault. We provide counseling services for clients, even if they do not have insurance All military coverage and all of our Advocacy Programs are free of charge. No one will be turned personnel are away. We walk hand-in-hand with survivors responsible to ensure that they are being updated about their case, have the referrals that they need for preventing and are getting proper treatment. We have clinicians who are specifically trained in the and trauma associated with sexual assault and responding to sexual abuse who can see clients and provide individual counseling. sexual How do you define sexual assault? Any unwanted sexual contact of any type. People usually think of only rape, but it’s not just sex. It could be any type of inappropriate or unwanted sexual contact including oral and anal sex, touching and inappropriate comments. It includes anything that you say no to and do not agree to.

assault.

How big is the issue of sexual assault? It is huge. Sexual assault impacts everyone, even if you have never been a victim yourself. You or someone you know most likely knows someone who has been sexually assaulted. Because of shame, guilt, embarrassment, and self-blame, sexual assault often times goes unreported or treated. No one should ever feel ashamed or embarrassed about a sexual assault. It is never the victims fault. 1 out of every 3 American women has been the victim of sexual assault in her lifetime. This number should empower people to stand up and say that sexual assault is unacceptable. What are some of the effects of sexual assault?

Everyone reacts differently. There is no set way a victim should behave or react to a sexual assault. Some people may experience depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic health issues, abuse drugs, abuse alcohol, have anxiety issues, feel numb or contemplate suicide. However, the more that people talk about their experience, the faster the healing process can begin. Why should someone who experienced sexual assault reach out? We want survivors of sexual assault to know that it was not their fault, they are not alone and that they have nothing to be ashamed about. Sexual assault is never the victims fault. Often times survivors of sexual assault are afraid to talk about what happened because they are afraid that they will not be believed or that people will blame them for what happened. At Day One, we spend time with every survivor listening to their story, offering them support services, letting them know that they are not alone, telling them that it is not their fault and letting them know that we believe them. Talking about the assault is the first step towards healing. Aren’t there a lot of myths about sexual violence? What are some of them? Yes, there are a lot. For example, only men are attackers and only women are the victims. This is not true. Both men and women can be offenders and victims of sexual assaults. Often times when someone is doing something they shouldn’t be doing, such as a teenager who was drinking, or someone who was doing illegal drugs, people blame them for the sexual assault. Just because someone was doing something illegal, does not give anyone permission to sexually assault them. Also, that only “bad guys” sexually assault not the good guys who have families, jobs and an education. People will tell victims “if you hang out with a bad guy, you should expect that to happen.” when in reality the majority of perpetrators are your regular, everyday, average person who has a job, a family and is viewed by society as a regular person. Obviously if only creepy bad people sexually assaulted, we wouldn’t have any sexual assaults occurring because people could protect themselves from the bad people. Another myth is that sexual assaults are usually committed by strangers. In reality, over 75% of time, the attackers is known to the victim. The perpetrator is usually a friend, a partner, a co-worker, a family member, someone the victim trusts. What are specific ways family, friend, battle buddy and clergymen can help? Listen. Say that “I love you”, “I am not here to judge you”, “I believe you”, “I’m here to support you and be with you all the way”. Lay out all the options, here is option A, B and C. Don’t encourage them to go specific paths, let the victims pick. Let them know that you will support them in whatever path they pick. Let them know that the rape wasn’t their choice but the decision to get help is theirs. What are specific ways family, friend, battle buddy and clergymen can help?


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The key to prevention is ensuring everyone understands their role and responsibilities in preventing sexual assault. A consistent, vigorous training and education element is crucial.

www.SafeHelpline.org

The best thing you can do is to listen and validate what the victim is saying and feeling. You want to say things like “I love you”, “I am not here to judge you”, “I believe you”, “I’m here to support you and be with you all the way”. As advocates and friends, we want to lay out all the options a victim can choose from and let him or her decide what is best for them at that moment. Let them know that you will support them in whatever path they pick. Let them know that the rape wasn’t their choice but the decision to get help is theirs.

Do you know who your victim advocates are?

What would you say to someone who say “I don’t believe there’s healing for this. I’ve tried this and that and it hasn’t worked”?

NAME

Everyone’s path is different. I would sit with that person and go through the options that he/she has tried and provide insight as to why those things may have not worked for them and provide them with more options to choose from that may have a different outcome. I would also advise him/her to speak to a counselor as well. I believe that there are always options. There are people who are willing to sit with victims and explain the pros and cons of every option. I would let them know that they are never alone. There is healing, there is hope. Don’t let sexual assault define who you are or impact how you live your life. With counseling and support, survivors will eventually heal. What would you say to someone who contact you and say “I need help, I am a soldier and have been assaulted but I don’t want help from the military. I don’t want anyone to know” I would let them know about the great work that Day One and the National Guard do together for survivors of sexual assault. I would let them know that whatever they tell me is confidential and that they are safe talking with me. I would explain all of their options, including the military sexual assault prevention and response program (SAPR) and how that program works. If they are comfortable and would like to know more about SAPR, I would facilitate a meeting between the survivor, myself and the SAPR program, meeting together to discuss their options and what can be done. If the survivor is not interested in the SAPR Program, I would encourage them to work with our advocates and counselors which is completely confidential. Last word to our soldiers You are not alone. You have nothing to be ashamed of, we are here to help you through this. Our services are totally confidential when you talk to us, we will do everything we can to get you the help you need. Soldiers, veterans and military members experience additional barriers to reporting a sexual assault. We are on your side and want you know that we support you no matter

what.

VICTIM ADVOCATES LISTING

CSMSgt Ashness

UNIT JFHQ/SARC

WOC Slater

JFHQ

LT Zaccaria

USPFO(FA B)

SFC Petrin

JFHQ

SSG Soto

FA BN

Ms. Adebuga

JFHQ/SARC Alt

SFC Beaulieu

43D MP BDE

LtCol Fletcher

143rd

Maj Hannon

143rd

TSgt Kalwak

143rd

Capt Burnham

282nd

MSgt Jorge

281st

SFC Gaudet

RTI

CPT Donth

Med Det

2LT Pinkerton

Med Det

MAJ Zulick

56TH TC

CW2 Jorge

56TH TC

MSgt Sherman

JFHQ

2LT Dias

103rd

SFC Durango

103rd

SSG Shenk

43D MP BD

SSG Walker

43D MP BDE


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FUN ARENA: ° Riddles ° Poems ° Cartoon ° Inspirational Quotes RIIDLES 1. What is once in a minute, twice in a moment, and never in a thousand years? 2. A train was on its way to Florida and derailed. Where would they bury the survivors? 3. What can be swallowed, but can also swallow you? 4. What two things can you never eat for breakfast?

4. Lunch and dinner. 3. Pride. 2. They wouldn't need to, the survivors are still alive! 1. The letter M.

6. What never gets any wetter, no matter how much it rains?

ANSWERS

www.SafeHelpline.org

5. Just one, me.

Cathy Gipson

6. Sea

We can't control what happened; we can't control what has been lost. What we can control is how we fight to take that control back, and the voice within us is powerful in doing so....”

5. While on my way to St. Ives, I saw a man with 7 wives. Each wife had 7 sacks. Each sack had 7 cats. Each cat had 7 kittens. Kitten, cats, sacks, wives, How many were going to St. Ives?

PUZZLE

° Air Force

° Army ° Courage ° Duty

° National Guard

° Personal ° Respect

° Excellence ° Honor ° Selfless

°Integrity

° Loyalty

° Service ° Values

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THE ADVOCATE