DP Subjects Guide for 2024-2026 cohort

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INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME 2024-2026 COHORT

CONTACT

IB Diploma Programme Coordinator: Anita Wijaya anita.wijaya@reigategrammar.edu.vn

No. 7 Nguyen Cong Thai Street, Dai Kim Urban Area

Dinh Cong, Hoang Mai, Hanoi, Vietnam

Tel: +84 (0) 2435 409 183

Acknowledgement:

Information within the following handbook has been drawn from various sources and as such are subject to the original copyright

IB Learner profile 2006, IB DP Subject Guides and Guides and IB DP Subject Briefs as well as IB DP Guides to Core content

Further information can be found at: http://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/

Reigate Grammar School Vietnam is an IB World School*, authorised to impart the International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Years and Diploma Programmes.

IB World Schools share a common philosophy—a commitment to improve the teaching and learning of a diverse and inclusive community of students by delivering challenging, high quality programmes of international education that share a powerful vision.**

*Only schools authorized by the International Baccalaureate can o er any of its four academic programmes: the Primary Years Programme (PYP), the Middle Years Programme (MYP), the Diploma Programme or the IB Career-related Certificate (IBCC). Candidate status gives no guarantee that authorisation will be granted.

For further information about the IB and its programmes, visit www.ibo.org

**Mission Statement from the IB

The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their di erences, can also be right.

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3 DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this guide is to outline the structure of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme that Reigate Grammar School Vietnam (RGSV) o ers to students in Years 12 and 13. Please consider carefully the School and IBO Mission Statements that are the framework in which our academic programme is delivered.

THE RGSV MISSION STATEMENT

At Reigate Grammar School Vietnam we value community and connection; the relationships we have with one another are central to our happiness and success at School and beyond. Our mission is to care for and support each individual's potential to become well-rounded, life-long learners with a strong sense of purpose based on their core values.

We empower and inspire our pupils by providing a challenging and diverse curriculum inside and outside the classroom that enables them to develop skills as reflective, brave, caring and principled learners.

We encourage our internationally-minded children to be inquisitive, collaborative and innovative by providing an inclusive and supportive environment.

We prepare our Reigatians to use their unique talents and abilities to make this world a better place by providing opportunities to give back to our community.

Our Vision

Reigate Grammar School Vietnam aspires to nurture, empower and connect students with their local and global communities, to become international citizens who are active, compassionate and life-long learners.

• Nurture

• Empower

• Connect

Our Values

The core set of values, principles and skills we seek to promote in our students include:

• Courageous/Risk-Taker

• Thinker

• Principled

• Caring

• Inquiring

• Balanced

• Communicator

• Reflective

• Open-mindedness

• Knowledgeable

THE IBO MISSION STATEMENT

“The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

To this end, the IBO works with schools, governments and international organisations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their di erences, can also be right.”

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DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

WHAT IS THE IB DIPLOMA PROGRAMME?

The Diploma Programme of the International Baccalaureate (IB Diploma) is a course of study for post-16 students of Secondary School. It leads to external examinations and the award of a diploma.

The IB Diploma is recognised by leading universities around the world. The success of the programme can be measured by the 10% growth rate in schools taking on the Diploma. The IB Diploma programme is now o ered in over 4,795 schools, located in over 150 countries in six continents.

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WHAT IS THE IB DIPLOMA PROGRAMME CURRICULUM?

IB Diploma candidates are required to study six subjects. Three subjects are taught at Higher Level (HL), the others at Standard Level (SL). While it is possible to take four subjects at Higher Level, this is not recommended other than exceptional cases.

HL courses represent 240 teaching hours SL courses require 150 hours. One subject is chosen from each of the following groups:

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IB DP Curriculum Model

GROUP 1: Studies in Language and Literature course

The languages we o er are: Vietnamese Language and Literature, English Language and Literature, Korean Language and Literature, both at Higher and Standard Level. A student may also study their mother tongue as a School Supported Self Taught Literature course, at Standard Level only.

GROUP 2: Language acquisition

This language could be:

Language B – a second language course for students who have studied the language for a minimum of 2 years and a maximum of 5 years –French and English

Language ab initio (Standard Level only) – a second language course for students new to language or with a limited background in that language –Spanish ab initio

French and Mandarin are o ered as an ab initio subject at RGSV in conjunction with Pamoja Education [at an additional cost];

NOTE: A student can study a second Language A (from Group 1) in place of a group 2 language.

GROUP 3: Individuals and Societies

Business Management, Geography, History and Digital Society.

GROUP 4: Sciences

Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science and Physics .

GROUP 5: Mathematics

Mathematics: application and interpretation and Mathematics: analysis and approaches.

GROUP 6: Arts and Electives

Music or Visual Arts or:

A second choice from Group 3 or A second choice from Group 4.

CORE

Additionally, each diploma candidate must participate in the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) and Creativity/Activity/Service (CAS) courses and write an Extended Essay (EE). The unique characteristics of TOK, CAS and the Extended Essay (known as the IB Diploma Core) qualify them to receive the full Diploma of the International Baccalaureate.

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The Learner Profile & Approaches to Learning

The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally-minded people who, recognising their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.

Reigate Grammar School Vietnam is committed to the IB Learner Profile as an integral part of the life of the school. With the Learner Profile and Bladins’s own ethos of igniting the spark of genius, every student can be elevated to the pinnacle of their own potential.

Inquirers They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

Knowledgeable They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

Thinkers They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

Open-minded They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive di erence to the lives of others and to the environment.

Risk-takers They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Communicators TThey understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work e ectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

Principled They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

We are also committed to equipping our students with the necessary 21st Century transferable skills. Therefore we integrate the following Approaches to Learning into our curricula:

• Thinking Skills

• Communication Skills

• Social Skills

• Research Skills

• Time-Management Skills

Balanced They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

Reflective They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

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The Core

Theory of Knowledge (TOK)

This course is obligatory for every candidate for the Diploma. It is a key

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Extended Essay

All Diploma students must undertake an Extended Essay on a topic of and deserve a central role in the curriculum. Along with the Theory of Knowledge and Creativity, Activity, Service components, the Extended be undertaken in any subject not just those traditionally associated with

The Extended Essay is an in-depth study of a focused topic within a DP subject. It is recommended that students spend around 40 hours on it, Students have a maximum of five contact hours, including 3 mandatory suitable topic, with techniques of gathering and analysing information/ research essay (maximum 4000 words) on a topic

Marks for the essay are based on subject-specific content and specific research skills which are common and highly-transferable: and graded

• “An analysis of costume as a source for understanding the inner life

• “Doing versus being: language and reality in the Mimamsa school of

• “What level of data compression in music files is acceptable to the

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The Core

Creativity Activity and Service (CAS)

Creativity, activity, service (CAS) is at the heart of the Diploma Programme. It is one of the three essential elements in every student’s Diploma Programme experience. It involves students in a range of activities alongside their academic studies throughout the Diploma Programme. The three strands of CAS, which are often interwoven with particular activities, are characterised as follows.

Creativity: arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking. Activity: physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the Diploma Programme. Service: an unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student. The rights, dignity and autonomy of all those involved are respected. Reflection

CAS enables students to enhance their personal and interpersonal development through experiential learning through taking action and reflection on those actions. At the same time, it provides an important counterbalance to the academic pressures of the rest of the Diploma Programme. A good CAS programme should be both challenging and enjoyable, a personal journey of self-discovery. Each individual student has a di erent starting point, and therefore di erent goals and needs, but for many their CAS activities include experiences that are profound and life-changing.

For student development to occur, CAS should involve:

• real, purposeful activities, with significant outcomes

• personal challenge—tasks must extend the student and be achievable in scope

• thoughtful consideration, such as planning, reviewing progress, reporting

• reflection on outcomes and personal learning

All proposed CAS activities need to meet these four criteria. It is also essential that they do not replicate other parts of the student’s Diploma Programme work.

As concurrency of learning is important in the Diploma Programme, therefore, CAS activities should continue on a regular basis for as long as possible throughout the programme, and certainly for at least 18 months.

Successful completion of CAS is a requirement for the award of the IB Diploma. CAS is not formally assessed, however students do need to document their activities and provide evidence that they have achieved seven key learning outcomes. Each student will be required to keep notes in an online journal (via Managebac) including evidence of their planning, involvement, and self-evaluation. The school’s CAS Coordinator will monitor student planning and performing.

A student who fails to fulfil the CAS requirements will not be eligible for the IB diploma.

(please consult the Reigate Grammar School Vietnam: CAS Handbook for more details)

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Reflection Reflection
Investigation
Reflection
Menmonstration Action Preparation

How the Core contributes to the final Diploma Score

While the Diploma Core consists of three elements. The Creativity, Activity, Service element must be completed but does not count towards the below Diploma points. The Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge components are awarded grades A to E, with A being the highest grade and E being the lowest. These grades are then combined according to the following table, and up to three core points can be awarded.

Theory of Knowledge

Receiving an E in either the Extended Essay or Theory of Knowledge will result in the Diploma of the International Baccalaureate not being awarded to the student. Diploma Courses certificates will still be awarded for each of the subjects that the student has taken.

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Essay Extended A 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Failing condition Excellent B Good C Satisfactory D Mediocre E Elementary N No grade N No grade Excellent A Satisfactory C Mediocre D Elementary E Good B DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme Subject Selection Processes and Procedures

Year 11 students will begin learning about the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) during Semester two of their Year 11 year. Please see the timetable below. This timetable outlines items to be focused on for subject selection and career focuses, and sets deadlines for information to be shared with parents.

During Semester two, Year 11 students will be introduced to the di erent programmes of study o ered at RGS Vietnam, and the various course options that all students have. Additionally, students will be researching and considering careers options to better inform them of how their future goals might impact their subject selection processes. These subject selection and careers-focused sessions will occur either during subject group classes or scheduled Friday homeroom times and invitation to special presentations. The Diploma Programme Coordinator (DPC) schedules these days and times into the overall homeroom calendars and coordinates the course presentations with the appropriate teachers and the careers focused events with the University Counsellor (UC). These are required components of the Year 11 Homeroom pastoral programme.

Procedures:

Year 11 students will:

• Complete a subject pre-survey at the end of Semester 1

• Attend the IBDP Subject Selection events in Semester 2

• Have their IBDP subject selection be finalised and approved by the Diploma Programme Coordinator (DPC) by the start of April.

In selecting to pursue the Full IB Diploma students will need to:

• Have successfully completed Year 11

• Select 3 Higher Level (HL) classes and 3 Standard Level (SL) classes

• Select a Language A as appropriate

• Meet subject requirements as outlined in the DP Subjects Guide

IB Diploma Courses are appropriate for students who:

• Do not have a Language A

• Cannot access one or more courses at HL

• Or are approved by the Head of Secondary

• If the school deems students not to be suited for the IBDP, the school may consider alternate graduation pathways including Diploma Courses or A Levels.

Procedures for changing Subject Selection after 1st April: Students who would like to make changes to their subject selection after 1st April confirmations will need to do the following:

If a change request occurs during the summer, students in combination with parents will need to email the DPC to request the change. The DPC will confirm the change and update relevant documents as soon as possible over the holiday period.

During Semester 1 of the Year 12 IBDP students will have 4 weeks to make a subject selection and/or programme change. In order to make the change students will have to:

Have attended at least 3 lessons of the subject or 3 weeks in the programme under consideration for a change

Have a valid justification for the change

Complete a subject change or programme change form that will need to be signed by:

Teachers teaching the classes connected to the change

Diploma Programme coordinator

University counsellor

Form tutor

Parents and student

There will be no subject changes after Term 1 of Year 12 unless exceptional circumstances are brought to the attention of the DPC and the Head of Secondary

Subject Level changes will be considered on an ongoing basis

Any consideration of changes will be at the discretion and consultation of the DPC and Head of Secondary

If a change request is not approved students may appeal to the Headmaster

Procedures for Subject Selection for new students:

New students will make their choices from 1st May by submitting their subject selection document before 1st June and confirmation will be made before the end of semester.

If they have been enrolled for the next academic year at RGSV before 1st May then they will be invited to attend the subject selection evening.

Over the summer

New students will make their choices by submitting their subject selection document before 1st August. Confirmation will be made after 1st August and by the start of the new academic year.

Parent meetings:

Information about Subject Selection Process

Workshop on Selecting subjects: Matching interests with university requirements

Subject Selection evening *required*

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GROUP 1

Studies in Language and Literature Language A

Language and Literature English, Vietnamese & Korean

Entry requirements:

English:

New students:

Students who have completed an IGCSE 0500 course with a grade B or above or an equivalent IB MYP Year 3 course with a grade 5 or above.

Internal students:

Students who have completed IGCSE 0500 course with a grade C or above.

Vietnamese:

New student: Students who pass the entrance exam with the results of 70% or above and who have learnt Vietnamese in both primary and secondary school.

Internal students: Students who completed Vietnamese programs in previous classes with a grade C or above.

Korean:

New student: Students who pass the entrance exam and who have learnt Korean in primary and secondary school

Internal students: Students who completed Korean programs in previous classes.

Who should take this course?

English:

Students who intend to complete their Y12 and Y13 education with an IB Diploma.

Students who have confidence in reading, writing and speaking skills and wish to extend these skills through a rigorous DP, two year course.

Students who are organised to develop their own portfolio and are equipped to meet deadlines and reach standard or higher level course expectations.

Vietnamese:

Students who hold a Vietnamese passport and intend to complete a Bilingual Diploma Degree.

Students who have some proficiency in reading, writing and speaking Vietnamese at native speaker level.

Students who wish to extend their knowledge and skills in using Vietnamese as well as committed to put e ort to meet the requirements of the course.

Korean:

Students who hold a Korean passport and intend to complete a Bilingual Diploma Degree.

What current students say…

English:

“This course is very di erent from IGCSE. You are required to think di erently, you explore a variety of literary and non-literary texts and you prepare to write lengthy essays and an individual oral. Even the grading is di erent from IGCSE”.

Vietnamese:

"The IBDP Vietnamese: Language and Literature course is absolutely splendid in its own nature. I am taking the course at HL level and the diversity, wide range of topics and mediums (photography, diary, caricature, novels,...) truly shows that it is not only rich and challenging in knowledge, but also extremely applicable and useful in many future career paths."

I really appreciate the experience that Vietnamese IBDP gives me. Self-study and time management are essential skills for university and we're able to practise all that in IBDP.

Korean:

"Korean A L&L subject is an essential subject for developing logical and critical thinking. L&L subject is very helpful in future social life because they deal with not only literary works but also various non-literary texts such as movies and newspaper articles."

“I experienced various perspectives and learned about creative interpretation and critical acceptance.”

“Korean A L&L subject is not just a subject limited to language or literature, but a subject that studies how to logically organise our arguments and convey them convincingly.”

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Language A: Language and Literature comprises four parts—two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature

Part of the course

Parts 1: Readers writers and texts

Study of one literary work and non-literary texts. Equal time should be arranged for literary works and non-literary texts.

Study of two literary works and non-literary texts. Equal time should be arranged for literary works and non-literary texts.

Parts 2: Time and space

Study of one literary work and non-literary texts. Equal time should be arranged for literary works and non-literary texts.

Study of two literary works and non-literary texts. Equal time should be arranged for literary works and non-literary texts.

Part 3: Intertextuality

Study of two literary works to prepare for the final exam paper 2.

Study of two literary works to prepare for the final exam paper 2.

An analysis of one non-literary text or extract (1 hour and 15 minutes)

A comparative analysis of a pair of texts, at least one of which is non literary (2 hours 15 minutes)

Write a literary essay about two works in response to a question (1 hour 45 minutes)

Write a literary essay about two works in response to a question (1 hour 45 minutes)

Individual Oral

15-minute individual oral exploring two of the texts in relation to a global issue of the student’s choice

15-minute individual oral exploring two of the texts in relation to a global issue of the student’s choice

HL Essay

Write a 1200-1500 word formal essay, following a line of inquiry of their own choice into one of the texts studied

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SL HL
Paper 1: Non-literary text analysis Paper 2: Literary essay
DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. A key aim of the Language A: Language and Literature course is to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts, which, it can be argued, is rarely straightforward and unambiguous. Helping students to focus closely on the language of the texts they study and to become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in shaping its meaning is central to the course.

The Language A: Language and Literature course aims to develop in students skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. The course is designed to be flexible —teachers have the opportunity to construct it in a way that reflects the interests and concerns that are relevant to their students while developing in students a range of transferable skills. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how

Distinction between SL and HL

The model for Language A: Language and Literature is the same at SL and HL, but there are significant quantitative and qualitative di erences between the levels.

In the literature sections the number of texts prescribed is greater at HL than at SL. In the language sections students are generally expected to cover many more texts of all kinds at HL than at SL.

Two of the assessment tasks at SL are significantly easier than the comparable tasks at HL. The first is the Paper 1 textual analysis, where SL students address and analyse only one passage, while HL students make a comparative analysis of two passages. The second is the HL Essay, where HL students must write a 1200-1500 word formal essay, following a line of inquiry of their own choice into one of the texts studied. HL Language A: Language and Literature candidates will have a choice between writing about a non-literary or literary text. Students can choose any of the texts studied during the course, with the exception of the texts they have used for their internal assessment or that they plan to use for their Paper 2.

that meaning is a ected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception.

In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the Language A: Language and Literature course does not limit the study of texts to the products of one culture or of the cultures covered by any one language. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB Diploma Programme students because it contributes to a global perspective, thereby promoting an insight into, and understanding of, the di erent ways in which cultures influence and shape the experiences of life common to all humanity.

Di erences between the HL and SL Language and Literature course Assessment at SL

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Assessment component Weighting External assessment (3 hours) Paper 1: Textual analysis (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 2: Essay (1 hour 45 minutes) 70% 35% 35% Internal assessment Individual oral 30% Assessment at HL Assessment component Weighting Internal assessment (4 hours) Paper 1: Comparative textual analysis (2 hours 15 minutes) Paper 2: Essay (1 hour 45 minutes) HL Essay 80% 35% 25% 20 % Internal assessment Individual oral 20%

Literature School Supported Self-Taught Languages

Entry requirements:

All Students:

The ability to write and read at a native speaker level in their own home language

Who should take this course? What current students say…

Students who cannot access a language A in another language o ered.

Students who want to strengthen their home language

Students who enjoy studying literature and are able to do so in their own language.

Through the study of a wide range of literature, the Language A: Literature course encourage students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the Language A: Literature course does not limit the study of works to the products of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of language. It is a flexible course that allows teachers to choose works from prescribed lists of authors and to construct a course that suits the particular needs and interests of their students. It is divided into three parts, each with a particular focus.

“I enjoy being able to read and write in my own language again!”

Readers, Writers and Texts: aims to introduce students to the notion and purpose of literature and the ways in which texts can be read, interpreted and responded to.

Time and Space: draws attention to the fact that texts are not isolated entities, but are connected to space and time.

Intertextuality: connecting texts focuses on the connection between and among diverse texts, traditions, creators and ideas.

SL students will study four literature works, whereas HL will study six literature works. This will include works written originally in the language studies, as well as works in translation.

Assessment at SL

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Assessment component Weighting External assessment (3 hours) Paper 1: Guided literary analysis (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 2: Essay (1 hour 45 minutes) 70% 35% 35% Internal assessment Individual oral (15 minutes) 30%
DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

GROUP 2 Language Acquisition

Overview

Group 2 Language acquisition consists of a foreign language course that is o ered in French, Spanish and English. Language AB INITIO & B are language acquisition courses designed to provide students with the necessary skills and intercultural understanding to enable them to communicate successfully in an environment where the language studied is spoken. This process allows the learner to go beyond the confines of the classroom, expanding their awareness of the world and fostering respect for cultural diversity.

The language course develops students’ linguistic abilities through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills.

Language B: French and English

Entry requirements:

New students:

At least 2 years of French at IGCSE level or equivalent are a prerequisite for non native speakers or / and students who did not study in a French school or with French language as a medium.

Internal students:

At least 2 years of French at IGCSE level or equivalent are a pre=requisite for non native speakers or / and students who did not study in a French school or with the French language as a medium.

English B:

Students who would like to take further studies in English.

Students should have completed IGCSE English Language or an equivalent course and have some proficiency in English Language.

External applicants will be required to take an admittance exam to determine suitability for the course.

Placement onto Group 2 courses is designed to ensure that students are following the course that is most suited to their needs and that will provide them with an appropriate academic challenge whether it is at SL or HL.

Priority for students with grade A* or A at IGCSE

Students with B at IGCSE with great motivation and work ethic

“The course covers many important topics and themes which are similar to other classes but from a di erent angle.”

“This helps both learn the language and gather new knowledge about France and culture in French-Speaking countries.”

“The course includes a lot of media (e.g. movies, music, etc.)”

“The topics are interesting and allow you to know more about the culture and life in French-speaking countries.”

Language B is an additional language-learning course designed for students with some previous learning of that language. It may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts, and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. The material enables students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. It should not be intended solely for the study of specific subject matter or content.

There are 5 assessment objectives for the language B course. Students will be assessed on their ability to:

Communicate clearly and e ectively in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes.

Understand and use language appropriate to a range of interpersonal and/or intercultural contexts and audiences. Understand and use language to express and respond to a range of ideas with fluency and accuracy.

Identify, organise and present ideas on a range of topics. Understand, analyse and reflect upon a range of written, audio, visual and audio-visual texts.

Presently at Reigate Grammar School Vietnam Language B is o ered at both HL and SL in French and in English

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should take this course?
say…
Who
What current students
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Course structure

Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabi of Language B and Language ab initio; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest.

The five prescribed themes are:

Identities

Experiences

Human ingenuity

Social organization

Sharing the planet

The themes allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The themes also provide opportunities for students to make connections to other disciplinary areas in the DP.

Language B assessment at SL and HL: All language B Courses follow a common Assessment structure and teaching sequence.

Assessment

component for SL

External assessment (3 hours)

Paper 1 (1 hour 15 minutes) Productive skills—writing (30 marks)

One writing task of 250–400 words from a choice of three, each from a di erent theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions.

Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes)

Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) .

Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks). Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks). Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes.

Internal assessment

This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Individual oral assessment

A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus, followed by discussion based on an additional theme. (30 marks)

Weighting

Assessment component for HL

External assessment (3 hours 30 minutes)

Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes)

Productive skills—writing (30 marks)

One writing task of 450–600 words from a choice of three, each from a di erent theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions.

Paper 2 (2 hours)

Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks).

Listening comprehension (1 hour) (25 marks). Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks). Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes.

Weighting

75%

Internal assessment

This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Individual oral assessment

A conversation with the teacher, based on an extract from one of the literary works studied in class, followed by discussion based on one or more of the themes from the syllabus. (30 marks)

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25% DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT
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Language AB INITIO: Spanish

Entry requirements:

New students:

Opened to all students new to this language or with a limited background in that language.

Internal students:

Opened to all students new to this language or with a limited background in that language.

Who should take this course? What current students say…

Anyone who desires to learn a new language as a beginner and discover the culture from the di erent Spanish-speaking countries.

Language AB INITIO is an additional language-learning course designed for students new to a second language or with a limited background in that language. It may only be studied at SL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts, and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. The material enables students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. It should not be intended solely for the study of specific subject matter or content.

There are 5 assessment objectives for the language AB INITIO course. Students will be assessed on their ability to:

Communicate clearly and e ectively in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes.

Understand and use language appropriate to a range of interpersonal and/or intercultural contexts and audiences.

Understand and use language to express and respond to a range of ideas with fluency and accuracy.

Identify, organise and present ideas on a range of topics.

Understand, analyse and reflect upon a range of written, audio, visual and audio-visual texts.

Presently at Reigate Grammar School Vietnam Language AB INITIO is o ered at SL in Spanish.

Course structure

Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabi of Language AB INITIO; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest.

The five prescribed themes are:

Identities

Experiences

Human ingenuity

Social organisation

Sharing the planet

“Studying Spanish at RGSV is an amazing opportunity to discover not only a new language but also so many di erent cultures as we learn from all the Spanish-speaking countries.”

The themes allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The themes also provide opportunities for students to make connections to other disciplinary areas in the DP.

Language AB INITIO assessment at SL: All language AB INITIO Courses follow a common Assessment structure and teaching sequence.

Assessment component for SL Weighting

External assessment (2 hours 45 minutes)

Paper 1 (1 hour)

Productive skills—writing (30 marks)

Two written tasks of 70-100 words from a choice of three tasks, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions.

Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes)

Receptive skills—separate sections for listening and reading (65 marks) .

Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks).

Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks).

Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes.

Internal assessment

This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Individual oral assessment

A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus, and at least one additional theme. (30 marks)

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
75% 25% 50% 25%
DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT 23

GROUP 3 Individuals and Societies

Geography

Entry requirements:

New students:

An interest in current a airs and real world events. A deep interest in the world around them to understand the connections between humans and their environment.

Strong and confident use of the English language.

IGCSE Geography or MYP 5 Individuals and Societies or other social science course at a ‘B’ grade or higher.

Internal students:

In addition to the above. Ambitious students who invest e ort into their own success.

IGCSE Geography ‘B’ grade students may consider SL IBDP Geography.

IGCSE Geography ‘A’ grade students may consider HL IBDP Geography.

Who should take this course?

Students interested in learning more about the world around them.

Students interested in challenging their own ideas as well as ideas of others.

Students who enjoy learning through discussion and debate.

Students who enjoy writing.

Students who enjoy considering a variety of di erent perspectives on the same issue.

Students who enjoy learning about current issues through real-life examples.

Students who enjoy science and the arts, looking to combine their interest in both disciplines.

What current students say…

“I never realised how broad Geography is and all it contains.”

“I like being challenged to think critically and develop my skills of evaluation.”

“I like learning through a variety of di erent media: watching, listening, reading and exploring graphical information.”

"I enjoy sharing my opinion and actively contributing to lessons. I like listening to what my classmates think and challenging their ideas.”

Geography is a dynamic subject that is firmly grounded in the real world and focuses on the interactions between individuals, societies and the physical environment in both time and space. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in these interactions and examines the processes behind them. It also investigates the way that people adapt and respond to change and evaluates management strategies associated with such change. Geography describes and helps to explain the similarities and di erences between spaces and places. These may be defined on a variety of scales and from a range of perspectives.

Within group 3 subjects, Geography is distinctive in that it occupies the middle ground between social sciences and natural sciences. The Diploma Programme Geography course integrates both physical and human geography, and ensures that students acquire elements of both scientific and socio-economic methodologies. Geography takes advantage of its position between both of these groups of subjects to examine relevant concepts and ideas from a wide variety of disciplines. This helps students develop an appreciation of, and a respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas.

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Distinction between SL and HL

Students at standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) in Geography are presented with a syllabus that has a common core and optional themes. HL students also study the higher level extension. The syllabus requires the development of certain skills, attributes and knowledge as described in the assessment objectives of the course.

Although the skills and activity of studying Geography are common to both SL and HL students, the HL student is required to acquire a further body of knowledge, to demonstrate critical evaluation, and to synthesise the concepts in the higher level extension.

In summary: SL: students study two optional themes; HL students study three optional themes, providing further breadth

HL: students study the HL extension—global interactions, and examine, evaluate and synthesise the prescribed concepts, which by their nature are complex, contestable, interlinked and require holistic treatment. This provides further depth at HL.

Course structure

The course consists of four sections.

SL and HL core

Geographic perspectives— global change

• Changing population

• Global climate— vulnerability and resilience

• Global resource consumption and security

HL extension— HL only

Geographic perspectives— global interactions

• Power, places and networks

• Human development and diversity

• Global risks and resilience

Optional themes (SL/HL)

Geographic themes—seven options

Two options are studied at SL, and three at HL

Freshwater—drainage basins

Oceans and coastal margins

Extreme environments

Geophysical hazards

Leisure, tourism and sport

Food and health

Urban environments

Internal Assessment - SL and HL: Fieldwork

Fieldwork, leading to one written report based on a fieldwork question, information collection and analysis with evaluation

Assessment at SL Assessment component Weighting External assessment (2 hours 45 minutes) Paper 1 (1 hour and 30 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour and 15 minutes) 75% 35% 40% Internal assessment (20 teaching hours) Fieldwork 25% Assessment at HL Assessment component Weighting External assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) Paper 1 (2 hour and 15 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour and 15 minutes) Paper 3 (1 hour) 80% 35% 25% 20% Internal assessment (20 teaching hours) Fieldwork 20%
DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT 25

Business Management

Entry requirements:

New students:

Very good command of English for both reading and writing

Internal students:

IGCSE English C or above

Who should take this course?

Everybody who is interested in what is happening around them since Business is everywhere and touches everything

The business management course is designed to meet the current and future needs of students who want to develop their knowledge of business content, concepts and tools to assist with business decision making. Future employees, business leaders, entrepreneurs or social entrepreneurs need to be confident, creative and compassionate as change agents for business in an increasingly interconnected global marketplace. The business management course is designed to encourage the development of these attributes.

Through the exploration of four interdisciplinary concepts—creativity, change, ethics and sustainability — this course empowers students to explore these concepts from a business perspective. Business management focuses on business functions, management processes and decision-making in contemporary contexts of strategic uncertainty.

Students examine how business decisions are influenced by factors that are internal and external to an organisation and how these decisions impact upon a range of internal and external stakeholders. Emphasis is placed on strategic decision-making and the operational business functions of human resource management, finance and accounts, marketing, and operations management.

What current students say…

‘I can no longer walk into a supermarket or convenience store without thinking business.’

‘Some of the articles we read are about issues I have never thought about before.’

‘I am learning about so many interesting topics.’

‘I always thought I would love Marketing most. I am doing my Internal Assignment on Financial tools.’

‘I did not realise how naive I was about what supermarkets do to entice me to buy from them.’

The business management course encourages the application of local, national and global examples to content and concepts; the internal assessment (IA) for both SL and HL is an individual business research project that allows greater analysis and evaluation of content, concepts and context. Students can develop a deeper understanding of an organisation by studying its processes through the lenses of creativity, change, ethics and sustainability.

Business management is a challenging and dynamic discipline that more than meets the needs of our students growing and developing in a complex business environment. This course prepares students to be global citizens ready to face up to the challenges and opportunities awaiting them in our ever-changing world.

The aims of the business management course at HL and SL are to:

Develop as confident, creative and compassionate business leaders, Entrepreneurs, social entrepreneurs and as change agents foster an informed understanding of ethical and sustainable business practices

Explore the connections between individuals, businesses and society Engage with decision-making as a process and a skill.

R E I G A T E G R A M M A R S C H O O L VIETNAM 26

Distinction between SL and HL

The SL course in business management di ers from the HL course in terms of the:

Eecommended hours devoted to teaching (150 hours for SL compared to 240 hours for HL)

Extra depth and breadth required (extension material for HL only)

Nature of the examination questions in papers 2 and 3.

Paper 2 for both SL and HL focuses on developing quantitative skills; however, HL students will need to develop these further in greater depth.

Paper 3 is an HL-only paper based on a social enterprise, where students identify and describe a human need and the potential organisational challenges facing the social entrepreneur. Further to this, students are required to write a decision-making document that includes a business recommendation.

Course structure

Unit 1: Introduction to business management

Unit 2: Human resource management

Unit 3: Finance and accounts

Unit 4: Marketing

Unit 5: Operations management

Business management toolkit

Business Management assessment at SL Assessment component Weighting External assessment (3 hours) Paper 1 (1 hour and 30 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour and 30 minutes) 70% 35% 35% Internal assessment (20 teaching hours) 30% Business Management assessment at HL Assessment component Weighting External assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) Paper 1 (1 hour and 30 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour and 45 minutes) Paper 3 (1 hour and 15 minutes) 80% 25% 30% 25% Internal assessment (20 teaching hours) 20%
27 DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

History

Entry requirements:

New students:

Students with a strong grasp of Academic English (Good IGCSE English/History results)

Internal students:

Students with a strong grasp of Academic English (Good IGCSE English/History results)

Who should take this course?

Students who enjoy reading and writing, especially as related to non-fiction materials. You should have an interest in learning about past events. Previous experience with IGCSE History is an asset.

History is a great stepping stone for a career in fields such as diplomacy, education, politics, journalism and the law.

Students who enjoy asking big questions about society, power, how societies are formed and the importance of historical narratives.

Students who enjoy subjects such as English, TOK and the Humanities.

Students who want to study in USA should strongly consider taking History.

History is a dynamic, contested, evidence-based discipline that involves an exciting engagement with the past. It is a rigorous intellectual discipline, focused around key historical concepts such as change, causation and significance. History is an exploratory subject that fosters a sense of inquiry. It is also an interpretive discipline, allowing opportunity for engagement with multiple perspectives and a plurality of opinions. Studying History develops an understanding of the past, which leads to a deeper understanding of the nature of humans and of the world today. The IB Diploma Programme (DP) history course is a world history course based on a comparative and multi-perspective approach to history. It involves the study of a variety of types of history, including political, economic, social and cultural, and provides a balance of structure and flexibility. The course emphasises the importance of encouraging students to think historically and to develop historical skills as well as gaining factual knowledge. It puts a premium on developing the skills of critical thinking, and on developing an understanding of multiple interpretations of history. In this way, the course involves a challenging and demanding critical exploration of the past.

What current students say…

“In my previous years we had to just memorize dates and names…here however essays check how you understood and analyzed the events. I personally think it’s the best way to learn history.”

History and international-mindedness ... an education for international-mindedness; an education designed to break down the barriers of race, religion and class; an education that extolled the benefits of cultural diversity; above all else, an education for peace. (George Walker 2011: 19) International-mindedness is an umbrella term through which the IB defines the goal of international education, and which is exemplified by the emphasis in all IB programmes on promoting global engagement, multilingualism and intercultural understanding. The DP history course is designed in such a way as to explicitly reinforce the emphasis on the development of international-mindedness. For example, one of the key concepts that weaves throughout the course is perspectives, and, more specifically, an emphasis on encouraging students to appreciate multiple perspectives. In addition, all students are required to study case studies and examples from di erent regions of the world, with comparison of such examples helping to ensure that the course adopts a transnational perspective. Teachers also have a great deal of freedom to choose relevant examples to explore with their students, helping to ensure that the course appropriately meets their students’ needs and interests regardless of their location or context.

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Throughout the DP history course, students have the opportunity to explore historical events that have played a key role in shaping the world today, deepening their understanding of the complex and interconnected nature of past and present events. For example, students explore historical examples of many of the global challenges facing the world today, such as conflict, rights and governance. This helps to meet one of the central aims of the course—to increase students’ understanding of themselves and of contemporary society by encouraging reflection on the past.

Distinction between SL and HL: Students at standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) are presented with a syllabus that has a common core consisting of prescribed subjects and topics in world history. In addition, students at HL are also required to undertake an in-depth study of three sections from one of the HL regional options. While many of the skills of studying history are common to both SL and HL, the di erence in recommended teaching hours at SL and HL signals a clear distinction between the demands made on students, with the greater depth of study required for HL.

External assessment (2 hours 30 minutes)

Paper 1 (1 hour)

Source-based paper based on the five prescribed subjects. Choose one prescribed subject from a choice of five. Answer four structured questions. (24 marks)

Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes)

Essay paper based on the 12 world history topics. Answer two essay questions on two di erent topics. (30 marks)

Internal assessment (20 hours)

This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Historical investigation

Students are required to complete a historical investigation into a topic of their choice. (25 marks)

Content Covered

SL

1. Rights and Protest

a. Apartheid South Africa (1948-1964)

b. Civil rights movement in the United States (1954–1965)

2. Authoritarian States

a. Mao’s China

b. Hitler’s Germany

c. Castro’s Cuba

3. Emergence of Democracies

a. India (1947-1975)

b. Germany (1918-1933)

HL

1. History of the Americas

a. Emergence of the Americas in global a airs (1880–1929)

b. The Great Depression and the Americas (mid 1920s–1939)

c. The Second World War and the Americas (1933–1945)

External assessment (5 hours)

Paper 1 (1 hour)

Source-based paper based on the five prescribed subjects. Choose one prescribed subject from a choice of five. Answer four structured questions. (24 marks)

Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes)

Essay paper based on the 12 world history topics. Answer two essay questions on two di erent topics. (30 marks)

Paper 3 (2 hours 30 minutes)

Separate papers for each of the four regional options. For the selected region, answer three essay questions. (45 marks)

Internal assessment (20 hours)

This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Historical investigation

Students are required to complete a historical investigation into a topic of their choice. (25 marks)

DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT
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component Weighting
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Assessment
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Digital Society

Entry requirements:

None

Who should take this course?

Students who are interested in the impact of technology on society. The course is suitable for students with no prior knowledge or experience of ICT.

Digital Society is an interdisciplinary course within the Individuals and Societies subject group designed for young people interested in exploring the impact and importance of digital systems and technologies in the contemporary world. At its heart, digital society invites students to develop as ethical, empathetic and creative young people who address the changing world around them with understanding, imagination and action.

The aims of the Digital Society higher level courses are to:

Focus inquiry using course concepts, content and contexts as well as real-world examples.

Explore diverse sources relevant to digital society.

Investigate impacts and implications of digital systems for people and communities.

Reflect on emerging trends, future developments and further insights.

Share discoveries about digital society with others

Course structure

What current students say…

“I thought I knew a lot about computers but the Digital Society course has made me realise that the way they are used is a lot more complex and interesting than I expected.”

R E I G A T E G R A M M A R S C H O O L VIETNAM 30
Introduction 1.1 What is digital society? Concepts 2.1 Change 2.2 Expression 2.3 Identity 2.4 Power 2.5 Space 2.6 Systems 2.7 Values and ethics Content 3.1 Data 3.2 Algorithms 3.3 Computers 3.4 Networks and the internet 3.5 Media 3.6 Artificial intelligence 3.7 Robots and autonomous technologies Contexts 4.1 Cultural 4.2 Economic 4.3 Environmental 4.4 Health 4.5 Human knowledge 4.6 Political 4.7 Social HL extension: challenges and interventions 5.1 Global well-being 5.2 Governance and human rights 5.3 Sustainable development

Digital Society assessment at SL

Assessment component

External assessment (2 hours and 25 minutes)

Paper 1 (1 hour and 30 minutes)

• Four structured questions that address the common SL and HL syllabus and real-world examples in an integrated way.

• Students answer two of four structured questions.

Paper 2 (1 hour and 15 minutes)

• Four source-based questions that address the common SL and HL syllabus in an integrated way. Sources may include text, audio, visuals, data, diagrams and/or infographics.

• Students answer all four questions.

Internal assessment (30 teaching hours)

Project

• Students conduct an inquiry into impacts and implications of digital systems for people and communities. The submission requirements for the project include:

0 An inquiry process document not to exceed 1500 words.

0 A recorded multimedia presentation that does not exceed 10 minutes.

0 A list of references.

Digital Society assessment at HL

External assessment (4 hours and 45 minutes)

Paper 1

Six questions in two sections that address syllabus topics and real-world examples in an integrated way.

Section A

• Students answer two of four structured questions on the common SL and HL syllabus.

Section B

• Students answer one of two extended response questions based on the HL extension

Paper 2 (1 hour and 15 minutes)

• Four source-based questions that address the common SL and HL syllabus in an integrated way. Sources may include text, audio, visuals, data, diagrams and/or infographics.

• Students answer all four questions.

Paper 3 (1 hour and 15 minutes)

• Questions that address an intervention related to an HL extension challenge topic. A brief statement indicating the real-world nature of a selected challenge topic will be released prior to the examination.

• Students answer all four questions.

Internal assessment (30 teaching hours)

Project

• Students conduct an inquiry into impacts and implications of digital systems for people and communities. The submission requirements for the project include:

0 An inquiry process document not to exceed 1500 words.

0 A recorded multimedia presentation that does not exceed 10 minutes.

0 A list of references.

Weighting
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component Weighting
Assessment
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DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

GROUP 4 Sciences

Biology

Entry requirements:

New or internal students:

Higher Level: B* grade in IGCSE* Biology, Co-ordinated or Combined Sciences.

Standard Level: C* grade in IGCSE* Biology, Co-ordinated or Combined Sciences.

*or equivalent

Who should take this course?

Students who are looking at taking university courses in biomedical studies, pharmacology, environmental sciences, food sciences and psychology. Students taking this DP course will have a good background in Biology.

Biologists have accumulated huge amounts of information about living organisms, and it would be easy to confuse students by teaching large numbers of seemingly unrelated facts. In the Diploma Programme Biology course, it is hoped that students will acquire a limited body of facts and, at the same time, develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of the subject.

By studying Biology in the DP students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the scientific method may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that characterises the sciences. Teachers provide students with opportunities to design investigations, collect data, develop manipulative skills, analyse results, collaborate with peers and evaluate and communicate their findings.

Through the overarching theme of the nature of science, the aims of the DP Biology course are to enable students to:

Appreciate scientific study and creativity within a global context through stimulating and challenging opportunities.

Acquire a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterise science and technology.

Apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterise science and technology.

Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise scientific information.

Develop a critical awareness of the need for, and the value of, e ective collaboration and communication during scientific activities. Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills including the use of current technologies.

Develop and apply 21st century communication skills in the study of science.

Become critically aware, as global citizens, of the ethical implications of using science and technology.

Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations of science and technology.

Develop an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and their influence on other areas of knowledge.

What current students say…

“I really enjoyed unit 2, particularly when we learned about Carbohydrates, Fats and Proteins, as I am interested in learning about nutrition in my own time so I found learning about the fundamentals of food beneficial.”

Distinction between SL and HL

Group 4 students at SL and HL undertake a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme and have some overlapping elements in the option studied. They are presented with a syllabus that encourages the development of certain skills, attributes and attitudes.

While the skills and activities of Group 4 Science subjects are common to students at both SL and HL, students at HL are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the additional higher level material. The distinction between SL and HL is one of breadth and depth.

Collaborative Sciences Project

All Diploma Course candidates must participate in an interdisciplinary investigation into the nature and process of science. This is a collaborative investigation including students from all four disciplines.

R E I G A T E G R A M M A R S C H O O L VIETNAM 32

Ecosystem

Course structure

Theme

A

Unity & diversity

Cells Molecules

A1.1 Water

A1.2 Nucleic acids

A2.1 Origins of cells [HL only]

A2.2 Cell structure

A2.3 Viruses [HL only]

B

Form and function

B1.1

Carbohydrates and lipids

B1.2 Proteins

B2.1 Membranes and membrane transport

B2.2 Organelles and compartmentalization

B2.3 Cell specialisation

C

Interaction and interdependence

C1.1

Enzymes and metabolism

C1.2 Cell respiration

C1.3

Photosynthesis

C2.1 Chemical signalling [HL only]

C2.2 Neural signalling

Organisms

A3.1

Diversity of organisms A3.2

Classification and cladistics [HL only]

Ecosystem

A4.1

Evolution and speciation

A4.2 Conservation of biodiversity

B3.1 Gas exchange B3.2 Transport

B3.3 Muscle and motility [HL only]

B4.1 Adaptation to environment

B4.2 Ecologi

Assessment at SL

D

Continuity and change

D1.1 DNA replication

D1.2 Protein synthesis

D1.3

Mutations and gene editing

D2.1 Cell and nuclear division

D2.2 Gene expression [HL only]

D2.3 Water potential

C3.1 Integration of body systems

C3.2

Defence against disease

D3.1

Reproduction

D3.2 Inheritance

D3.3

Homeostasi

C4.1

Populations and communities

C4.2

Transfers of energy and matter

D4.1 Natural selection

D4.2 Stability and change D4.3 Climate

External assessment (3 hours)

Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes)

Paper 1A: Multiple choice questions (30 marks)

Paper 1B: Data-based questions related to experimental work and syllabus (25 marks) (Total 55 marks)

Paper 2 (1 hour and 30 minutes)

Section A: Data-based questions and short answer questions (34 marks)

Section B - Extended-response questions (16 marks) (Total 50 marks)

Internal assessment (10 hours)

The internal assessment consists of one task: the scientific investigation. This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

(Total 24 marks)

Assessment at HL

Assessment component

External assessment (4 hours and 30 minutes)

Paper 1 (2 hours)

Paper 1A: Multiple choice questions (40 marks)

Paper 1B: Data-based questions related to experimental work and syllabus (35 marks) (Total 75 marks)

Paper 2 (2 hours and 30 minutes)

Section A: Data-based questions and short answer questions (48 marks)

Section B - Extended-response questions (32 marks) (Total 80 marks)

Internal assessment (10 hours)

The internal assessment consists of one task: the scientific investigation. This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

(Total 24 marks)

36%

44%

20%

Weighting

80%

36%

44%

20%

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DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT
Assessment component Weighting
80%

Chemistry

Entry requirements:

New or internal students:

Higher Level: B* grade in IGCSE*

Chemistry, Co-ordinated or Combined Sciences.

Standard Level: C* grade in IGCSE*

Chemistry, Co-ordinated or Combined Sciences.

*or equivalent

Who should take this course?

Students don’t have to become Scientists but should have a curiosity about the world around them. Also, many careers require a Chemistry background such as Doctors, Forensic Scientists, Chemical Engineers and so forth.

What current students say…

“It’s not an easy ride, but well worth it!”

Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. It is called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science, and serves as useful preparation for employment.

All students undertake both theory and practical work as they complement one another naturally, both in school and in the wider scientific community. The DP Chemistry course allows students to develop a wide range of practical skills and to increase facility in the use of mathematics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal and information technology skills, which are essential to life in the 21st century.

By studying Chemistry, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the scientific method may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that characterises the subject.

Chemistry provides students with opportunities to develop manipulative skills, design investigations, collect data, analyse results and evaluate and communicate their findings.

Through the overarching theme of the nature of science, the aims of the DP chemistry course are to enable students to:

Appreciate scientific study and creativity within a global context through stimulating and challenging opportunities

Acquire a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterise science and technology

Apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterise science and technology

Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise scientific information

Develop a critical awareness of the need for, and the value of, e ective collaboration and communication during scientific activities

Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills including the use of current technologies

Develop and apply 21st century communication skills in the study of science

Become critically aware, as global citizens, of the ethical implications of using science and technology

Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations of science and technology

Develop an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and their influence on other areas of knowledge

34 R E I G A T E G R A M M A R S C H O O L VIETNAM

Distinction between SL and HL

Group 4 students at SL and HL undertake a common core syllabus, a common internal assessment (IA) scheme and have some overlapping elements in the option studied. They are presented with a syllabus that encourages the development of certain skills, attributes and attitudes.

While the skills and activities of Group 4 Science subjects are common to students at both SL and HL, students at HL are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the additional higher level material. The distinction between SL and HL is one of breadth and depth.

Collaborative Sciences Project

All Diploma Course candidates must participate in an interdisciplinary investigation into the nature and process of science. This is a collaborative investigation including students from all four disciplines.

Course structure

Atomic structure and electronic structure, moles, and ideal gases

Intra- and intermolecular bonding, and polymer chemistry

Trends and patterns in the periodic table, introduction to organic chemistry, chemical analytical techniques

17 hrs SL 21 hrs HL Structure 3 Structure 2 20 hrs SL 30 hrs HL 16 hrs SL 31 hes HL
Core (SL and HL) Structure 1 21h rs SL 31 hes HL Reactivity 1 12 hrs SL 21 hes HL Moles 2, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria Energy changes, energy from fuels, and energy and spontaneity Reactivity 2 Reactivity 3 24 hrs SL 45 hes HL Proton– and electron transfer and electron sharing reactions Assessment at SL Assessment component Weighting External assessment (2 hours and 45 minutes) Paper 1 MCQ (1 hour and 30 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour and 15 minutes) 80% 36% 44% Internal assessment (10 hours) 20% Assessment at HL Assessment component Weighting External assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) Paper 1 MCQ (2 hour) Paper 2 (2 hour and 30 minutes) 80% 36% 44% Internal assessment (10 hours) 20% 35 DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

Physics

Entry requirements:

New or internal students:

Higher Level: B* grade in IGCSE*

Physics, Co-ordinated or Combined Sciences.

Standard Level: C* grade in IGCSE*

Physics, Co-ordinated or Combined Sciences.

*or equivalent

Who should take this course?

Students who plan to study physical sciences or Engineering should take Physics. This course is also for those students who have a natural curiosity about how things work in the physical world, whether it’s at the classical or quantum level.

What current students say…

“What I like the most about the subject is that it has a strong and obvious connection to real life. Physics inspires me in a way that it makes me pay logical attention to my surroundings from the physics perspective. As a music lover, I am especially interested in waves and how they travel to make sound.”

Physics encompasses everything that we do as human beings. The very meaning of the word is “the study of nature”. As with the universe, physics knowledge is constantly expanding.

However, physics is not just about staring into the vastness of space or scrutinising the tiniest particles that make up the fabric of the universe. The fact is that discoveries in physics are the root of ideas that revolutionise the technology used in our daily lives. It is an everyday, grounded science encompassing advances in communication, medical technology and renewable energy.

It is above all a creative discipline. Physics requires solid knowledge of basic principles and a willingness to put them to the test in new ways. It requires curiosity and an appetite to explore what might be.

While the scientific method may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that characterises the subject. So the course also provides students with opportunities to develop manipulative skills, design investigations, collect data, analyse results and evaluate and communicate their findings.

The course enables students, through the overarching theme of the Nature of Science, to:

Develop conceptual understanding that allows connections to be made between di erent areas of the subject, and to other DP sciences subjects.

Acquire and apply a body of knowledge, methods, tools and techniques that characterise science.

Develop the ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise scientific information and claims.

Develop the ability to approach unfamiliar situations with creativity and resilience.

Design and model solutions to local and global problems in a scientific context.

Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations of science.

Develop technology skills in a scientific context. Develop the ability to communicate and collaborate e ectively. Develop awareness of the ethical, environmental, economic, cultural and social impact of science.

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Distinction between SL and HL

Students at SL and HL share the following.

An understanding of science through a stimulating experimental programme.

The nature of science as an overarching theme.

The study of a concept-based syllabus.

One piece of internally assessed work, the scientific investigation.

The collaborative sciences project.

The SL course provides students with a fundamental understanding of physics and experience of the associated skills. The HL course requires students to increase their knowledge and understanding of the subject, and so provides a solid foundation for further study at university level.

Collaborative Sciences Project

All Diploma Course candidates must participate in an interdisciplinary investigation into the nature and process of science. This is a collaborative investigation including students from all four disciplines.

Course structure

The structure of this physics syllabus is intended to promote concept-based learning and teaching that can be connected through three concepts: energy, particles and forces. These concepts appear throughout the five organising themes in the physics syllabus.

A.

A.1 Kinematics

A.2 Forces and momentum

A.3 Work, energy and power

A.4 Rigid body mechanics

A.5. Galilean and special relatively

D.1

Assessment at SL

Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes)

Paper 1A: Multiple choice questions Paper 1B: Data-based questions

45 marks)

Paper 2 (1 hour and 30 minutes)

Short answer and extended-response questions on standard level material only.

55 marks)

The internal assessment consists of one task: the scientific investigation. This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

(Total 24 marks)

B.The particulate nature

C. Wave behavior

of matter

B.1 Thermal energy transfers

B.2 Greenhouse e ect

B.3 Gas laws

B.4 Thermodynamisc

B.5 Current and circuits

C.1 Simple harmonic motion

C.2 Wave model

C.3 Wave phenomena

C.4 Standing waves and resonance

C.5 Doppler e ect

E.Nuclear

E.1

E.4

E.5

Topics with content that should be taught to all students

Topics with content that should be taught to all students plus additional HL content

Topics with content that should only be taught to HL students

Paper 1 (2 hours)

Paper 1A: Multiple choice questions

1B: Data-based questions

60 marks)

Paper 2 (2 hours and 30 minutes)

Short answer and extended-response questions on standard level and additional higher level material.

90 marks)

The internal assessment consists of one task: the scientific investigation. This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

(Total 24 marks)

DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT 37
Fields
Space, time & motion D.
Gravitational fields
Electric and magnetic fields
Motion in electromagnetic fields
Induction
D.2
D.3
D.4
and quantum
physics
Structure of the atom
E.2 Quantum physics
E.3 Radioactive decay
Fission
Fusion and stars
Assessment component Weighting External assessment (3 hours) 80%
(Total
36%
(Total
44%
Assessment at HL Assessment component Weighting External assessment (4 hours
30 minutes) 80%
and
(Total
36%
Paper
(Total
44%
Internal assessment (10 hours) 20% Internal assessment (10 hours) 20%

Computer Science

Entry requirements:

New students:

HL & SL Level completed the IGCSE Computer Science course or any experience with Computing or Computer Science is an advantage.

Internal students:

HL & SL Level completed the IGCSE Computer Science course, a background in coding would an advantage.

Who should take this course?

Computing science is aimed at students who wish to study Computer Science at university level.

What current students say…

“It is an in depth course that covers many topics that we didn't study at IGCSE level.”

The DP Computer Science course requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. The course, underpinned by conceptual thinking, draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge, and enables and empowers innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge. Students study how computer science interacts with and influences cultures, society and how individuals and societies behave, and the ethical issues involved. During the course the student will develop computational solutions.

This will involve the ability to:

Identify a problem or unanswered question. Design, prototype and test a proposed solution. Liaise with clients to evaluate the success of the proposed solution and make recommendations for future developments.

The aims of the Computer Science courses are to:

Provide opportunities for study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students developing the skills necessary for independent and lifelong learning

Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize computer science

Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize computer science

Demonstrate initiative in applying thinking skills critically to identify and resolve complex problems

Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, e ective collaboration and communication in resolving complex problems

Develop logical and critical thinking as well as experimental, investigative and problem-solving skills

Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of computer science to communicate information confidently and e ectively

Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology

Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with continued developments in IT systems and computer science

Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.

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Course structure

Core syllabus content

SL/HL core

Topic 1: System fundamentals

Topic 2: Computer organization

Topic 3: Networks

Topic 4: Computational thinking, problem-solving and programming

HL extension

Topic 5: Abstract data structures

Topic 6: Resource management

Topic 7: Control

Case study

Additional subject content introduced by the annually issued case study

Option

SL/HL core

HL extension

Students study one of the following options:

Option A: Databases

Option B: Modelling and simulation

Option C: Web science

Option D: Object-oriented programming

Internal assessment

Solution

Practical application of skills through the development of a product and associated documentation

Group 4 project

Computer Science assessment at SL

Assessment component

External assessment (2 hours and 30 minutes)

Paper 1 (1 hour and 30 minutes)

Short answer and structured questions covering the following subject objectives:

Know and understand

Apply and Use

Construct, analyse and evaluate

Paper 2 (1 hour)

Answer questions on their chosen option covering the following subject objectives:

Know and understand

Apply and Use

Construct, analyse and evaluate

Internal assessment (30 teaching hours)

Solution

The development of a solution for a specified client to a specified problem or an unanswered question.

Computer Science assessment at HL

Assessment component

External assessment (4 hours and 45 minutes)

Paper 1 (2 hours and 10 minutes)

Short answer and structured questions covering the following subject objectives:

Know and understand

Apply and Use

Construct, analyse and evaluate

Paper 2 (1 hour and 20 minutes)

Answer questions based on their chosen option covering the following subject objectives:

Know and understand

Apply and Use

Construct, analyse and evaluate

Paper 3 (1 hour)

Answer questions based on the case study covering the following subject objectives:

Know and understand

Apply and Use

Construct, analyse and evaluate

Internal assessment (30 teaching hours)

Solution

The development of a solution for a specified client to a specified problem or an unanswered question.

Weighting

Weighting

39
80% 40% 20% 20% 20%
70% 45% 25% 30 DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

GROUP 5 Mathematics

Students will be able to choose from two courses. Mathematics: applications and interpretation, or, Mathematics: analysis and approaches. Both courses will provide the students the options of studying the subject at SL or HL.

These courses include core syllabus content for SL along with extended syllabus content within each topic for HL. Students wishing to study subjects with a high degree of mathematical content should therefore opt for a mathematics HL course rather than a mathematics SL course.

Course structure

All topics are compulsory. Students must study all the SL sub-topics in each of the topics in the syllabus as listed in this guide.

Topic 1: Number and Algebra

Topic 2: Functions

Topic 3: Geometry and trigonometry

Topic 4: Statistics and probability

Topic 5: Calculus

Mathematical exploration: Internal assessment in Mathematics SL is an individual exploration. This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics.

The internally assessed component, the exploration, o ers students the opportunity for developing independence in their mathematical learning. Students are encouraged to take a considered approach to various mathematical activities and to explore di erent mathematical ideas. The exploration also allows students to work without the time constraints of a written examination and to develop the skills they need for communicating mathematical ideas.

SL

These courses cater for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as Chemistry, Economics, Psychology and Business Administration.

The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way. Students should, wherever possible, apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context.

HL

These courses cater for students with a good background in Mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. The majority of these students will be expecting to include Mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as Physics, Engineering and Technology. Others may take this level because they have a strong interest in Mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems.

These courses focus on developing important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent and rigorous way. This is achieved by means of a carefully balanced approach. Students are encouraged to apply their mathematical knowledge to solve problems set in a variety of meaningful contexts. Development of each topic should feature justification and proof of results. Students embarking on this course should expect to develop insight into mathematical form and structure, and should be intellectually equipped to appreciate the links between concepts in di erent topic areas. They should also be encouraged to develop the skills needed to continue their mathematical growth in other learning environments.

Mathematics: applications and interpretation SL/HL

Mathematics: applications and interpretation focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques, with a greater emphasis on Topic 2 (Functions) and Topic 4 (Probability and Statistics). Technology will play a large role in this course.

Entry requirements:

SL:

New students: Passing entrance test

Internal students: No specific requirements.

HL:

New students: Passing entrance test with a score of at least 80%

Internal students: Achieving at least a B in IGCSE Additional Mathematics OR an A* in IGCSE Mathematics (Extended)

Who should take this course?

SL: Students who do not plan to take mathematics-related courses at the university level.

HL: Students who consider mathematics as one of their strongest subjects but prefer technology to algebra.

What current students say…

“The Internal Assessment allows me to explore the area that I like and learn to connect mathematical theories with real-life situations.”

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Mathematics: analysis and approaches SL/HL

Mathematics: analysis and approaches also focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques, however, with a greater emphasis on Topic 1 (Number and algebra), Topic 3 (Geometry and trigonometry) and Topic 5 (Calculus). Algebraic skills will be tested and developed in this course.

Entry requirements: Who should take this course? What current students say…

SL:

New students: Passing entrance test

Internal students: Passing the IGCSE Additional Mathematics OR achieving a minimum of a D in IGCSE Mathematics (Extended)

HL:

New students: Passing entrance test with a score of at least 80%

Internal students: Achieving at least a B in IGCSE Additional Mathematics OR an A* in IGCSE Mathematics (Extended)

Assessment in Mathematics SL

Assessment component

External assessment

Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Technology required for AI (Applications and Interpretations). No technology allowed for AA (Analysis and Approaches). Short-response and extended response questions.

Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes) Technology required. Short-response and extended response questions.

SL: Students whose university entry requirements do not include Higher Level for the mathematics course.

HL: Students who have successfully completed the Cambridge IGCSE Additional Mathematics course; students who consider mathematics as one of their strongest subjects.

SL: "Mostly algebra and calculus but there is also some stats and probability."

HL: "There is a lot to learn. There are a lot of concepts."

Internal assessment

Mathematical exploration Internal assessment in mathematics SL is an individual exploration. This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics and will be externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Weighting

Paper 1 (2 hours)

Technology required for AI (Applications and Interpretations). No technology allowed for AA (Analysis and Approaches). Short-response and extended response questions.

Paper 2 (2 hours)

Technology required. Short-response and extended response questions.

Paper 3 (1 hour)

Technology required. Two compulsory extended-response problem-solving questions.

Internal assessment

Mathematical exploration

Internal assessment in mathematics HL is an individual exploration. This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics and will be externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

41
80% 40% 40% 20%
component
External assessment
Assessment
Weighting
80% 30% 30% 20% 20% Assessment in Mathematics HL DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

GROUP 6 The Arts

Visual arts

Entry requirements:

A natural interest in visual art is important and having previous success in drawing and painting is an advantage.

Preferably students will have secondary Art experience (Yr. 10-11).

Those enrolled at RGSV in Year 11 should have studied IGSCE Visual Art or Prep DP Visual Art.

Who should take this course?

The IB DP Visual Art program is aimed at students who want a career in the creative arts sector. These include careers in; architecture, animation, fashion, illustration, and photography.

Students who take Visual Arts will develop skills in drawing and painting, sculpture, photography, and digital art, as well as learning how to curate exhibitions and journal their process.

Visual Arts continually creates new possibilities and can challenge traditional boundaries. This is evident both in the way we make art and in the way we understand what artists from around the world do. Theory and practice in visual arts are dynamic, ever changing and connect many areas of study and human experience through individual and collaborative production and interpretation.

New ways of expressing ideas help to make visual arts one of the most interesting and challenging areas of learning and experience. The processes of designing and making art require a high level of cognitive activity that is both intellectual and e ective. Engagement in the arts promotes a sense of identity and makes a unique contribution to the lifelong learning of each student. Study of visual arts provides students with the opportunity to develop a critical and intensely personal view of themselves in relation to the world.

The Diploma Programme Visual Arts programme enables students to engage in both practical exploration and artistic production, and in independent contextual, visual and critical investigation. The course is designed to enable students to study visual arts in higher education and also welcomes those students who seek life enrichment through visual arts.

Course structure

Visual arts in context

Visual arts methods

Communicating visual arts

Distinction between SL and HL

Because of the nature of the subject, quality work in visual arts can be produced by students at both HL and SL. The aims and assessment objectives are the same for visual arts students at both HL and SL. Through a variety of teaching approaches, all students are encouraged to develop their creative and critical abilities and to enhance their knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of visual arts.

The course content for HL and SL may be the same. However, due to the di erent amount of time available for each, students at HL have the opportunity to develop ideas and skills, to produce a larger body of work and work of greater depth. In order to reflect this, the assessment criteria are di erentiated according to level.

What current students say…

“I am learning how to communicate my ideas through my artwork”

“Art challenges the way I see the world, to develop and change what I am thinking.”

“When I do Art I have a safe place to express myself.”

Visual Arts assessment Assessment component Weighting

Comparative study (External assessment)

Students analyse and compare di erent artworks by di erent artists. This independent critical and contextual investigation explores artworks, objects and artefacts from di ering cultural contexts

SL: 10-15 Screens

HL: 10-15 Screens plus an artwork related to the artist of study and 3 Screens

Process portfolio (External assessment)

Students submit carefully selected materials which evidence their experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of visual arts activities during the twoyear course

SL: 9-18 Screens

HL: 13-25 Screens

Exhibition (Internal assessment)

Students submit for assessment a selection of resolved artworks from their exhibition. The selected pieces should show evidence of their technical accomplishment during the visual arts course and an understanding of the use of materials, ideas and practices appropriate to visual communication.

SL: 4-7 Artworks, Exhibition Text and Curatorial Rationale

HL: 8-11 Artworks, Exhibition Text and Curatorial Rationale

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20% 40% 40%
43 DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

Music

Entry requirements:

New students:

ABRSM G4 (or above) or equivalent in any instrument.

Music theory Knowledge ABRSM G4 (or above) or equivalent.

Compstional/ Notation experience will help.

Internal students: All of the above

A* A or B at IGCSE Music recommended.

Who should take this course? What current students say…

Musicians dedicated to all- round learning in Music.

Researchers, Performers and Composers- you will integrate all of these roles into your work.

Open minded musicians who are prepared to step out of their comfort zone to interact with the four Areas of Inquiry.

Mature, hardworking students!

“Music is a very challenging subject at DP level”.

“You must be ready to work really hard to achieve well in this course”!

“I am learning to use research, analysis and contextual information for preparing my own performance and creative work”.

Music is an essential part of the human experience and a unique mode of creativity, expression and communication. Music is both functional and meaningful, and its vitality and complexity enriches our lives. Though music is rooted in specific societies and cultures, it also transcends—and often connects—them. Music not only o ers a way of understanding the world, but also a means by which we can express and share our understanding of it with others.

Music’s many rich histories continue to evolve through individual and collaborative contributions. In the past, as in our contemporary and increasingly digital world, music responds to, and is shaped by, new and emerging technologies and approaches.

The study of music encourages inquiry into creative practices and performance processes. Music study develops listening, creative and analytical skills, as well as encouraging cultural understanding and international-mindedness. In this way, music is a catalyst for expanding critical thinking—a crucial life skill. When we understand others and ourselves through music, we are empowered to make positive and e ective change in the world.

In this course, students and teachers engage in a journey of imagination and discovery through partnership and collaboration. Students develop and a rm their unique musical identities while expanding and refining their musicianship.

Throughout the course, students are encouraged to explore music in varied and sometimes unfamiliar contexts. Additionally, by experimenting with music, students gain hands-on experience while honing musical skills. Through realising and presenting samples of their musical work with others, students also learn to communicate critical and artistic intentions and purpose.

As students develop as young musicians, the course challenges them to engage practically with music as researchers, performers and creators, and to be driven by their unique passions and interests while also broadening their musical and artistic perspectives.

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Distinction between SL and HL

The syllabus di erentiates between SL and HL. The greater breadth and depth required for HL is reflected through an additional assessment task. This task requires HL students to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the core syllabus areas by formulating and communicating intentions for a project that is based on:

Real-life practices of music-making

Their experiences as developing musicians in this course

Their collaboration with others

Exploring Music in Context

Students select samples of their work for a portfolio submission (maximum 2,400 words). Student submit:

a. written work demonstrating engagement with, and understanding of, diverse musical material

b. practical exercises:

o creating: one creating exercise (score maximum 32 bars and/or audio 1 minute as appropriate to style)

o performing: one performed adaptation of music from a local or global context for the student’s own instrument (maximum 2 minutes)

c. supporting audio material (not assessed).

Experimenting with Music

Students submit an experimentation report with evidence of their musical processes in creating and performing in two areas of inquiry in a local and/or global context. The report provides a rationale and commentary for each process. Students submit:

a. a written experimentation report that supports the experimentation (maximum 1,500 words)

b. practical musical evidence of the experimentation process:

o three related excerpts of creating (total maximum 5 minutes)

o three related excerpts of performing (total maximum 5 minutes)

Presenting Music

Students submit a collection of works demonstrating engagement with diverse musical material from four areas of inquiry. The submission contains:

a. Presenting as a researcher

o programme notes (maximum 600 words) with fully notated scores and evidence of any work produced in Digital Audio Workstations

b. Presenting as a creator

o composition and/or improvisation (maximum 6 minutes)

c. Presenting as a performer

o solo and/or ensemble (maximum 12 minutes)

o excerpts, where applicable (maximum 2 minutes)

The Contemporary Music-Maker (HL only)

Students submit a continuous multimedia presentation documenting their real-life project. Students submit: Multimedia presentation (maximum 15 minutes), evidencing:

a. the project proposal

b. the process and evaluation

c. the realized project, or curated selections of it.

Course Structure External/ Internal SL HL
30% 20% External
30% 20% Internal Course Structure External/ Internal SL HL
40% 30% External
NA 30% 100% 100% Internal 45
DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

Admissions to the Diploma Programme at RGSV

CAN ANYONE ENTER THE IB DIPLOMA PROGRAMME?

Yes! The IB Diploma is an open programme.

However, the programme is rigorous and students are advised to seriously consider the recommendations of teachers and counsellors before choosing their subjects as this can impact upon success at the IB Diploma.

Admission to the Diploma Programme at RGSV is firmly rooted in two supporting principles. The first being, where possible all students who can benefit from participation in the IB Diploma Programme should have that opportunity. The second is that where possible all students should have access to the full Diploma Programme.

Admission Routes.

Internal Entries:

(Existing Students moving from Year 11 to Year 12)

Students entering the IB Diploma internally from the IGCSE Programme at RGSV take part in an extensive course selection process that includes input from sta as well as the DP Coordinator and University Counsellor. The Diploma Programme course selection process occurs during Year 11, where students take part in a series of workshops and seminar sessions as outlined in the IB Diploma Subject selection section below.

While each student is individual and this is evident within each student’s own programme, RGSV advises that students selecting Higher Level (HL) subjects would be expected to regularly achieve grade B or above during the final two years of in-school assessment or as a final IGCSE grade in that subject. All students entering the Diploma Programme should also demonstrate a commitment to the Learner Profile, in part evidenced through their approach to learning.

For Standard Level (SL) subjects students would be expected to regularly achieve grade C or above during the final two years of in-school assessment or as a final IGCSE grade in that subject.

Where a student has not met the above requirements fully, entry to the full Diploma Programme may be granted as a conditional entry through discussion with the Headmaster or Head of Secondary and the DP Coordinator. Students entering conditionally will be expected to follow a support programme agreed with the DP Coordinator towards successful completion of the Diploma Programme. Progress of conditional students will also be monitored throughout the programme with target setting and review meetings twice each semester.

Students who have not met the above requirements may elect to take individual IB Diploma Programme courses. Where this route is deemed appropriate for the student and their future aspirations individual programmes of courses and support will be developed in thorough discussion with the DP Coordinator and University Counsellor.

External Entries:

All external entries to the Diploma Programme undertake placement testing to help determine suitable pathways through the programme for each student. Programme testing is based on the preliminary subject choices of each entrance student with tests in English and Mathematics mandatory for all applicants. This is considered in conjunction with previous school records and results of any recognised external examinations or assessments that are aligned to the expectations for Internal entrance within RGSV. As part of the application process each applicant, and their parents, have an individual course selection meeting with the Diploma Programme Coordinator and University Counsellor following successful completion of all entrance requirements prior to formal acceptance onto the Diploma Programme. Each application is processed on a case by case basis.

For example:

• IGCSE as per RGSV Internal candidates

• IB MYP. HL subjects: regularly achieving a 5 or above in the final two years of the MYP. SL subjects: regularly achieving a 4 or above in the final two years of the MYP

• Other systems as equivalent

For further details please refer to the RGSV Admissions Policy.

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WHAT DOES SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THE IB DIPLOMA PROGRAMME MEAN?

All final written examinations are taken at RGSV in May of Year 13, but they are set and assessed by IBDP external examiners. In addition, for most subjects, approximately 25% of the assessment is done internally.

The DP grading scheme for each subject is as follows:

7 = excellent

6 = very good

5 = good

4 = satisfactory

3 = mediocre

2 = poor

1 = very poor

The Diploma of the International Baccalaureate will be awarded to a candidate whose overall score is 24 points or above, provided all the following requirements have been met:

Numerical grades have been awarded in all six subjects registered for the Diploma;

An approved programme of CAS has been completed; Grades A (highest) to E (lowest) have been awarded for both Theory of Knowledge and an extended essay, with a grade of at least D in one of them;

There is no grade 1 in any subject;

There is no grade 2 at Higher Level;

There is no more than one grade 2 at Standard Level; Overall, there are no more than three grade 3 or below; At least 12 points have been gained on Higher Level subjects (candidates who register for 4 Higher Level subjects must gain at least 16 points at Higher Level);

At least 9 points have been gained on Standard Level subjects (candidates who register for two Standard Level subjects must gain at least 6 points at Standard Level);

The final award committee has not judged the candidate to be guilty of malpractice.

Bonus points

Up to three bonus points in total can be earned for performance in the Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay. These bonus points are added to the candidate’s total score.

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DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT

IS IT NECESSARY TO FOLLOW THE WHOLE PROGRAMME?

Students who wish to obtain the Diploma of the International Baccalaureate must meet all requirements. Under some conditions it may not be possible for a student to take the full IB Diploma Programme. In these instances a student is entered for Individual Diploma Programme Course credits, whereby the student gains individual certification from the IB for each successfully completed full IB Diploma Subject course.

HOW DO STUDENTS DECIDE WHICH PROGRAMME AND SUBJECTS TO TAKE?

Since all candidates have di erent needs and backgrounds, it is important to work out which programme to take in consultation with the IB Coordinator and University Counsellor. This process starts in Year 11; prior to the student starting the two-year programme. There will also be Information Evenings to inform parents and students about the various courses o ered.

ONLINE LEARNING

(A 21 CENTURY APPROACH TO BROADENING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES)

IB World Schools, like RGSV, have the opportunity to enrol students in Diploma Programme courses online. These courses are developed and delivered by IB-approved online course providers. Approved course providers comply with the IB standards and practices for course development and course delivery. RGSV will be using the successful Pamoja Education provider.

We, as well as the IB recognise that Diploma Programme courses online can:

Extend subject choice for students in IB World Schools

Create the potential for di erent ways to experience international and intercultural classrooms

Enable students to develop essential learning skills

Students, especially those new to online learning, can find the initial experience challenging. An online course will require as much, if not more, of a student’s time as the equivalent face-to-face course. Consequently, the time devoted to online courses will be scheduled as a regular part of a student’s school day, with the expectation that a student will need additional time to study and complete assignments. The time allotted for this by the school will also be used for meetings between the student and site-based coordinator to discuss grades, progress and to resolve technical or other issues. As courses can be accessed at any time during the day or night, students may sometimes wish to start an assignment during the day and finish it away from school.

Success for students also relies on their access to appropriate hardware, software and to the internet. A prestart technical check will take place by the site-based coordinator to ensure that the student is able to operate all necessary systems and pre-empt a loss of time at the beginning of the course. Students will require o -school time to complete course work; therefore, the site-based coordinator will ensure, via liaising with the family, that students have the necessary devices and systems for o site access.

E ective time management skills and self-discipline are necessary for students to succeed in online courses. Online students will have frequent interaction with teachers and classmates synchronously via web conferencing, phone calls, online chats or other technologies, as well as asynchronously via discussion boards, forums, wikis, feedback on assignments and other means. Students taking a Diploma Programme course online will study the same material and take the same exams as face-to-face students.

Taken from IBO Publication Diploma Programme courses online: An overview for schools (Aug 14)

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ST

RECOGNITION OF THE IB DIPLOMA FOR ADMISSIONS

TO UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES – UK

UK universities and colleges accept the International Baccalaureate Diploma for entry to all first degree courses and higher education institutions. However, the institutions are autonomous, and therefore the standards required (i.e. combination of IB subjects, points secured in total and in individual subjects) are a matter for each individual institution to decide. Requirements will vary considerably depending on the institution and the course. RGSV recommends that students read the IB guide on applying to the U.K. as an IB student. (https://www.ibo.org/contentassets/5895a05412144fe890312bad52b17044/recognition---internationalstudent-guide-uk--march2016---eng.pdf.pdf)

All applications for full-time undergraduate degree, Diploma of Higher Education, HND and Foundation degree courses at UK Higher Education institutions should be made via UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). All applications are made online via the UCAS website (www.ucas.com) between 1 September and 15 January for entry in the following September/October. (However, applications for the University of Oxford or the University of Cambridge, and for courses in Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine must be made by 15 October of the year preceding entry). Applicants may select up to five choices of institution/course, but are restricted to four choices for courses in Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine with the opportunity to apply to one further choice of courses in other subject areas.

Applications to Art and Design courses are made through two di erent pathways of equal status:

(a) Route A (simultaneous route) - applications to be made between 1 September and 15 January

(b) Route B (sequential route) - applications to be made between 13 February and 24 March.

Institutions make their decisions independently of each other and relay them to applicants via UCAS. If the IB Diploma has not yet been achieved, the o ers will normally be conditional on specified IB grades being obtained.

Please refer to the UCAS website (www.ucas.com) which includes Course Search listing entry requirements for all courses in the UCAS scheme.

For further information:

UCAS

PO Box 28

Cheltenham

GL52 3LZ

www.ucas.com

RECOGNITION OF THE IB DIPLOMA FOR ADMISSIONS

TO UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES – USA

Although there is no national ministry or centralised bureaucracy in the United States that controls university admission or placement, all colleges and universities value and accept the International Baccalaureate Diploma as a valid qualification equivalent to the American high school diploma. Some higher education institutions will also accept Diploma Courses. RGSV recommends that students read the IB guide on applying to the U.S. as an IB student. (https://www.ibo.org/contentassets/5895a05412144fe890312bad52b17044/recognition---internationalstudent-guide-us--march2016---eng.pdf.pdf)

A student interested in post-secondary study in the USA should contact the college or university he or she is interested in directly. Each university application is unique, and it is the student’s responsibility to explore the college's website, email the Admissions O cer and discuss with the University Counselor to understand all the requirements and deadlines of the specific college or university.

In general terms, U.S. colleges and universities require you to submit a written application for admission, which is often done through the Common Application (www.commonapp.org), the Coalition Application (www.coalitionforcollegeaccess.org) or individual university websites. University applications often include written essays and a list of extracurricular activities the student has undertaken. Students will also need to request two letters of recommendation from teachers. RGSV will submit these letters of recommendation and a transcript with secondary school grades directly to the university on the student’s behalf.

Additionally, many universities require either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (www.collegeboard.org) or the American College Test (www.act.org). These tests are being reconsidered as the COVID-19 pandemic has left students around the world without access to the SAT/ACT testing centres. As a result, many universities have implemented test-optional policies. Students whose first language is other than English are normally required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (www.toefl.org) or International English Language Testing System (www.ielts.org). IB exams, while not mandatory, will increase a student’s chance for securing admission to selective universities and often count as credit towards completing a bachelor's degree.

Other web sites may be helpful in answering general and specific questions about the college admissions process in the U.S.A. Consult The National Association of College Admissions Counseling (www.nacac.com); The College Board (www.collegeboard.org); EducationUSA (www.educationusa.info) and the Higher Education Directory and the Higher Education Resource Center of the web site for the Council of International Schools (www.cois.org).

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DP SUBJECTS GUIDE FOR 2024-2026 COHORT
Reigate Grammar School Viet nam, No 6-7 Nguyen Cong Thai Street, Dai Kim New Urban Area, Hoang Mai District, Hanoi, Vietnam +84 ( 0 ) 2 4 3 5 4 0 9 1 8 3 1 i nq u i r y @reigategr a m m ar.edu. v n reigategrammar edu.vn
Reigate Grammar School Viet nam, No 6-7 Nguyen Cong Thai Street, Dai Kim New Urban Area, Hoang Mai District, Hanoi, Vietnam. +84 (0) 2435 409 183 1 inquiry@reigategrammar.edu.vn reigategrammar.edu.vn
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