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PRESIDENT'S REPORT 2019–20


To our friends and supporters, This past year has been unlike any in Millersville University’s history. After a fun and eventful fall semester, the early months of 2020 saw the SARS COVID-19 pandemic spread quickly across the globe, necessitating a decisive and rapid response. Our community banded together to ensure continuity of our classes and our operations, and I am deeply grateful to our faculty, staff and students for their support of each other and our university. While the pandemic shaped the second half of the year, it did not define our community or prevent us from achieving numerous successes. In the pages that follow, I am happy to share with you the many ways our community has shined in these unusual times. The past year brought major successes in planning for our future. We submitted our Reaffirmation of Accreditation Self-Study to the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and set a comprehensive virtual site visit for the fall. Through the work of the All University Council, we completed our 2020-25 Strategic Plan, Tradition and Transformation, which was endorsed by the Council of Trustees in June and will serve as our blueprint for the next five years. We also completed a Campus Facilities Master Plan and updated our Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Strategic Plan and incorporated them into our Strategic Plan using an integrated planning approach. The past year also brought new heights for giving to MU. We received the single largest gift in our history—a $3.5 million gift to support nursing scholarships from Ms. Liselotte Wehrheim. We also received a gift of $3 million from Sam and Dena Lombardo to support the first named college in our history, the Lombardo College of Business. Through these and many other generous gifts to MU, we ended the third year of the Imagine the Possible campaign with a total of about $52.8 million, which exceeded our goal of $32 million by 65%. We also continued to lay the foundation for long-term student success. We established a chapter of Alpha Alpha Alpha, a new honor society for first-generation students, as well as a Chartered Circle of the National Leadership Honor Society, Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK). We added seven new undergraduate major programs that are aligned with regional workforce needs, created a Student Success Center that centralizes key student services, and welcomed a new Associate Provost and Dean of Student Success, Dr. Rachel Finley-Bowman, and Dean for the Lombardo College of Business, Dr. Marc Tomljanovich. Our student athletes excelled on the field—including back-to-back PSAC Championships for men’s soccer—and in the classroom, with a combined GPA of 3.37 among our 388 student athletes. I hope you enjoy the many highlights contained within this report and allow them to bring you joy and reasons to share in our optimism for the days ahead.

With warm regards,

Dr. Daniel A. Wubah President, Millersville University


By the Numbers WHAT THEY SAY ABOUT

MILLERSVILLE

100

+

UNDERGRADUATE

PROGRAMS

OF STUDY

95% MERIT-BASED 83% SCHOLARSHIPS OF GRADUATES EMPLOYED WITHIN 6 MONTHS

OF STUDENTS RECEIVE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Philanthropic Gifts to Millersville University RAISED

$3,500,000

$52.8 MILLION

Imagine the Possible LARGEST GIFT IN UNIVERSITY HISTORY CAMPAIGN Freshman Class Profile AVERAGE SAT CR (ERW) + M

1097

AVERAGE ACT (COMPOSITE)

23 AVERAGE GPA 3.4

26 ratio of

19:1

TOP 30

$292,000

RAISED THROUGH OUR ANNUAL GIVING EVENT TO SUPPORT STUDENT SUCCESS Give To What You LOVE | 2 • 27 • 20

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE

STUDENT : TEACHER

RANKING

2.3% REDUCTION IN

UNDERGRADUATE TOTAL COST OF ATTENDANCE

OF PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN THE NORTH

98%

OF FACULTY HOLD HIGHEST DEGREE IN THEIR FIELDS

8 new

AFFINITY-BASED PROGRAMS

for students of color, LGBTQIA+and the Latinx community

7 new

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Degrees awarded

961 336

Bachelor’s degrees

Graduate degrees


A Tale of

TWO SEMESTERS

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2), dominated and changed the trajectory of life for local, national and international communities in 2020. The Millersville University community was no exception. Faced with adjusting to a new way of operating, teaching, and learning, the University responded quickly and effectively. On February 28, President Wubah issued his first communication to campus detailing how the Incident Response Team had been formed to track the course of the pandemic. In the coming weeks, MU students who were studying abroad were called home, and by March 9, a decision to move to remote-learning modalities for a short period of time after spring break had been made. On March 16, with consideration of the directives coming out of the governor’s office, the Department of Health and Office of the Chancellor, it was officially decided that all face-to-face instruction would be suspended through the remainder of the spring 2020 semester. Faculty were then trained on online platforms, including D2L and Zoom, and classes were transitioned. A total of 37,331 Zoom sessions were held during the spring semester. Offices and departments across campus were challenged to move their services online, as all nonessential workers

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were asked to work remotely for the foreseeable future. This presented specific challenges for each office as employees familiarized themselves with new technologies and remote work expectations. Helping students process all of the changes this semester, including the virtual move to online learning and the physical move off campus for most students, became the primary focus for the University. Departments such as Counseling and Human Development met with students over video chats or phone calls, as did advisors, professors, athletic team coaches and others. They all did their part in easing the challenging transition. Despite the quick changes this spring, communication between the University, its faculty, staff and students remained strong and provided critical support during a tumultuous time. At the end of the semester, the Student Affairs and Enrollment Management division issued a survey to Millersville students that yielded positive results. Of 6,065 students surveyed, 81% of those responding agreed or strongly agreed that the University provided effective communications regarding COVID-19, and 80% of students agreed or strongly agreed that they were able to access the technology they needed. More than 65% of the students agreed or strongly agreed that they had access to University resources, that administration and staff showed concern for their needs, and that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the University’s response.


[ COVID-19 Response ]

Student Compassion Fund

$8,155,782

$2,808,651

$37,121

Student Fees refunded

CARES Act funding available

Raised

2,284

716

37,331

IT Help Desk Tickets addressed

Courses added for remote instruction

Donated to first responders

89,006

1,791 159

Pairs of PPE gloves

COVID-19 webpage views

PPE respirators

Zoom sessions

200 189

Faculty participated in

Training sessions for remote instruction

MU Video

1,490 7,746 1,050,680

Students, faculty and staff added

Degrees awarded

New videos

Bachelor’s degrees

Minutes of video

Graduate degrees

961 336

Stats as of May 2020

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• •

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0

20

25

202 ST

EGIC PLA

N

TRADITION AND TRANSFORMATION 2020 • STRATEGIC PLAN • 2025

• Ensure access, affordability and completion • Invest strategically in people and place • Transform student experiences and foster • Communicate our value innovation

After a year of hard work, Millersville University has a new strategic plan, complete with a vision, mission statement and strategic directions. The work is the result of the All University Council (AUC), an ad hoc group created to enhance input into the development of Millersville University’s 2025 strategic plan. The 85 members of the AUC met every other Tuesday during common hour from August 2019 to May 2020 to help plan Millersville University’s future. The AUC and five phase teams completed a draft in April 2020. The President’s Cabinet, Strategic Advisory Council (SAC) and President Wubah reviewed and further refined the plan. In addition, using the model of Integrated Planning, the facilities master plan and the Diversity,

Equity and Inclusion Strategic Plan were both approved and incorporated into the new strategic plan. At their meeting in June 2020, Millersville’s Council of Trustees endorsed the overall 2020-25 strategic plan for a July 1 launch. The plan, which will guide Millersville University through 2025, includes and supports our EPPIIC Values. A lot of the planning that went into developing the new strategic plan occurred prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The SAC made adjustments to accommodate the early impacts of the pandemic while finalizing the strategic plan and will continue to look for transformational opportunities in the months ahead.

Dr. Lisa R. Shibley, 57, of Lancaster, died on March 21, 2020, after a three-year battle with ovarian cancer. Dr. Shibley joined Millersville University in 2007 as the Assistant Vice President of Institutional Assessment and Planning. Her work on Middle States reaccreditation spanned from the “Rediscover Millersville: The 2010 Self-Study” to serving on the coordinating team of the 2020 Self-Study until her death. In addition, she was one of the architects behind the former strategic plan, “Our Bold Path,” and she was the glue that held together the Strategic Advisory Council and the All University Council for their work on the new strategic plan. Her spirit will live on through our plan and impact students for the next decade and beyond.

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OUR MISSION We are a community dedicated to high quality education at an exceptional value.

OUR VISION We will inspire learners to change the world.

OUR EPPIIC VALUES Our EPPIIC values guide all that we do. They are foundational elements that guide our decision making, inform our strategy and define our culture.

EXPLORATION

INCLUSION

We embrace a culture of exploration, creating a dynamic learning environment that fosters intellectual curiosity, creative intelligence, innovation, forward-thinking ideas and exciting discoveries. We place a high value on student-faculty research, scholarship and collaborative projects.

We are firmly commit­ted to supporting and advancing the diversity and inclusion of our campus community. Inclusion is creating a campus community where differences are welcomed and respectfully heard and where every individual feels a sense of belonging. We affirm our shared values, recognize our challenges and commit to building on existing efforts to foster a diverse, equitable and inclusive campus community.

PROFESSIONALISM Our diverse community of learners is comprised of skilled and dedicated educators and staff who model maturity of thought and practice while exhibiting mutual respect. We provide opportunities for professional development and growth, especially for our students, using academic enhancement and collaborative programs to emphasize the importance of critical thinking, active listening, self-discovery, collaborative leadership and responsibility.

PUBLIC MISSION Our mission calls upon us to respond to the urgent and emerging needs of our growing regional, urban and metropolitan communities. Through interdisciplinary learning, collaborative and cross-cultural experiences and a renewed focus on a liberal arts tradition, we prepare our students for meaningful participation in the broader society.

INTEGRITY We steadfastly defend freedom of thought, ideas and discourse as core to authentic and honest scholarship. We consistently live by and practice our institutional principles, standards and beliefs.

COMPASSION Our ethos of compassion permeates all of our endeavors and interactions. Learning about and being sensitive to the experiences of people and cultures, whether nearby or afar, fosters individual, professional and institutional growth. Compassion moves the campus community towards focusing on each learner and their unique potential to impact the public good.

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STRATEGIC DIRECTION 1

ENSURE ACCESS, AFFORDABILITY AND COMPLETION NEW ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

NEW INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DEGREE

Academic Affairs added seven new undergraduate major programs, all bachelor’s in science—Entertainment Technology, Sport Administration, Packaging Engineering Technology, Information Technology, Media Arts Production, Environmental and Spatial Sciences and Multidisciplinary Studies to the university curriculum. The new programs are all aligned with regional workforce needs. In addition, a new graduate program, Educational Specialist in School Psychology, was added to the curriculum.

Millersville University is now offering a bachelor’s degree in information technology. Classes for this new major began in fall 2020.

Showcasing the vitality of our University’s community outreach, Millersville was reapproved for the prestigious Carnegie Community Engagement Classification for another five years. This elective designation is the highest standard of recognition for community engagement efforts among institutions of higher education. The University also started the “30 to Graduate Initiative,” which encourages students to earn 30 credits per year to graduate in four years. The initiative helps students customize a schedule to fit their needs and saves them money.

“As technology advancements change our lives, there are more well-qualified IT professionals needed Dr. Behrooz Etesamipour to create and maintain information systems,” said Dr. Behrooz Etesamipour, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. “In all aspects of our society, such as healthcare transportation, education, businesses and government, information technology plays an important role. In every place where technology is involved, there is a need for an IT professional to create and support the system. And, because of the current pandemic, there are even more jobs in the field.”

LOMBARDO

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

NEW LOMBARDO COLLEGE OF BUSINESS On May 6, 2020, Dr. Samuel Lombardo and his wife Dena announced a $3 million gift for the Lombardo College of Business. With other gifts throughout the years, it brings their total giving to Millersville University to over $5 million! The gift will be used where it’s most needed in the Lombardo College of Business: for student scholarships, faculty development, equipment and internships. The Lombardo College of Business is the first named college in the history of Millersville University.

6Dr. Samuel Lombardo and his wife Dena.


MEDIA ARTS PRODUCTION Lights. Camera. Action. Get in front of or behind the lens of the camera. Pick up a microphone. Develop production expertise and gain a deep understanding of the tools and traits that mean success in the exciting, competitive and fast-paced industry of media arts production through this new academic program. Because developing media is more relevant than ever, our students in this major learn every aspect of storytelling and content creation for broadcast and film, from concept to distribution: planning, writing, directing, producing, shooting and editing. Massive shifts in the media industry have created a new, overarching term called “content creators," and our new program is training students to become just that.

ENSURE ACCESS, AFFORDABILITY AND COMPLETION | 7


STRATEGIC DIRECTION 2

RANSFORM STUDENT EXPERIENCES T AND FOSTER INNOVATION STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER During the past year, the University made significant progress to create a Student Success Center in Lyle Hall. The center now houses the Registrar, Student Financial Services, Learning Services and Tutoring, International Programs and Services, and the College of Education and Human Services Advisement Support Center. The Success Center is also the new home for the Center for Academic Excellence and MU’s Instructional Design team.

NEW HONOR SOCIETIES Millersville University launched the inaugural “First-Gen Week,” a new program that saw 449 people attend first-generation celebration events and the chartering and induction ceremony of Alpha Alpha Alpha. In addition, the University received a charter to launch a circle of Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK).

“Actualized through our EPPIIC values, student success is a holistic enterprise in which every stakeholder on campus plays a role in championing a learning community dedicated to intellectual, personal, purposeful and professional growth.”

In November 2019, Millersville joined the nationwide movement to celebrate first-generation college students, faculty, staff and alums. First-Generation Week at MU ran November 2 to November 8 and included events ranging from a breakfast and wellness event, to free flu shots and a celebration.

Dr. Rachel Finley-Bowman, Dean of Student Success and Associate Provost for Academic Support Services

ALPHA ALPHA ALPHA During First-Gen week, a new honor society for first-generation students on campus was introduced. The Tri Alpha celebration introduced the Alpha Alpha Alpha chapter to MU’s campus. Tri Alpha recognizes the academic achievements of first-generation college students. Students who have completed at least three full-time terms of study, come from a family where neither parent nor any legal guardian earned a bachelor’s degree and have an overall GPA of 3.2 are welcome to join.

Darlene Newman, ’84, director of Student Access and Support Services and a first generation student, notes the importance of First-Gen week for MU’s campus. “While this is our first year participating in FirstGeneration Week, Millersville University has long been a supporter of first-generation college students and their educational journeys,” said Newman. “Many of our faculty and staff are also first-generation students. This week of events is designed to shine a light on these students and give them the support they need through resources and mentorship opportunities.”

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OMICRON DELTA KAPPA Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK) is a national organization that identifies, honors and develops leaders in collegiate and community life. The Millersville University chapter was established in the fall of 2019, and Millersville is now one of only two PASSHE institutions with an on-campus chapter. To become a member of ODK, students must hold a minimum 3.3 cumulative GPA, be a junior or senior ranking in the upper 35% of their class, and demonstrate leadership achievements in scholarship, athletics, campus or community service, social or religious activities, campus government, journalism or mass media or in the creative and performing arts.

“Alpha Alpha Alpha, or Tri Alpha, is an honor society for first-generation students on campus. As a firstgeneration student, college can be hard sometimes, especially because my mother never went to school. I came to the United States from a refugee camp in Nepal, where education seemed limited. Coming to the United States has opened many doors for me. Having additional support from Tri Alpha and the way it represents firstgeneration students, and my mom’s hard work to give me more opportunities motivate me, to work harder, do well in college and continue my higher education.” Apsara Uprety ‘23, English Education and Social Work – Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Presentation of ODK Charter.

Student Spotlight – ODK

Millersville University’s charter group of more than 35 members includes faculty, staff, administrators and student leaders. Among those were eight student-athletes, including football’s Nicholas Borelli. Borelli, a junior, holds a 3.64 GPA as an accounting major. He currently serves as the president of Millersville’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) and is the PSAC SAAC representative. He is a two-time PSAC Scholar-Athlete.

TRANSFORM STUDENT EXPERIENCES AND FOSTER INNOVATION | 9


MILLERSVILLE ATHLETICS It was a bittersweet 2019-20 season for Millersville Athletics. The Marauders provided much to celebrate, but a pandemic cut short promising seasons for baseball, softball, lacrosse, track and field, men’s and women’s golf, and men’s and women’s tennis. Without sports in the spring, the student-athletes rallied against adversity, producing an outstanding academic semester. All 19 teams produced a GPA of 3.0 or higher, and the 388 student-athletes combined for a 3.37 GPA. More than 47 percent of all student-athletes achieved Dean’s List status in the spring. The department set a new record with 169 PSAC Scholar-Athletes.

SUCCESS IN COMPETITION The men’s soccer team became the third team in the last 50 years to win back-to-back PSAC Championships when it defeated Gannon, ranked fifth in Division II, by a 1-0 score on Nov. 17, 2019. Freshman Bob Hennessey scored the game’s only goal. Goalkeeper Darian McCauley was

voted MVP. The championship landed the team in the NCAA Tournament for the second consecutive season. At season’s end, Jacob Gosselin was named PSAC East Athlete of the Year. Women’s soccer’s 15 victories set a school record, and a 3-1 victory of No. 23 East Stroudsburg on Nov. 6 marked the program’s first in the NCAA Tournament. Senior Kay Liebl finished her career as the only Millersville women’s soccer player named All-Atlantic Region three times. She set the program’s career record for goals (39) and points scored (96). Led by PSAC Athlete of the Year Jayci Suseland and AllPSAC performers Katie Laughman and Lindsey Blevins, Millersville women’s volleyball won a school record 26 matches, breaking the record that was previously set in 1995. The team won its second NCAA Tournament match, beating Shippensburg in five sets. Suseland set a Millersville record with 463 kills on the season and 1,474 in her career. Laughman also set a single-season record with 1,289 assists.

Men's Soccer celebrates back-to-back PSAC Championships.

10 | TRANSFORM STUDENT EXPERIENCES AND FOSTER INNOVATION


Track and field’s Aliyah Striver earned USTFCCCA All-America recognition in the shot put after qualifying for the NCAA Championships. Striver won both the shot put and hammer throw at the PSAC Indoor Championships en route to being named PSAC Championships Field Athlete of the Meet. Despite significant injuries to key players throughout the season, the men’s basketball team advanced in the PSAC Tournament for the first time since 2015. Khari Williams, James Sullivan and Caden Najdawi made Millersville the only team in the PSAC with three all-division selections.

Aliyah Striver

Field hockey won at least 13 games and reached the postseason for the eighth consecutive season. Erica Tarsi, Jordan Goddard and Hannah Brown were all named All-America.

RETIREMENT OF LONGTIME MARAUDERS After 30 seasons and more than 600 victories, women’s basketball coach MARY FLEIG announced her retirement. Fleig earned 523 of her 645 wins at Millersville and left the game ranked 11th all-time in Division II in wins. She won seven PSAC East titles and six PSAC East Coach of the Year Awards.

Coach Mary Fleig

DONNA ESHLEMAN spent 36 years serving the student-athletes and coaches in athletic operations. Eshleman announced her retirement in June, ending a career that started in 1982 and included four seasons as the softball coach. Eshleman is a lifelong Marauder, having graduated from the University in 1982, starring in both basketball and softball.

“To accomplish what we did as a team meant so much to us. At the beginning of the season, we set goals for our team to accomplish, and we had a mutual understanding that we had to all work hard to reach them. Making it to the NCAA regional proved to us that the morning lifts and practices paid off. We hope it is motivating to future teams to push harder and go farther, which is great for the program.” Jayci Suseland ’20, Biology. Suseland became one of the most decorated and dominant volleyball athletes in Millersville history after deciding to transfer and move from Michigan to Lancaster County to live closer to family. The 2019 PSAC Athlete of the Year led the Marauders to a PSAC East title in 2018 and the program’s first NCAA Tournament appearance since 1995. Suseland plans to graduate in December 2020 with a degree in biology and then apply to veterinary school to continue pursuit of her dream career. She has interned the previous four summers at a large vet animal clinic.

Donna Eshleman

TRANSFORM STUDENT EXPERIENCES AND FOSTER INNOVATION | 11


STRATEGIC DIRECTION 3

INVEST STRATEGICALLY IN PEOPLE AND PLACE “IMAGINE THE POSSIBLE” CAMPAIGN FOR STUDENTS The “Imagine the Possible” campaign has provided Millersville University students with access to highquality academic and athletic opportunities and handson learning experiences since the campaign began in July 2017. As the first fundraising campaign in the history of Millersville University entirely focused on students, the “Imagine the Possible” campaign has produced valuable benefits, including supporting 1,957 scholarship award recipients, 807 student-athletes and providing financial support for 519 students exploring the world through study abroad programs, to name just a few of the ways students were helped by campaign funds already. In light of the magnitude of the challenges facing Millersville University students and their families as a result of the pandemic, the University announced an extension of the “Imagine the Possible” fundraising campaign to support student success. In making the announcement, President Wubah said the impact on students has been tremendous already, and the expansion of the “Imagine the Possible” campaign has the ability to benefit every student seeking support during this difficult time.

When the campaign launched in July 2017 with a goal of raising $32 million in private support for student scholarships, athletics and student experiences, no one imagined that as of June 2020, the campaign fundraising total would reach more than $52.8 million in support— over 165% to goal. Throughout the first three years of the “Imagine the Possible” campaign, generous donors contributed more than $14.4 million to support scholarships for students, more than $5.1 million for Marauder Athletics and more than $33 million for Student Learning Experiences like student faculty research, study abroad, internship stipends, and funds to support unique student learning experiences at the new Lombardo College of Business. The length and goal for the campaign extension will be determined at a later time. For more information, visit the campaign website at Imagine.Millersville.edu.

“Imagine the Possible” Campaign Fundraising Progress (July 2017–June 2020): Percent to goal as of June 2020: 165% overall | Three-Year Fundraising Total: $52,839,892

Campaign Priority Areas:

SCHOLARSHIPS: Goal: $10 million

SCHOLARSHIPS

145%

o Percent toward goal as of June 2020

STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES: Goal: $16 million

STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES

208%

o Percent toward goal as of June 2020

MARAUDER ATHLETICS: Goal: $6 million

ATHLETICS

85%

o Percent toward goal as of June 2020 12

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Noah Manno ’23

MAJOR: Music Education & Vocal Performance

“‘Imagine the Possible’ is about nurturing, encouraging and supporting excellence in education and student achievement for Millersville students. In the spring of 2020, when COVID-19 brought our country and our educational institutions to a standstill, students and professors at Millersville University stepped up and met the challenge with creativity and determination. I have the pleasure of being a part of Millersville’s sole a cappella group, Chromatic. We designed and executed a new and refreshing way for our vocal performances to be shared. The group put together a virtual choir experience. Over 50,000 people have viewed our work. The support Millersville University has provided each and every one of their students has allowed me along with many other students to imagine the possible.”

Susan Lloyd ’20

MAJOR: Secondary Mathematics Education

May 2020 graduate Susan Lloyd was assisted by the “Imagine the Possible” campaign through her internship at Donegal Insurance and as a scholarship recipient. “The dedication of professors toward students made my Millersville experience a great one,” she said. “The campus was big enough to get a great college experience, but small enough to have a great sense of community, which I felt from my first tour to the day I graduated. Millersville has such a strong network of donors, which allowed me to get scholarships and graduate in four years,” she said. Lloyd, who participated in the Math Educator Organization, Relay for Life and Leadership Honor Society at Millersville, is now in graduate school at Penn State.

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2019-20 FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS REVENUES Source of Funds

Actual 2019-20

Tuition

$71,650,111

Fees

$14,417,317

State Appropriation

$35,567,379

Gifts, Grants and Contracts

$2,024,657

Sales and Services of Educational Activities

$1,670,721

Other Sources

$2,490,738

Total E&G Revenues

$127,842,619

EXPENSES

Revenue 56.1% Tuition 2 7.8% State Appropriation 11.3% Fees 1.9% Other Sources 1.3% Sales and Services of 1.6%

Educational Activities Gifts, Grants and Contracts

Expenses Actual 2019-20

Instruction

$54,855,564

Academic Support

$9,914,695

Student Services

$16,689,139

Institutional Support

$28,090,940

Operation and Maintenance of Plant

$12,845,534

Student Aid

$3,310,705

Total E&G Expenses

$125,706,576

43.6% Instruction 22.3% Institutional Support 13.3% Student Services 10.2% Operations and 7.9% 2.6%

Maintenance of Plant Academic Support Student Aid

UNDERGRADUATE COST TO ATTEND 2018-19 ACADEMIC YEAR

$22,838

GREAT COLLEGES

U.S. News & World Report 2020

RECOGNITION

PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN THE NORTH

2019-20 ACADEMIC YEAR

$22,324

A REDUCTION OF 2.3%

$23,500

$23,000

$22,500

$22,000

$21,500

$21,000

$20,500

$20,000

14

TOP 30

2020

TO WORK FOR


SCHOLARSHIPS 300

269

250

Scholarships

200

231 189

$1,041,044

$1,000,000

$881,477

$820,158

$1,200,000

$800,000

150

$600,000

100

$400,000

50

$200,000

0

2017-18

2018-19 Scholarships

2019-20

$-

Scholarship Dollars

Giving Record (% of total committed)

45% 31% 10% 6%

Grants Alumni Associations Friends

5% 3% <1% <1%

Corporations Foundations Employees Parents

THE 2019-2020 GIVING RECORD Unrestricted

Restricted

Donor Count

Total

Pledge Balance

Total Committed

Alumni

$171,105

$4,814,539

2,321

$4,985,644

$2,134,803

$7,120,447

Parents

$6,782

$48,400

334

$55,181

$800

$55,981

Friends

$17,126

$921,697

979

$938,823

$3,107,135

$4,045,958

Employees

$7,593

$58,773

286

$66,366

$10,055

$76,421

Associations

$11,014

$1,636,403

48

$1,647,416

$0

$1,647,416

Corporations

$4,348

$774,368

125

$778,716

$105,250

$883,966

Foundations

$5,000

$415,833

19

$420,883

$60,000

$480,883

Grants

$7,210,408

36

$7,210,408

$7,210,408

Contracts*

$73,990

4

$73,990

$73,990

$15,954,461

4,152

$16,177,427

2019-20 Totals

$222,967

$5,418,043

$21,595,470

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STRATEGIC DIRECTION 4

COMMUNICATE OUR VALUE INCLUSIVE EXCELLENCE At Millersville University, our EPPIIC (Exploration, Professionalism, Public mission, Inclusion, Integrity, Compassion) values are everything that makes our campus what it is. It is our goal to continually improve them.

“We have to speak truth to empower,” said Dr. Felicia Brown-Haywood, Millersville’s Chief Diversity Officer. “I compare it to pulling back the layers of an onion. It’s going to get on our hands and smell, maybe even make our eyes water. However, this type of enlightenment is going to make not just our campus, but the world a better place.”

If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s that we can always be doing more. That’s why our Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Strategic Plan was reviewed and updated to include new goals and objectives and incorporated into the 2020-25 University Strategic Plan. A major initiative completed by our Office of Diversity and Social Justice was the creation of the Millersville University Inclusive Community Response Team and the launch of the MU Incident Bias Reporting system. Students, faculty or staff now have the option to fill out an anonymous inclusive community report form if they witness or hear something that bothers them from a standpoint of not being culturally diverse or inclusive. Our Inclusive Community Response Team, which is comprised of undergraduate students, graduate students and faculty in our Office of Diversity and Social Justice, is always looking for ways to improve inclusion and open dialogue. In February 2020, we celebrated Black Heritage Month with multiple events and welcomed Dr. Mary Frances Berry as the keynote for the Carter G. Woodson Lecture.

Dr. Felicia Brown-Haywood, Chief Diversity Officer

CARNEGIE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

CLASSIFICATION

2019

AWARD WINNER HIGHER EDUCATION EXCELLENCE IN DIVERSITY 8th   CONSECUTIVE YEAR

16 | COMMUNICATE OUR VALUE

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IN PENNSYLVANIA by Your Local Security

#6 SAFEST COLLEGE CAMPUS IN THE USA FOR 2019


KENT AWARDED WITH MILLERSVILLE SOCIAL JUSTICE AWARD Domir Kent’s resume will be many pages long when he graduates from Millersville University in the fall of 2021. Kent, an engineering major, is the president of the Society of Latino Affairs, founder of Millersville’s chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers, a member of Millersville’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee, a committee member for the Black Justice Council, a Resident Assistant for the South Village residence halls and is currently on a committee that’s Domir Kent, '21 working with the Student Memorial Center to fill the building with more diversity. As a result of this leadership and involvement, Kent was named the 2020 recipient of the Commitment to Social Justice Award. Kent’s mother is Puerto Rican and his father is African-American. Growing up with different traditions and norms compared to the rest of his peers was just a way of life. His upbringing in Philadelphia, a city that is 65 percent non-white, also led to interactions with people of all different backgrounds. Kent plans to pursue a master’s degree in business after graduation next year. He hopes to one day own a house-flipping business.

“As a Community Policing Specialist, my role is to develop a rapport with students and serve as a liaison to the student body so they feel comfortable coming to us with questions and concerns. Keeping the campus safe, in every aspect, means quite a lot to me. We want parents and the students to feel and be safe here, and I think we do that. MU takes every precaution to keep our students, faculty, staff and visitors safe.” Officer Phoulideth Chanthongthip ‘21, Multidisciplinary Studies major – Quarryville, Pennsylvania

COMMUNITY POLICING Millersville became the first university in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) to have Community Policing Specialists. On December 17 during a swearing-in ceremony, Officers Phoulideth Chanthongthip, Mary Reynolds and Shawn Sweda were provided certificates of recognition as Community Policing Specialists. The process included completing about 80 hours of training and education on engagement and problem solving, and emphasizes the commitment of the department to public mission.

“As a community policing specialist, I have gotten to attend more trainings and learn more about community and police relationships. I get to work closely on community engagement opportunities and functions which get the students and community members to bond with police in a more relaxed manner. Community Policing is all about strengthening the bond and relationships within the community and building trust with one another. It is so important that we form these bonds with the community to ensure that not only are we keeping people safe, but that they also feel safe with us around and feel comfortable enough to approach us in any setting. I am truly honored to be of service to MU.” Mary Reynolds, Community Policing Specialist – Lancaster, Pennsylvania

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SUSTAINABILITY POSITIVE ENERGY FUND Millersville University is converting building energy savings into human energy by using dollars from utility rebates and the Lombardo Welcome Center’s energy savings to fund faculty, staff and student-led projects that contribute positively to local and global communities. The work is being recognized. In September, Millersville was one of four universities recognized nationally as a Green Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education.

“The Positive Energy award has helped me prove to myself that what I do is valid and important, that hard work does pay off and that doing what you love is absolutely achievable. Achieving sustainable practices with ocean resources is a major need going forward. One of the most diverse and biologically productive ecosystems within our oceans are coral reefs. These reefs provide endless resources for coastal areas and are often a staple in economic growth. If humans continue to negatively impact the oceans and the reefs within them, we will see diminishing resources and the economic effects to match. That’s where my project comes into play. Because of this award, I am working with computer simulations to determine the impacts that commercial fishing is having on the resiliency of coral reefs.”

In October, President Wubah accepted the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) Excellence and Innovation in Sustainability and Sustainable Development award in recognition of the Positive Energy Fund.

Dr. Daniel Wubah receiving the award from AASCU.

Robyn Blevins ‘20, first-generation college student, biology major concentrating in Marine Biology and a minor in Mathematics – York, Pennsylvania

2019

AWARD WINNER

GREEN RIBBON SCHOOL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

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2020

SUSTAINABILITY AWARD WINNER FROM AASCU EXCELLENCE AND INNOVATION IN SUSTAINABILITY


HOBBS-WICKERSHAM DONORS* The Hobbs-Wickersham Society recognizes individuals who ensure the long-term stability and growth of Millersville University through their estate plans. W. Gary & Nancy C. (Brown) ‘73 Adams

James E. Harf ‘61

Walter Leo Petroski ‘75

Barbara Jo Apichella ‘69

Nadene K. Hausmann ‘78

Frank E. & Verla Phillips

Edward & Jacqueline ‘69 Balderston

Michael E. & Margaret A. ‘53 Helmintoller

Marc T. & Carol Y. Phillips

Richard F. ‘70 & Jeanne Barbacane

Robin D. ‘71 & Wendy L. Herr

Steven R. ‘89 & Lynn A. ‘91 Pomponi

Margaret E. Bellis ‘52

Kathryn J. Hess ‘84, ‘92M

Ronald D. Porter ‘67

Diane L. ‘82 & Jim Black

Douglas W. ‘97 & Janet (Pitkin) ‘97 Hitz

Robert Lamar Redcay ‘76

John L . Bockelmann ‘66

Leroy T. Hopkins ‘66

Jacqueline Lee Reighard

Seymour & Anita Brandon

Micheal B. Houlahan

Thomas M. ‘92 & Jennifer L. ‘92 Renkevens

Lyman R. Brenner ‘71

James C. ‘73 & Judith (Miller) ‘74 Hower

Melinda Rae Richards ‘84

Rebecca Anne Brown ‘72

Charles W. & Nancy E. ‘80 Hungerford

Brian Andrew Rider ‘87

Hannah Gettz Bryson ‘50

Peter L. & Barbara B. ‘65 Hunsberger

Charles W. ‘10H & Patricia Kay ‘66, ‘10H

Clintin E. Probst & Karen E. ‘95 Buehler-Probst

Eleanor D. Isaacson

Joseph A. ‘03H & Linda R. ‘03H Caputo

Jerri Anne Johnson ‘76, ‘87M

Jean Marie Romig

David B. & Elizabeth A. ‘70 Chamberlin

Janet E. Kacskos

Essie M. ‘63 & Franklin J. Rothermel

Roy B. ‘67, ‘13H & Rochelle Clair

Suzanne L. Keffer ‘78

Bernice R. Rydell

Robert R. ‘60 & Dorothy A. ‘74 Cooper

Thomas G. Klingensmith ‘72

Randy C. & Luan M. Ryder

Bennett J. ‘67 & Joanne E. (Wargo) ‘67 Cooper

Fay F. Kramer ‘62

Joseph Ronald ‘70 & Karen L. ‘70 Sadowski

Barbara Radgowski Czestochowa ‘69

Richard H. Kuhn ‘57

David E. ‘82 & Leslie M. ‘86 Schlosser

Ingrid (Benjamin) DeBellas ‘71

Timothy I. & Eilena R. Ladd

Kathryn G. Seaber ‘76

Dennis Denenberg

William H. & Barbara R. ‘70 Lashley

Edward C. & Carol T. Shane

Victor S. & Melanie A. DeSantis

Walter J. & Frances E. Legenstein

C. Ray & Francine R. Shaw

Steven A. DiGuiseppe ‘82

Marie Bryson Libhart ‘63

Sylvia Shellenberger ‘71

Dominick ‘53 & Helen DiNunzio

Eric G. ‘71 & Rochelle M. ‘70 Liddell

Robert L. Shoener & Alan K. Wyand

Kathleen (Davison) ‘74 & John J. Dobbins

Samuel N. ‘07H & Dena M. Lombardo

Robert L. ‘78 & Jane Slabinski

Alma P. Duncan

H. Sidney Long

Paul H. & Catherine L. Slaugh

Ruth R. Dutcher

William B. McIlwaine

Jeffrey A. ‘91 & Amy E. Sollars

Gerald C. & Susan Eckert

Michael K. McInerney ‘76

Jeffrey S. Crompton & Susan A. ‘77 Stanton

Evelyn M. Ernst

A. Lucille Meissner ‘68

Dennis J. ‘70 & Constance R. Stephen

Glenna M. Eshleman ‘50

Salvatore Micciche

Glenn R. ‘75 & Karen M. Stickles

Owne B. & Ermaleen B. ‘68 Etter

J. Eric ‘76 & Julie A. ‘78 Miller

Jack M. & Anne J. ‘54 Stumpf

Nancy J. Fegley ‘76

James R. ‘70 & Naomi Miller

Gerald R. ‘65 & Kathleen E. ‘65 Swope

Robert J. ‘74 & Mary Mcevoy Fink

Paul Lorah Minnich

Patrick J. Tell

Stacey M. Fink ‘72 & Karen Ketner-Fink

Stephen J. & Patricia A. ‘75 Moran

Thomas C. Tirado

Ronald D. ‘57 & Mary Frey

David R. Morris ‘01

Jeffrey W. Vermuth ‘71

Eugene E. & Mary N. ‘73 Fritz

Karl E. & Carolyn S. Moyer

Michael G. Warfel ‘84

Jack F. ‘64 & Joyce ‘64 Fuls

Stephen Murray & Anne C. Jackson ‘78

James K. & Rebecca K. ‘79 Weaver

Carrie N. Gardner ‘90

Flo E. Neff ‘71

Gerald S. & Rebecca Weiss

Conor G. Gilbert ‘15

Margaret J. Neff

Robert O. & Kathleen C. ‘60 Winder

Richard A. & Lorena S. ‘98 Glenn

Conrad W. Nelson ‘93

R. Michael & Nancy D. ‘87 Wunderly

Warren L. Godshall ‘72

Robert P. ‘70 & Rose L. Newcomer

Rachael D. Wywadis ‘73

Chester L. & Kay L. ‘60 Gontner

John & Kristina M. ‘71 O’Doherty

George J. & Zaferula (Valudes) ‘62 Yelagotes

Louis F. & Susan Grammes

John F. & Candace H. ‘76 O’Donnell

Lee Snyder & Charlotte J. ‘55 Zeigler-Snyder

Jan L. ‘80 & Alisa McCambridge ‘80 Graybill

Renee Genbauffe O’Leary ‘50

J. Terry Zeller ‘64

Stephen R. ‘72 & Mary Ann ‘74 Gring

Harvey W. Owen

Roland T. ‘69 & Judith F. ‘71 Hahn

Kate Y. Parker ‘76

*Bolded names indicate new members.

Robertson

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1855 SOCIETY DONORS The 1855 Society recognizes individuals whose contributions, while living, total or exceed $25,000. W. Gary & Nancy C. ‘73 Adams

Lee & Amy H. Dmitzak

Michael & Wendy Jackson

William W. ‘90 & Susan C. Adams

Patrick M. Donan ‘85

Scott T. ‘88 & Deborah C. Jacobs

Elizabeth M. Allen

John W. Dooley & Sandra L. Turchi-Dooley

Jerri Anne Johnson ‘76

John M. & Vivien G. Anderson

Tom R. & Shelly (Kreiger) Duff

Robert L. ‘61 & Nancy H. ‘60 Jones

Ralph G. & Judith ‘76 Anttonen

Alma P. Duncan

Stephen ‘70, ‘12H & Veronica (Jordan) Kepchar

Andrew H. Appel

Ruth R. Dutcher

Joyce (Denelsbeck) King ‘83

Gibson E. ‘09H & Martha Armstrong

Thomas G. ‘75 & Lori A. ‘77 Ecker

Regis P. & Irene R. Kirchner

Carol S. Avery ‘70

Gerald & Susan Eckert

Andrea C. Kissh ‘76

Edward & Jacqueline ‘69 Balderston

William E. Evans

Fay Kramer ‘62

Ann B. Barshinger

Wilson Farrell & Joyce Munro

Howard L. ‘57 & Martha Kriebel

Dorothy P. Beam

Stacey M. ‘72 & Karen Leigh Fink

Darryl L. ‘85 & Suhaila Landis

Paul S. ‘71, ‘07H & Caroline E. Beideman

Saul W. ‘85 & Tracy L. Fink

John M. & Mimi Lembo

Daniel R. ‘71 & Gretchen (Dieck) Biemesderfer

Glenn M. Flegal ‘54

Eric G. ‘71 & Rochelle M. ‘70 Liddell

Larry W. Bishop

Richard L. Frerichs ‘64

Bruce R. & Lynda Limpert

Frederick & Heike ‘94 Bloom

Leigh Ann & Joseph M. Fulford

Lynn W. Lisella

Richard E. ‘67 & Elaine N. ‘67 Blouse

Joseph W. ‘90 & Elizabeth J. ‘91 Garner

Leonard S. & Evanna S. ‘90 Litowitz

John L. Bockelmann ‘66

John H. & Susan J. Garofola

Harry Albert ‘65 & Carolyn Lohss

Chip & Kathleen L. ‘70 Brabson

J. Philip ‘67, ‘80 & MaryAnn ‘67, ‘70M Gerber

Samuel N. ‘07H & Dena M. Lombardo

Lyman R. Brenner ‘71

Conor G. Gilbert ‘15

H. Sidney Long

Gerald M. Brenner ‘64

Brian T. ‘87 & Judith M. Gladden

Susan P. Luek

Michael K. ‘81 & Neysa M. (Fratantoni) ‘81

Catherine C. Glass ‘53

Kimberly A. Mahaffy

Joseph W. ‘53 & Susan (Fulton) ‘84 Glass

Kevin B. ‘81 & Pamela J. (Kane) Mahoney

David T. & Marilyn A. ‘58 Camp

M. Constance B. Greeley

Douglas L. & Frances M. Maine

Joseph A. ‘03H & Linda R. ‘03H Caputo

Andrew A. ‘73 & Margaret H. ‘73 Greenawalt

John Charles ‘73 & Ann Sheridan ‘74 Martin

Judith C. Carter ‘60

Stephen R. ‘72 & Mary Ann ‘74 Gring

Michael A. McCarty

Samuel E. & Lorraine Casselberry

Kent C. & Elisabeth H. Habecker

C. Clair & Margaret D. McCormick

Michael T. & Jennifer A. ‘81 Chambers

James D. Hagelgans & Gale Zorian-Hagelgans

William B. McIlwaine

Joseph Y. ‘96 & Eileen E. Choi

John M. & Audrey Hallgren

Michael K. McInerney ‘76

Dana Andrea Chryst ‘81

James E. Harf ‘61

Francine G. McNairy ‘13H & Herbert A.

Bernard P. ‘73 & Yvonne J. Citerone

Nadene K. Hausmann ‘78

Richard D. Clark & Sepideh Yalda

John K. Herr & M. Diane Koken ‘72, ‘08H

Dale H. ‘60 & Doris Messerschmidt

Elizabeth L. Cleaver

Stuart W. & Cynthia Herr

Salvatore Micciche

Greta L. Cohen

J. Wilson ‘72 & Donna Jean ‘72 Hershey

Lois Todd Morgan ‘54

Frank G. ‘53 & Inez Coons

Kathryn J. Hess ‘84

Phyllis S. Mowery

Bennett J. ‘67 & Joanne E. (Wargo) ‘67 Cooper

Mervin W. ‘70 & Nora L. Hess

Karen Ashkar Murley ‘63

Richard G. Cornogg & Martha P. ‘83 MacAdam

Albert C. Hoffman

Dennis W. Murphy

John Lloyd Davenport

Linda Holman-Marcks

James L. ‘69 & Linda G. Natale

Susan Ashbey Davis

Benjamin L. Holmes & Carol J. Scheifele-

Margaret J. Neff

Callahan

William L. Davis

Holmes ‘65

McNairy-Nelson

Conrad W. Nelson ‘93

Benjamin J. ‘77 & Anna DeBlois Del Tito

Leroy T. Hopkins ‘66

Joseph P. & Marianne S. ‘70, ‘74M Nolt

Dennis Denenberg

Micheal B. Houlahan

Renee Genbauffe O’Leary ‘50

David R. ‘80 & Jennifer H. ‘80 Dickinson

James C. ‘73 & Judith (Miller) ‘74 Hower

Kate Yvonne Parker ‘76

Abram W. ‘73 & Karen Louise Diffenbach

Peter L. & Barbara B. ‘65 Hunsberger

Byron L. & Dolores E. B. ‘56 Parry

Maureen (McGarvey) Dinges

Eleanor D. Isaacson

Steven R. ‘89 & Lynn A. ‘91 Pomponi

Dominick ‘53 & Helen M. DiNunzio

Anne C. Jackson-Murray ‘78 & Stephen Murray

William K. ‘83 & Diane K. Poole

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Vilas A. & Sneha V. Prabhu

Janet A. ‘65 & Georg U. Simon

Paul W. & Judy Ware

Willis Ratzlaff & Genevieve M. Tvrdik

Robert L. ‘78 & Jane Slabinski

Michael G. Warfel ‘84

Jacqueline Lee Reighard

William E. & Joyce (Scout) Smedley

Daniel J. & Charmaine A. Warmenhoven

Larry N. Reinking

Carol M. ‘64 & Joseph P. Snyder

Marjorie M. Warmkessel

H. James ‘69 & Dorothy G. Reisinger

Jeffrey S. Crompton & Susan A. ‘77 Stanton

Gerald S. & Rebecca Weiss

Hans E. Richter ‘10

Samuel N. & Margaret Lee Stayer

Richard Welkowitz

Charles W. ‘10H & Patricia Kay ‘66, ‘10H

Richard W. & Heidi Stewart

Steven Widdowson

George F. & Helen A. ‘64 Stine

Richard S. ‘52 & Barbara Ann ‘54 Will

Rick & Jessica L. Rodgers

Gerald R. ‘65 & Kathleen E. ‘65 Swope

Stephen H. ‘73 & Linda L. ‘73 Williamson

Bernice R. Rydell

Patrick J. Tell

Ronald A. ‘79 & Lisa Wilson

Richard Stuart & Janet M. Sasin

Richard B. & Marjorie A. Trout

Robert O. & Kathleen C. ‘60 Winder

James W. & Sally C. ‘78 Saxton

Sarah Newton Vanderslice

Anita B. Winter

Charles K. Scharnberger

Betty W. Waetjen

Brian E. Worrell ‘76

Edward L. ‘64 & Kathy H. ‘69 Schoenberger

Robert S. ‘64 & Barbara K. Walker

Howard W. ‘72 & Lois B. Wright

Kathryn G ‘76 Seaber

Jon G. Walker

Daniel A. & Judith Wubah

Sylvia ‘71 & Robert C Shellenberger

Andrew G. Wallover

Alan E. Yefko & Trudy Tyler-Yefko ‘77

Mary Ann Shirk

Michael & Suzanne J. ‘94 Walstrum

David S. & Marie N. Zubatsky

Robertson

Robert L. Shoener & Alan K. Wyand

The 1855 Society recognizes businesses and other organizations whose contributions total or exceed $100,000. International Organization for Chemical

Access Manufacturing Systems Inc.

Sciences in Development

Arconic Foundation

Solar Innovations, Inc. Student Lodging, Inc.

Armstrong Foundation

Jay Group, Inc.

Student Services, Inc.

Armstrong World Industries, Inc.

Lancaster County Community Foundation

TE Connectivity

Benchmark Construction Company, Inc.

Lancaster General Health Foundation

The BENECON Group

Campbell Soup Foundation

Max Kade Foundation

The S. Dale High Family Foundation

Carpenter Technology Corporation

Menchey Music Service, Inc.

The Steinman Foundation

ConnectCare3

Millersville University Alumni Association

Turkey Hill Dairy, Inc.

Cy Fritz Foundation

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Brossman Charitable

UPMC Pinnacle Health – Lancaster

Foundation

Engle-Hambright & Davies, Inc. Ferree Foundation

Music for Everyone

Fulton Bank

PA State Employees Credit Union

Goethe House

RR Donnelley & Sons Company

Hughes Foundation, Inc.

Rixan Associates, Inc.

William Randolph Hearst Foundation Willis & Elsie Shenk Foundation

FIAT LUX SOCIETY DONORS The Fiat Lux Society recognizes individuals whose contributions total or exceed $1,000,000. Lyman R. Brenner ‘71

Robert L. Shoener & Alan K. Wyand

POSTHUMOUS RECOGNITION

Eric G. ‘71 & Rochelle M. ‘70 Liddell

Patrick J. Tell

Luceille Hagarman

Dr. Samuel N. ‘07H & Dena M. Lombardo

Paul & Judy Ware /The Ferree Foundation

Roy ’53 & Janet ’52 Keiser

Dr. Susan P. Luek

Michael G. Warfel '84

Clair ’26 & Velma ’24 McCollough

Lois Todd Morgan ‘54

Anita (& Dr. Charles) Winter

Edna Myers

Dr. Patricia ’66, ‘10H & Charles ‘10H Robertson

Liselotte Wehrheim ‘74 The Clarence Schock Foundation

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millersville.edu/give • giving@millersville.edu 717-871-7520 or 877-872-3820 (toll-free) Millersville University • P.O. Box 1002, Millersville, PA 17551

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The Tell School of Music Millersville University is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM). Millersville University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution. A Member of Pennsylvania ‘s State System of Higher Education. 8013-UCM-1020-JC