Annual Report FY 2014

Page 1

ANNUAL

REPORT

FY 2014 Better Before Bigger



TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S Annual Report FY 2014 (Oct 2013 - Sept 2014)

MESSAGE OF THANKS

O U R I M PA C T

04

13-16

BETTER BEFORE BIGGER

VOLUNTEER STORY

05

18-19

OVERVIEW OF SEX TRAFFICKING IN NYC

SURVIVOR STORIES

06-08

20-23

OUR RESPONSE

H I G H L I G H T O F PA R T N E R S

09-11

24

OVERVIEW OF PROGRAMS

S TAT E M E N T O F F I N A N C I A L S

12

25-29


LETTER FROM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

4

MESSAGE OF THANKS FROM JIMMY LEE "It is the privilege of a lifetime for me to be able to lead passionate, smart colleagues in this hard, incredibly rewarding work."

Dear Friends, Our motto in 2014? “Better before bigger.” We truly lived into this. From finding victims to restoring survivors, we’ve gone deeper, made difficult choices and built on our learnings ­— we have indeed gotten better: 94% increase in identifying trafficking victims via our innovative partnership with the Human Trafficking Intervention Courts, while meeting 25% more exploited women. Hiring a college professor, a former investment banker, a certified ESL instructor and one of our safehome graduates to help lead our aftercare services, while also expanding the capacity of our New York safehome by 50%.

What we do produces results. In the year to come we plan to grow our impact. We also plan to prove that our work is much more than noble activities, but a cost-effective net benefit to society. It is the privilege of a lifetime for me to be able to lead passionate, smart colleagues in this hard, incredibly rewarding work. I look forward with anticipation to report back to you exhilarating stories of beauty from pain and proven strategies that rebuild the life intended. With deep gratitude,

Establishing collaborations with anti-trafficking organizations across the nation, from CA to TN to VA to TX to DC to CO. JIMMY LEE Executive Director


K E Y I N I T I AT I V E S O F F Y 2 0 1 4

5

BETTER BEFORE BIGGER Key Initiatives from the fiscal year of 2014

RESTRUCTURED SAFEHOME Our motto for 2014 was “Better Before Bigger� and in prayer and discernment this is where God led us. Our restructured safehome strategy included closing our New Jersey safehome in June 2014 and expanding our New York safehome in July 2014. We also implemented a new staffing structure and program strategy, which required increased investment and expertise.

E X PA N D E D L E A D E R S H I P E X P E R T I S E We added significant leadership and expertise, primarily with the addition of Suzi Chun-Turley, Director of Strategy & Development (former board member) and Dr. Amanda Eckhardt, Director of Programs (former professor of counseling). We also launched our Strategic Advisory Board, consisting of senior leaders in business, nonprofit and academia.

P R I O R I T I Z E D O U R ' P R O V E ' S T R AT E G Y Our theory of why our strategies are effective must be backed up by quality indicators and outcomes. We believe that if we can indeed prove the effectiveness of our strategies in both identifying victims and restoring survivors, we will be able to make necessary adjustments, understand how to allocate limited resources, and influence the wider movement.


OVERVIEW OF SEX TRAFFICKING IN NYC

6

W H AT I S S E X T R A F F I C K I N G ? "In which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such an act has not attained 18 years of a g e . " — T r a f f i c k i n g V i c t i m s P r o t e c t i o n A c t o f 2 0 0 0 OVERVIEW OF THE CLIENTS WE SERVE:

WHERE ARE THEY FROM?

97% 97% of the women we served were trafficked in illicit massage parlors. Sex trafficking operations can be found in highly-visible venues such as street prostitution, strip clubs, spas, massage parlors as well as underground systems such as residential brothels.

We have served foreign national survivors from five different continents.

HOW ARE TH

77% 77% of the women we served are mothers. In order to support their children and/or leave an abusive husband, most responded to false job opportunities.

Traffickers typically pre brought into situations

False Promises: False promises are often of a good job in another country.


OVERVIEW OF SEX TRAFFICKING IN NYC

PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS

7 Psychological Harm:

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder:

Tr a u m a t i c Bonding:

The psychological harm of trafficking victims can include: shame, grief, fear, distrust, hatred of men, self-hatred and suicide.

PTSD symptoms can include acute anxiety, depression, insomnia, physical hyper-alertness, and self-loathing that is long-lasting and resistant to change.

Traumatic bonding is a form of coercive control in which the perpetrator instills fear in the victim as well as gratitude for being allowed to live.

Many of the women we serve report "working" from 8am - 10pm, forced to prostitute themselves as much as 5 , 1 0 , t o 3 0 t i m e s a d ay.

HEY TRAFFICKED?

ey on the poor and vulnerable, the majority being women and children. Common methods by which victims are s of sex trafficking include:

False Marriage Proposals:

Significant Other Sells:

Kidnapping:

False marriage proposals lead to a traumatic bondage situation.

A woman is sold into the sex trade by her husband, significant other, or even her parents.

Traffickers kidnap women and young girls from their remote village.


OVERVIEW OF SEX TRAFFICKING IN NYC

8

THE CHALLENGE

VICTIMS ARE HIDDEN Sex trafficking of foreign nationals is a complex crime with victims rarely coming forward and self-identifying to receive care. The level of trauma experienced by some trafficking survivors is equivalent to that of victims of state-organized torture. Similar to the psychological effects that victims experience, the negative factors that prevent these women from being “free” or reporting to law enforcement include:

Debt-bondage The victim “owes” significant funds to trafficker(s) or family/friends in order to work or get to the US.

Shame Deep shame, often more pronounced in certain cultures.

LACK OF COMPLETE AFTERCARE A lack of complete aftercare, such as scarce appropriate long-term housing, is a significant factor in the re-trafficking of victims. Emergency shelters are not safe or sufficient in meeting needs of survivors given limited language capabilities and cultural competency. Typically emergency shelters offer housing for less than three months.

87%

of sex trafficking victims in New York need long-term housing. Only 4% receive it. Safe, secure, long-term housing is essential to full recovery and a healthy future.

Fear of Jail or Depor tation Many victims are undocumented and therefore fear law enforcement and do not know their rights.

The psychological, emotional, spiritual, and in many cases physical “bondage” of trafficking is why many call this crime a form of modern day slavery. Foreign nationals have a further challenge around immigration issues and language barriers that make finding work or developing other forms of income more difficult.

BRINGING TRAFFICKERS TO JUSTICE Far too often, cooperating witnesses and/or evidence to bring a trafficker to justice are in short supply. Another challenge in bringing traffickers to justice is a distrust of law enforcement due to a victim's traumatic experience and/or mistreatment by authorities in the past. In addition, survivors are often unwilling to cooperate in prosecuting traffickers due to fear for themselves and loved ones, Stockholm syndrome, of lack of support and trust.


RESTORE NYC'S RESPONSE

9

OUR RESPONSE

R e s t o r e N YC ’s m i s s i o n i s t o e n d s e x t r a f f i c k i n g i n N e w Yo r k a n d r e s t o r e t h e w e l l - b e i n g a n d indepedence of foreign national survivors.

FIND

Victims are found through our partnerships with federal and local law enforcement, the Human Trafficking Intervention Court system, and community-based organizations.

RESTORE

We restore survivors through our groundbreaking safehome program and through our courts intervention strategy. These programs have empowered survivors to bring traffickers to justice.

WE BELIEVE In always putting the wellbeing of the survivor first

That community is essential

In complete restoration

In delivering the best-in-class care

In God's desire and power to transform


RESTORE NYC'S RESPONSE

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HOW WE FIND VICTIMS

An estimated 18,000 foreig n nationals are trafficked i nt o t h e U S annu a l ly, b u t o n ly a s m a l l percentage of victims are identified.

An estimated 18,000 foreign nationals are trafficked into the US annually, but only a small percentage of victims are identified, leaving thousands hidden and exploited. We refuse to leave these victims behind. Therefore, we actively seek to identify trafficking victims through our partnerships with:

Hu m a n Tr a f f i c k i n g Inter vention Cour ts (HTIC) Federal and Local Law Enforcement

Other non-profit and community organizations

Our primary strategy for finding victims has been through our court partnerships and the Human Trafficking Intervention Courts to meet with women who are at high risk of sex trafficking and assess whether they are actually victims. A variety of experts have recognized that prostitution is often a form of human trafficking. In response, judges, courts, and other key stakeholders have developed new approaches —rather than fines and jail time— to address this reality. Women and girls who are prostituted are often victims of violence, trauma, exploitation and coercion. New York state courts now have a policy of not prosecuting most of these victims in the traditional criminal-justice system but diverting them to a separate court that treats them as sex trafficking victims in need of social services. This is the first statewide court system in the country dealing with human trafficking. Restore was selected as one of a handful of nonprofits to participate in these courts in Queens, Manhattan and Nassau County (Long Island). At the onset of counseling, these women typically do not self-identify as sex trafficking victims, though through our experience we expect approximately 50% to indeed be victims. Therefore an important goal of ours is to increase self-identification.


RESTORE NYC'S RESPONSE

11

HOW WE RESTORE SURVIVORS OUTREACH PROGRAM Clients in our outreach program via our court partnerships are often without education about both sex trafficking and their legal/immigration rights. Moreover, they are not connected to or aware of essential community resources necessary to achieve independence and well-being. Within the court mandated sessions, we provide:

Education:

Counseling:

Resource Coordination:

On client's rights, the legal system, trafficking, trauma, coping and more

Sessions based on traumainformed care and advocacy

Connecting clients to immigration, legal service, ESL classes, job training and more

SAFEHOME PROGRAM Our Safehome program is a holistic, trauma-informed, and culturally-sensitive residential care approach to helping foreign national survivors of sex trafficking move toward greater independence and well-being. The women develop a strong community and network and ultimately regain their dignity, find identity, and establish positive goals toward restored lives. As a result, many have the courage to cooperate with law enforcement to bring traffickers to justice. We have 11 beds where survivors can stay 12-15 months in a safe home environment where their immediate, long-term, and on-going needs are met through partnerships with other service provider organizations as well as our own in-house programs. The women are diverse in terms of nationality, ethnicity, language, age, education, and religion/faith. Our programming is survivor-centered and uniquely designed for each woman based on their personal restoration goals. Programs are designed around:

Physical and Mental We l l - b e i n g :

Ecomonic Empowerment:

Spiritual Growth:

(e.g., counseling, safety planning, doctor referrals, nutrition and cooking classes, safety planning, community service)

(e.g., personal budgeting, ESL classes, job skills training, job placement)

(e.g., times of prayer, worship, thanksgiving, and reflection)


12

OVERVIEW OF PROGRAMS OUTREACH

SAFEHOME

183

14

# o f Wo m e n S e r v e d ( F Y 2 0 1 4 )

5

Country of Origin Chinese/Korean Chinese

Across Five Continents

e ur

s Un

% Tr a f f i c k e d

25

%

25%

100%

Primary Source of Referrals NYPD & NY Human Trafficking Intervention Courts

Federal Law Enforcement


O U R I M PA C T

13

OUTREACH PRO GRAM

Old Model vs. New Model

We r e c e n t l y p i l o t e d a new counseling model and curriculum where w e’v e s e e n an i n c re a s e in the women who have disclosed their trafficking history by 94%.

% o f Wo m e n W h o S e l f - I d e n t i f i e d

39%

94% increase

18%

35%

Old Model

New Model

# o f Wo m e n We S e r v e d

35%

increase

increase

18%

25%

139

183

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2013

FY 2014


O U R I M PA C T

14

OUTREACH PRO GRAM - NEW MODEL

TEAM GROWTH AND SUPPORT

FY 2014: Te a m

In FY 2014, we welcomed the following new roles to our team:

Mandarin-speaking Counselor Director of Strategy and Development

FY 2013: 1 Counselor

Aftercare Coordinator and Research Specialist 3 S o c i a l Wo r k I n t e r n s These additions enabled the team to receive more structured supervision, training, and trauma-informed care.

PROJECT H O S P I TA L I T Y Enhanced our environment to be more welcoming to visitors and the women we serve. Examples include

STRUCTURED INTO GROUPS We re-structured our counseling sessions to include group sessions to increase peer support: GROUP SESSIONS 1-TO-1

Redecorated Counseling Room

Gifted plants to our clients completing the program

Added theraputic stones to our waiting area

ADOPTED THE MIDTOWN COMMUNITY COURT CURRICULUM ( W. I . S . E . ) FO R C H I N E S E C L I E N TS Educates on rights, trafficking, trauma, and healing/coping techniques Introduces creative forms of expressions


O U R I M PA C T

15

SAFEHOME PROGRAM

OUTCOMES

Have a job when they transitioned out of the safehome Received safe housing after transitioning out of the safehome Returned to a trafficking situation

% of safehome g r a d uat e s

8 women moved into our safehome in FY 2014

80%

14

100%

In FY 2014, Restore NYC served a total of 14 women in our safehome program

0%

FOCUSED AND RE-ORGANIZED VOLUNTEERS Simplified and specified the roles and opportunities to be more impactful for safehome residents, program staff, and volunteers Enhanced volunteer training with clearer expectations, responsibilities, and structure Redesigned volunteer activities based on input from our safehome residents as well as prioritized program needs and individual restoration

5

The women we served in the safehome program came from 5 different continents


O U R I M PA C T

16

SAFEHOME PROGRAM

Key Inputs for FY 2014 INTRODUCED TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE We introduced trauma-informed care to our team and the residents of the safehome. What does that look like?

We Talk About Trauma

We work to recognize vicarious trauma and do staff self-care. It is part of our new program philosophy and mission. We discuss it during staff education, training, and consultation meetings and client interventions.

We F o c u s o n S a f e t y

We create physical and emotional safety through: Our relationships: Striving to be authentic, respectful, and hold clear boundaries Avoiding "re-traumatization" for clients Honoring and respecting diversity

We Give Clients Choice We empower clients (choice & voice) Clients help to develop our services and evaluate our work

We Hightlight Strengths We focus on the positives and see resiliency

Creating predictable environments

E N H A N C E D S TA F F I N G S T R U C T U R E We enhanced the staffing structure to be more sustainable by adjusting our safehome model from having one live-in coordinator in the home to a team of part-time coordinators, supervised by an Aftercare Specialist. In addition, we added a licensed counseling psychologist to provide mandatory weekly individual and group supervision. Lastly, we added social work interns to support the team.



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THE GLIMMER OF JEWELS Vo l u n t e e r S t o r y

A question nagged me as I walked toward the Restore NYC safehome on my first day volunteering: What were we going to talk about? The standard topics defining modern identity such as family, place of origin and work history) were taboo. Not to mention, I didn’t want to babble about clothing, eating habits or anything else that could make someone feel self-conscious. I compiled a list of basic questions: What’s your favorite color? Do you like to cook? What music do you like? And I brought along a bagful of mini pumpkins. A coordinator greeted me warmly at the safehome door. It was a fall afternoon, and a breeze blew in through a window. The spacious dining room was loaded with craft supplies, and I had time to set some of these on the long, wooden table before any of the residents got home. Then the first one arrived. “Hello! How are you? It’s so nice to meet you!” I said, holding back the Western handshake but smiling as wide as possible. The woman, let’s call her October, met my gaze with a timid but very kind smile. She was at home and wanted me to feel at home too. I told her about the pumpkins, and though she could not understand much of what I said, she nodded and followed me into the dining room. She picked up a pumpkin and turned it over in her hands, laughing. “What?” she said. I launched into an explanation of the American jack-o’-lantern and waved a hand over the craft supplies. October started painting her pumpkin bright pink.

“What’s your favorite color?” “This.” She held up the pumpkin,“Nice?” “Very nice.” Other women trickled in throughout the evening, and by the end of the night that pink pumpkin was decorated with multicolored glass beads and a stem of blue— October’s second favorite color. There were carved pumpkins in the house too, which we lit together, and the others we decorated with painted faces or more beads and sequins. Each was lovely and unique. None were standard orange. Volunteering with Restore, I have experienced love that makes me feel freer. Identity at the safehome is something simpler, more precious and diverse than we often make it out to be. Things like paychecks, qualifications, or past failures don’t matter. We meet as women, valuing each other and feeling valued. And because there are so many languages and cultures, we try not to make assumptions. We listen and learn a little more each time about how to relate, and how to love each other in a way that’s felt and understood. I leave the safehome softened by the women’s love and acceptance. I feel more courage to look at my own life and believe there can be healing— restoration from old sin and wounds. I remember what God promises to His people, those he bought back at a price:


VOLUNTEER STORY

19

“...my unfailing love for you will not be shaken.” He will go to the afflicted city, “lashed by storms and not comforted,” and rebuild it with stones of turquoise, battlements of rubies and gates of sparkling jewels (Isaiah 54).

A D I F F I C U LT S T O R Y I came to Restore quite simply because I knew I had to join the battle against human trafficking. This was how I wanted to do that and so I did it. I have not been surprised by much. I knew the safehome was going to be a beautiful and well run home because I had met the staff and seen the website. I was not surprised to find the women relatable, kind, intelligent, diligent and easy to get along with either. Who isn’t when shown a little love? Volunteering has not been a deeply emotional experience. For example, we don’t sit around and cry together. We drink tea and make glass-beaded necklaces. What’s more, volunteering has not been an unequivocally rewarding experience. I feel loved, treasured and appreciated by the women and staff. But since volunteering, I have also felt more spiritual darkness, the burden of remembering weekly that precious people are being exploited all the time. Weird and sudden fears pop up when I’m riding the subway that the people around me are going to be trafficked too, and there’s nothing I can do about it. I sometimes feel very alone in those feelings. I would rather write cathartically about shock and resolution, but that’s not my story.

And I am not done yet. You see, I am surprised about a few things. I’m surprised human trafficking still exists in such flagrant numbers and forms. I’m surprised we’re not talking about it more actively as a society and pouring far more time, resources and love into fighting it. I’m surprised that more places like Restore don’t exist all over the world, even in NYC.

HOPE FOR THIS CITY The Bible talks a lot about restoring broken cities and people. When Nehemiah led the Israelites in rebuilding Jerusalem’s walls, he started inspecting the walls by night and proceeded through the “Valley Gate toward the Jackal Well and the Dung Gate” (Nehemiah 2). He was with a small company but had to leave them behind. He was on horseback, but he later had to leave the horse, too. He finished on foot and alone. But by the end of the story, this outsider with no credentials rallied the people of Jerusalem to defend and rebuild their walls in just 52 days. I hold onto the hope that we will see such changes in our times. Sometimes it’s frustrating, lonely and upsetting to be involved in this kind of work. But it’s what needs to be done right now. And inside Restore, I can start to see the glimmer of jewels. Please pray for this work. Please pray for us volunteers. We need it.

— Lainie Mullen Volunteer of Restore NYC


S U R V I V O R ' S S T O R Y: M I N

20

MIN'S STORY The following is an 'example narrative' created and based on the stories we hear from the women that we serve. The name has been created to protect the p r i v a c y o f t h i s s t o r y.

I am Korean, but spend most of my life in China. I recently moved to Flushing, Queens for a better life. My husband and 2 year old son are still back there. My husband left after he gambled away our money. People were after him. I don’t mind. It was hard living with him. There’s no more hitting and yelling now. I never finished school and I don’t speak Mandarin very well, so finding work was hard. I didn’t know what to do. The local Chinese newspaper has ads that say I can make lots of money. Massage jobs that say no experience is needed. I call the phone number and a woman answers. She asks if I live with anyone or need housing. She asks if I have children. I smile and say that’s why I am here but that I miss him as he’s in China. She says she can provide housing and I can keep all tips. It’s safe, she assures. The woman promises me good money— it can help my son. I am hesitant because I have never worked in massage, but the woman says that I will be trained and have nothing to worry about. My luck has finally turned.

I arrive at my new job at the massage parlor. The manager is a young Chinese man. He speaks to me very quickly. He asks for my passport and takes it from me. He shows me to the room where I’ll be working. The room is small and poorly lit with just a bed and a folding chair. The man points to the chair, “Wait here.” Then to the bed, “Work here.” I object and ask for the nice woman I spoke with on the phone, but the man reprimands me and mocks my Korean accent. He says, “We provide clients, you keep tips.” I see three men during the first hour at the parlor. The manager takes pictures of me with the different men. He threatens to use those photos as black mail if I tell anyone. I must work 14 hours a day. At the end of the night I am told to go home. The manager says “See you tomorrow.” I am helpless. Scared. It’s 11pm on a holiday. I take a deep breath, knowing I still have a long night. I hear a knock and a man enters. He tells me what he paid for. I acknowledge and approach him, but he quickly takes out handcuffs and leads me out of the room. The parlor manager is in handcuffs too, cursing at another officer. We are both put in a police car and taken to the station. I don’t understand what the police officers are saying. I don’t


S U R V I V O R ' S S T O R Y: M I N

21 understand what is happening. Everything is happening so fast. I feel shame. I am now sitting in court. I am relieved that the manager is nowhere in sight. I know I am in the right place, but I feel completely out of place. It’s quiet even though there is a lot of activity around me. I was told to wait here until I hear my name. A woman approaches me. The woman introduces herself in my language. Her smile is kind. She explains that she is a counselor from Restore NYC and she can help me. She tells me about the court— it’s called a Human Trafficking Intervention Court. She explains what will happen next, and how Restore NYC will stand by me through it all. I feel so grateful, but confused. I ask her why she is here to help me. She replies, “Because this is what we do.” I participated in Restore NYC’s counseling program where I experienced a new kind of hope. I found a community with the other women in the program. They understood the suffering. I belonged. Restore NYC connected me to many resources. I even got a free eye exam and new reading glasses. Soon I will begin English classes at a church that works with Restore NYC. And because of what happened to me, I can get a real passport and a way to get my son to America. It has not been easy, but I found work at a beauty salon near my apartment. I can see a better life for me and my son.

I now know that I don’t have to give up my dreams for a better life for my son— we can have them together.


S U R V I V O R ' S S T O R Y: V E R A

22

VERA'S STORY The following is an 'example narrative' created and based on the stories we hear from the women that we serve. The name has been created to protect the p r i v a c y o f t h i s s t o r y.

I live in a small village in Mexico. I am 19 years old, the eldest of three. For as long as I can remember, my parents have traveled 2 hours to our closest city to find work. Sometimes my father is gone for weeks, while my mother usually comes home every other day. I spend my time caring for my grandmother and younger siblings. Our home is small and simple, our meals smaller and simpler. My days are long, the heat constant. Caravans full of migrants pass through our village on their way to “la linea” separating Mexico and Texas. They ask for food, and I feel ashamed that my family is too poor to offer any help. I love my family, but I wonder what could be if I leave this desert life. It’s just past noon and I am interrupted from my daily routine. It is a young man, named Enrique. Enrique is different. He has the culture of the city, but the kindness of the countryside. I am captivated. Enrique says he is simply passing through, but we end up talking the entire afternoon. He even helps me hang laundry. Enrique travels back and forth to the US, where his family lives in New York. Enrique visits me frequently and I feel like a princess. He buys me nice clothes and food for my family. My parents feel this is a

blessing from God. Enrique told me he loves me and promises a much better life for us in New York. His family will find me work, and I could send money to my family in Mexico to ease their burden. Enrique and I now have a baby girl. He arranges for me to cross the border but I must leave our daughter behind until a later time. I am torn— I can’t turn down an opportunity to better provide for my family, but can I live without her? Will this new life in America be worth it? I trust Enrique for a better life for my daughter, for myself, and for my whole family. It’s the middle of the night. I arrive at a bus stop that says Corona. An older couple picks me up. I assume they are Enrique’s parents, but they are cold and distant. They take me to a small room in a big apartment building and lock the door. I am nervous and alone, but I am able to sleep. In the morning, the older man comes into my room and asks for my IDs. He tells me I will live and work here, and that I must pay them the money it cost to bring me here. I am so confused and ask where Enrique is. The man’s demeanor shifts and he swears at me, calling me an ungrateful wife. He says, “We are doing you a favor. Most women cannot find work and you complain for having a home and a job? Enrique owes us, so we own you.” The man says if I refuse customers, I will be thrown out on the street to be arrested


S U R V I V O R ' S S T O R Y: V E R A

23 and deported. This is the reality of my “better life”. The price of my services: $30 for 15 minutes $50 for 30 minutes About 25 men a day. All paying customers. All with one simple expectation: A limited time. Unlimited power. I dream of Mexico. I long to be with my child. One evening, there are loud noises outside of my room. People are shouting. I approach the door to listen when a man and woman in uniform enter. I am startled, but realize they’re not paying customers. The woman gently smiles and speaks Spanish. “Do not be afraid, we are here to help.” They give me a large coat with the letters “FBI”. They take me outside and I take a deep, deep breath of the midnight air. After the FBI raid, I was referred to Restore NYC. I now feel safe. I live in their safehome where I have been able to rest and recover. I now understand that I was a victim of a terrible crime called human trafficking. As much as it hurts to admit, I understand that Enrique was never my lover, but my trafficker. Restore NYC connected me a lawyer who is helping me get on a path toward citizenship through a “Trafficking Visa”. It will let me work and bring my daughter and family to the US! I am also meeting with the FBI to

bring justice to my trafficker. Being at Restore NYC has given me the courage to tell my story so that I can help others. At the safehome, I am grateful for the other women I get to live with. They are my new family, who all have stories similar to mine: once a story of shattered dreams, now a story of a future redeemed.


THANK YOU

24

H I G H L I G H T O F PA R T N E R S We a r e g r a t e f u l f o r t h e j o b s , t r a i n i n g , a n d f i n a n c i a l s u p p o r t t h a t all of our partners have provided. Here are a few highlights:

ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT Our friends at We Rub You and Elegantees are not only amazing entreprenurs, but also are partners in our economic empowerment program. They help train and provide employment to the women we serve. In additon, they have donated portions of their sales to fund the work we do at Restore.

F I N A N C I A L PA R T N E R S Zoetik, Secret Someone's, and Smithereenes donated a percentage of their proceeds to financially support the work we do at Restore and build awareness about sex trafficking in New York to their audience and customers. SECRET SOMEONE'S

C H U R C H PA R T N E R Going beyond the conventional measures of service, Calvary Baptist Church supported Restore NYC in a variety of ways such as conducting workshops on trafficking, hosting movie nights, and even financially partnering with us.


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S TAT E M E N T O F FINANCIALS Statement of Financial Position Statement of Activities Statement of Cash Flows Statement of Functional Expenses


S TAT E M E N T O F F I N A N C I A L P O S I T I O N

26

F o r t h e Ye a r E n d e d S e p t e m b e r 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 a n d S e p t e m b e r 3 0 , 2 0 1 3

ASSETS

2013

2014

653,770

755,978

2,473

24,268

17,703

12,169

5,690

9,028

Property and equipment

22,525

21,220

Security deposits

20,012

16,710

$722,173

$839,353

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

$15,032

$14,883

Total liabilities

$15,032

$14,883

Cash and cash equivalents Contributions receivable Prepaid expenses Investments

Total Assets liabilities & net assets Liabilities:

Net Assets Unrestricted

556,981

Undesignated

-

573,216

Board designated

-

200,000

Total of Undesignated & Board designated

-

773,216

Temporarily Restricted

150,160

51,254

Total Net Assets

707,141

824,470

$722,173

$839,353

Total Liabilities & Net Assets


S TAT E M E N T O F A C T I V I T I E S

27

F o r t h e Ye a r E n d e d S e p t e m b e r 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 w i t h s u m m a r i z e d f i n a n c i a l information for the year ended September 30, 2013

SUPPORT, REVENUE, AND RECLASSIFICATIONS

2013

unrestricteD

temporary REstricted

2014

Contributions and grants

830,224

734,027

146,210

880,237

Fundraising events, net of direct benefit costs

115,191

57,236

-

57,236

71,922

18,351

-

18,351

1,859

1,269

-

1,269

12

1,361

-

1,361

-

245,116

(245,116)

-

1,019,208

1,057,360

(98,906)

958,454

584,939

626,272

-

626,272

91,129

101,633

-

101,633

101,071

113,220

-

113,220

Total Expenses

$777,139

$841,125

-

$841,125

Change in Net Assets

$242,069

$216,235

($98,906)

$117,329

Net Assets, Beginning of Year

$465,072

$556,981

$150,160

$707,141

Net Assets, End of Year

$707,141

$773,216

$51,254

$824,470

Donated services and materials Investment income Other revenue Net assets released from restrictions Total Support, Revenue, and Reclassifications EXPENSES Program Services Supporting Services: Management and general Fundraising


S TAT E M E N T O F C A S H F L O W S

28

F o r t h e Ye a r E n d e d S e p t e m b e r 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 a n d S e p t e m b e r 3 0 , 2 0 1 3

CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

2013

2014

$242,069

$117,329

4,293

5,825

-

175

(192)

(813)

Contributions Receivable

24,576

(21,795)

Prepaid expenses

(8,605)

5,534

Security deposits

(5,612)

3,302

5,401

(149)

230,614

109,408

Change in net assets Adjustments to reconcile net change in net assets to cash provided (used) by operating activities: Depreciation Realized loss on investments Unrealized gains on investments (Increase) decrease in:

Accounts payable and accrued expenses Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from sale of investments

3,976

Purchases of property and equipment

(4,500)

Purchases of investments

(6,676)

Net Cash Used by Investing Activities

(7,200)

Change in Cash and Cash Equivalents

229,614

102,208

Cash and Cash Equivalents, Beginning of Year

424,156

653,770

$653,770

$755,978

Cash and Cash Equivalents, End of Year


S TAT E M E N T O F F U N C T I O N A L E X P E N S E S

29

F o r t h e Ye a r E n d e d S e p t e m b e r 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 w i t h s u m m a r i z e d f i n a n c i a l information for the year ended September 30, 2013

MANAGEMENT & GENERAL

2013

PROGRAM SERVICES

$330,485

$316,570

$42,661

$60,043

$419,274

Payroll Taxes

29,332

26,596

3,584

5,044

35,224

Employee benefits

45,962

54,816

7,387

10,397

72,600

Total salaries and related expenses

405,779

397, 982

53,632

75,484

Occupancy

129,796

124,363

4,754

4,754

133,871

Professional fees

45,618

12,921

36,140

10,138

59,199

Program expense

44,329

37,561

-

-

37,561

Fundraising event costs

43,783

-

-

16,648

16,648

6,212

11,890

758

753

13,401

Supplies

14,112

9,945

1,666

1,537

13,148

Insurance

10,598

9,321

742

1,045

11,108

Travel

8,713

6,318

842

1,391

8,551

Database management

6,849

4,679

405

405

5,489

Telephone

2,995

3,715

225

225

4,165

Miscellaneous

5,379

1,586

656

357

2,599

Printing

1,192

588

588

294

1,470

Postage

769

323

323

161

807

1,323

129

28

28

185

774,833

621,321

100,759

113,220

835,300

2,306

4,951

874

-

5,825

777,139

$626,272

$101,633

$113,220

$841,125

Salaries

Conference/ meetings

Subscriptions Total expenses before depreciation Depreciation Total Expenses

FUNDRAISING

2014


G R AT E F U L We a r e g r a t e f u l f o r t h e h i g h l i g h t s o f t h i s y e a r, t h e i n d i v i d u a l s i n v o l v e d i n s p r e a d i n g awareness of exploited women, and the impact it has made in restoring the lives of the survivors that we serve.


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