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urban detail Noah Resnick : Selected Professional Work

2006 - 20081

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urban detail

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Table of Contents

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personal biogr ap hy

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professional ph ilos op hy

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new york

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bost on

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berlin

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c hicago

noah resnick

uR ban Det ail 1351 joliet plac e det roit mi 482 0 7 586.405.1712 noahresnic k@u r b an - d et ail.c om

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Biography : Noah Resnick currently teaches and practices in the city of Detroit, Michigan. He is a principal of uRban Detail, along with cofounder and wife, Melissa Dittmer. It is a small research based architecture and urban design studio that operates under the interrelated concepts of the architectonics of multiple scales; the architect as urban collaborator; and the architect as community builder. Noah grew up in Miami, Florida, where he attended the Design and Architecture Senior High magnet school (D.A.S.H.). He earned his BArch from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, graduating at the top of his class, for which he was awarded the AIA Henry Adams Medal of Excellence. Noah completed his Masters of Science in Architecture Studies (SMarchS) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Architecture + Urbanism stream. This degree culminated in an urban design thesis that focused on the potential for transit oriented development nodes in the city of Detroit. In addition to Detroit, Noah has lived and practiced in Chicago, Boston, and New York, as well as Berlin, Germany where he worked in the studio of Daniel Libeskind. His professional experience in architecture and urban design ranges from the conceptual and design development of a two hundred thousand sq ft mall/ spa complex in Switzerland, to in depth urban design studies and proposals for very high profile Central Artery sites above the ‘Big Dig’ in Downtown Boston, to the full service design and construction administration of a high-end townhouse building in New York City, to the landscape design of the City Hall Plaza and nearby park in Downtown Brockton, Massachusetts. Most recently, Noah served as the project architect for the construction administration of the Affirmations Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Community Center in Ferndale, Michigan.

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urban detail Professional Philosophy

It is the architect’s role not merely to design buildings and spaces, but to create wholistic environments, both physical and cultural, for humans to exist, inhabit, and transgress. This must be accomplished at a multiplicity of scales, with a diverse set of tools, and the proper balance between theory and practical knowledge. Nowhere is the employment of these elements experienced more clearly than with a successful architectural intervention in an urban context. Thus, it is through the lens of urbanism that I approach my professional practice and research endeavors. In practicing architecture, I intend not only to design buildings on an urban scale, but also to construct the details of urbanism at the scale of the body. A professional process focused on the conditions inherent in an urban fabric allows me to operate under three central concepts: The architectonics of scale, the architect as collaborator, and the architect as community builder. The first of these three concepts serves to explore the relationships between the micro and macro scales of an urban environment. My objective is to find projects that utilize the building not merely as the product of a single client, but as a design(ed) tool that mediates between these scalar poles. To do so, I must foster a process with which to work simultaneously on the construction details that engender interaction with the human body, and the urban plan that promotes interaction with the community. Louis Kahn stated: “A street wants to be a building”. I approach my practice under the theory that the entire city wants to be a building. One that is designed and constructed organically with an amalgam of architectural and landscape interventions,

as an emergent solution to a community’s needs. Through this viewpoint, I strive to exploit the potential for a detail at the human scale to create a new type of public space at the urban scale. The second concept at the core of my practice is to accept architecture as a predominantly collaborative endeavor. I appreciate that my design efforts can only be manifested as architecture through an engagement with those who will engineer, construct, finance, and use the building. And, just as the designer must work in concert with these agents, so should the architectural intervention engage with its surrounding urban condition and its cultural, historical, economic, and philosophical context. The third central concept integrates the first two in order to empower my work to reach beyond the physical boundaries of building design. By identifying the role of architecture in the urban fabric, I hope to fulfill the architect’s responsibility to the community - both as a sustainable builder/craftsman, as well as an intelligent and sensitive social problem solver. Although I seek to understand and employ universal concepts of urbanism, it is through the filter of a number of specific cities that I shape each design. My architectural outcomes are directly influenced by the particular city in which I am practicing, regardless of the project site location. Every design is infused with the culture, history, frustrations and opportunities extent in the urban context that surrounds me, and is compounded by the collective experience of the cities where I have practiced in the past. no a h resnick : ur ban det a il

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Detroit, Michigan: Grass-Roots Modernism “Forget what you think you know about this place. Detroit is the most relevant city in the United States for the simple reason that it is the most unequivocally modern and therefore distinctive of our national culture: in other words, a total success.”

Jerry Herron

The degree to which capitalism was allowed to shape the urban environment and define the culture in such a direct manner is what made Detroit the most successful modernist city of the twentieth century. The city’s single source of capital was the ability to move individuals at a rapid speed, independent from one another. It defined the individual by placing them in a modern conveyance, and giving them the freedom to go in their chosen direction, at their chosen velocity, in solitude. This freedom came at the expense of the city’s centrality of cultural activity and social interaction. The urban functions were spatially reorganized year after year based on a

logic of horizontally increasing distance and a network of paths leading out of the city. Detroit’s success was its ability to organize its pursuit of profit into a spatial logic, one that justified the product while simultaneously creating its market, controlling its labor force, and eliminating its competition. Detroit’s success was in its singular commitment to the industrial production of technologies that would profoundly affect the culture and space of every modern city. Detroit’s success was its failure. With these industrial giants rapidly fading, it is up to enlightened and empowered citizens and community groups to retread the city.

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PEDESTRIAN CROSSING PARK SPACE

PARK SPACE

LANDSCAPED PERFORMANCE VENUE STAGE 1 (AUGUST 2008)

roosevelt park master plan uRban Detail w/ los pistaleros design group

COMMUNITY PARKING (CURRENTLY IN DEVELOPMENT)

P2

PARKING / POSSIBLE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT PARCEL

LIGHT FIELD INSTALLATION STAGE 3 (2009) LANDSCAPED CROSSING ISLAND STAGE 2 (SEPTEMBER 2008)

P PHASE 2

IGAN

P1

MICH

PHASE 2 MICH

P2

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U AVEN

U AVEN

IGAN

IGAN

IGAN

P1

MICH

MICH

E

UE

UE

AVEN

AVEN

the masterplan design is a phased proposal which responds to the desires of the community, the potential for continued development along Michigan Avenue, and the dramatic presence of the historic Michigan Central Depot. the initial phase will include an amphitheater, a public work of art, landscape improvements, and lighting. The amphitheater will be formed from a series of shifts in the ground plane, utilizing the existing earth along with excess earth from nearby community projects that would otherwise end up in a landfill. The stage will allow for public performances, instantly breathe new life into the space, and offer both a physical and symbolic platform for further fundraising efforts for the park. When it is not in use, the grounds leading up to the stage will provide ample family-friendly green space for exercise and relaxation.

P1

PHASE 1 PROGRAMMING

PHASE 2 PROGRAMMING

PRIMARY AXIS PARK PARCELS ALONG THIS AXIS EXISTING TRAFFIC FLOW1 ARE THE FIRST TO BE DEVELOPED IN PHASE

PARK SPACE

P1

TRAFFIC PATTERN

PARK PARCELS (FUTURE DEVELOPMENT) PEDESTRIAN CROSSING

COMMUNITY PARKING PROPOSED TRAFFIC FLOW (CURRENTLY IN DEVELOPMENT) TRAFFIC PATTERN

PHASE 1 COMPLETED

PARK SPACE

PEDESTRIAN CROSSING

PARK SPACE PHASE 2 P1 COMMUNITY PARK LANDSCAPING AND ATHLETICPARKING FIELDS (CURRENTLY IN DEVELOPMENT)

P2

PARKING / POSSIBLE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT PARCEL

existing traffic Flow Diagram

proposed traffic Flow Diagram

Roosevelt Park has been fractured into four distinct pieces by Vernor Highway. This eight lane boulevard, which once

All streets cutting through Roosevelt Park will be closed off to vehicular traffic, creating a unified public green space, safe from automotive traffic.

served to bring large amounts of traffic to and from the now abandonded Michigan Central Depot, is currently obsolete.

LANDSCAPED PERFORMANCE VENUE STAGE 1 (AUGUST 2008)

roosevelt park

16 LIGHT FIELD INSTALLATION STAGE 3 (2009) LANDSCAPED CROSSING ISLAND STAGE 2 (SEPTEMBER 2008)

P PHASE 2

UE

UE

AVEN

AVEN

IGAN

IGAN

P1

MICH

MICH

PHASE 2

PHASE 1 PROGRAMMING

PHASE 2 PROGRAMMING

PRIMARY AXIS PARK PARCELS ALONG THIS AXIS ARE THE FIRST TO BE DEVELOPED IN PHASE 1

PARK SPACE

P1

PARK PARCELS (FUTURE DEVELOPMENT)

COMMUNITY PARKING (CURRENTLY IN DEVELOPMENT) PHASE 1 COMPLETED

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PHASE 2 PARK LANDSCAPING AND ATHLETIC FIELDS

phase 1 programming Diagram

phase 2 programming Diagram

The first phase focuses on transforming the axial boulevard into a performance stage with strategically landscaped public seating.

Athletic amenities, including basketball courts, soccer fields, and skateparks, will be placed in the western portion of the Park. The eastern half of the proposed Roosevelt Park design will consist of serene natually landscaped spaces. The four portions of the park are unified by the closing of Vernor Highway.


michigan central depot

roosevelt park

old tiger stadium

mercury coffee bar

slows bbq

mercury coffee bar

proposed community

roosevelt park

michigan central depot

parking lot

slows bbq

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MASTER PLAN LANDSCAPE ISLAND CROSSING MICH E

SOCCER FIELD

U AVEN

BASKETBALL COURT

IGAN

SKATE PARK

LIGHT SCULPTURE AMPHITHEATER WALKING PATH NATURAL LANDSCAPE

roosevelt park : to see afresh , - blink -

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Canine To Five Site

martin luther king blvd

stimson

renovation and addition to a 5700 sqft dog daycare, grooming and boarding facility in midtown Detroit. The multiphased project consists of space planning, HVAC assessment, interior design, faรงade redesign, and 3000 sq ft of new construction. The design seeks to fold the exterior space of the sidewalk into a vestibule/lobby that separates the human users from the canines. Tight budget constraints necessitate both a creative approach to material selection and detailing, as well as fundraising through small business grants.

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cass ave

canine to 5 doggie daycare uRban Detail

o st

peterbor

To Downtown

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EXISTING PROGRAM KEY - Existing building is approximately 5700 sf

150’ 50’ 120’

- Existing exterior space is 1400 sf

LARGE DOG

50’

SMALL DOG

150’ 50’

LOBBY/RECEPTION OPTION 01 : PHASE 1

KENNEL

120’ 180 sf

250 sf

50’

160 sf 55 sf 230 sf

3,080 sf

GROOMING

CIRCULATION/STORAGE

160sf 200sf BATHROOM

460 sf

430 sf APARTMENT 100’

120’ 150’

OPTION 01 : PHASE 2

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Van Alen Institute 2007 Competition : Democracy of Disturbance uRban Detail w/ tadd heidgerken The re-envisioning of Gateway National Recreational Area as an urban public

Alternating tracts of appropriately programmed parkland are anchored to the

park is predicated on redefining the sites in terms of choices made by an

institutional nodes and assigned finite frequencies of time. A series of pathways

ever changing body politic, fully engaged in the democratic process. Included in this body are stewards of the biological

connect park program while cutting representational sections through the current body politic.

ecosystems, individual users as represented by publicly run constituent groups, and the park service responsible for land allocation. All groups evolve according to the

This project approaches the evolutionary nature of community

interests of the community and the needs of the affected ecosystems. The inevitable

through an understanding of the

conflicts that arise between disparate programmatic desires are both integral to

than a planned architectural outcome. The strategy thus involves crafting a dynamic

the model of

agonistic democracy, and analogous to the phenomenon of disturbance in nature, which inhibits diversity, adaptability and growth.

site that reacts to an educated and involved democratic body.

The multi-scalar design embraces this establishing an

politics of disturbance by open framework that modifies over time, anticipating a

disturbance in nature is to act as a catalyst, thereby preventing stagnation from predictable environmental trajectories. In addition, it promotes growth and adaptability of competing organisms. Disturbance

shifting definition of the public’s needs and desires. The framework is structured on

is a balancing agent that prevents any unhindered effects of hegemony between

long-term institutional nodes located according to inherent site logics which act as catalysts for related activities, and a cyclical concept of programmatic phasing.

adversarial species, thus resulting in a diverse ecological landscape

park as a public process,

rather

The role of

six initial disturbances or

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over multiple spatial and temporal scales.


Simultaneously,

disturbance manifests itself as conflict

within the ethico-political principles that form a democratic society. Conflicting viewpoints form a

pluralism of values

that allow for the survival of

democratic discourse. An agonistic model of democracy nurtures dissent and its supporting institutions in order to shape these adverse passions into democratic designs. The open

framework for Gateway National Park provides a theatre for

disparate needs within the urban and ecological community. It sets variable term limits to ensure that the park always remain in phase with the

evolving nature

constantly

of the community. The pluralistic activities of the park,

as programmed by its users, will foster a rich and dynamic public landscape.

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Drawing upon the historic natural and industrial pathways, multiple modes of transportation are re-connected to the site on both regional and local scales.

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Tracts of parkland are assigned varied lengths of time

A creative approach to phasing creates a dynamic site. thus, allowing the program to continually evolve in tandem with the physical public space and the “defined� public.

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Long term institutional nodes serve as catalysts for related activities

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Embedded multi-scalar site logics point to initial disturbance locations. Each disturbance connects through the PATHWAYS system

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The re-envisioning of Gateway National Recreational Area as an urban public park is predicated on redefining the sites in terms of choices made by an

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ever changing body politic, fully engaged in the

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10 year

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seasonal

democratic process. Included in this body are stewards of the biological ecosystems, individual users as represented by publicly run constituent groups, and the park service responsible for land allocation. All groups evolve according to the interests of the community and the needs of the affected ecosystems. The inevitable conflicts that arise between disparate programmatic desires are both integral to the model of agonistic democracy, and analogous to the phenomenon of disturbance in nature, which inhibits diversity, adaptability and growth. The multi-scalar design embraces this politics of disturbance by establishing an open framework that modifies over time, anticipating a shifting definition of the public’s needs and desires. The framework is structured on six initial disturbances or long-term institutional nodes located according to inherent site logics which act as catalysts for related activities, and a cyclical concept of programmatic phasing. Alternating tracts of appropriately programmed parkland are anchored to the institutional nodes and assigned finite frequencies of time. A series of pathways connect park program while cutting representational sections through the current body politic.

1 year

This project approaches the evolutionary nature of community through an understanding of the park as a public process, rather than a planned architectural outcome. The strategy thus involves crafting a dynamic site that reacts to an educated and involved democratic body.

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nature is to act as a catalyst, thereby preventing stagnation from predictable environmental trajectories. In addition, it promotes growth and adaptability of competing organisms. Disturbance is a balancing agent that prevents any unhindered effects of hegemony between adversarial species, thus resulting in a diverse ecological landscape over multiple spatial and temporal scales.

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Simultaneously, disturbance manifests itself as conflict within the ethico-political principles that form a democratic society. Conflicting viewpoints form a pluralism of values that allow for the survival of democratic discourse. An agonistic model of democracy nurtures dissent and its supporting institutions in order to shape these adverse passions into democratic designs.

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Affirmations lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community center luckenbach | ziegelman pllc design and construction administration of 17,000 sq ft center for the l.g.b.t. community and their allies. The mixed-use facility includes a library, art gallery, cyber-cafĂŠ, youth center, game room, offices, conference rooms, and counseling center. The LEED certified building utilizes multiple atria to enhance both passive heating and cooling systems as well as natural illumination from large skylights.

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contextual modernism: modular housing in lafayette park, Detroit luckenbach | ziegelman pllc this project proposes the placement of 164 prefabricated condominium units in a vacant lot adjacent to Mies van der Rohe’s Lafayette Park in downtown Detroit. Dwelling units range from 864 square feet to 1728 square feet and include one bedroom, two bedroom, two bedroom with den, and three bedroom two-story townhouses. it envisions the possibility of expanding modular dwelling units vertically at some later date or removing units if a home owner wants to relocate onto a private lot.

Ave ard

dw

The modules consist of a rigid steel vierendeel truss system developed and patented in the 1960’s by Robert Ziegelman, and have been successfully utilized as bank buildings, offices, schools, and a hospital. In addition to enabling the use of large glass areas that became part of the shipping container and final site configuration, the rigid steel frame expresses structural elements and proportions compatible with the earlier Mies project. The concept was not only about prefabrication and mass produced housing but the continuance of the “Miesian” philosophy of universal space expanded into universal building blocks that can be adapted for any use. This includes future sustainability insights for reusing modules on other sites, stacking, expanding or changing use without destroying an existing asset in an urban or suburban setting. 24

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New Detroit River Walk Proposed Dequindre Cut Bike Path Downtown People Mover Public Green Space


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ay laf

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n ew york cit y : murphy burnham & buttrick


New York City Urban Anomaly

Rather than being considered the ultimate American city, New York stands out as anomalous to the growing number of post-industrial urban centers throughout the Midwest and South. One can almost imagine that the conditions plaguing these metropolitan areas - decentralization, depopulation of the urban core, municipal budget deficits, lack of public transit - are simply not manifested in New York. While this city does not offer creative solutions to the stressed conditions it does not seem to suffer from, it does provide a set of models that smaller scale urban interventions can aspire to. With the exception of a few large urban design projects occasionally dotted throughout the boroughs, most of the fabric of the city is manipulated one facade, or skyscraper, at a time. If an architect desires to contribute to the shaping of the city, they must accept their role in the enormous collaborative effort that is New York. no a h resnick : ur ban det a il

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world youth alliance: new york, new york murphy burnham & buttrick

71st street

Project manager for the complete renovation of a four story townhouse in New York’s Upper East Side to house the new global headquarters of the World Youth Alliance. The 7500 sf building includes a library, gallery, lecture hall, offices, kitchen, lounge, garden, and permanent housing for the staff and interns.

n ew york cit y : mu r p hy b u r n h a m & b u ttr ick

2nd avenue

3rd avenue

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b ost on : massachusetts institute of technolo g y


Boston, Massachusetts : The practice of theory

In 1959, Kevin Lynch described the perception Boston as being: “a city of distinctive districts and of crooked, confusing paths. It is a dirty city, of red brick buildings, symbolized by the open space of the Boston Common, the State House with its gold dome, and the view across the Charles River form the Cambridge side...it is an old, historical place, full of worn-out buildings, yet containing some new structures among the old.�

While the charm of the European street flavor and historic structures is still present in certain Boston neighborhoods, the city has progressed greatly with regards to its theory and implementation of architecture and urban design. From mega-projects like the Big-Dig, to cultural moments such as the Institute of Contemporary Art, the Boston area is being gradually reshaped with guidance from the academic institutions at its center.

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Sustaining Development in Detroit Massachusetts Institute of Technology Master of Science in Architecture Thesis This thesis tests strategies that confront urban decay by accepting the city’s state of decentralization; viewing low density, low cost of vacant real estate, and low skilled workforce as being assets; and mitigating auto dependency as necessary steps to promote reinvestment and repopulation. It begins by identifying the factors that sustain development and uses them to map out multiple areas of urban activity. It suggests large-scale citywide initiatives to

utilize and expand the existing transit infrastructure to form a network of non-centralized urban nodes and then concentrates on one of these nodes– using a proposed intermodal transit station at the juncture of two potential rail transit routes–as the nexus for an urban design scheme that focuses on the re-use of existing building stock for sustainable programs, as well as the use of vacant land for community urban agriculture.

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urban, community based agriculture

intensive streetfront greening

recreational / pedestrian oriented greenspace

reforestation for park space, fruit production, or lumber

recreate existing block density

define entire block perimeter

infill north-south perimeter edges

infill all vacant perimeter edges

centralized residential tower

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intermodal transit station

downtown detroit

pedestrian greenway

urban agricultural space

music incubator public athletic facility visual and performing arts high school art and design incubator intermodal transit hub state of michigan governmental offices research and technology park

henry ford health systems public governmental incubator laboratory residential mixed use existing mixed use parking health care church industrial

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civic space

housing and amenities – while preserving the urban, industrial context of the Strip. Infrastructure improvements combined with civic and recreational facilities leverage the district’s unique advantages of unfettered access to the waterfront and immediate proximity to the convention center, cultural district and downtown. On a regional scale, the Center Strip will be a model for development along the Allegheny River shelf, reclaiming the formerly industrial zones and transforming the riverbanks into a series of neighborhoods along the shores of the Allegheny.

transit connections

As the Strip District in Pittsburgh extends to meet the waterfront, the master plan for the Center Strip builds on the foundations of the existing fabric, ensuring that future developments maintain the District’s distinct spirit and character without supplanting the thriving community, businesses and identity. Our Center Strip scheme promotes an environmentally, economically and socially sustainable approach to development, oriented around transit and continually adaptable. It provides for what is notably absent from downtown Pittsburgh– residential

community network

Urban Land Institute Gerald Hines Academic Urban Design Competition Massachusetts Institute of Technology Team

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Toronto Portlands Massachusetts Institute of Technology Urban Design Proposal for the reuse of the Toronto Portlands, 450 acres of industrial land situated on a peninsula to the east of downtown. The design proposes an extension of Toronto through the formulation and arrangement of distinct communities, open spaces, and connections to the city center. The goal is to create a unique series of neighborhoods that will provide amenities for the residents, while simultaneously establishing cultural and recreational destination points. 44

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Berlin, Germany City Rebuilt

“ Berlin...was a city undergoing reconstruction (or construction twiceover). Now...many of the things that were there (on top of what didn’t exist) are no longer there. As if the city that was and no longer is were rebuilt. Berlin...is a city that doesn’t exist. It’s a shadow, a sigh, a pointless endeavor, a city that grows and un-grows, that rests and surfaces, that looks towards the future and at its own past.” Jordi Bernardo, Ramon Prat Berlin Bis no a h resnick : ur ban det a il

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west side: freizeit und einkaufszentrum: bern, switzerland studio daniel libeskind 180,000 sq meter multi-function leisure / shopping complex straddling the major highway that leads to the center of Bern. The wide ranging program included: the central shopping mall, a leisure bath and spa / fitness facility, cinema center, hotel, garden market, builder’s market, senior housing, and a parking garage. The larger scale programmatic elements were conceived of as static volumes linked by a dynamic crystalline circulation spine. This serpentine path carved out both the surface of the boxes to allow for natural light, as well as interior walls to provide social gathering spaces.

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b erlin : st u di o d a n i e l l i b e s k i n d


cinema center

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hotel

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leisure bath

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chicago


Chicago, Illinois High-Rise / Low-Rise

Arguably the most significant city in the country with regards to the development of a uniquely American style of commercial architecture, Chicago has also historically been on the forefront of urban design. The foundations of Daniel Burnham’s 1909 plan continue to shape the growth of the city both formally and organizationally. Chicago led the trend for the return of the upper-middle class to the urban core via the residential gentrification of its industrial zones, and continues to creatively rectify the reprehensible treatment of its African American population during the public housing efforts of the 1950’s and 60’s. The city maintains its adoration and innovation of the modern skyscraper, while simultaneously embracing lowrise, environmentally sustainable, mixed income housing as a solution to the failed housing projects that once loomed over the racially segregated neighborhoods. no a h resnick : ur ban det a il

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cohodes residence dirk denison architects 7000 sq ft residence outside of san francisco for a family with a wheelchair bound child. The concept centers on three primary accessible circulation paths ordered around a procession of formal courtyards. The design process involved the development of the architectonic forms and interior spaces almost entirely through the construction of large scale working models.

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ch icago : dirk denison architects


no a h resnick : ur ban det a il

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ch icago : dirk denison architects


no a h resnick : ur ban det a il

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blue note records global headquarters illinois institute of technology, undergraduate thesis Revitalization of the former Chicago main post office building through the insertion of the Blue Note Jazz facilities. In addition to the corporate office program, the urban amenities include recording studios, a jazz museum, night club, performance hall, hotel, retail spaces, and river access, all housed within the vacant 3 million sq ft art deco structure. professor: susan conger-austin

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ch icago : illinois institute of technolog y


no a h resnick : ur ban det a il

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drawing from travel illinois institute of technology, semester abroad program selected images from sketchbooks professor: timothy brown

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ch icago : illinois institute of technolog y


no a h resnick : ur ban det a il

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