Issuu on Google+

studio detail Noah Resnick : Selected Academic Instruction

2006 - 20081

no a h resnick : stud io det a il


2


studio detail

03

t able of c ont en t s

Table of Contents

04

acknowledgem en t s

07

pedagogic al st a t em en t

11

biography

12

st udio 01 : urb an Re- As s em b lage

26

st udio 02 : Eco - Village

42

st udio 03 : c rit ic al M a s s t r an s it

56

st udio 04 : urb an Al c hem y

noah resnick

uR ban Det ail 1351 joliet plac e det roit mi 482 0 7 586.405.1712 noahresnic k@u r b an - d et ail.c om

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

3


4

s t ude nts 2 0 0 6 - 2 0 0 8

brit t any desrocher

brian ho e h n

wh it n ee r ac h el p h illip s

sa m i a l -j ure i dini

melissa detloff

agnieszka kar p in s ka

m ic h al_p ias ec ki

j o h a nna a l la n

kat ie dings

bret t kel lm an

c od y r ap ai

c hris baer

aaron gardiner

andrew k i n g

m ar y s e r ic h ard s

t odd bally

ant hony giacco

mark klimkows ki

v an es s a r u s s ell

e d mond bardhi

christ opher gillen

karol kon ar s ki

sean ryan

i v ana barisic

peter gillis

sam koe h ler

d av id s ilver

kenyo tta brow n

scott hampton

heidi koni e c z k a

s in is a s im ic

d o m i n i k bude ck i-ne hri ng

jessic a harrison

fillip kurzews ki

c at h er in e s t ein

ro byn burgo s

seth har te

adrian lat on a

d an ielle waire

ren e’e chl o pa n

paulina hernandez

jac ob lyon

m at t h ew ward

j o se ph co rde s

philip herriges

samant ha m of f

m on ika wojt alu k

c r aig co rmie r

jessika hic ks

nic k mor iar t y

lu ke wood s

z u za cz apli ck a

brian hinz

jessica ph i l l i p s

kaija wu ollet


c ri t i cs 2 0 0 6 - 2 0 0 8

wladek fuchs

allegra pit era

a n i r b a n adhya

l ars graebner

dan pit era

ra i ek a f a t h a lla a l lo s

chr ist ina hansen

mandy prent is

b r a n do n be cke r

tad heidgerken

michael prent is

c o n s t a n c e c . bodurow

brian hur ttienne

rober t prud’homm e

do r i a n m oo re

julie kim

joel t . schmidt

p h i l l i p c o o ley

daniel kinkead

lori singlet on

j ac o b s t eve n s co r vi da e

st eve lagrassa

virginia st anard

t e ddy c ruz

john mueller

karen swansen

m e l i ssa d i ttme r

k ha lil s. mogassabi

st eve vogel

g r a i g d o n ne lly

mark nikit a

will wit t ig

studio detail Acknowledgements

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

5


6


As you know, I am a teacher which means, really I am teaching myself and whatever rubs off the student gets.”

studio detail Motives

Louis Kahn, 1960

It is the architect’s role not merely to design buildings and spaces, but to create wholistic environments, both physical and cultural, for humans to exist, inhabit, and transgress. This must be accomplished at a multiplicity of scales, with a diverse set of tools, and the proper balance between theory and practical knowledge. Nowhere is the employment of these elements experienced more clearly than with a successful architectural intervention in an urban context. Thus, when formulating a pedagogical approach within which to immerse both the students and myself in the design process, it is through the lens of urbanism that I base the studios. A pedagogy focused on the conditions inherent in an urban fabric allows me to operate the studios under the same three central concepts that I use in my private practice: The architectonics of scale, the architect as collaborator, and the architect as community builder. The first of these three concepts, which is the predominant theme for many of my initial design exercises, serves to introduce the students to the relationships between the micro and macro scales of an urban environment. My objective is to have the students utilize the building not merely as the product of a studio assignment, but as a design(ed) tool that mediates between these scalar poles. To do so, they must develop a process with which they can work simultaneously on the construction details that foster interaction with the human body, and the urban plan that fosters interaction with the community. Louis Kahn stated: “A street wants to be a building”. I approach my studio pedagogy under the theory that the entire city wants to be a building. One that is designed and constructed organically with an amalgam of architectural and landscape interventions, as an emergent solution to a community’s needs.

Through this viewpoint, I intend for the students to emerge with a sense of the potential for a detail at the human scale to create a new type of public space at the urban scale. The second concept at the core of my studio approach is the one most prone to initial resistance from the students. It is my intent that they appreciate architecture as a predominantly collaborative endeavor. While each student develops their skillsets mostly through autonomous design exercises, they learn that their efforts can only be manifested as architecture through an engagement with those who will engineer, construct, finance, and use the building. And, just as the designer must work in concert with these agents, so should the architectural intervention engage with its surrounding urban condition and its cultural, historical, economic, and philosophical context. The third central concept integrates the first two in order to empower the students to reach beyond the physical boundaries of building design. By identifying the role of architecture in the urban fabric, I hope to instill in them the architect’s responsibility to the community - both as a sustainable builder/craftsman, as well as an intelligent and sensitive social problem solver. The integration of architecture and urbanism in the design studio permits students to develop all of their traditional architectural skillsets while simultaneously encouraging them to implement these skills in non-traditional ways. By structuring my pedagogy on these three concepts, the students first refine and then transgress the familiar methods of designing space, ultimately transforming them into tools for creating socially sustainable environments. no a h resnick : stud io det a il

7


8


studio detail Methods

The architect should be equipped with knowledge of many branches of study and varied kinds of learning, for it is by his judgment that all work done by the other arts is put to test. This is the child of practice and theory... It appears, then, that one who professes himself an architect should be well versed in both directions... Let him be educated, skillful with the pencil, instructed in geometry, know much history, have followed the philosophers with attention, understand music, have some knowledge of medicine, know the opinions of the jurists, and be acquainted with astronomy and the theory of the heavens.”

Vitruvius, “Education of the Architect”, Page one of chapter one in book one of The Ten Books of Architecture While my pedagogic motives focus on the previous three concepts regarding the role of the architect, my methods within the studio center on the idea of architectural process as collage. More than simply a mixture of all the disciplines that Vitruvius has acknowledged, architecture and architectural education is a constant re-assemblage of information, intent, and intuition. In their design exercises, I ask the students to explore combinations of meaning, scale, media, and presentation techniques in order to achieve a more complex understanding of their process. Every assignment I hand out, while rigid in its structure, is widely open to interpretation as to the various narratives it can produce.

In order to solidly ground the collaged exploration to a rigorous process, I place a heavy emphasis on research as a design tool. I expect students to engage in research not just in the early phases, but consistently throughout the term. This often takes the form of architectural case studies, conceptual precedents, or design influences and inspirations. Their research is synthesized through writings, discussions, and all forms of visual, graphic, and three-dimensional presentations. One element that remains consistent from my motives to my methods is the utilization of collaboration as a learning, teaching, and design methodology. It is my view that students within an architectural studio are considered colleagues rather than classmates. As such, they are partially responsible for each other’s performance and level of success with the projects. For all levels of studio this is achieved through a combination of group design exercises, group research, encouraging camaraderie in the class setting, and most importantly through peer review via participation in all critiques and discussions. It is mandatory that all of my students actively engage in each pin-up, mid-term, and final review by critiquing their colleagues’ work. For my graduate level courses, I take this one step further by empowering them with certain professorial responsibilities and ensuring that they take a proactive role in the academic community. In addition to having grad students assign each other pin-up requirements, it is mandatory that each one serve on at least one undergraduate review per semester. It is my intent that this collaborative approach to studio, within the framework of a collaged design process rooted in research, will engender an attitude of creating and constructing the social environments that are the principal endeavor of the responsible architect. no a h resnick : stud io det a il

9


10


Biography : Noah Resnick currently teaches and practices in the city of Detroit, Michigan. He is a principal of uRban Detail, along with cofounder and wife, Melissa Dittmer. It is a small research based architecture and urban design studio that operates under the interrelated concepts of the architectonics of multiple scales; the architect as urban collaborator; and the architect as community builder. Noah grew up in Miami, Florida, where he attended the Design and Architecture Senior High magnet school (D.A.S.H.). He earned his BArch from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, graduating at the top of his class, for which he was awarded the AIA Henry Adams Medal of Excellence. Noah completed his Masters of Science in Architecture Studies (SMarchS) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Architecture + Urbanism stream. This degree culminated in an urban design thesis that focused on the potential for transit oriented development nodes in the city of Detroit. In addition to Detroit, Noah has lived and practiced in Chicago, Boston, and New York, as well as Berlin, Germany where he worked in the studio of Daniel Libeskind. His professional experience in architecture and urban design ranges from the conceptual and design development of a two hundred thousand sq ft mall/ spa complex in Switzerland, to in depth urban design studies and proposals for very high profile Central Artery sites above the ‘Big Dig’ in Downtown Boston, to the full service design and construction administration of a high-end townhouse building in New York City, to the landscape design of the City Hall Plaza and nearby park in Downtown Brockton, Massachusetts. Most recently, Noah served as the project architect for the construction administration of the Affirmations Community Center in Ferndale, Michigan. no a h resnick : stud io det a il

11


University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture Term 1 Fall 2007 AR210 Architectural Design Urban Re-Assemblage Vertical Studio Instructor: Noah Resnick Project By: Adrian La Tona

+80’ Horizon

+30’ Fragmented

+0’ Street

12

st u dio 0 1 : u r b a n Re-As s e m b l a g e Collage Scale: None


Urban Re-Assemblage: An Adaptive Re-use of Old Tiger Stadium in Detroit tru mb

mic

higa

n av e

ull

The intent of this studio was to explore the benefits and challenges of architecturally absorbing an existing structure into a new design, and the implications that might have on the surrounding urban fabric. We tested multiple relationships between an old building and its new uses with varying degrees of renovation, restoration, modification, alteration, and adaptive re-use. The testing ground for these theories and techniques was the Old Tiger Stadium and the surrounding historic Corktown Neighborhood in Detroit.

documenting an existing structural assemblage - and how it might be manipulated into a useful object for the contemporary urban inhabitant.

In this studio, we explored the methods and theories of designing for Re-use primarily in three scales: that of the human body, the architectural, and the urban. Put in more tactile terms, we investigated Re-use at the detail, building, and neighborhood levels. The studio began with a 2 week design and fabrication exercise examining and no a h resnick : stud io det a il

13


Motive : Ready-Made Design There are myriad reasons for integrating an existing structure into a new design. This decision can be influenced by economics, environmental sustainability, historical or cultural significance, nostalgia, or aesthetic desires. The combination of these factors determines not only the extent of the modifications to the affected artifact, but also the methods, strategies, and direction of our designed interventions. Starting with this first project, we will attempt to form a working attitude towards the integration of old and new that will allow us to employ a consistent process throughout the duration of the studio. We will begin by confronting assemblages on the human scale, and use the theories and techniques developed on successively larger scales, as we attempt the Reassemblage of the old Tiger Stadium in Corktown. This first project will be centered on the creative re-use of discarded furniture. In order to approach an existing assemblage in a meaningful way, we must attempt to identify with the decisions made by the original designer, while at the same time critically evaluating them to determine what would be of value to the new use. We must assume ownership of the individual materials and components that comprise the object. This will be achieved via a calculated deconstruction and visual cataloging of the pieces of furniture. Methods : Each group will be given a piece of discarded or damaged furniture. They will then collectively dismantle their object in a way they deem appropriate. Students will then individually document the various parts of their group’s piece through drawing, and produce a graphically intriguing presentation to be pinned up. 14

st u dio 0 1 : u r b a n Re-As s e m b l a g e


Motives : With an adequate understanding of the components that your former object consisted of, your group will now utilize this inventory of parts as new building materials from which you will create an entirely new design. Methods : This object will comprise primarily of the materials at hand, and be constructed using many of the same methods found in the original piece. The function of the new object can be anything your group decides, with the following two exceptions: 1. It must provide any use other than that of the origin piece. 2. It must serve a purpose other than pure sculpture. New materials or fasteners may be introduced, as long as they are employed in a method or style similar to that exhibited in the origin object. You are not required to use the entire kit-of-parts, but a majority of the origin object should be extent in the new piece. There is no size limit.

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

15


Motives : Urban Re-Assemblage As we begin our investigation into the proposal for an adaptive re-use of Tiger Stadium, we will analyze the prospective site and its physical, historical, cultural, and urbanistic features. We will examine the ways that people inhabited architecture, the ways architecture inhabits the site, and the ways that the site inhabits the city. We will also explore the relationships of scale between the stadium and the Corktown neighborhood, as well as the existing urban amenities, or lack thereof, that may be accommodated in the development schemes to we will propose for the site.

16

st u dio 0 1 : u r b a n Re-As s e m b l a g e


mic higa n av e

ull mb tru

Methods : Site Readings Document and interpret the significant features of our site, while analyzing the relationships between these features and the ways the site is used. The salient features may include: 1. Stadium and grounds 2. Topography 3. Existing neighborhood buildings (type, construction, scale...) 4. Transit infrastructure (streets, highways, railways, viaducts) 5. Traffic flow (automotive, bus, freight and passenger rail, bicycle) 6. Pedestrian movement (paths through the site) 7. Building and land use 8. Building and land vacancy rate 9. Existing amenities and businesses You may chose one of the following methods to examine the site: a)

Create a collage combining analytical drawings and diagrams with

photographs or other artifacts and images of the site

(or)

b) Film a 5-10 minute movie exploring these same concepts. This movie should be creatively edited with an appropriate soundtrack & visual effects.

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

17


Motives : Building Program / Urban Program As seen in our various site analyses, there are many architectural, urban, and cultural features that define the area within which we will proposing our design intervention. These same features can help to guide us in determining the appropriate uses for our site. These uses should take advantage of the existing physical, social, and economic infrastructures, while simultaneously looking forward to the infrastructural changes that may be possible in Corktown and Detroit. They must be sensitive to the history, needs and desires of the surrounding neighborhood, while also providing amenities to the whole of Detroit, the metro region and the millions of people given direct access to this site via major interstate expressways and potential future mass transit initiatives. Our next step in approaching an adaptive re-use of Tiger Stadium is to determine a program suitable to development at this scale. Methods : 1. Propose 8 individual uses to match the scale of the stadium. Provide documentation of 3 precedents out of the previous 8. 2. Propose 10 smaller scale component uses directly benefitting the Corktown neighborhood. Provide documentation of at least 3 precedents out of these 10. 3. Propose 10 smaller scale component uses directed to a citywide or regional audience. Provide documentation of at least 3 precedents out of these 10. Documentation can consist of print-outs from websites, scans or photocopies from journals or books etc...Images should be arranged on a board(s) for the pin-up.

18

st u dio 0 1 : u r b a n Re-As s e m b l a g e


University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture Term 1 Fall 2007 AR210 Architectural Design Urban Re-Assemblage Vertical Studio Instructor: Noah Resnick Project By: Adrian La Tona

+80’ Horizon

+30’ Fragmented

+0’ Street

Motives : Parti Diagrams We have already begun to develop an understanding of the building typologies related to our various programs via the precedent studies that were conducted. This next phase will consist of applying our programs, and the spaces they

require, into the site. These parti diagrams serve to transition the programmatic, spatial, historical, and conceptual elements of our process so far, into an architectural design.

Collage Scale: None

Methods : We will begin by organizing our spaces and exploring the relationships between the programmatic elements and the existing structure using adjacency diagrams. Produce parti diagrams illustrating a basic site strategy and integration of the

programmatic elements. These studies can be in any media, 2-D or 3-D. Keep in mind that at least 25% of existing Tiger Stadium must remain.

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

19


Motives : Design Synthesis At this stage in the studio design process we have a fundamental understanding of the site and urban context, a developed program that responds to this understanding, and a central thesis or concept under which to organize the program. The next critical step is to synthesize all of these elements into the primary architectonic form that you will develop into a final project. Methods : The architecture that emerges from this stage should integrate your site, urban, programatic, and conceptual investigations into a cohesive design. An attitude towards the existing stadium structure should be clearly articulated and evident in your design decisions. The relationships between the organization of program and the circulation systems you employ both inside and outside of the site should be defined. The overall architectural experience of your building should manifest itself through continued explorations in drawings and models.

20

st u dio 0 1 : u r b a n Re-As s e m b l a g e


Gu

ard

-

ral Station, 1913

Re

na

ob

sco

tt B

uil

Bu

ild

ing ,1

an

rh oo igh bo Ne kto wn Co r

Pen

ian

92

iss

d, 1

85

0-

Michigan Cent

ce Ce nt er,

19

9-

77

-

din

g, 1 9

28

-

Site Plan Scale: 1�= 100’

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

21


Motives : Skin and Structure: Refining the Material Language As your projects continue to develop from parti to concept to schematic design, the massing studies and spatial analyses will evolve into an exploration of the structural strategies that will be employed, as well as the nature and material of the building envelope. It is at this point in the definition of your architectural vocabulary that architectonic and material considerations will play a critical role in your overall scheme. In the next phase of the project, you will continue develop both the structural integration of the existing stadium, as well as the architectural material palette and its implementation in the building facade and envelope.

Section A Scale: 1�= 40’

22

st u dio 0 1 : u r b a n Re-As s e m b l a g e


Methods :

Horizon

You will continue to develop your building through structural diagrams and facade studies. The pin-up will consist of these drawings and sketch models as well as a structural model of pertinent section of your building at a minimum of 1/8� = 1’ scale. This model should clearly show the structural concept of your project as well as the relationship between the existing stadium and your intervention. Using your structural model as the framework, you will design and integrate the material palette onto the skin of your building. This model as well as your elevation and facade studies will be pinned up.

Fragmented

Street

Interior Perspective Scale: None

no a h resnick : stud io det a il Michigan and Trumbull Perspective

23


Resolutions: Final Representations of the Studio Process

24

st u dio 0 1 : u r b a n Re-As s e m b l a g e


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

25


stud 26 io 0 1 : u rb an Re -A s s e m b l a g e


Eco - Village: A Sustainable Housing Student Design Competition in the City of Detroit

This studio was predicated on the EcoVillage Student Design Competition being sponsored by the City of Detroit, the W.A.R.M. Training Center, and the three accredited schools of architecture in Southeastern Michigan. As was elaborated in the competition brief, the central project focused on the architectural and urban design of an environmentally sustainable housing community to be located in the Woodbridge neighborhood of Detroit. The pedagogical intent of this studio was threefold:

1. To explore ecologically responsible design on both the architectural and urban scales. 2. To incorporate sustainable practices and techniques within the architectural design process, while controlling their influence, if any, on the overall architectonic expression of the buildings. 3. To gain insight and experience in the participation of design competitions. These were achieved through various individual and group investigations utilizing multiple design skills including: collage, hand and computer drawing, physical and computer modeling, video, writing, and graphic design.

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

27


Motives : Design Terminology Defining Sustainable/Ecological/Green The competition brief you will receive brandishes certain politically and socially loaded words that may have diffuse, if not fully subjective meanings. The notion of an ‘Eco-Village’ itself is intellectually charged with a specific socio-political agenda, but has not yet been determined as an established architectural or urban typology. Before we attempt to design a project predicated on central theme, we must first familiarize ourselves with the terminology that describes this concept in order to take a critical stance on the subject. We must analyze and formulate our own interpretation of the terms: sustainability, ecological and green as they pertain both to this competition and our architectural design process. Methods : Create a collage combining analytical drawings and diagrams with photographs or other artifacts and images of your research and our site. The collage should be an artful expression of the potential concepts and meanings of the terms sustainability, ecological, green. It may be crafted using traditional cut and glue techniques, wholly in photoshop, or any combination of the two. You can incorporate three dimensional elements, however, the final composition must be pinned up on the wall in a 20” X 20” format.

28

st u dio 0 2 : Ec o -V i l l a g e


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

29


Motives : Project Research and Precedent Studies We will concentrate this initial research stage on four distinct subjects regarding both the nature of the competition brief as well as the sustainable design in general. You will be divided into four groups, each dedicated to researching one of the following topics: A) Case studies of sustainable urban projects or ‘eco-villages’ either built or proposed. e.g.: BedZed development in the UK; Viikki ecological housing development in Helsinki, Finland; Urban eco-village networks B) Case studies of built sustainable architecture from primitive to high-tech. C) Private and governmental agencies that promote sustainable building and development. e.g.: United States Green Building Council (USGBC); Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED); WARM Training Center Detroit; Kresge Foundation D) Current, future and experimental green materials and technologies that have possible applications on our site or neighborhood. Methods : Each group will present a summary of their research findings either in power point or on printed boards. In addition to the presentation, each group will provide the studio a binder of research materials to be used as a reference throughout the semester. 30

st u dio 0 2 : Ec o -V i l l a g e


Motives : Site Readings As we begin our investigation into the proposal for an eco-village we will analyze the prospective site and its physical, historical, cultural, and urbanistic features. We will also explore the nature of sustainable planning, as well as the existing urban amenities, or lack thereof, that may be accommodated in the development schemes to we will propose for the site. Methods : You will again be divided into 4 groups in order to document and interpret the significant features of our site, while analyzing the relationships between these features and the ways the site is used. The groups will undertake the following investigations / tasks:

Group A: Construct the studio site model Group B: Calculate the LEED points under the Neighborhood Development rating system for our given site. Group C: Examine the land use and existing built fabric of the neighborhood and site, including: Group D: Examine the means of inhabitation in the neighborhood, including: -population demographics -community amenities or lack thereof -circulation: pedestrian movement, automotive traffic flow and infrastructure, mass transit Groups C and D may chose one of the following methods to examine the site: a) Create collages combining analytical drawings and diagrams with photographs or other artifacts and images of the site. b) Film a 5-10 minute movie exploring these same concepts

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

31


Motives : Building Program / Urban Program As seen in our various site analyses, there are many architectural, urban, and cultural features that define the area which we will proposing our design intervention. These same features can help to guide us in determining the appropriate uses for our site. These uses should take advantage of the existing physical, social, and economic infrastructures, while simultaneously shifting the city’s attitude towards sustainability. The programmatic elements must be sensitive to the history, needs and desires of the surrounding neighborhood, while also providing amenities that are consistent with the concept of an eco-village.

32

st u dio 0 2 : Ec o -V i l l a g e


housing recycling center greenhouse grocery store transportation center community center restaurant / retail water conservation canal

140 units (1,300/1,500 8,500 sqft 30,000 sqft 10,800 sqft 10,000 sqft 30,000 sqft 12,000 sqft 4,000 sqft varies

housing recycling center greenhouse grocery store transportation center community center restaurant / retail water conservation canal

140 units (1,300/1,500 8,500 sqft 30,000 sqft 10,800 sqft 10,000 sqft 30,000 sqft 12,000 sqft 4,000 sqft varies

PROGRAM C

sqft)

Methods : Using data and knowledge of the Woodbridge neighborhood, as well as design guidelines put forth in the LEED Neighborhood Development standards, determine the appropriate density and number of housing units for the 2 acre eco-village. Keep in mind alternative housing arrangements. sqft)

Propose at least 10 uses to compliment the residential component of the site on the remaining 3 acres. Provide documentation of at least 4 precedents out of these 10. Documentation can consist of print-outs from websites, scans or photocopies from journals or books etc... Images should be arranged on a board(s) for the pin-up.

PROGRAM D no a h resnick : stud io det a il

33


34

st u dio 0 2 : Ec o -V i l l a g e


Motives : Conceptual Design At this stage in the studio design process we have a fundamental understanding of the site and urban context, a developed program that responds to this understanding, and a central thesis or concept under which to organize the program. The next critical step is to synthesize all of these elements into the primary architectonic form that you will develop into a final project. Methods : The architecture that emerges from this stage should integrate your site, urban, programatic, and conceptual investigations into a cohesive design. An attitude towards sustainability should be clearly articulated and evident in your design decisions. The relationships between the organization of program and the circulation systems you employ both inside and outside of the site should be defined. The overall architectural experience of your eco-village should manifest itself through continued explorations in drawings and models.

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

35


Motives : Re-Group In order to develop our competition entries, the schemes that were selected have to incorporate the comments and critiques from the mid-term review, as well as elements from the new team members’ design processes. It is up to each team to determine the how to implement these new ideas and points of view, while maintaining the identity of the project’s parti. The teams must also capitalize on the advantages of collaboration, and identify methods to effectively distribute the work load. Methods : Present a graphic outline of the final project.The outline will serve to: -determine which elements from the original scheme will remain, which elements will be modified, which will be removed, what areas will be developed further, and what new elements may be introduced -re-produce the parti diagram as conceived by the team -provide site master plan that reflects the urban design concepts of the project -identify the various tasks involved in the design and production of the final competition entry. i.e.: site development, architectural development, details, presentation drawing, 3-D modeling, physical modeling, written narrative, LEED calculations, etc...

36

st u dio 0 2 : Ec o -V i l l a g e


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

37


Resolutions : Final group submission boards

38

st u dio 0 2 : Ec o -V i l l a g e


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

39


40

st u dio 0 2 : Ec o -V i l l a g e


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

41


42


Critical Mass Transit: An inter-modal transit station in Detroit

The intent of this studio was to explore the relationship between large scale public architecture and its urban context. The principal studio project focused on an inter-modal transit hub that was meant to serve as an infrastructural interface connecting an existing neighborhood and a hypothetical local and commuter mass transit system in central Detroit. An architectural, as well as urban design intervention, was proposed to reintroduce pedestrian accessible commercial, retail, residential and other viable uses into a largely vacant urban fabric. The suggested site for this project was the Amtrak station on Woodward Avenue in the New Center area, and the surrounding rail viaduct and vacant lots.

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

43


Motives : Big Dumb Shed Before we proceed with our exploration of the urban inter-modal transit station, we must place the salient architectural and programmatic components into an historical and typological context. As we progress in this studio, we will come to realize that this type of urban intervention has the capacity to provide not only a means of commuter accessibility to the city, but also serve as a social gathering space and marketplace.

44

st u dio 0 3 : C r i ti c a l M a s s Tr a n s i t

During the industrial Revolution era of 19th century Europe these same urban activities emerged on a relatively massive scale, housed within a new architectural typology whose form was the direct expression of the structural and material technologies being rapidly developed. The enormous sheds – made possible by the long span capabilities of cast-iron structures – appeared in every major European capitol. From the great train stations of London and Paris, to the large covered markets of Barcelona and Milan, to the impressive exhibition spaces of the various World’s Fairs.

The ultimate culmination of these large-span industrial structures was the modern early to mid 20th century factory building, perfected by Albert Kahn in cities like Detroit. In the first exercise, we will spend two weeks conducting a critical analysis of these “big dumb sheds” and reinterpret their meaning and usefulness on an intimate scale in an urban setting. The final product will be a full scale fabrication of all or part of your design proposal.

Methods : Research and document big dumb sheds from the 19th century up to the 1960’s. Focus primarily on train stations (eg. St Pancras, London), covered marketplaces (Eastern Market, Detroit), and exhibition structures (Galerie des Machines, Paris). Produce a collage, no less than 20”X20”, using images of these structures to represent their capacity for public space. Collages should be predominantly black and white; can be traditional cut and glued images or digitally assembled in photoshop; can have 3-dimendisonal elements, but must be pined up on the wall.


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

45


Motives : (continued)

Big Dumb Shed

The cast-iron technologies that made these initial 19th century long-span sheds possible would transition into the use of steel by the early 1900’s. The use for these large open spaces also underwent a significant change. These sheds were no longer utilized for covering mainly public spaces, but were found to be essential for large scale private manufacturing facilities. In Detroit,as Henry Ford was pioneering the mass production techniques for his private automobiles, Albert Kahn was doing the same for the architecture and building materials that would support and house the assembly processes. The typology of ‘big dumb shed’ architecture had been transformed from diverse public activity, to that of specific private production.

46

st u dio 0 3 : C r i ti c a l M a s s Tr a n s i t

Methods : In groups of 4, you will select one of the Albert Kahn Detroit factory building images provided to use as a typological reference in designing a public bus shelter. All or part of this design will be built in full scale out of found material. The building material should be recyclable. The design should include seating for at least 4 people.


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

47


Motives : Site Readings As we begin our investigation into the proposal for an inter-modal transit center, we will analyze the prospective site and its physical, historical, cultural, and urbanistic features. We will examine the ways that people inhabit its architecture, the ways that the architecture inhabits the site, and the ways that the site inhabits the city. We will also explore the influences of urban public and private transit on the area, as well as the potential role our site can play in a citywide mass transit system.

48

st u dio 0 3 : C r i ti c a l M a s s Tr a n s i t


Methods : Document and interpret the significant features of our site, while analyzing the relationships between these features and the ways the site is used. The salient features include: - topography - existing buildings - transit infrastructure (streets, highways, railways, viaducts) - traffic flow (automotive, bus, freight and passenger rail, bicycle) - pedestrian movement (paths through the site) - building and land use - building and land vacancy rate You may chose one of the following methods to examine the site: a) Create a collage combining analytical drawings and diagrams with photographs or other artifacts and images of the site. or b) Film a 5-10 minute movie exploring these same concepts. This movie should be creatively edited with an appropriate soundtrack and visual effects.

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

49


Motives : Parti Diagram par•ti Pronunciation: (pär-te’, pär’te), [key] —n. Archit. the basic scheme or concept of an architectural design. Methods : Begin by researching the typology of the inter-modal transit center. Some examples include: -Miami Intermodal Center (MIC) -Zoo Station, Berlin (Bahnhof Zoologischer Garten) -Shanghai South Station Explore the relationship between the programmatic elements and the site using adjacency diagrams. The building program must include, but not be limited, to the following: -commuter rail platform -light rail platform -city bus concourse -main terminal with access to bus and rail platforms, and retail spaces -transit / security offices -outdoor public space / park -rental car facility -community amenities

50

st u dio 0 3 : C r i ti c a l M a s s Tr a n s i t

Produce parti diagrams illustrating a basic site strategy and integration of the programmatic elements. These studies can be in any media.


SECTION EAST

SECTION SOUTH

PRELIMINARY DESIGN

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

51


Motives :

Methods :

Skin and Structure: Refining the Material Language

In the next phase of the project, you will develop both the structural diagram of your transit station, as well as the building material palette and its implementation in the building facade.

As your projects continue to develop from parti to concept to schematic design, the massing studies and spatial analyses will evolve into an exploration of the structural strategies that will be employed, as well as the nature and material of the building envelope. It is at this point in the definition of your architectural vocabulary that architectonic and material considerations will play a critical role in your overall scheme.

52

st u dio 0 3 : C r i ti c a l M a s s Tr a n s i t


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

53


Resolutions : Final representations of the studio process

54

st u dio 0 3 : C r i ti c a l M a s s Tr a n s i t


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

55


56

st u dio 0 4 : U r b a n Al c h e m y


Urban Alchemy : 2nd Year Undergraduate Foundation Studio

The intent of this second year studio was not simply to extend what the students learned in their first year, but to expand their concept of architecture and the role of the architect in the urban scale. With the following projects, students were introduced to the tools used to design in an urban context, and placed collaborative situations where successful architectural outcomes were precipitated within the group dynamic. Woven throughout the architectural design problems were the technical integration components addressing heating, cooling, and acoustical concerns.

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

57


Urban Retrieval: Making as a Catalytic Event Motives: How do we operate in varied urban conditions How do we speculate as architects on the future of cities and space How do we engender a direct prosthetic relationship between the user as an active being and the program of design… In addition to these issues, we will initiate the study of heating and cooling as design intensive activities, and not “things” that are “figured out” after the design is complete. Methods: Baker Metal Smith Potter Glass Sculptor You are to select from the previous list one “maker” [your client]. You are to define what they do and how and why they do it. From this information you are to define or design a program from which to design your architectonic response. 58

st u dio 0 4 : U r b a n Al c h e m y

Your site will be in Detroit on Michigan Avenue. It is a vacant infill site with an abandoned building on one side. The boundaries of your project include both the vacant site and the abandoned building.


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

59


Project 1, Phase 2 Urban Retrieval / Urban Collage Motives: Performance Space Radio Station Recording Studio The challenges inherent in designing for an urban site lay not only with accommodating and utilizing its natural and environmental features, but also in understanding and managing the multiple social and programmatic factors that tend to be layered, woven, or collaged into a project. 60

st u dio 0 4 : U r b a n Al c h e m y

Many of these influences are external to the site, such as: the neighborhood population’s make-up and density; vehicular and pedestrian traffic patterns; and the character of the surrounding built environment. Some of these urban influences, however can be internal, such as: city zoning and building codes; accommodating various and sometimes disparate uses; and incorporating existing buildings or structures.

Methods: In Phase 2 of this project, we will continue to develop the given site, but with the addition of a new client and a new set of programmatic requirements. We will pick up the project from where we left off, except that the previous program and design for our ‘maker’ will now be treated as an existing condition. The maker’s building, however, may be modified to the same extent that the original masonry structure was in the design for Phase 1.


Program : To be developed individually based on a narrative of the client and research into precedents for the program. Questions to Consider : -How will the new program react /incorporate / modify / strengthen / weaken / influence the maker’s program? -How can the heating system from Phase 1 be incorporated into Phase 2? -How do the users / visitors actively engage with both spaces collectively and separately? -How do we engender the connection between architectural design and decisions about technical systems?

no a h resnick : stud io det a il

61


Final Project : Urban Collage/Urban Passage “Above all, we understand this: the man of primitive societies has sought to conquer death by transforming it into a rite of passage.� -Mircea Eliade , The Sacred and the Profane

This project will deal with the movement of people through the site, both in the physical and metaphysical sense. The primary design will consist of a funeral home. A place that prepares the human body before it passes into its final resting place, and provides a temporary space of solace and meditation for mourners to celebrate a life that has passed. The Funeral Home must accommodate mortuary sciences and funerary practices, as well as provide quiet gathering and viewing spaces acoustically buffered from the elevated trains rumbling by every five minutes.

Basic Program: -Lobby -Viewing room for up to 200 people -Chapel / meditation space for up to 50 people -Embalming room -Office -Garage for up to 2 hearses - Ancillary services Total area: +/- 10,000 sf The secondary design element will be a CTA transit stop for the Orange and Green line elevated trains that pass through our site. You will share the site with another student(s) in another studio. Between your two/ three projects, which will be conjoined in some way, will be the CTA station which you will work on as a team. Basic CTA station considerations: -Northbound and southbound train platforms for the Orange and Green line trains -Station attendant booth -Concession stand The site is located on the NorthWest corner of 18th Street and State Street on the South Side of Chicago.

62

st u dio 0 4 : U r b a n Al c h e m y


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

63


64

st u dio 0 4 : U r b a n Al c h e m y


no a h resnick : stud io det a il

65


Studio Detail