New Orleans Magazine November 2022

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$6.95NOVEMBER 2022 NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2022 TOP LAWYERS 2022 BEST OF NOODLES COZY FALL FAVORITES MY NEWORLEANS .COM MYNEWORLEANS.COM

Josh Groban

legend Cyndi Lauper; Emmy Award winner Rachel Brosnahan; and film, TV,

and

star Rita Wilson on GREAT PERFORMANCES "Josh Groban’s Great Big Radio City Show” on Friday, November 25 at 9:00 p.m.

on WYES-TV.

6 NOVEMBER 2022 DIAL 12, D1 World-renowned baritone
performs with music
stage
recording
— only
Contents NOVEMBER 2022 / VOLUME 57 / NUMBER 2 New Orleans Magazine, (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: one year $19.95; no foreign subscriptions. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright © 2022 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners. FEATURES 28 Life is Noodiful Best of Noodles BY
42 By the Book FAQ when you need a lawyer BY
46 Top Lawyers 2022 550+ leading professionals STANDARDS 8 FROM THE EDITOR Oodles of Fun 10 JULIA STREET At the Movies 12 ONLINE The Latest News, Events, Stories and More 14 NEWS + NOTES Top Things to Do, Read & Try 16 BAR TAB Best Bars, Drinks & More 18 THE DISH News from NOLA Kitchens 20 STYLE Painterly Prints 22 PERSONA Olivia Pritchard 24 MODINE Gnome Sweet Gnome 26 VINTAGE 1897 64 TRAVEL On the Road Again 66 HOME ADVICE Jay Dryden 68 GROWING PAINS An Untraditional Thanksgiving 70 CHEERS A Scottish Play 72 NOSH Pie in the Sky 74 DINING GUIDE Listings from Around the City 104 STREETCAR Popeyes at 50 22 16 7220 ON THE COVER Plant-Based Miso Ramen at Union Ramen Bar Photograph by Kat Kimball

November is already here, which means the beginning of the long holiday season in New Orleans. From Thanksgiving through to New Year's Day and then Carnival coming right along afterwards, it’s important to remember it’s a marathon, not a sprint, of celebrating. Right now, it’s all about settling into comfort whenever possible.

It’s my favorite time of year – the weather is just about right, there’s lots of activities to look forward to, and comfort food is back on the menu. For me, that may mean a simple bowl of something warm and spicy.

This month, we take a deep dive into the most comforting of food across many cultures, the humble, yet mighty, noodle. From hand rolled Italian pastas to hearty Japanese soba or udon noodles, pad Thai or a simple concoction of macaroni and cheese, there’s a taste for all noodle lovers. We struggled to find a better way to name our feature, always coming back to “oodles of noodles,” as that’s just what we’ve got for you: oodles of noodle goodness to add to your own comfort food menu this season.

November is also our annual Top Lawyers issue. We have a primer on all the FAQs you may have when deciding if, how or who to choose to help with your legal issues, plus a comprehensive list of the top professionals across the area. So, take comfort that when you are in need, we’ve got you covered with the best and the brightest in all areas of the legal profession.

Have something you want to share with us? Email ashley@myneworleans.com.

Be sure to check out our regular columns, for cozy advice on outdoor fireplaces, a delicious recipe for chocolate pie that just may be the ultimate in dessert comfort, and plenty of great things to do, restaurants to check out and much more.

So, this November, before things start to really ramp up, we invite you to put on your softest clothes, perhaps treat yourself to a bowl of comfort, pour a cup of your favorite warm beverage and tuck in. Things are just about to get started!

8 NOVEMBER 2022
FROM THE EDITOR
THERESA CASSAGNE PHOTO

At the Movies

Film and the city

HEY JULIA,

When I was a child living with my family at 1024 Royal St., I used to frequent a movie theater on the corner of Royal and Ursulines. What happened to the building?

Susan, what you are referring to is a rather troubled property that began its life in 1914 as the Gaiety Theater. (The name was a popular one for theaters in America and even Dublin and London.) The best account of the history of local theaters is the book, “There’s One in Your Neighborhood: The Lost Movie Theaters of New Orleans,” by Ray Brunet, Jr. and Jack Stewart, published by Arthur Hardy Enterprises, 2012. Brunet himself was a part of local movie history, best known for having saved the Uptown Prytania Theater, now operated by his son. According to the book, in 1915 there was a legal announcement that the theater’s contents were being auctioned. Not a good sign. The building survived, even showing films of Italian operas appropriate to the neighborhood which, at that time, had a large Sicilian population. In 1927, a banner painter for the theater was the suspect in a double murder. The building itself was even a victim when it was one of several theaters experiencing the wrath of projector operators who triggered stink bomb attacks. Oh, and, in 1937 there was a major fire. Through the years, the theater’s name was changed to The Royal Arts, the Theatre Royale, Le Theatre de St. Genesius and finally, as an adult theater, the Capri. In 1969 the theater was shut down and eventually demolished, leaving only its garden walls. Poydras says his great grandpa use to hide in the balcony there to see some of the old “Francis the Talking Mule” films that were popular in the 1950s.

Anyway, to answer your question Susan, I wish I could tell you that the site is the location of a bar where Jean Lafitte and Marie LaVeau used to sip Sazeracs together. Instead, what outsiders see is a wall on both the Ursulines and Royal Street sides. What goes on behind the walls is uncertain. There are heavy metal gates on each side solid enough to stop Russian tanks. I suspect it is a green space for nearby condos and maybe even some parking. Visually, though, it is a dead block. At least there are still mules to be seen in the neighborhood, but they are busy pulling and not talking.

DEAR J & P, What was the best movie ever made in New Orleans?

- ROTH JOHNSON, MARRERO

Well, opinions vary, of course, but Poydras always discounts other opinions and goes with his own beliefs. One question though is what is meant by “made in.” Artistically, the best film ever set in New Orleans was “A Streetcar Named Desire,” but the Tennessee Williams play was shot almost entirely in Hollywood. Some outside shots, such as the opening scenes of Blanche arriving by train, were shot locally, but for the most part where Brando did his yelling, was mostly in a back lot studio.

As for the best film shot on loca tion, Poydras votes for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” director David Fincher’s 2008 film, starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett about a person who was born old and grew younger. It had a presence throughout town.

Button received many Academy Awards nominations and was consid ered a front runner for picture of the year, but as the night progressed most of the awards went in a different direction. The big winner was the British/Indian Production, “Slumdog Millionaire,” in which a kid from the old country achieves wealth in a talent contest and the challenges of dealing with it. New Orleanians were disappointed that the film they saw being made locally lost, although their attention was diverted by the awards being the same night as the Bacchus parade.

Associate Publisher Kate Henry

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SEND US YOUR QUESTIONS

Poydras is looking for something to do. Send your questions to julia@myneworleans.com and be sure to include your name and information. For the subject line use: Julia and Poydras Question.

10 NOVEMBER 2022 WITH POYDRAS THE PARROTJULIA STREET
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Holiday Planning

‘Tis the season for holiday planning. From special Thanksgiving menus, baked goods and take-out items to Réveillon dinners, holiday catering and party planning, at MyNewOrleans.com, we will keep you posted on all the local holiday restaurant news from around town.

EDITORS’ PICKS

Each week our editors dish on their favorite books, restaurants, bars, music and more. Find out if your favorite made our cut.

TOP LAWYERS LIST 2022

Whether you need advice or counsel, our Top Lawyer List is a great resource to connect with the right legal professional for your needs. Check out MyNewOrleans. com “Best in New Orleans” resources for our updated 2022 Top Lawyers list, plus our latest information on top doctors, dentists and real estate professionals.

BLOGS MyNewOrleans.com weekly blogs bring you irreverent takes on parenting, inside information on things to do, restaurant news, history and more.

12 NOVEMBER 2022
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 13

OAK STREET PO-BOY FESTIVAL

Prepare your taste buds, the city’s biggest po-boy party is back Nov. 6 on Oak Street. Stop by for a variety of top-notch po-boys and local music. PoBoyFest.SquareSpace.com

“SIX”

The six wives of King Henry VIII tell their sides of the story in the new hit musical playing at the Saenger Nov. 29-Dec. 4. SaengerNOLA.com

SEE THIS

“HOLIDAY DREAMS: A SPECTACULAR HOLIDAY CIRQUE”

This groundbreaking acrobatic holiday show incorporates acrobats, aerialists, comedians, daredevils and specialty acts, plus the latest in visual and technological magic (holograms, projec tion mapping, interactive lasers) at the Saenger Nov. 27. SaengerNOLA.com

LATIN MUSIC “DINE & DANCE WITH MUEVELO”

If you’re in the mood for dinner and dancing, BB’s Stage Door Canteen at the National World War II Museum is hosting New Orleans band Muevelo. NationalWW2Museum.org

EAGLES

On Nov. 18, legendary rock band the Eagles are set to perform their classic hit album “Hotel Cali fornia” at the Smoothie King Center on Nov. 19. SmoothieKingCenter.com

ABITA FALL FEST 2022

Eight-time Grammy-winning country superstar Carrie Underwood performs at the Smoothie King Center on Nov. 5 as part of her “Denim & Rhinestones Tour.” SmoothieK ingCenter.com

CELEBRATION

IN THE OAKS

City Park will once again transform itself into a place of holi day magic for one of the Crescent City’s premier light shows Nov. 24 to Jan. 1, with a walking tour and a drive-through celebration. Celebra tionInTheOaks.com

NEW ORLEANS FILM FESTIVAL

Downtown Abita will host “Fall Fest” Nov. 4-5, featuring music, food, kids’ activities and a LSU tailgating event for Saturday’s big game. AbitaFallFest.com

PJ MORTON

PJ Morton, the Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter and keyboard ist for Maroon 5, will play for one night only at the Fillmore on Nov. 25. FillmoreNOLA.com

On Nov. 26, Grambling and Southern will once again face off in the Caesars Superdome for the Bayou Classic. There will also be a parade on the morning of the game and a Battle of the Bands.

MyBayouClassic.com

The New Orleans Film Festival will hold in-person screenings Nov. 3-8 and virtual screenings Nov. 3-13. Every year, the festival hosts presti gious Hollywood films and spotlights great young local filmmaking talent as well. Screenings will take place in a variety of venues, includ ing the Prytania and the Broad. NewOrleansFilmSociety.org

Beloved Disney Junior charac ters and Marvel superheroes team up together on stage at the Saenger Theatre Nov. 25. There will be songs from the hit Disney Junior series, as well as original new music.

SaengerNOLA.com

Check all event websites for the most up-to-date information.

14 NOVEMBER 2022 BY FRITZ ESKERNEWS + NOTES
CARRIE UNDERWOOD “DISNEY JUNIOR LIVE ON TOUR: COSTUME PALOOZA” BAYOU CLASSIC CHERYL GERBER PHOTO COURTESY OF SAENGER
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 15

Spirits of Mexico

Casa Lumbre, a liquor brand founded in Mexico, has three brands that are now available locally. Abasolo Ancestral Corn Whisky (available at American Townhouse, Sidecar and Jewel of the South) pays homage to Mexico’s heritage with the country’s first-ever whisky made from 100 percent ancestral corn. Deep and smooth, it features notes of roasted corn, leather, vanilla, toffee, honey and black tea. Meanwhile, the Ojo de Tigre Mezcal Artesanal (available at Fulton Alley) is a Mezcal made in collaboration with Mexican actor Luis Gerardo Méndez. It features a subtle smoke profile and notes of green apple, citrus, cooked agave, caramel and smoked cocoa. There’s also the dual-origin Las Californias Gin (at Bijou Restaurant and Seline Catahoula New Orleans), which takes inspiration from the U.S. and Mexico border (previously known as the Las Californias region) and comes in two expressions (Nativo and Citrico). Both feature a base of the species Juniperus Californica, while Nativo highlights indigenous botanicals like Pacific kelp and Damiana, and Citrico highlights botanicals like lemongrass, figs and almonds. Finally, Nixta Licor De Elote (available at Alma) is the world’s first corn liqueur. This silky and sweet spirit features hints of roasted corn, caramel and vanilla, along with sweetness from both the corn and piloncillo (a form of unrefined cane sugar traditional to Mexico and Latin America). casalumbre.com

BEST IN BUBBLES

The Cham pagne Bureau, U.S.A. has re leased its list of top 10 U.S. bars and restaurants to enjoy Cham pagne, and Effervescence made the list. In addition to a great selection of Champagne, Effervescence offers themed Sunday brunch es, a luxe caviar menu and re served Cham pagne table service. 1036 N. Rampart St., 509-7644, nolabubbles. com

WINE & DINE

Check out Bacchanal’s Vino Wine Wednesdays, 4 to 6 p.m. to enjoy a back yard party like no other. These free winetasting events also feature live music from 6-9 p.m. Of course, there’s also a menu of delicious cheese plates and more from which to choose. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111, bacchanalwine. com

SWEET SPOT

Baton Rouge-based Three Roll Estate recently relaunched with a new name—Oxbow Rum Distillery. The distillery continues to produce select Three Roll products, but it also has launched a new premium flagship line, dubbed Oxbow Estate Rum, which includes Oxbow Small Batch White Rum, Oxbow Barrel Aged Straight Rum, Oxbow Rhum Louisiane Cane Juice Agricole, and the new False River Spiced Rum, all made with locally grown, fresh-pressed sugarcane and Grade A molasses. Available at Martin Wine Cellar, 3827 Baronne St., 899-7411, martinwine.com, oxbowrumdistillery.com

GAME DAY CELEBRATIONS

Saint John in the French Quarter features multiple TVs and will be open for game day brunch and dinner. Try the new "Black and Gold Lemonade," made with Citron vodka, Saint Germain, blackberry lemonade and muddled blackberries with a sugared rim, or the popular Who Dat Old Fashioned. 1117 Decatur St., 581-8120, saintjohnnola.com

Meanwhile, Polo Club Lounge at Windsor Court Hotel's game day specials include the "Black and Gold" cocktail, Urban South's Who Dat Golden Ale Beer, half off select bottles of sparkling wine (Dom Perignon, Krug Champagne and Veuve Clicquot until sold out) and caviar service ($75). 300 Gravier St., 522-1992, windsorcourthotel.com

OOH LA LA

Couvant Bar & Brasserie at The Eliza Jane Hotel has launched a new Happy Hour, Tuesday through Saturday, 5-6:30 p.m. Choose from $7 select wines by the glass and half-priced snacks (like crispy chickpea fries with tomato aioli and crisp Tête de Cochon topped-deviled eggs). Couvant also offers weekend brunch on Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Enjoy $25 unlimited brunch cocktails, plus a menu of French classics with a Southern twist. 315 Magazine St., 342-2316, couvant.com

16 NOVEMBER 2022
BY MISTY MILIOTOBAR TAB
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 17

A Welcome Return

Kingfish Kitchen & Cocktails has reopened in its French Quarter location. In addition to popular Louisiana dishes like the red beans and rice and Southern fried chicken, the bar and restaurant is offering a new Happy Hour on Thursdays and Fridays from 2-5 p.m. Enjoy $4 draft brews, $6 select wines and $7 specialty cocktails, plus $9 small plates such as boudin boulettes, pork cracklins, duck and andouille gumbo, and Louisiana crawfish bread. 337 Chartres St., 598-5005, kingfishneworleans.com

SUNDAYS AT ST. ROCH

The Elysian Bar at Hotel Peter and Paul is offering new fall dishes. The menu now features items like a pear and local lettuce salad (with Manchego cheese, pear vinaigrette and fried shallots); snapper crudo (with tomato, yuzu and pickled aji dulce); and tri-tip steak (with carrot puree, sunflower, carrot and brown butter emulsion). Other popular dishes include the roasted Gulf shrimp, and the crab and ricotta gnocchi. 2317 Burgundy St., 356-6769, theely sianbar.com

St. Roch Market’s seasonal art market returns 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sundays through next spring. The weekly events feature five to 12 art-focused vendors, live music and televised New Orleans Saints games at The Mayhaw. Enjoy a bevy of cocktails and bites from the likes of The Mayhaw, The French Stall and Elysian Seafood while you’re at it. 2381 St. Claude Ave., 267-0388, strochmarket.com

MOVIN’ ON UP

Kimpton Hotel Fontenot has welcomed Samuel Peery as Executive Chef. He now oversees the hotel’s restaurant and bar concepts, including the Peacock Room, Gospel Coffee and Boozy Treats, and a new concept coming early next year. Peery joins the hotel from his most recent position as chef de cuisine at Restaurant R’evolution where he worked alongside renowned Chef John Folse. In addition to a new fall menu, the Peacock Room is now open for breakfast Monday through Friday; Gospel Coffee and Boozy Treats also now offers enhanced menu options. 501 Tchoupitoulas St., 571-1818, hotelfon tenot.com

Lengua Madre is a local restaurant known for Chef Ana Castro’s five-course tasting menu rooted in traditional Mexican cuisine. It has become so well known in fact, that Bon Appétit recently named it as a Best New Restaurant in America. Additionally, Food & Wine also just named Castro as one of its Best New Chefs of 2022. Previously, Lengua Madre was named one of The New York Times’ favorite restaurants in America and a 2022 semifi nalist for the coveted James Beard Foundation Awards. 1245 Constance St., 655-1338, lenguamadrenola.com Meanwhile, Brennan’s Executive Chef Ryan Hacker has been named StarChefs Rising Star Honoree for 2022. This award celebrates up-andcoming food and beverage professionals who are the leading the way for contem porary American cuisine, and Hacker’s innovative approach to Southern and New Orleans cuisine certainly fits the bill. 417 Royal St., 525-9711, brennans neworleans.com

TIMELY TOME

The Copeland Family, founders of the legendary Popeyes empire, has released a cookbook filled with never-beforereleased recipes from the late founder Al Copeland. The book, with a foreword from his son Al Copeland Jr., chronicles the life of Al Copeland and the rise of the Popeyes empire in biographical stories sprinkled alongside more than 100 tried-and-true recipes. Written by Pulitzer Prize-winning and New York Times best-selling author Chris Rose and the Copeland family’s Kit Wohl, Secrets of a Tastemaker: Al Copeland The Cookbook ($30, The CookBook Studio) has been released in celebration of Popeye’s 50th Anniversary. Can’t miss recipes include the buttermilk biscuits, sweet heat chicken, ricochet catfish, fettuccine Lamborghini and Cajun duckanoff. Available at your local indie bookseller; be sure to ask!

Red Fish Grill is offering new Sunday Blitz Brunches from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Sundays when the New Orleans Saints play at home. The two-course menu ($30) features dishes like alligator sausage and seafood gumbo; crab Croque Madame; and Louisiana shrimp and smoked gouda grits—all prepared by Executive Chef Chris Vazquez and team. Bottomless brunch cocktails (for two hours maximum) also are available for $28. 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, redfishgrill.com

18 NOVEMBER 2022
BY MISTY MILIOTOTHE DISH
TOP TOQUES BLITZ BRUNCHES AUTUMNAL APPETITE
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 19

Style

Local artist Liz Kamarul has ventured into the realm of handpainted clothing. In an effort to reduce waste, she carefully selects secondhand clothing and turns them into wearable works of art using paint samples left over from projects mixed with a medium to soften the paint. Available in a range of styles through Liz Kamarul, lizkamarul. com.

Painterly Prints

Brush strokes are popping up everywhere this season

Not only will BENE’s Samuel bag in black leather with white paint look effortlessly chic on your arm, 25% of each purchase will be given to the Equal Justice Initiative. At 4.5 x 6.5, the bag is cleared as an approved size for most sporting/ concert arenas, with 4 credit card slots and an inside pocket. Available (while limited edition supplies last) through BENE, benehandbags.com.

Crafted with dressmaker details, including hidden zippers, JADE’s Candied Icing Frappe Pillow (22’’x22’’) has a textured weave and soothing wave-like brush strokes. The neutral linen palette and abstract print make it a great fit to mix in with almost any décor. Available through JADE, jadenola.com.

Joseph’s Tela Abstract Print long sleeved t-shirt is made in Italy and evokes major artistic vibes. Throw it on with jeans or dress up with a skirt for a fun, and comfy, night on the town. Available at Joseph Stores, josephstores.com.

The owners of The Collective Shop enjoy the charm of a potted plant and have filled the space with items for green thumbs. They also appreciate a modern aestheic and wanted to incorporate pots that felt like artwork – so they made the decision to freehand paint the pots with acrylics, sealing them for durability. Available in a range of designs and colors at The Collective Shop, statementgoods.com.

20 NOVEMBER 2022
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 21

OLIVIA PRITCHARD

Arecent article written for The Atlantic posed the question, “Why are so many millennials obsessed with their dogs,” – to which the writer Amanda Mull noted in the subhead “The only thing getting me through my 30s is a cranky, agoraphobic chihuahua named Midge.” Dogs have been domesticated for thou sands of years, but the billion-dollar industry has seen an increase in the last few decades, and an even larger boost during the pandemic. Dogs, no matter the breed, are considered family members, adored by their owners. Olivia Grey Pritchard has been taking photos of people and places all over the world, but her newest set of clients is of the four-legged kind, capturing gorgeous shots of local New Orleans family’s furry members. This September, Pritchard released her new coffee table book “Mutts: A Celebration of Mystery Mixed Breeds.”

Q: Why was it important to focus on mutts specifically? Just from a personal perspective, I’ve always had mutts and my family has always had mutts, so that’s kind of how I was raised. When you want a dog, you go to the shelter and get a dog. Then also, there are some beautiful coffee table books out there of dog portraits. Randall Ford, Vincent Meucci, there are some amazing books out there. And I know because I bought all of

them. I was researching this particular project, and I just wanted to see what had been done before. There was nothing that was only mutts. There were books that had mutts in them alongside purebred dogs, but nothing that was just dedicated to mutts, and I just really thought they deserved their own book.

Q: What was photography process for the book? For about two and a half months, I had six dogs a day in the studio for two or three days a week, depending on my human shooting schedule – because I didn’t want to have dogs in and then have a newborn baby without a deep clean in between. So, some days were reserved for people and some days reserved for the mutts. Some dogs would be done in 10 minutes. I had them scheduled for hour intervals, just because some of them took the whole hour, because they needed 45 minutes to sniff and get comfortable. I would just keep working or chat with the owner, doing other things, and moving with the body language of “this is a calm, safe place.” It really just depended on the dog. And like I said, there were a few where I clicked the shutter and I was thought, “Oh, well that’s it. I’ll take a few more, but that’s the one.” Some owners would say, “my dog’s a model, my dog is made for this.”

I have a lot of people who feel that way. One of them is Malibu Barbie’s mom. She posted Malibu’s picture and said, “from stray to slay.”

Q: What was it like dealing with dog clients, as opposed to people clients? I’ve always also done four-legged clients in the studio. One thing I’ve learned is that I’m allergic to dogs a little bit, which was really shocking because I grew up with dogs. But I started getting really bad sinus migraines and bad inflammation and sinus infections, and I went to the allergist. She did a more comprehensive test and told me I was a little allergic to dogs and I was like, “Oh, well that’s why I’m having so many problems right now.”

A series of allergy shots later, I’m good to go. I really learned more technically, more so than about my creative process. For example, you would think maybe that two white dogs would have the same lighting setup. But they don’t, because their fur reflects light really differently. I had never noticed that before, because I’ve never shot two white dogs in a row separately. I had never really considered before. But the texture, the color, all of that plays into how light is reflecting off the animal. And it doesn’t matter if it was in color [or black and white].

Q: In the book, we loved the dog Chicory, who under her name said, “farts audibly.” What made you want to put facts or little tidbits about the dogs? It wasn’t always the plan at first, it was just gonna be the dog’s name and then the best guess of their breed mix. But I think somebody put something on their form because I asked for an interesting or unique characteristic about the dog so that I could feel like I know

Mutts: A Celebration of Mystery Mixed Breeds by Olivia Grey Pritchard. $45, Hardcover, 256 pages, available at your local book seller or at Oliviagreypritchard.com/ mutts-the-book

them better. Someone put something really funny and I thought it would be really cool and would make the readers feel more connection to the dog. I made sure to add that to the form. If the owner didn’t really give us anything from the form, or it was something simple, I would ask their unique story or for something that would paint more of a picture of the dog and I would reword what they said. Once we started doing that, I knew that that’s what we needed to do in the book because it just makes it all the better.

Q: Why should everyone have a copy of “Mutts”? It’s a perfect, joyful escape from the stress of daily life. It is funny; it’s heartfelt. It’s moving, especially if you get read the index. And even if you’re not necessarily a dog lover, I think you would still enjoy this book. I really feel like it’s for everyone. It’s the perfect happy book for any age and any holiday.

To continue this conversation, visit our website for exclusive online content.

MyNewOrleans.com

22 NOVEMBER 2022
BY KELLY MASSICOTPERSONA

Q A

GREG MILES PHOTO

Gnome Sweet Gnome

Something is afoot.

My sister-in-law, Larva, is changing her name.

This has got my mother-in-law Ms. Larda very upset. Larva is her oldest daughter and Ms. Larda gave her the most beautiful name she could think of: Larva Lavender Gunch.

But now Larva is going around calling herself Gnola.

Larva insists this is for business purposes. She now creates gnomes. Garden gnomes - them little statues of bearded guys with pointy hats you see peering out from shrubbery in people’s yards. She also makes mini-gnomes for the mantle and for table settings.

Anyway, it has become a full-size business, “Gnaturally Gnola Gnomes.”

She bestows a individual name on each gnome: Gnancy, Gneville, Gnorman, Gnatalie and like that.

Now, for years, Larva has worked at Bubba’s Hardware. She knows what a lug wrench is, where to find the picture hanging stuff and all that. And she specializes in tool packs for single women: screwdriver sets,

screws to match, nails, plus hammers and advice to not use them on their ex-husband. If a lady asks for a stud finder, she whispers, “Just wear a low-cut dress and go to a nice bar.” Customers love her.

But now she’s gnome-crazy.

She almost made a big mistake last month at Halloween, when she created gnomes dressed like ghosts. She just dropped a little white handkerchief over each one and added eye holes. She didn’t think about how the pointy hats under the handkerchiefs would make it look until her husband walked in, saw them on the kitchen table, and bellowed, “You got a mini-KKK meeting going on here, Larva?”

So she yanked off the handkerchiefs and stayed up late painting the pointy hats black and making little black capes and brooms.

Now she got this rush Thanksgiving order from St. Sloven’s Retirement home. A dozen little gnome place card holders. She got them almost done - gnomes in long aprons holding little pies - right down to their little bare feet, which she always makes out of special clay and bakes in the oven.

And of all times, her oven breaks down.

She calls up Ms. Larda, and says she is rushing over with a pan of gnome feet to bake.

While they are waiting for them to be done, she and Ms. Larda step out real quick for some lottery tickets. They are gone maybe five minutes, but when they get back, the cookies are out of the oven and three sets of feet are missing. So are my brothersin-law, Lurch and Leech.

It don’t take Columbo to figure out that them two mistook them for cookies.

And the gnomes have to be delivered by 5 p.m.

Now, some gnome-makers don’t add feet, but Gnola’s gnomes always have either two bare feet, or two shoes. It’s a trademark.

What to do; what to do? They could run to Wal-Mart and buy Barbies and use their shoes, but Gnola thinks the retired folks would wonder why Gnicholas, Gnathan, and Gnolan had high heels sticking out from under their beards. You can expect anything these days, but still. Gnomes in high

heels might shock the old people.

Then Ms. Larda gets an idea. She finds some dried fava beans left over from St. Joseph’s Day and slips two of them under each of the aprons of the feetless gnomes. With the ends sticking out, they look kind of like shoes.

So while Gnorma is busy gluing 18 bare feet on nine gnomes, Ms. Larda takes a marker and turns six fava beans into beat-up looking tennis shoes for the three feetless gnomes. Ms. Larda is very talented at this kind of thing and they come out perfect.

“Ok ‘Gnola,’” she says. “You got 45 minutes to get these gnomes delivered.”

“Ohh, Ma, I’ll always be your little Larva.” And she reaches over and hugs her, careful not to glue her fingers to Ms. Larda’s neck.

Leech wanders in with a glass of Alka Seltzer.

“How ya like them cookies? I’m bringing three dozen for Thanksgiving,” says Larva/Gnola. Then she hustles out of there.

Revenge and (and clay cookies) are best served cold.

24 NOVEMBER 2022
LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION MODINE GUNCH
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 25

NewOrleansisknown for its magnificent architecture that ranges from clas sical Greek Revival, Italianate and Spanish Colonial to the thousands of Creole cottages and ornate Victorian shotgun houses that fill old city neighborhoods. Traveling around town, however, one can find unexpected architectural treasures like this 19th century Egyptian Revival former police station located at 2229 Rousseau St. just off Jackson Avenue in the Irish Channel.

Its origins are somewhat of a mystery. In her history of Jefferson Parish, historian Betsy Swanson states it served as a jail and courthouse when the neighborhood was still part of Jefferson Parish. In 1833, the Louisiana Legislature created the city of Lafayette, which ran from

about Felicity to Toledano streets. A year later the Jefferson Parish Police Jury instructed parish surveyor and engineer Benjamin Buisson to build a courthouse and market on Jackson Avenue. In 1836, Buisson also designed and constructed a two-story prison at today’s 2229 Rousseau St.

The Police Jury sold the 1834 courthouse on Jackson Avenue in 1852. Meanwhile in May 1843 the Police July accepted a proposal by the eminent Irish-born New Orleans architect James Gallier Sr. to redesign and convert the prison into a new courthouse. Swanson and other historians cautiously credit Gallier with the building’s Egyptian Revival design then popular in Europe and other parts of the United States.

The building continued as a courthouse and prison even after New Orleans annexed the City of

1897Lafayette in 1852. The annexed area, however, remained part of Jefferson Parish until 1870 when the Legislature moved the Orleans Parish line upriver to Lowerline Street and the City of Carrollton. According to a Feb. 22, 2021, Times-Picayune article, the building soon after became the Sixth Precinct police station.

Herein lies the mystery. Did Gallier design the Egyptian Revival building?

1836 prison remained in tact behind the new station. Adding to the confusion as to who designed the Egyptian Revival façade, former director of the Historic New Orleans Collection Boyd Cruise noted on his conceptualized 1952 painting of the police station that architect Harry W. Charlton (sometimes identified as Henry) designed the building. Charlton, active in New Orleans from 1887 to 1904, also worked for the city’s engineering department as an architectural draftsman. To muddy the waters a bit more, according to a May 26, 1897 article in the New Orleans Daily Picayune (later TimesPicayune), the City Council awarded the construction contract to one R. Fletcher.

In 1917, the city closed the station and destroyed arrest records. On Nov. 27, 1921, the city announced plans to renovate and reopen the 1897 station to house stolen cars on one side and, on the other side, construct cells for temporary prisoners. It also planned to demolish the still-standing 1830s prison in the rear. The police station continued to operate until the mid 1930s. Since then, it has housed an auto mechanic’s garage, bakery, and various other businesses, including a float storage warehouse for a New Orleans carnival krewe. The building sold again in 2019.

Rousseau Street Police Station with the Black Maria.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

According to city records and newspaper reports in 1897 and 1921, the city constructed in 1897 a new Sixth Precinct police patrol wagon station with its “ornamental front” at that location on Rousseau Street. It replaced “an ancient structure that was known as the court building,” perhaps it replaced Gallier’s 1843 courthouse. Meanwhile, Buisson’s

A 1957 photograph by famed Louisiana photographer Clarence John Laughlin shows the Egyptian design fully in tact. Today, however, a gutted shell of the original Egyptian Revival precinct station still stands at 2229 Rousseau St. Unfortunately, over the decades much of the Egyptian motifs were removed and its front gate replaced by a metal garage door. The mystery continues. What’s next for this historic building?

26 NOVEMBER 2022 BY JOHN R. KEMPVINTAGE
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 27
Fettucine Nero at Jack Rose

Magazine St., 504-373-6471 2200 Royal St., 504-948-9309

Noodles are a staple food in many culinary cultures - Chinese, Filipino, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Italian, German - and they are made with everything from wheat to rice to acorn meal. They are cheap to make, easy to store and preserve, and lend themselves to thousands of preparations. Noodles are a got-to for feeding young families on a budget, so, many of us literally cut our teeth on them. They are familiar and we find them comforting. Doubt the comforting power of noodles? Just shove a bowl of Kraft mac and cheese or buttered noodles with Parmesan in front of a crying child.

To make the cut for consideration as one of New Orleans’ best noodle dishes the noodles had to be made from a grain, so no zoodles and no spaghetti squash. The dish also had to be about the noodles themselves, rather than noodles as a vehicle for something else—like a fried soft-shell crab or a meatball, as tantalizing as those foods may be.

Despite their mild and agreeable nature, noodles had to be the star of the show to make the cut.

Upon graduating from LSU with a degree in landscape architecture, Keith Scarmuzza decamped to Thailand where he worked on resort developments and fell in love with Thai food. He and his wife Surpeeya married in Bangkok. When the couple moved back to Keith’s native New Orleans there was no Thai food that met their standards. They opened the original SukhoThai (meaning ‘Dawn of Happiness’) in 2003.

The couple developed all the recipes for their two restaurants and continue to work hands-on with a team of chefs, most of whom are Thai. The Drunken (so called because of the generous amount of sauce) Duck Noodles start with fresh, wide rice noodles. Duck (choice of either breast or half of a duck) is marinated in a combination of anise, cinnamon, black pepper, celery, and soy sauces, then lightly stewed, then flash fried before it is stir-fried with the chewy noodles in roasted chili paste with garlic, onion, carrot, broccoli, cabbage, bell peppers, sweet basil, and egg. The result is a fragrant, visually appealing dish with a symphony of fresh flavors.

30 | new orleans magazine november 2022
SukhoThai 4519
sukhothai-nola.com

A native of Chiang Ria in northern Thailand, Chef Suda Oun-in said “I like Pad Thai to the extent I was willing to go home late after school to wait for the Pad Thai restaurant to open, even though I knew I would argue with my father after I got home.”

As a classically trained Thai chef, Oun-in travelled all over Thailand eating what remains her favorite dish.

Her job as a chef with Marriott hotels transferred her from the island of Similan to downtown New Orleans in 2010. With a dazzling smile and seemingly boundless energy, Oun-in met Jeerasak Boonlert, a Buddhist monk, at Chua Bo De temple on the West Bank, at which he had been serving as a missionary since 2008. The couple married in 2012

after he returned to secular life upon completing his practice with the temple. They opened Thai D’Jing in Old Gretna in 2020.

Oun-in’s Pad Thai uses the customary base of rice noodles, egg, and red and green onion but her sauce of tamarind, fish sauce, dried shrimp, garlic, and red chili pepper is of a brighter, redder hue

than others found around town. The chef speculates this is the love she pours in.

“Noodles are essential to the dish but so is the love, the warmth, and the feeling that you want to convey to the person who is tasting it,” she said.

Her Pad Thai is offered with a choice of protein including tofu, shrimp, chicken, beef, and scallops.

PAD THAI Thai D’Jing 93 5th St, Gretna 504-766-0681 thaidjing.com

Maypop

611 O’Keefe Ave. 504-518-6345 maypoprestaurant.com
Chef Michael Gulottta credits Chef de Cuisine Conner Hinderks with the brilliant marriage of house-made spaghetti that showcases seasonal
produce—it might be
figs, roasted Asian pears, winter squash— with Bowfin caviar, crème fraiche, lemongrass soubise, and coconut chili
vinegar. Like so many dishes, the
team conjures up at Maypop this combination of disparate flavors should
not
work,
yet somehow, they do: the chew of the spaghetti is offset by the
sweetness of the roasted produce.
The
tang and heat of the vinegar play against the produce
while the Bowfin adds pops of briny texture. The lemongrass soubise bathes everything
in vibrancy and the crème fraiche lends tang and
creaminess. This should be enough to set your tastebuds on alert, but if more is needed, house
charcuterie
is offered as an add-on.
SPAGHETTI WITH SEASONAL PRODUCE AND BOWFIN CAVIAR

FETTUCINE NERO

Jack Rose (in the Pontchartrain Hotel) 2031 St. Charles Ave. 504-323-1500 jackroserestaurant.com

Everything about Jack Rose feels vaguely otherworldly, like Andy Warhol might walk in at any time. There is the Mad Hatter-like, color saturated, Instagramdriven décor. The Champagne “bongs” that allow users to down their glass of Champagne or sparkling wine in next to no time, effectively launching you off on that rocket to Russia that much faster. Then there is the “Fettucine Nero”— deeply black squid ink pasta with a faint brininess that offsets giant, creamy, deftly seared scallops, and wild mushrooms in an unctuous sauce of parmesan and vermouth. The eye-popping dish arrives garnished with bright herbs and flowers, making it even more unforgettable.

CHEF LINDA GREEN’S YAKA MEIN

Chef Linda Green, the Ya-Ka-Mein Lady neworleanssoulfood.com, @cheflindagreen on Instagram for information on popups

Lore has it that Black southern soldiers fighting abroad in the Korean War were first exposed to a version of yaka mein—a soupy elixir of savory roast beef or pork and shrimp, hard-boiled eggs, scallions, spaghetti, and occasionally, vegetables in a spicy, salty broth with heavy doses of soy sauce and black pepper. The soldiers consumed it after a day on the battlefield or an evening in a bar to sober up and fortify themselves. They brought the tradition home with them and ever since it has been served in some of the city’s Black bars, where is it often referred to as “Old Sober.” Chef Linda Green “The Ya-Ka-Mein Lady” learned to make the restorative dish from her mother. She carried on the tradition through her catering service and started selling it from the back of her pickup at second line parades, various festivals, farmers’ markets, and food truck gatherings around town.

WITH LIITTLENECK CLAMS & GULF SHRIMP

Compère Lapin (in the Old No. 77 Hotel & Chandlery) 535 Tchoupitoulas St. 504-599-2119 comperelapin.com

A chef needs mojo to bring together the ingredients in this dish and Nina Compton has that in spades. Though she has been making pasta throughout her global career, she really honed her exemplary technique at Scarpetta, where she started digging deeper and focused on perfecting the craft.

“I love scialatielli and really wanted to use Louisiana shrimp in a pasta dish,” said the James Beard Award-winner. “At the same time, we were receiving these beautiful, briny clams so I added those. For the sauce I used puréed cauliflower and to brighten it up, added habanero, coconut milk, star anise, lemongrass, and ginger. The sweetness of the sauce works with the brininess of the seafood.”

| 33new orleans magazine november 2022

pasta delivery

Jimmy Lee Moran, scion of the legendary Moran restaurant family behind Moran’s Riverside and Bella Luna, will deliver just-made pasta of your choosing (anything from Angel Hair to Pappardelle) to your door for $9 a pound. He makes his pasta with a Toresani-style machine, which rolls the pasta—as opposed to extruding it—resulting in a product that is delicate and whisper thin, like billows of clouds on your tongue. Jimmy delivers in the New Orleans area, just call him 504.715.5019.

Moran’s Fettuccine Alfredo Serves 4 as an entrée, 8 as a side

1 pound fresh fettucine noodles from Jimmy Moran

1 stick unsalted butter, cut into pats, at room temperature

1/3-pound grated Parmesan cheese 2-4 tablespoons whole milk or half-and-half, scalded and kept hot

1. Bring a tea kettle filled with water to a boil. Fill a large, shallow, heat-proof serving bowl with the boiling water. Set aside.

2. Bring a stockpot filled with salted water to a vigorous boil. Add the fettuccine and stir gently to separate the noodles. Cook for one minute then taste the pasta to determine if the texture is as you desire. Do not overcook. 3. Reserve 1/4 cup of the cooking water. Keep it hot.

4. Loosely drain the pasta, allowing some water to cling. Working quickly while wearing oven mitts, dump the water out of the reserved serving bowl and dry the interior with a dishcloth. Add the pasta to the bowl. Immediately add the butter and mix well, tossing with a fork and a spoon or kitchen tongs. Add one fourth of the cheese. Toss gently, yet thoroughly, to break up any lumps. Add one tablespoon of the hot milk or half-and-half and toss. Continue alternating the cheese and the hot milk or half-and-half until the pasta is loose and creamy, neither wet, nor dry. Add a bit of the reserved water from cooking the pasta if necessary to achieve a creamy sauce.

5. Divide among serving bowls and top with freshly ground black pepper. Serve immediately.

nod to noodles

THE OLDEST EVIDENCE OF NOODLES IS FROM 4,000 YEARS AGO when a plate of rice lamian was found during an archeo logical dig in northwest China. Data indicates that soon after the Etruscans, Arabs, Greeks, and Romans all started producing pasta similar to what we eat today made with grains native to their respective cultures. What the ancient Romans called “laganum” was made with a dough of water and flour that was kneaded then cut in strips. It was very much like today’s fettuccine.

| 35new orleans magazine november 2022

SPICY DAN DAN NOODLES

Luvi 5236 Tchoupitoulas St. 504-605-3340 luvirestaurant.com

The Dan Dan Noodles Chef Hao Gong serves at Luvi are of the style his grandmother made for him as a child in Shanghai in the1970s. Ground chicken breast is cooked with black bean paste, brown Sochu, and garlic to form a hearty sauce. It is served over slippery wheat noodles floating in a pork and chicken bone broth rendered creamy with white tahini paste, then topped with scallions and chili oil. The name of the dish refers to a type of pole walking street vendors hoist over their shoulders to carry baskets—one filled with noodles, the other with sauce—suspended at either end. Over time the name of the inexpensive dish became synonymous with that of the dan dan poles.

SINGAPORE NOODLES

China Orchid 704 S. Carrollton Ave. 504-865-1428 chinaorchidneworleans.com

A staple in Cantonese restaurants in Hong Kong, Singapore Noodles combine a tangle of whisper-thin rice vermicelli, curry powder, vegetables, scrambled eggs, and a protein. At China Orchid in the Riverbend neighborhood, an abundance of shrimp rounds out the dish.

Situated in an uninspiring strip mall, for 35 years China Orchid has never disappointed. The portions are fresh and hefty, the service is friendly, delivery is available Uptown, and the prices are thrifty.

MACARONI PIE WITH CREOLE RED GRAVY

Saint John 1117 Decatur St. 504-581-8120 saintjohnnola.com

Chef Eric Cook’s belt-busting take on the sacred goo of Southern holiday dinners was inspired by the macaroni and cheese with red gravy at Rocky & Carlo’s, a spot frequented by Cook and his family when he was a child growing up in St. Bernard Parish. Cook’s version at Saint John is both decadent and homey. A deep, chewy crust forms at the bottom of a baking dish crammed with bucatini noodles and a custard sauce of heavy cream, eggs, and sharp cheddar that is piled high with more cheddar. What comes out of the oven is a solid mass that is cut into generous squares. Each bite is an explosion of textures. A finishing foil of Creole Red Gravy brings depth and acidity needed to cut through the richness of the pie.

CACIO E PEPE

Sophia 516 Julia St. New Orleans, 504-322-3216

sofianola.com,

Cacio e Pepe (literally, cheese and pepper) is the simplest of all ancient Roman pasta dishes. It is also one of the easiest to screw up. At Sophia, Chef Talia Diele takes no shortcuts. She tosses house-made tonnarelli pasta (like spaghetti but with squared edges) with Locatelli Pecorino, black pepper, and several ladles of the hot, salted water used for cooking the pasta. The pasta is tossed swiftly and repeatedly until the sauce emulsifies and coats the pasta. She then scatters over a few pink peppercorns before the dish is raced to the dining room as it has zero hold time. The result is perfection.

SEAFOOD LO MEIN

Eggroll House 3507 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Metairie 504-887-9364 eggrollhouserestaurantmetairie.com

No bells, no whistles, no charm. This operation is mostly drivethrough with a few counter stools and a couple of booths. It is also, hands down, the greatest bargain around for those low on dough with the need to feed a crowd for under $15. A large takeout clamshell container of Seafood Lo Mein had to be wrestled into closure so crammed was it with noodles, shrimp, crawfish, tuna, salmon, white fish, surimi and vegetables in a light, flavorful sauce. Everything is cooked to order and service comes with a smile.

36 | new orleans magazine november 2022

After an inspirational trip to Japan to study the various styles of ramen, and after hosting numerous pop-ups Nhat “Chef Nate” Nguyen’s first entrepreneurial venture came together just as the pandemic was taking root. He has carved out his own style that eschews the use of the usual pork-based tonkatsu broth in favor of a lighter approach. His bright spot offers a selection of dishes based around his silky housemade noodles: Original Tori

with a poultry-based broth; Miso with a plant-based broth; Slap-Ya-Kimchi Mazeman (brothless with blackened chicken, kimchi, and poached egg); and Dirty Mazemen (brothless with ground beef, tasso, roasted sweet pepper and poached egg).

The plant-based Miso broth arrives loaded with ramen topped with confit oyster mushrooms, roasted tomato, spinach, wakame, black garlic oil, and a poached egg.

PLANT-BASED MISO RAMEN Union Ramen Bar 1837 Magazine St., Suite B 504-459-2819 unionramen.com

SAUTEED ITALIAN OYSTERS AND VEAL STUFFED CANNELLONI

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine 7839 St. Charles Ave. 504-866-9313 4411 Chastant St., Metairie 504-885-2984 vincentsitaliancuisine.com

Go to Vincent’s for dinner and a show. “Hey Baby, how’s your family? Look how big you’ve gotten! How’d that deal work out? We’ve got a special on the menu tonight that’s got your name on it, Mr. C! What a lovely dress, looking good! Let me get chair for you, ma'am. It’s a dry vodka martini with an olive and an onion: I’ll have that sent right over.”

Watching co-owner Anthony “Tony” Imbraguglio work his art is straight up cinema verité. Ever in motion with fluidity and grace, his is the kind of relaxed, though courtly, service associated with a dying breed of older restaurateur. But this 40-something man has the touch: He makes children feel important, women beautiful, and men virile. Many warrant hugs or a kiss on the cheek. Upon administering his greeting, Imbraguglio’s guest stands taller. What, after all, would one expect of the most important person in the room—even in a room full of them, you just know it’s you Tony admires most.

The food at Vincent’s is as fresh, flavorful, and robust as it has ever been in the restaurant’s nearly 25-years. The House Specialty, “Veal Cannelloni,” is a silken creation involving sheets of house-made pasta stuffed with a puree of ground veal, spinach, and Parmesan set atop a pool of Alfredo cream and finished with light red sauce. Equally satisfying, the “Sauteed Italian Oysters” are plump, lightly battered Gulf specimens sauteed with a lively Bordelaise of green onions, garlic, and olive oil that bathes angel hair pasta.

SPICY MISO CHICKEN RAMEN

Haiku

4430 Magazine St. 504-301-0850 haikunola.com

To enter Haiku on Magazine Street one must first cross a covered, raised outdoor porch to reach the entrance. The intimate, jewel-like interior pretty much lacks natural light and is, instead, subtly lit to reflect the tiny metallic flecks in the stone counter of the sushi bar, and hung with serene art. Even when busy it feels like a secret—just the place to slurp a bowl of slippery ramen noodles when it is hot outside, but you want to forget about it.

The extensive menu includes ramen with choices of tonkatsu, kansu, shoyu and miso broths as well as selections of protein.

The spicy miso ramen with chicken comes with chicken chashu, baby bok choy, a marinated egg, thinly sliced scallions, and naruto maki in a miso broth deep with umami undernotes.

DUCK LEG LASAGNETTE

Del Porto Ristorante

501 E. Boston St. Covington 985-875-1006

delportoristorante.com

At the stylish Del Porto, Chefs David and Torre Solazzo, three-time James Beard award finalists, have been turning out rustic Italian fare and hand-made pasta since 2014, making it a neighborhood favorite in Covington and a destination restaurant for the entire metro area. It’s hard to go wrong on the menu but the promise of cooler weather brings cravings for the “Duck Leg Lasagnette,” a personal-sized portion of something you do not way to share, anyway. Thin sheets of house-made pasta are layered with duck braised with locally grown fall greens and wild mushrooms, and ricotta, then topped with a house-made founduta of Montasio cheese that is gratineed just before it hits the table.

TAGLIATELLE WITH SEASONAL SEAFOOD

The Gloriette 428 E. Boston St. Covington 985-202-8090 thegloriette.com

Opened in the Spring, The Gloriette is a beautiful confection of a restaurant. A lush garden mural by Graham Menage scrolls across robin’s egg blue walls, tucking its way into the alcoves behind two recessed tables to form a cocoon of brilliant garden flowers. Banquette seating covered in azure blue ultra-suede invites lingering, gazing through the picture windows upon a verdant park of moss-draped oaks while sipping proper cocktails from elegant coupee glasses.

A standout on Chef Steven Marsella’s appetizer menu is a tangle of wide ribbons of Tagliatelle cradling sauteed Screaming Oaks mushrooms, bottarga, and lemon chili gremolata. Depending on the season the dish may bear crawfish tails, shrimp, or lumps of crabmeat. It is a light, lovely, and fragrant way to start a meal in this stunning space.

BASIL SPAGHETTI AND PAPPARDELLE BOLOGNESE

The Bower 1320 Magazine St. 504-582-9738 thebowernola.com

At the rear of The Bower, a chic, verdant spot in the LGD, is an open kitchen manned by Chef Marcus Woodham where he makes his perfect, chewy, billowy pasta. The kitchen’s expansive picture windows overlook a lushly planted courtyard and outdoor dining spaces. It seems like an inspiring place to work. Perhaps this is Woodham’s Kryptonite.

It was a hot day, and the Basil Spaghetti was just the ticket. Perfectly al dente spaghetti is coated with fresh basil pesto, preserved lemon, oven dried cherry tomatoes and burrata. Crack into the burrata and its rich cream will spill out atop the pasta. Bliss.

When the chill sets in I am headed back for another visit with the Pappardelle Bolognese of pork, beef, Parmigiano, and aged balsamic. It is finished with truffled cultured cream.

38 | new orleans magazine november 2022

LASAGNA

The standout noodle dishes at Gianna cover the seasons. When a real chill in the air hits, the luxurious “Lamb Lasagna” will keep you cozy and satiated. The thin pasta sheets are house-made and arranged in layers between braised lamb shoulder slow cooked with mushrooms, a Northern Italian-style Bechamel sauce, and nutty Grana Pandana. When it is too hot to breathe outside, noodles from Gianna are still the answer. The “Blue Crab Mafaldini” is as light and uncomplicated as the lasagna is rich and complex. Ruffled ribbons of house-made mafaldini form a nest in a shallow pool of crab stock. The twirled ribbons are topped with jumbo lump crabmeat, shaved jalapeños, and topped with breadcrumbs toasted in butter.

LAMB
AND BLUE CRAB MAFALDINI Gianna 700 Magazine St. 504-399-0816 giannarestaurant.com

MII KIEW

Pomelo

4113 Magazine St. 504-442-9570

pomelonola.com

Chef Aom Srisuk’s version of Mii (noodles) Kiew (wontons), checks all the boxes for a fresh, satisfying dish brimming with flavors and textures. Small, pillowy wonton dumplings (dumplings and noodles in one perfect dish!) filled with shrimp and pork are composed atop a tangle of egg noodles lightly dressed with the vibrant house-made special sauce. Also composed atop the noodles are a choice of barbecue pork or slow-cooked five-spice chicken (both are divine), baby bok choy, dry chili, crushed peanuts, and a shower of fresh herbs.

A native of Thailand, Srisuk and her husband Frankie Weinberg opened the diminu tive Pomelo one year ago on a bustling stretch of Magazine Street. Srisuk wanted to start off small then grow her busi ness as demand dictates for the food she has been cooking since she was a child helping in her family’s restaurant before opening restaurants of her own in Bangkok and later in her hometown of Ayutthaya. After moving to New Orleans with Weinberg, she cooked in the kitchens at Restaurant August, and Cho Thai before opening Pomelo where the recipes are her own and she does most of the cooking.

She is slowly introducing New Orleans diners to Thai specialty dishes with which they may be unfamiliar.

ANGEL HAIR ZIAD

Maple Street Café 7623 Maple St. 504-314-9003

maplestreetcafenola.com

Evergreen and always bustling, Maple Street Café was opened in 1997 by Jordanian bothers Jameel and Traeq Alqutob, both of whom started their American culinary careers in the kitchen at Andrea’s before opening their own place in an Uptown cottage, where they describe their food as “Mediterranean with an Italian flair.”

Jameel continues to man the kitchen on Maple Street where he is joined by other family members, now in their second generation, who help run the front of the house. The elder Alqutob has an affection for naming dishes for loved ones. Such is the case with “Angel Hair Zaid,” which he named for a nephew. For the dish a generous portion of fresh, U-10 Gulf shrimp are sauteed with several varieties of wild mushrooms and sun-dried tomatoes in a light sauce of olive oil and garlic then served atop al dente, angel hair pasta.

OYSTERS DANTE AND SHRIMP MEDITERRANEAN

Pascale’s Manale 1838 Napoleon Ave. 504-895-4877

pascalesmanale.com

Best known as the birthplace of New Orleans-style “Barbecued Shrimp” and for its sprawling oyster bar, despite its provenance as a Creole-Italian restaurant, it’s easy to assume pasta dishes in the 110-year Pascale’s Manale would be an afterthought. Not so. There are real standouts on the menu including “Oysters Dante” — crisp fried oysters served over penne pasta bathed in a brandy-butter sauce with prosciutto and mushrooms. Another standout: “Shrimp Mediterranean” combines colossal sauteed Gulf shrimp with a touch of marinara sauce studded with roasted garlic, spinach, Kalamata olives and penne pasta with a finishing of Romano cheese. Both dishes are served exclusively at lunch.

| 41new orleans magazine november 2022

by the book

finding the best professional for your legal needs

DEALING WITH A LEGAL ISSUE CAN OFTEN BE A DAUNTING TASK.

For the uninitiated, stepping into a court room with its strict mores and peculiar, Latin-heavy lexicon can be a very intimidating environment. While government and legal websites have made it easier for some processes to be handled by individuals without a law degree, local attorneys say ease and security live at opposite ends of the street and having a specialist to help guide a client through their process may be the ounce of prevention that saves a pound of pain.

“As a lawyer, I would say you need a lawyer every minute of every day, but candidly, the best answer to the question of ‘When do people need a lawyer?’ is when you get to the point regarding any issue or transaction, accident, when you start to wonder, ‘Do I need a lawyer?’ That’s the time you need a lawyer,” said David Sherman, one of the founding partners of Metairie-based law firm Chehardy Sherman Williams.

legalese

Understanding terms and phrases used in a courtroom can make dealing with a legal situa tion much less intimidating. Here are a few important legal terms and their meanings.

Affidavit

A written or printed statement made under oath.

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR)

Settling a dispute outside the courtroom with a neutral party such as an arbitrator or mediator.

Arraignment

A proceeding in which an indi vidual who is accused of commit ting a crime is brought into court, told of the charges, and asked to plead guilty or not guilty.

Class action

A lawsuit in which one or more members of a large group, or class, of individuals sue on behalf of the entire class.

Damages

Money a defendant pays a plaintiff in a civil case if the plaintiff has won. Damages may be compensatory (for loss or injury) or punitive (to punish and deter future misconduct).

De facto

Latin, meaning “in fact” or “actu ally.” Something that exists in fact but not as a matter of law.

Deposition

An oral statement taken to examine potential witnesses, to obtain discovery, or to be used later in trial.

Due process

In criminal law, the constitutional guarantee that a defendant will receive a fair and impartial trial. In civil law, the legal rights of someone who confronts an adverse action threatening liberty or property.

42 NOVEMBER 2022

devil in the details

Once it is determined that a lawyer’s advice is needed, experts recommend finding an attorney with a specific area of focus who can properly handle the case.

“You still have a tremendous number of attorneys who try be general practitioners,” Sherman said. “I’ve always said I’m not smart enough to be all things to all people. We started with six lawyers. We now have between 40 and 50 who specialize. Every lawyer has an area of expertise.”

Covington-based attorney Brittany Carter compared finding the right lawyer to handle a specific legal issue to someone finding the right doctor for a medical issue. If you have a problem with your foot, you go to a podiatrist. If you got an issue with your knee, you go to an orthopedist,” she said. “It’s going to a professional for advice and help to get to a resolution. You want to go to someone who really focuses on the certain areas that you need, because they’re doing that every day, day in and day out. And like dealing with your health, it’s very important for clients to be truthful upfront – with the good and bad – so that we can prepare the best in our situation going forward.”

Technology has made some legal dealings a lot easier and faster to process, but local attorneys advise the service an online portal can provide might not include all of the protections an individual or organization needs.

“In the last 10 years, especially since the pandemic, it’s amazing how many people try to practice law themselves via the internet,” Sherman said.

He offered setting up a business as an example. “In Louisiana, the state has made it so easy to go online to set up a business entity, corporation or a Limited Liability Company (LLC) [with the secretary of state’s office], but they don’t think about the fact that you need bylaws, organizational structure, succession plans…. All they know is they can go online, set it up, and not pay a lawyer,” he said. “It’s given people a false sense of security when they think all they have to do is fill out the formation documents online and they’re home free, and they’re really neglecting dealing with so many details that have to be dealt with when establishing a business.”

legal fees

One of the main deterrents when it comes to people hiring a lawyer is anticipated costs, but most attorneys are willing to work with clients on fees. With the shape of the economy following the pandemic, Sherman said his firm will adjust fees with individual and business clients and come up with creative ways of helping so that they are not a complete economic drain.

“Finances can be really tough,” he said. “But a lot of times they can end up worse on the back end if you don’t have a lawyer. If all the Is aren’t dotted and the Ts aren’t crossed, your whole case can fall apart.”

Sherman advises people to talk with lawyers about taking their case on a contin gency fee before they hire one. “If they say no, then you probably don’t have much of a case, and it’s probably not worth spending the money to pursue it,” he said. “If they take it, it’s a sign they think you have a strong chance to win.”

According to Carter, attorneys get a bad rap when it comes to fees. “We’re looked at as raking people over the coals for their money, but really, we are trying to be advocates, as a whole, for people, and I think they forget that,” she said. “There’s some not so great ones out there

Grand jury

A body of 16-23 citizens who listen to evidence of criminal allegations, which is presented by the prosecu tors, and determine whether there is probable cause to believe an individual committed an offense.

Indictment

The formal charge issued by a grand jury stating that there is enough evidence that the defen dant committed the crime to justify having a trial.

Information (Bill of)

A formal accusation by a govern ment attorney that the defendant committed a crime.

Injunction

A court order preventing one or more named parties from taking some action.

Mistrial

An invalid trial caused by funda mental error. When a mistrial is declared, the trial must start again with the selection of a new jury.

Nolo contendere

No contest.

Pro se

Serving as one’s own lawyer.

Pro bono

uniquely louisiana Louisiana has a multitude of things that set it apart from the other 49 states, arguably the most notable is its legal system. The Pelican State’s laws are derived from the Napoleonic Code and the civil law of the state’s French and Spanish colonial period. All of the other states’ base their legal systems on Great Britain’s common law.

Carter said the differences between the two can upend a case for a Louisianan who uses an online website or app, like Legal Zoom, which is based on common law. “People will try to represent themselves and use something online which may not conform to Louisiana law,” she said. “I’ve seen instances where cases have come undone for people – especially with wills – who thought they could take a supposed easier road compared to hiring an attorney. They thought they were protected, but the documents were invalid.”

short for “pro bono publico,” Latin for “for the public good,” refers to professional services provided at no or very low cost.

Petit jury (or trial jury)

A group of citizens who hear the evidence presented by both sides at trial and determine the facts in dispute.

Plea deal (bargain)

Agreement between the defendant and prosecutor where the defen dant pleads guilty in exchange for a concession by the prosecutor. It may include lesser charges, a dismissal of charges, or the prosecutor’s recommendation to the judge of a more lenient sentence.

Probable cause

An amount of suspicion leading one to believe certain facts are prob ably true. The Fourth Amendment requires probable cause for the issu ance of an arrest or search warrant.

Standard of proof

In criminal cases, prosecutors must prove a defendant’s guilt “beyond a reasonable doubt.” The majority of civil lawsuits require proof “by a preponderance of the evidence” (50 percent plus), but in some the standard is higher and requires “clear and convincing” proof.

Statute of limitations

The time within which a lawsuit must be filed or a criminal prosecu tion begun.

Subpoena

A command to a witness to appear, give testimony and/or produce documents.

Search warrant

Orders that a specific location be searched for items, which if found, can be used in court as evidence. Search warrants require probable cause in order to be issued by a judge.

Tort

A civil, not criminal, wrong. A negli gent or intentional injury against a person or property, with the excep tion of breach of contract.

Unlawful detainer action

A lawsuit brought by a landlord against a tenant to evict the tenant from rental property – usually for nonpayment of rent.

Voir dire

The process by which judges and lawyers select a petit jury from among those eligible to serve by questioning them to determine knowledge of the facts of the case and a willingness to decide the case only on the evidence presented in court. “Voir dire” is a phrase meaning “to speak the truth.”

the “law & order” effect

The proliferation of courtroom dramas in film and television has also had an impact on how potential clients anticipate their cases to play out potentially. While the shows are very entertaining and wrap up a story very neatly in 60 minutes, a lot of what is presented is inaccurate, lawyers say.

“Clients have misconceptions from watching shows like ‘Law & Order’ or even ‘Judge Judy,’” Carter said. “They see a very limited setting and go in thinking that things are going to be a certain way and that their attorney can pull a rabbit out of a hat sometimes, and we only can work with what we’re given.”

Most legal dramas are based in New York or in California, states that have very different laws and statutes than Louisiana. What people see on TV or in a movie may not be applicable everywhere.

“There is no way that people would be able to get away with these monologues that they get away with in court (on television) without people objecting,” Carter said. “The things that are really allowed in court, it’s nowhere near what you see in a TV show’s criminal trial. You’re not allowed to do a lot of what is portrayed and have to stick to a specific set of evidence.

“Additionally, every state has its own laws, and people need to understand that,” she said. “What’s being portrayed in one place may not be applicable everywhere.”

Combined with legal dramas, online and social media commentary, especially anonymous posts, that play fast and loose with the truth have altered peoples’ understanding of the law as well as their expectations of how a case may unfold in reality, according to Sherman,

“So much of it is completely untrue,” he said.

criminal v. civil law

Legal representation for criminal defendants is constitutionally guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment. Those who cannot afford an attorney are assigned a public defender. While there is no right to counsel for civil matters, there are options available, in some circum stances, for people to work with attorneys who offer their services for free.

In Louisiana, 70 percent of cases in civil court have one or more parties that is selfrepresented, according to C.C. Kahr, executive director of The Pro Bono Project, a New Orleans-based organization that provides free civil legal services across southeast Louisiana.

“People are going to civil court and representing themselves. Experiencing those proceedings and trying to follow and understand the legal language can be incredibly daunting,” Kahr said. “The impact of these cases can have a profound effect on people’s lives. It’s almost always economics, money that dictates that decision. And, certainly, there are some legal issues where we can help the self-represented litigant. For example, in making a change that doesn’t require complicated forms or proceedings. But the goal should be for everyone who has a legal need, who can’t afford an attorney, to have access to counsel. When they do, they do better. They’re going to have a more successful outcome.”

The Pro Bono Project is a non-profit, taxexempt, 501(c) (3) legal entity that draws on the local legal community to provide the underserved free legal services in civil cases, including people who need help navigating their divorce, adopting a child, writing a will, challenging an insurance claim, declaring bankruptcy or communicating with creditors, or working on a succession on a family home, and additional matters.

“All of these are civil matters where the public doesn’t have a right to representa tion, but that’s where we step in and help,” Kahr said.

Attorneys, paralegals, law students, and others give their time to help people who would not otherwise have any legal advice to help them with their case. Last year, the Pro Bono Project’s nearly 2,000 volunteers worked on about 5,000 cases.

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SOURCE USCOURTS.GOV/GLOSSARY
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Top Lawyers

Most people hope not to need them, but when they do, they want the good ones on their side. To help with that, we present our annual list of Top Lawyers. The list was prepared by Detroit-based Professional Research Services.

PRS provided this explanation of its methodology: The voting was open to all licensed attorneys in New Orleans. They were asked which attorney, other than themselves, they would recommend in the New Orleans area. Each attorney was allowed to recommend up to three colleagues in each given legal specialty. Once the online nominations were complete, each nominee was carefully evaluated on the basis of the survey results, the legitimacy of their license and their current standing with the State Bar Association of Louisiana. Attorneys who received the highest number of votes in each specialty are reflected in the following list.

As always when making professional services choices, second opinions are encouraged. In the end, you’re the judge.

Cayce Peterson

JJC Law, LLC 3914 Canal St., 985-518-8296

Bradley Schlotterer

Kean Miller LLP

909 Poydras St., Suite 3600 504-585-3045

William Schwartz

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-299-6107

Daniel Snellings

Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Paul Sterbcow

Lewis, Kullman, Sterbcow & Abramson 601 Poydras St., Suite 2615 504-588-9722

Frederick Swaim III

Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith, APLC 701 Poydras St., Floor 40 504-982-1193

Jason Waguespack

Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith, APLC 701 Poydras St., Floor 40 504-616-5306

Raymond Waid

Administrative/ Regulatory Law

New Orleans

Michael Fontham

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0810

Kathryn Munson Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 2500 504-523-1580

Dana Shelton

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 546 Carondelet St., 504-593-0816

Admiralty & Maritime Law Metairie

Tommy Badeaux

The Law Office of Tommy J. Badeaux 3500 N. Hullen St., Suite 17F 504-323-4777

New Orleans

Katharine Colletta

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 504-584-9361

Christopher Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5251

Michael Ecuyer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2800 504-522-2304

Gregory Ernst

The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St., Suite 2708 504-399-3495

Delos Flint Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St., Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Thomas Forbes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7041

A. Spencer Gulden Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Paul Hale Hale Devall LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2107 504-576-0700

Christopher Hannan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-8612

Daniel Hoerner

Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St., Suite 4250 504-583-4021

Scott Huete Elkins PLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 4400 504-529-3600

Walter Maestri

Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St., 504-593-0757

Kevin Marks

Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave., Suite 2550 504-336-2432

André Mouledoux

Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St., Suite 600 504-421-6967

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4042

Derek Walker

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7044

Andrew Waters

Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith, APLC 701 Poydras St., Floor 40 504-525-6802

Cheryl Wild-Donde’Ville

Waltzer Wiygul & Garside LLC

14399 Chef Menteur Hwy., Suite D 504-254-4400

Jon Wise

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7549

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Timothy J Young

The Young Firm 400 Poydras St., Suite 2090 866-703-2590

Alternate Dispute Resolution

Mandeville

Danny Shaw ShawADR, LLC 3 Sanctuary Blvd., Suite 201 985-789-0701

Metairie

Daniel Buras Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4100

Patrick Follette

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4281

Conrad Meyer

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4141

New Orleans

Ashley Belleau

Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St., Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Stephen Bullock

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0822

Lambert Hassinger

Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith, APLC 701 Poydras St., Floor 40 504-648-6294

Roger Javier The Javier Law Firm LLC 1340 Poydras St., Suite 2100 504-599-8570

Corinne Morrison

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7228

John Olinde

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7241

John Perry Perry Dampf Dispute Solutions 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2275 866-389-9899

Sarah Pfeiffer

Law Office of Sarah Pfeiffer 400 Poydras St., Suite 1125B 504-366-4025

Bryan Reuter

Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 2500 504-523-1580

Robert Rooth

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7226

H. Bruce Shreves

Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Floor 30 504-569-2908

Lacy Smith

The Law Office of Lacy M. Smith, LLC 3914 Canal St., 504-249-8242

Antitrust Law

New Orleans Craig Caesar Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 504-584-9272

Mark Cunningham Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8536

James Gulotta Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0817

Amelia Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5222

Alexander McIntyre

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5215

Robert Rooth

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7226

Appellate Practice Metairie

Inemesit O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-384-7640

Walter Woodruff Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-420-7542

New Orleans

Roy Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5266

Eva Dossier Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 2500 504-523-1580

Michael Fontham

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0810

Catherine Giarrusso

Pipes | Miles | Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1800 504-322-7140

Kathryn Gonski

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4029

Douglas Grundmeyer

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7028

Matthew Hemmer Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Shannon Holtzman

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4148

Donald Miester

Taggart Morton, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2100 504-599-8510

Katherine Roth

Pipes | Miles | Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1800 504-569-5868

Martin Stern Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St., Suite 4500 504-585-0289

Raymond Ward

Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St., Suite 4500 504.585.0339

Nicholas Wehlen

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0827

Jon Wise

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7549

Banking and Finance Law Metairie

Stephen Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4105

New Orleans

William Bennett

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4113

Roy Blossman

Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 3100 504-585-3807

Edward Crosby

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7212

Susan Talley

Stone Pigman Walther

Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0828

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights/Insolvency and Reorganization Law

Covington

Rachel Vogeltanz

The Law Office of Rachel Thyre Vogeltanz, LLC 428 W. 21st Ave., 985-377-9271

Hammond Frank DiVittorio

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

111 N. Oak St., Suite 200 985-287-5511

Metairie

Frederick Bunol

The Derbes Law Firm, LLC 3027 Ridgelake Dr., 504-207-0913

New Orleans

Edward Arnold

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5204

Alicia Bendana

Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St., Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Joseph Briggett

Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St., Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Rudy Cerone

McGlinchey Stafford

PLLC 601 Poydras St., Suite 1200 504-596-2786

Jon DeTrinis

DeT Law Firm, LLC 4000 Bienville St., Suite C-1 504-722-9711

Douglas Draper

Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St., Suite 2500 504-299-3333

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John Duck Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St., Suite 4500 504-585-0226

J. Forsyth

Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1521

Alan Goodman Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5465

Jan Hayden Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-8645

Benjamin Kadden

Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St., Suite 2775 504-568-1990

John Landis

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0819

Fernand Laudumiey IV Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7052

Tristan Manthey

Fishman Haygood LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 4600 504-905-7896

Carey Menasco Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4171

Andrew Mendez Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0821

David Messina Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7055

Stewart Peck

Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St., Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Lacey Rochester Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5292

R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8194

David Waguespack

Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 3100 504-585-3814

Michael Walshe

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0881

Bet-the-Company Litigations

Metairie

Fred Herman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-212-4161

George Recile Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4100

James Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-420-7542

New Orleans

James Brown Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4116

Peter Butler Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5427

Roy Cheatwood

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5266

Nancy Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5249

Kent Lambert Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5252

John Olinde

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7241

Biotechnology Law New Orleans

William Buckley Willis & Buckley, APC 3723 Canal St., 504-488-6301

Paula Estrada de Martin Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-8669

Business Litigations

New Orleans

Phillip Wittmann

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0804

Commercial Litigation Metairie

Fred Herman

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-212-4161

Melanie Mulcahy

The Derbes Law Firm, LLC 2 Lakeway Center, Suite 400 504-831-2141

Matthew A. Sherman

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4130

Jacob Young Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-833-6600

New Orleans

Thomas Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5464

Peter Butler Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5427

Michael Finkelstein

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-881-1906

Thomas Flanagan

Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3300 504-569-0064

Justin Lemaire

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0942

Paul Masinter

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0882

Richard Passler

Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5440

Taylor Stone

The Law Office of Taylor C Stone, LLC 4130 Canal St., 504-717-4874

Graham Williams

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-324-2141

Metairie

Steven Hayes

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4207

New Orleans

Edward Crosby

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7212

Michael Eckstein

Eckstein Law Firm 1515 Poydras St., Suite 1000 504-527-0701

Andrew Legrand

Spera Law Group, LLC 2200 Tulane Ave., Suite 304 504-300-9938

Jon Leyens

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-8628

Robert Steeg

The Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3201 504-875-6171

Communications Law

New Orleans

Mary Roy Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 504-584-9254

Construction Law Mandeville

Timothy Hassinger

Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith, APLC

3 Sanctuary Blvd., Floor 3 504-237-5402

New Orleans

Scott Barney

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 225-922-4672

Keith Bergeron

Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St., 504-593-0789

Ryan Casteix

Leake & Andersson, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1700 504-585-7500

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Commercial
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Brian Cowan

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC

1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6303

Mark Frilot

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 985-819-8417

Shannon Holtzman

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4148

Richard E. King

Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave., Suite 2550 504-336-2435

Michael Kurtz

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5259

John Landis

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0819

Christopher LeMieux

Riess LeMieux 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1100 504-234-0586

Daniel Lund

Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 504-584-9325

Thomas McEachin

Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 1600 504-680-6055

Gerald Melchiode

Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave., Suite 2550 504-336-2970

Mark Mercante

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 985-819-8410

Benjamin Pri-Tal

Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave., Suite 2550 504-336-2675

John Sinnott

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2116

Cherrell Taplin

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504.556.4025

Kelly Theard

Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St., 504-593-0667

Tyler Trew

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4164

Corporate Governance and Complaints Law

Hammond

Jennifer Lee Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 111 N. Oak St., Suite 200 985-284-9743

Metairie

R. Christopher Martin

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-905-8400

Walter Woodruff

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-977-2687

Corporate Law

Metairie

David Sherman

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4110

Adam Stumpf

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504- 962-4280

Sheila Wilkinson Sheila M. Wilkinson, PLC PO Box 9012, 504-383-5353

New Orleans

Bernard Bagert

The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St., Suite 2708 504-499-0186

Keith Benit

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7582

Edward Bukaty

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0865

Amanda Butler Schley

Business Law Group, LLC 900 Camp St., 504-446-6506

Edward George

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7253

Abid Hussain Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-383-0716

Steven Klein

Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 2800 504-299-2105

Noah Kressler

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5207

Michael D. Landry

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0852

Andrew Legrand

Spera Law Group, LLC 2200 Tulane Ave., Suite 304 504-300-9938

Leon Reymond III

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4028

David Rieveschl

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0920

Robert Steeg

Steeg Law Firm LLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3201 504-582-1240

Clayton White

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 643 Magazine St., Suite 402 504-324-2141

Scott Whittaker

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0836

Criminal Defense Non White-Collar Covington Stephanie Beard Stephanie Griffith Beard, Attorney and Counselor at Law 90 Louis Prima Dr., Suite A 985-639-1875

Lieu Clark Law Office of Lieu T. Vo Clark 810 N. Columbia, Suite A 985-238-1100

Mandeville

Keith Couture

Crouch Law, LLC 1011 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite 9 985-792-7746

Metairie

Louis DiRosa

The Law Offices of Louis DiRosa, Jr. 4608 Rye St., 504-525-7272

J. Garrison Jordan

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 985-283-3348

New Orleans Katherine Crouch

Crouch Law, LLC 2372 St. Claude Ave., Suite 224 504-982-6995

Stephen Hébert

Stephen D. Hebert, LLC 700 Camp St., Suite 216 504-528-9500 ext. 216

Cody Loggins

The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St., Suite 2708 504-399-5604

George McGregor Burgos & Associates 3535 Canal St., Suite 200 504-517-8976

Peter Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0811

Sean Toomey Liskow & Lewis, APLC 625 Cherokee St., 504-556-4014

Timothy Yazbeck Smith & Fawer, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3702 504-525-2200

Criminal Defense White Collar New Orleans

Walter Becker Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7000

Brian Capitelli

Capitelli & Wicker 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2950 504-582-2425

Ralph Capitelli Capitelli & Wicker 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2950 504-582-2425

Edward Castaing

Crull, Castaing & Lilly 601 Poydras St., Suite 2323 504-442-1699

Matthew Chester Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5231

William Gibbens

Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 1600 504-680-6050

Sara Johnson

Sara A. Johnson, Attorney at Law 700 Camp St., 504-528-9500

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Cody Loggins

The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St., Suite 2708 504-399-5604

Michael Magner

Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8316

Charles Marshall

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7242

Avery Pardee

Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8358

Harry Rosenberg Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 504-584-9219

Kyle Schonekas

Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 1600 504-680-6052

Peter Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0811

Sean Toomey

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 625 Cherokee St., 504-556-4014

Jacob Weixler

Weixler Law, LLC P.O. Box 52197, 504-408-2180

Elder Law Hammond Patrick Reso

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 111 N. Oak St., Suite 200 985-284-9743

Metairie

Steven Hayes

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4207

New Orleans Steven Bain Steven E. Bain Attorney at Law, LLC 830 Union St., Suite 300 504-322-3939

Stephanie Gamble Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1568

Joel Mendler

Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2550 205-478-1638

Sheila Moragas

LaFleur & Laborde, L.L.C. 612 Andrew Higgins Blvd., Suite 1001 504-946-9181

Carole Neff

Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1519

Eric Schorr

Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1540

Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law

New Orleans Matthew D. Simone Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4191

Randall A. Smith

Smith & Fawer, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3702 504-525-2200

Employee Benefits Law

Hammond

Jennifer Lee

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 111 N. Oak St., Suite 200 985-284-9743

Metairie

Sarah Christakis

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4119

New Orleans

Magdalen Bickford

McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC

601 Poydras St., Suite 1200 504-596-2726

H. Bush

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P.

1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7271

Lindsey Chopin Jackson Lewis

601 Poydras St., Suite 1400 504-208-1755

Alex Glaser

Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8312

William Most

Most & Associates 201 St. Charles Ave., Suites 114 & 101 504-509-5023

Sarah Myers

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7009

Randye C. Snyder

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4033

Energy Law

New Orleans

Kelly Becker

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4067

Noel Darce

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0831

Harry Holladay

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7518

Colleen Jarrott

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-8664

Kenneth Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5258

Edward Poitevent

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0889

Dana Shelton

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0816

Wade Webster

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7217

Jon Wise

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7549

Adam Zuckerman

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5210

Energy Regulatory Law

New Orleans

Paul Zimmering

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 546 Carondelet St., 504-593-0818

Environmental Law New Orleans

Daria Diaz

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0858

Clay Garside

Waltzer Wiygul & Garside, LLC 14399 Chef Menteur Hwy., Suite D 504-254-4400

Greg L. Johnson

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4115

David Melancon

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2117

Joel Waltzer

Waltzer Wiygul & Garside LLC 3201 General DeGaulle Dr., Suite 200 504-340-6300

Stephen Wiegand

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4192

Equipment Finance Law

New Orleans

Kathleen Plemer

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7222

Robert Thibeaux

Rimon Law 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2900 504-399-6617

Family Law

Covington

Brittany Carter

Brittany V. Carter, Attorney at Law, LLC 90 Louis Prima Dr., Suite A 985-789-4508

Mark Mansfield

Tranchina & Mansfield, L.L.C. 321 E. Kirkland St., 985-892-1313

Frank P. Tranchina Jr. Tranchina & Mansfield, L.L.C. 321 E. Kirkland St., 985-892-1313

Peggy Vallejo

Vallejo Law Firm 428 W. 21st Ave., 985-892-6855

Luling Loyd Bourgeois

Loyd J. Bourgeois, LLC 50 Wade St., Suite 9 985-441-3448

Lucy Killen

Loyd J. Bourgeois, LLC 13755 River Rd., Suite A 985-441-3448

New Orleans

Robin Arnold Blue Williams 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2010 504-846-9747

Katherine Crouch

Crouch Law, LLC 2372 St. Claude Ave., Suite 224 504-982-6995

Alexandra Faia

Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave., 504-581-4892

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Esther Greenbaum

Esther L. Greenbaum, LLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 4100 504-525-4361

Jeffrey Hoffman

HNK Family Law 541 Julia St., Suite 200 504-507-1288

Mitchell Hoffman

Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St., Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Steven Lane

Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave., 504-581-4892

Robert Lowe

Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St., Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Elizabeth Meneray

Meneray Family Law, L.L.C. 710 Carondelet St., 504-581-4334

Edith Morris

Morris, Lee & Bayle, LLC 1515 Poydras St., Suite 1420 504-524-3781

Kim Nguyen

HNK Family Law 541 Julia St., Suite 200 504-507-1288

Richard Perque

Law Offices of Richard G. Perque 700 Camp St., 504-681-2003

Sarah Pfeiffer

Law Office of Sarah Pfeiffer 400 Poydras St., Suite 1125B 504-366-4025

David Prados

Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver L.L.P. 701 Poydras St., Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Lacy Smith

The Law Office of Lacy M. Smith, LLC 3914 Canal St., 504-249-8242

Brooke C. Tigchelaar

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0862

Marc Winsberg

Winsberg, Heidingsfelder & Gamble, LLC 650 Poydras St., Suite 2050 504-648-2716

Barbara Ziv

Barbara J. Ziv, LLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 4100 504-525-4361

First Amendment Law

New Orleans

Jennifer Deasy Jennifer C. Deasy, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-582-2300

Lori G. Mince

Fishman Haygood LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 4600 504-586-5273

Scott Sternberg

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-324-1887

Gaming Law Hammond

John Miranda Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 111 N. Oak St., Suite 200 985-283-3348

New Orleans

Thomas Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5464

Kathryn Knight

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0915

Walter Metzinger

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., 504-593-0922

C. Lawrence Orlansky

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0842

General Service Law Firm

Gretna

Jon McGill

The Law Offices of Jon S McGill, LLC 235 Derbigny St., Suite 100 504-208-5551

Metairie

Anya Jones HMS Law Firm 3850 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite 590 504-356-0110

New Orleans Jonathan Ley

Kelley Kronenberg 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2500 504-208-9055

Government Relations Practice Metairie

Lawrence Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4294

New Orleans

Richard Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5440

Bryant York Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0803

Health Care Law Mandeville Normand Pizza Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 68031 Capital Trace Row, 985-292-2000

Metairie Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4141

David Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4110

New Orleans

Anthony J Herbert Taggart Morton, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2100 504-599-8514

Immigration Law Harvey Cristian Silva

Attorney at Law 1818 Manhattan Blvd., Suite 2 504-301-2549

Metairie Elaine Kimbrell

Ware | Immigration 3850 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite 555 504-830-5900

New Orleans Brandon E. Davis Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 504-584-9312

Kathleen Gasparian

Gasparian Spivey Immigration 829 Baronne St., 504-262-9878

Insurance Law Metairie

Adrienne Ellis Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4272

Inemesit O’Boyle

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-384-7640

New Orleans

Kristin Beckman

Pipes | Miles | Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1800 504-322-7120

Leah Engelhardt

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7081

Harold Flanagan

Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3300 504-569-0062

Catherine Giarrusso

Pipes | Miles | Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1800 504-322-7140

Douglas Holmes

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7263

Alexis Joachim

Pipes | Miles | Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1800 504-322-7448

Richard E. King

Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave., Suite 2550 504-336-2435

Byron Kitchens Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2100 504-565-7553

Wayne Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0814

Heather Lonian Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0951

Stephen Miles Pipes | Miles | Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1800 504-322-7474

Seth Schmeeckle

Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St., Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Jennifer Simmons Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave., Suite 2550 504-336-2494

Christopher Teske

Pipes | Miles | Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1800 504-356-0976

Matthew Woolf

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5262

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Jacob D Young

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd, Suite 1100 504-833-6600

Intellectual Property Law New Orleans

Stephen Bullock

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0822

Melanie Derefinko

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4054

Emily Gummer

Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 3100 504-585-3821

Lesli Harris

Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP 400 Poydras St., Suite 1812 504-434-6727

Benjamin Janke

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-8607

Andrew Lilly Lilly, PLLC 4907 Magazine St., 504-249-8670

Mark Melasky

Intellectual Property Consulting, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 1400 504-322-7166

Carey Menasco

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4171

Carol Reisman

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4193

Vincent Trombatore

Spera Law Group, LLC 2200 Tulane Ave., Suite 304 504-300-9938

Michael Walshe

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0881

International Arbitration

New Orleans

Andrew Lilly Lilly, PLLC 4907 Magazine St., 504-249-8670

Derek Walker

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7044

International Trade and Finance New Orleans

Edward Hayes

Leake & Andersson, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1700 504-585-7500

Labor and Employment Law Mandeville

Kevin Vogeltanz

The Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, LLC 823 Carroll St., Suite A 985-377-9033

Metairie

Taquincia Jairles

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-977-2687

George Recile

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4100

New Orleans

Magdalen Bickford

McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St., Suite 1200 504-596-2726

H. Bush

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7271

Brandon E. Davis

Phelps Dunbar, LLP 365 Canal St., Suite 2000 504-584-9312

Casey Denson

Casey Denson Law, LLC 4601 Dryades St., 504-618-8715

Philip Giorlando

Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-680-5244

Rachael Jeanfreau

Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5467

Tracy Kern Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8134

Kathryn Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0915

Julie Livaudais

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7007

Eve Masinter Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, LLP 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 594-421-6366

Thomas McGoey Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-299-6101

Christopher Moore Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart, PC 701 Poydras St., Suite 3500 504-648-3840

William Most Most & Associates 201 St. Charles Ave., Suites 114 & 101 504-509-5023

Kerry Murphy Kerry Murphy Law 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 250 504-603-1500

Sarah Myers Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7009

E. Preis Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5470

Courtney Turkington Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4078

David Whitaker Kean Miller LLP 15 Fairway Oaks Dr., 504-620-3358

Rachel Wisdom

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0911

Land Use and Zoning Law

Metairie

Lawrence Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4294

Meredith Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-977-2687

New Orleans G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7289

Joseph Marriott Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-324-1886

Alexandra Mora

The Law Office of Alexandra Mora, APLC 862 Camp St., 504-566-0233

Kathleen Plemer

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7222

Legal Malpractice Law

Covington

Jacques Bezou

The Bezou Law Firm 534 E. Boston St., 985-892-2111

Metairie

Dane Ciolino

Dane S. Ciolino, LLC 18 Farnham Pl., 504-975-3263

New Orleans

Judy Burnthorn

Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St., 504-593-0688

Richard Chopin

The Chopin Law Firm LLC 650 Poydras St., Suite 1550 504-475-2429

Gus Fritchie III

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2106

Melissa Lessell

Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St., 504-593-0689

Carey Menasco

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4171

Thomas Owen Jr.

Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 2500 504-523-1580

William Ross

Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 2500 504-523-1580

Richard Stanley

Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 2500 504-523-1580

Mass Tort Litigation/ Class Actions

Metairie

Patrick Follette

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4281

Matthew A. Sherman

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4130

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James Williams

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-420-7542

New Orleans

Charles Abbott Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2100 504-565-7555

Betsy Barnes Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Charles Blanchard

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7216

John Enochs Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Darryl Foster

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6304

Melissa Fuller Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2100 504-799-4390

Tim Gray Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2100 504-799-4386

Stephen Herman Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave., 504-581-4892

Wayne Lee

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0814

Heather Lonian Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0951

Jay Mattappally

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2210

Michael Mims

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6136

Kim Moore

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2108

Richard Root Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Medical Malpractice Law

Mandeville Sarah Hickman Wagar Hickman, LLC 1425 W. Causeway Approach, 985-888-8740

Metairie Rebecca Beck Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4274

Sarah Christakis

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4119

New Orleans Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates, PLC 4173 Canal St., 504-526-2222

Benjamin Biller

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6120

C. Bradley

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6302

Richard Crisler

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6308

Michael Ecuyer

Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2800 504-522-2304

Karen Fontana Young

Kean Miller LLP 909 Poydras St., Suite 3600 504-620-3191

Michael Luquet

Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5441

Micholle Mordock

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6123

Tracey Rannals Rannals Law Firm 400 Poydras St., Suite 900 504-500-0517

Kara Samuels

Kara Hadican Samuels & Associates, L.L.C. 4004 Canal St., 504-558-9478

Ravi Sangisetty Sangisetty Law Firm, LLC 3914 Canal St., 504-662-1318

T. Wicker Capitelli & Wicker 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2950 504-582-2425

Mergers and Acquisitions Law Metairie George Mueller Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4282

New Orleans William Bennett Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4113

Edward Bukaty

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0865

Joseph Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0845

Maureen Gershanik

Fishman Haygood LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 4600 504-586-5278

Michael D. Landry

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0852

Matthew Miller Miller Sullivan & Demarcay 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1515 504-708-1258

Keith Naccari Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-324-1876

J Marshall Page III Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8000

David Rieveschl

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0920

Andrew Sullivan Miller Sullivan & Demarcay 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1515 504-708-1323

Ryan C. Toups

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7036

Clayton White

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-324-2141

Scott Whittaker

Stone Pigman Walther

Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0836

Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law Metairie

Stephen Marx

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4105

New Orleans

Katie Dysart Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5200

Gregory Ernst

The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St., Suite 2708 504-399-3495

Municipal Law New Orleans

Mark Hanna

Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St., Suite 600 504-400-1081

Natural Resources Law New Orleans

Noel Darce

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0831

Non-Profit/Charities Law

New Orleans

Erin Kriksciun

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0975

Alexandra Mora

The Law Office of Alexandra Mora, APLC 862 Camp St., 504-566-0233

Oil and Gas Law New Orleans

Aimee Hebert

Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP 400 Poydras St., Suite 1812 504-522-1812

58 NOVEMBER 2022
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 59

Colleen Jarrott

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-8664

Kenneth Klemm

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5258

James Lapeze Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4187

Anthony Marino Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-299-6114

Charles Marshall Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 1100 Poydras St., 504-585-7242

Robert McNeal Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4052

Taylor Mouledoux

Looper Goodwine P.C. 650 Poydras St., Suite 2400 504-503-1503

Edward Poitevent

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0889

Natalie Taylor Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6315

Adam Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-5210

On Air Media Legal Analyst

Metairie Dane Ciolino Louisiana Legal Ethics, LLC 18 Farnham Pl., 504-975-3263

New Orleans Scott Sternberg Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-324-1887

Personal Injury Litigation

Covington

René Paul Frederick Rene Frederick & Associates 222 N. Vermont St., 985-893-8484

Peggy Vallejo Vallejo Law Firm 428 W. 21st Ave., 985-892-6855

Gretna John Redmann Redmann Law 1101 Westbank Expy., 504-500-5000

Metairie Tommy Badeaux

The Law Office of Tommy J. Badeaux 3500 N. Hullen St., Suite 17F 504-323-4777

Louis DiRosa

The Law Offices of Louis DiRosa, Jr. 4608 Rye St., 504-525-7272

Jeffrey Gennusa

Gennusa, Piacun & Ruli 3001 Division St., Suite 207 504-308-0301

Megan Kiefer Kiefer & Kiefer 2310 Metairie Rd., 504-828-3313

Ana Rodrigues Gennusa Firm, L.L.C. 3001 Division St., Suite 207 504-308-0301

New Orleans Michael Abraham Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2100 504-799-4345

Morris Bart Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Justin Chopin The Chopin Law Firm LLC 650 Poydras St., Suite 1550 504-475-2429

Louis Gertler

Gertler Law Firm, LLP 935 Gravier St., Suite 1900 504-581-6411

Jeffrey Green JJC Law 3914 Canal St., 504-513-8820

Brian Katz Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave., 504-581-4892

Walter Leger Jr. Leger & Shaw 935 Gravier St., Suite 2150 504-588-9043

Glenn Lieberman Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Terry Loup Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Przemek Lubecki Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Wendy Manard Manard Law 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2610 504-585-7777

M. Montero

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-308-1395

Jennifer Thornton Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC 909 Poydras St., Suite 2500 504-523-1580

Cheryl Wild-Donde’Ville Waltzer Wiygul & Garside LLC 14399 Chef Menteur Hwy., Suite D 504-254-4400

Product Liability Litigation Metairie Patrick Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4281

Jeffrey Gennusa

Gennusa, Piacun & Ruli 3001 Division St., Suite 207 504-308-0301

New Orleans Charles Abbott Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2100 504-565-7555

Michael Abraham Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2100 504-799-4345

Betsy Barnes Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Kelly Brilleaux

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2233

Francis Brown McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC 601 Poydras St., Suite 1200 504-596-2735

Timothy Daniels

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2203

Darryl Foster Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6304

Melissa Fuller Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 2100 504-799-4390

Louis Gertler

Gertler Law Firm, LLP 935 Gravier St., Suite 1900 504-581-6411

Dwight “Trey”

Paulsen III Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6305

David E. Redmann Jr.

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6307

Carol Reisman

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4193

Kelly Juneau Rookard

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2214

James Shuey

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4026

Dorothy Wimberly

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0849

Project Finance Law Hammond Frank DiVittorio

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

111 N. Oak St., Suite 200 985-287-5511

Public Finance Law New Orleans

Mandy Gagliardi

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7018

Railroad Law Mandeville

Joseph Miller

Davis, Saunders, and Miller, PLC

450 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite D 985-612-3070

Benjamin Saunders

Davis, Saunders, and Miller, PLC

450 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite D 985-612-3070

Metairie

Daniel Poolson Jr.

Poolson Oden 3900 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite 680 504-766-2200

60 NOVEMBER 2022

New Orleans

Carlos Benach

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2224

Timothy Daniels

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2203

Kelly Juneau Rookard

Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-310-2214

Benjamin Slater

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7516

Brent Talbot

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7059

Real Estate Law

Hammond Patrick Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 111 N. Oak St., Suite 200 985-284-9743

Mandeville

Robert Knights

The Law Office of Robert William Knights, L.L.C. 350 Jasmine Dr., 504-259-2586

New Orleans

Roy Blossman

Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St., Suite 3100 504-585-3807

James Breaux

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4027

Ryan Christiansen

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4136

Lillian Eyrich

Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3201 504-582-1199

Vanessa W. Graf Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8225

Paul Kitziger

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4126

Jon Leyens

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3600 504-566-8628

Joseph Marriott

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-324-1886

Annie McBride

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0880

Alvin Miester

Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 2800 504-299-2125

Marie Moore Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 2800 504-299-2108

Wesley Plaisance

Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-584-5471

Michael Ricci

Ricci Partners, LLC 101 W. Robert E. Lee, Suite 400 504-304-7115

Michael Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0835

Michael Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0835

Jonathan Schultis

Ricci Partners, LLC 101 W. Robert E. Lee, Suite 400 504-304-7115

Taylor Stone

The Law Office of Taylor C. Stone, LLC 627 Cherokee St., Suite 205 504-717-4874

Susan Talley

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0828

Peter Title

Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1542

Susan Tyler Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8298

Joseph Wilson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4011

Securities Regulation Metairie

George Mueller

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4282

P.J. Stakelum

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4155

New Orleans

John Anjier

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4177

Kenneth Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8386

Clinton Smith Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8429

Jessica Vásquez

Vásquez Law 400 Poydras St., Suite 900 504-571-9582

Securities/Capital Markets Law

Metairie

P.J. Stakelum III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4155

New Orleans

John Anjier Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4177

Jessica Vásquez

Vásquez Law 400 Poydras St., Suite 900 504-571-9582

Tax Law Metairie

David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-830-4110

New Orleans Hirschel Abbott

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0809

A. Albert Ajubita

Ajubita, Leftwich & Salzer, LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1500 504-582-2300

Robert Angelico

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4112

Hilton Bell

LaFleur & Laborde, L.L.C. 612 Andrew Higgins Blvd., Suite 1001 504-491-5360

Susan Burkenstock

Elkins PLC 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 4400 504-529-3600

Jaye A. Calhoun

Kean Miller LLP 909 Poydras St., Suite 3600 504-293-5936

John Colbert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0832

Sanders Colbert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0956

James Exnicios

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4034

Mandy Gagliardi

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7018

Edward George

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7253

Matthew Miller Miller Sullivan & Demarcay 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1515 504-708-1258

Sheila Moragas

LaFleur & Laborde, L.L.C. 612 Andrew Higgins Blvd., Suite 1001 504-946-9181

Keith Naccari

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-324-1876

Laura Plunkett

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0838

Leon Rittenberg III

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-299-6102

Transportation Law

New Orleans

Francis J. Barry Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St., 504-581-5141

Bradley Belsome

Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St., Suite 2700 504-596-6309

62 NOVEMBER 2022

Louis Bonnaffons

Leake & Andersson, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1700 504-585-7500

Robert Bonnaffons

Leake & Andersson, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1700 504-585-7500

Craig Cousins

Leake & Andersson, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1700 504-585-7500

Patrick DeRouen

DeRouen Law Firm 650 Poydras St., Suite 1913 800-594-9610

Gerard Dragna

Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St., Suite 600 504-655-4871

Daniel Hoerner

Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St., Suite 4250 504-583-4021

C. Parks

Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St., Suite 600 504-655-5419

Benjamin Slater III

Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St., 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7516

Trusts and Estates

Covington

Brittany Carter

Brittany V. Carter, Attorney at Law, LLC 90 Louis Prima Dr., Suite A 985-789-4508

Hammond Elsbet Smith

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 111 N. Oak St., Suite 200 985-284-9743

Metairie

Jeffrey Gennusa

Gennusa, Piacun & Ruli 3001 Division St., Suite 207 504-308-0301

Steven Hayes

Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Recile & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100 504-962-4207

Ana Rodrigues

Gennusa Firm, L.L.C. 3001 Division St., Suite 207 504-308-0301

Beau Sagona

The Derbes Law Firm, LLC 3027 Ridgelake Dr., 504-207-0905

Amanda Sullivan

NOLA Succession Law 4141 Veterans Blvd., Suite 212 504-885-3332

New Orleans

Hirschel Abbott Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0809

Marguerite Adams

Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4142

Dara Baird

Dara L. Baird, Inc. 5523 S. Johnson St., 504-865-9004

Hilton Bell

LaFleur & Laborde, L.L.C. 612 Andrew Higgins Blvd., Suite 1001 504-491-5360

Mervatt Eljaouhari

Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St., Suite 2020 504-605-2463

Laura Fine Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1500

Erin Kriksciun

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0975

Lawrence Lehmann

Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1500

Carole Neff

Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1519

John Overby

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0964

Laura Plunkett

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0838

Leon Rittenberg III Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-299-6102

Eric Schorr Sessions, Fishman & Nathan, L.L.C. 400 Poydras St., Suite 2550 504-582-1540

Rose Sher Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8446

Joseph Wilson Liskow & Lewis, APLC 701 Poydras St., Suite 5000 504-556-4011

Venture Capital Law New Orleans

Barbra Barnett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann L.L.C. 909 Poydras St., Suite 3150 504-593-0830

Asher Friend Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave., Floor 51 504-582-8362

Workers Compensation Law

Covington

Stephanie Beard Stephanie Griffith Beard, Attorney and Counselor at Law 90 Louis Prima Dr., Suite A 985-639-1875

Metairie Corey Fitzpatrick Worker’s Compensation, LLC 3045 Ridgelake Dr., Suite 203 866-870-1439

Daren Sarphie Worker’s Compensation, LLC 3045 Ridgelake Dr, Suite 203 866-870-2656

New Orleans

Heather Angelico

Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith, APLC 701 Poydras St., Floor 40 504-525-6802

Jason Bonnet Leake & Andersson, LLP 1100 Poydras St., Suite 1700 504-585-7500

Stephanie Cheralla

Degan, Blanchard & Nash 400 Poydras St., Suite 2600 504-529-3333

Wayne Fontana

Roedel, Parsons, Koch, Blache, Balhoff & McCollister 1515 Poydras St., Suite 2330 504-680-0156

John Goehring Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St., Floor 24 504-613-4771

Kevin Marks Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave., Suite 2550 504-336-2432

MYNEWORLEANS.COM 63

On the Road Again

Nashville recently changed its brand from “Music City” to “Music City USA” because it’s not just a country music haven, but a global incubator and marketer of music. People still flock to Nashville for its traditional music venues, the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Grand Ole Opry, but they also come to hear new voices in a range of musical genres.

And to visit the thriving, hip neighborhoods.

“The neighborhoods are fun to explore,” said Heather Middleton, senior vice president of Visit Music City marketing. “We always encourage people to get out and explore the city.”

Here’s a taste of what all Nashville offers.

HILLSBORO VILLAGE

Located near Vanderbilt and Belmont universities, Hillsboro Village is a

collection of shops, boutiques and restaurants. Visit the Belmont Mansion, a historic home located on Belmont University with family ties to Louisiana, or take in a film at the nonprofit Belcourt Theater, known for its indie and classic films. The Village features lots of great eateries but don’t miss breakfast or lunch at Biscuit Love, which, as you might guess, serves up a variety of dishes centered around scratch-made biscuits.

12 SOUTH

Visit this neighborhood with shop ping in mind. Emerson Grace offers unique apparel while across the street Judith Bright creates magical jewelry onsite. Pause at Butter Milk Ranch for coffee and a fabulous homemade pastry, but if you’re hungry, an elevated brunch menu by Chef Daniel Gorman is available.

We started the night with a cocktail class at Audrey, a restaurant named after the maternal grandmother of James Beard Award-winning Chef Sean Brock. Each cocktail was created with only three ingredients and with no stirring and no shaking. One drink consisted of a Meyer lemon, Don Nuño oloroso sherry and lemon verbena and it turned out delicious.

“The point is the production,” said Jon Howard, bar director. “You want to keep it clean and succinct.”

We followed our imbibing with a variety of tasty tacos at the Tex-Mex restaurant Redheaded Stranger, named for Chef Bryan Lee Waver’s favorite Willie Nelson album.

THE NATIONS

Love heals is the motto of Thistle Farms, an organization designed to empower female “survivors” of addiction and abuse by giving them

housing and teaching them skills. Visitors may enjoy lunch in their bistro or items from the gift shop. Able boutique owns a similar mission, born from the owners’ experience seeing the commercial sex industry up close overseas. Women here make lovely scarves and other clothing items, plus leather goods.

DOWNTOWN

Check into the new Bobby Hotel, a boutique property that’s as much an eclectic art gallery as hotel. Enjoy innovative dishes by Chef Ryan Poli at Union Tavern off the lobby, then move to the rooftop lounge for afterdinner drinks with great views of downtown Nashville — even from a city bus that’s been relocated to the roof!

Downtown remains the place for honkytonks along Lower Broadway and numerous music attractions. There’s the new National Museum of African American Music, the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, the historic Ryman Auditorium and the architectural beauty of the Schermerhorn Symphony Center, home of the Nashville Symphony.

IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Looking to not only view lights but be part of the experience? “Immersive Nutcracker: A Winter Miracle” comes to Nashville Nov. 19 and runs through Dec. 31, while the Nashville Zoo will display 1,000 custom-made silk Chinese lanterns on three miles of zoo pathways as part of Zoolumination Nov. 18 through Feb. 14, 2023.

Ring in 2023 with Jack Daniel’s New Year’s Eve: Nashville’s Big Bash, a free event on Dec. 31 at Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park. The fivehour televised special on CBS and Paramount+ will headline Brooks & Dunn, Kelsea Ballerini and Zac Brown Band.

64 NOVEMBER 2022
TRAVEL
Music lovers in Nashville EAST NASHVILLE

1

Consider your lifestyle and how you will use the product.

2 Get the big picture.  Look for inspiration photos, factor in the location of the product and the overall design of the outdoor area, have a budget.

3

Finish materials should be weather compatible and location should be compatible with safety require ments.

JOHN DRYDEN

Fall and fireplaces go together hand in glove. For those who want to enjoy a cozy, crackling fire outside, there are a range of options. John Dryden, Vice President of Hollywood Door, which carries outdoor fireplaces and firepits (as well as garage doors), gives us the rundown.

“Outdoor fireplaces have been around for quite a while,” Dryden said. “But the products have been increasing. They are more popular than ever in the past.”

Dryden notes that outdoor fireplaces are specifically designed for withstanding the elements and that there are many styles and price points. As with indoor fireplaces, there are woodburning and gas burning

choices. The latter category includes gas models made to look like they are burning wood or glass rocks.

Dryden suggests starting by reviewing what’s available and considering the overall style of the rest of your home. “The whole concept needs to be considered,” he said. “When we begin working with clients, we are trying to clarify what they are going to do.”

The least expensive way to go is a firepit. Chimineas, made of terracotta, are portable and freestanding and can be purchased at Hollywood Door. Firepits also can be purchased at big box home improvement stores. Because they can be smoky, Dryden advises choosing both a quality brand and burning a good quality wood.

“Use well-seasoned wood and

use wood like oak versus pine or cedar which crackles and pops a lot,” he said.

One of the most popular trends in the current outdoor fireplace market is the fire table. They have a minimalist aesthetic, run on propane and come in a variety of shapes and materials - including marble - so you can customize your look to some degree.

At the higher and most customiz able end of the outdoor fireplace spectrum are built-in fireplaces. These are often a focal feature in a patio, outdoor kitchen, or what Dryden calls “an outdoor living center,” and they usually require a contractor. Finishes include stone, brick and tile. For this type of investment, he advises a design that “matches your personality

and the rest of the house” and notes that built-ins may involve codes and permits. The product comes with all the components necessary to complete the job.

“People are focusing more on their home,” Dryden said. “When they get home after a long day, they don’t want to go out, they’d rather go in their backyard.”

ABOUT THE DESIGNER

Hollywood Door, in business since 1954, built its name on garage doors. John Dryden joined the business in 1980 and in 1985, added fireplaces. “Over time, it has become an important part of what we do in addition to our 67 years in the garage door business,” he said.

66 NOVEMBER 2022 BY LEE CUTRONEHOME ADVICE GREG MILES PHOTO
Outdoor fireplaces
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 67

different than the ones that came before.

The first pandemic Thanksgiving, I think we did a porch visit with a few family members, ate a rotisserie chicken with mashed potatoes, and baked a pie. I’m not sure we even set the table. I don’t think we did. What would have been the point?

Last year, I cooked an elaborate, labor-intensive feast, including a multistep gravy that took a full two days, because what I was actually trying to do was distract myself from grief over losing my mom suddenly in May. The gravy was indeed delicious, but it turns out that it takes more than slow-roasting turkey necks and aromatics for hours to overcome a shocking, devastating loss.

And this year? This year I’m now dealing with my father’s rapid decline into end-stage dementia, and so instead of Googling “inventive ways to cook sweet potatoes,” I’m Googling “how to talk to parent who thinks you’re their spouse instead of their child.”

I’m sure I’ll get it together and at least bake a pie or two, but this is not going to be a year of ambitious meal-planning.

It used to be that Thanksgiving inspired me to try to be a better/ different version of myself.

Many people think of Jan.1 as the time to set resolutions to be a person completely different than the person they actually are. To exercise. To organize. To give up cherished vices.

For me, though, it’s long been Nov.1 that has brought about that impulse. As soon as we hit the holiday season, I start wanting to become the kind of person who loves entertaining. Who both has and uses a gravy boat. Who knows more about table settings than that you can remember what side to put the silverware on because “fork” and “left” both have four letters and “knife,” “spoon,” and “right” all have five letters.

The truth is, I am not that person at all. Most days, we eat off of chipped plates we bought 11 years ago at Target and wipe our mouths with paper towels from Costco. We probably have fancy serving pieces somewhere, but I don’t know where to find them. And entertaining requires cleaning the house much more extensively than the basic steps we take to keep squalor at bay and, typically, wearing clothes that aren’t pajamas.

Still, though, every November sets me to Googling: “best pie crust recipe,” “homemade gravy,” “exciting new Thanksgiving salad ideas,” “cute tablescape,” “festive place cards.” I read listicles like, “8 Interesting Side Dishes You Can Bring to a Thanksgiving

Dinner to Make Sure Everyone Loves You” and “25 Fun Ways to Get Kids Involved in Thanksgiving Meal Prep” and “Holiday Season Memories to Last a Lifetime.”

By the time the actual week of Thanksgiving rolls around, I’ve inevi tably decided that I’m going to make the same stuff I make every year, that my kids need to just leave me alone to cook and not try to help, and that our holiday season memories will mostly be of me frazzled because everything needs to go into the oven all at once and at different temperatures.

For more Eve, check out her blog “Joie d’Eve” on Tuesday mornings at myneworleans.com

Since 2019, I am no longer the same person; that’s undeniably true, for better and worse. The 2022 version of me is worn down by grief both sudden and sustained – but also wiser, taking nothing for granted. The 2022 version of me doesn’t care about making place cards with thumbprint turkeys I saw on Pinterest; the 2022 version of me is just trying to make it through the day and hug my kids and my husband and my dog as tightly and as often as possible.

The past several Thanksgivings, though, have looked markedly

This isn’t a “better version” of me, but it’s who I am becoming. I may not be able to find a gravy boat, but I’m finding out just how strong I am.

68 NOVEMBER 2022
PEYTONGROWING PAINS
JANE SANDERS ILLUSTRATION
An Untraditional Thanksgiving My usual rituals are going by the wayside this year.
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 69

A Scottish Play

A riff on a classic

Jordan Deis’ “Layover in Glasgow” is a riff on the “Paper Plane,” itself inspired by the “Last Word.” Jordan’ s version at the Hotel Fontenot’s lavishly decorated Peacock Room returns the drink to its Last Word origins, subbing the Paper Plane’s whiskey for gin, along with a variety of unusual modifiers. Scottish Botanist Gin’s closest airport is Glasgow, cementing the name. Jordan observes that his opulent work space is “a feast for the eyes.” He also enjoys the broad cross section of clientele that hotel bars draw noting “the beauty of the space attracts even more walks of life.” He admits he never quite knows what each evening holds in store. “One minute I’m making a 12-ingredient cocktail, the next a round of shots.” Jordan may not know what to expect, but we know the drinks will be delicious.

1 Try to use the Citadel Jardin gin. Its citrusy, yuzu flavors pair well with sloe gin.

2 Whey adds a very subtle mouth feel and aromati cally enhances a drink. It’s very hard to describe, but you notice it if it’s not there. It’s nice mixed with unfiltered sake.

3 Orange blossom water is a floral aromatic used in cocktails. It offers a mysterious, intangible quality and like the whey, you note its absence more than its presence. Jordan uses the Nielsen Massey brand.

LAYOVER IN GLASGOW

1/2 ounce Aperol

½ ounce Amaro Nonino

½ ounce Botanist Gin

½ ounce Bittermen’s Tepache

½ ounce Fresh grapefruit juice

½ ounce Clarified Earl Grey whey *

¼ ounce Lemon juice

¼ ounce 1:1 simple syrup

2 drops orange blossom water

5 drops 25% salt tincture*

Shake all ingredients well. Serve up in a coup glass. “Kilt Garnish” Plaid fabric clothes pin

Clarified Earl Grey Whey:

1 liter whole milk

6 Earl Grey tea bags

4 ounces fresh lemon juice

Bring milk to scald, turn off heat, drop bags into milk, let sit until milk returns back to room temperature. Remove bags, add lemon juice to and stir to make sure everything is curdled. Pour through a filter to remove curds and retain a nice yellow Earl Grey whey.

Salt Tincture: 25 grams kosher salt  25 grams water  Mix until dissolved.

BY
PEARCECHEERS
PODCAST LISTEN TO ELIZABETH’S PODCAST “DRINK & LEARN;” VISIT ELIZABETH-PEARCE.COM
EUGENIA UHL PHOTO
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 71

Pie in the Sky

A chocolate dream

This is a definite for your holiday dessert spread. It is wickedly good, and the crust can be made up to a week in advance, as can the ganache. The crust must be wrapped in plastic wrap but does not require refrigeration. The ganache must be refrigerated. The chocolate pudding and the Chantilly crème can be made up to three days in advance and kept refrigerated. The night before or morning of your gathering just assemble everything (bring the ganache up to room temperature so you can spread it) then enjoy the applause. One less thing to do at the last minute.

NOSH 72 NOVEMBER 2022

COOK WITH US!

Join us each third Tuesday of the month and cook along with New Orleans Magazine and our featured chef on Instagram.

@neworleansmagazine

CHOCOLATE CREAM PIE

Shared by Chef Maggie Scales, La Boulangerie Serves 8

Graham Cracker Crust

2 1/2 cups Graham cracker crumbs

2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons granulated sugar

9 tablespoons unsalted butter

1. Preheat oven to 350ºF.

2. Place the butter in a small saucepan and melt over medium heat. Alternatively, put in a microwave-safe container and melt in the microwave.

3. Prepare a 9-inch pie mold by spraying it generously with pan-release spray.

4. In a small bowl, combine all ingredients. With your hands, mix until all the ingredients are completely incorporated, and the crust can hold its shape.

5. Dump the mixture into the prepared pie mold. Use your fingers or a straightsided small juice glass to firmly push the crust into the bottom edge of the pie mold. Use the palm of your hand or the glass to push the crust into the bottom of the pan. Go around the bottom a few times to ensure that the crust is not loose and is firmly in place. Use your knuckles or the glass to firmly push the crust up the sides of the pan. Use your other hand to press down on the edge of the crust. This step is crucial to ensuring the crust does not crumble when removing it

from the tin. Go around the sides as many times as needed until the crust feels firmly in place.

6. Bake for 15 minutes.

7. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. The crust can be wrapped in plastic wrap and stored at room temperature for up to a week.

Chocolate Ganache

6 tablespoons heavy cream

1 1/2 teaspoons Trimoline (inverted sugar) (See NOTES)

5 3/4 ounces semisweet chocolate

1 1/2 teaspoons unsalted butter, softened

1. In a small saucepot, combine the heavy cream and the Trimoline and whisk together over low heat.

2. Combine the chocolate and butter together in a bowl.

3. Once at a low boil, pour the heavy cream mixture over the chocolate and butter and whisk until thoroughly blended.

4. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator until ready to use, up to 1 week.

5. To reheat, place in the microwave for 1minute intervals until liquified. Stir completely to re-emulsify the ganache.

Chocolate Pudding

1 1/2 teaspoons unflavored powdered gelatin

1/4 cup cold water

5 egg yolks

3/4 cups granulated sugar

2 1/2 cups heavy cream

1 teaspoon salt

4 ounces semisweet chocolate

1. Bloom gelatin in the cold water. Set aside.

2. Whisk the egg yolks in a small bowl.

3. Place the chocolate in a medium bowl.

4. In a small saucepot combine the sugar, heavy cream, and salt. Bring the mixture to a low boil.

5. Whisking constantly, temper the eggs yolks by ladling some on the hot cream mixture into them. When half of the hot cream has been incorporated into the egg yolks pour the egg yolk mixture into the saucepot with the remainder of the cream. Cook, whisking constantly, until the mixture reaches 185ºF

6. Whisk in the bloomed gelatin, blending thoroughly.

7. Pour the hot custard over the chocolate.

8. Use an immersion blender to thoroughly blend the mixture, ensuring the chocolate has fully melted.

9. Place the bowl in an ice bath to cool then refrigerate overnight before using. Can be stored, refrigerated, for up to 4 days

Chantilly Crème

2 cups heavy cream

1/4 cup powdered sugar

Make the Chantilly Crème:

1. In a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, combine the cream and the confectioner’s sugar. Mix on medium speed until medium peaks form. May be stored, refrigerated for up to 4 days.

Assemble the Pie

1. Spread warmed ganache across the bottom of the graham crust. Allow to cool completely and harden, about 2 hours in the refrigerator.

2. Top the ganache with the pudding. Allow to set for 2 hours in the refrigerator.

3. Top the pudding with the Chantilly Crème, leaving a 1-inch border of pudding uncovered.

4. Top with chocolate shavings or mini chocolate chips.

5. Store in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

NOTE: Light Corn Syrup may be substitute for the Trimoline.

SAM HANNA PHOTO
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 73

DINING GUIDE

The Dining Guide is comprised of restaurants recently reviewed and visited by New Orleans Magazine The list will change regularly to provide information on others that are also worth noting and acknowledging. Please check restaurant websites for up-to-date hours and locations. If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com.

$ = AVERAGE ENTRÉE PRICE $ = $5-10 $$ = $11-15 $$$ = $16-20 $$$$ = $21-25 $$$$$ = $25 & UP

AMERICAN Acorn City Park, $ AcornNola.com

Audubon Clubhouse Uptown, $$ AudubonInstitute.org

Boulevard American Bistro Multiple Locations, $$$ BoulevardBistro.com

Caffe! Caffe! Metairie, $ CaffeCaffe.com

Café NOMA City Park, $ CafeNoma.com

Camellia Grill Riverbend, $ 309-2679

District Donuts Sliders Brew Multiple Locations, $ DonutsAndSliders.com

Five Happiness Mid-City, $$ FiveHappiness.com

Martin Wine Cellar Multiple Locations, $ MartinWineCellar.com

New Orleans Social House CBD/Warehouse District, $$ NOSocialHouse.com

Parkway Bakery and Tavern Mid-City, $ ParkwayPoorBoys.com

Restaurant August CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ RestaurantAugust.com

Rib Room French Quarter, $$$ RibRoomNewOrleans.com

The Grill Room CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ GrillRoomNewOrleans.com

The Pelican Club French Quarter, $$$$$ PelicanClub.com

Ye Olde College Inn Carrollton, $$$ CollegeInn1933.com

Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill Multiple Locations, $$$ ZeaRestaurants.com

ASIAN FUSION/PAN ASIAN Blue Giant Lower Garden District, $$ BlueGiantNOLA.com

Hoshun Restaurant Uptown, $$ HoshunRestaurant.com

Little Tokyo Multiple Locations, $$ LittleTokyoNola.com

Lotus Bistro Lakeview, $$ LotusBistroNOLA.com

MoPho Mid-City, $$$ MoPhoNola.com

Rock-N-Sake Multiple Locations, $$$ RockNSake.com

Union Ramen Bar Lower Garden District, $$ UnionRamen.com

BAKERY/BREAKFAST

Breads on Oak Multiple Locations, $ BreadsOnOak.com.

Café du Monde Multiple Locations, $ CafeDuMonde.com

CC’s Coffee House Multiple Locations, $ CCsCoffee.com

Gracious Bakery + Café Multiple Locations, $ GraciousBakery.com

Ruby Slipper Café Multiple Locations, $$ TheRubySlipperCafe.net

BURGERS

Bayou Burger French Quarter, $$ 5SportsBarNewOrleans.com

Port of Call French Quarter, $$ PortOfCallNola.com

The Company Burger Uptown, $ TheCompanyBurger.com

FRENCH

Broussard’s French Quarter, $$$$ Broussards.com

Café Degas Faubourg St. John, $$ CafeDegas.com

Coquette Uptown, $$$ CoquetteNola.com

Justine French Quarter, $$$ JustineNola.com

La Crêpe Nanou Uptown, $$$ LaCrepeNanou.com

La Petite Grocery Uptown, $$$ LaPetiteGrocery.com

Lilette Uptown, $$$$$ LiletteRestaurant.com

GASTROPUB

Bouligny Tavern Uptown, $$ BoulignyTavern.com

Cane & Table French Quarter, $$ CaneAndTableNola.com

Copper Vine CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ CopperVine.com

Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro French Quarter, $$$ OrleansGrapevine.com

Patrick’s Bar Vin French Quarter, $$ PatricksBarVin.com

Sylvain French Quarter, $$$ SylvainNOLA.com

The Delachaise Uptown, $$ TheDelaichaise.com

ITALIAN

Arnaud’s Remoulade French Quarter, $$ Remoulade.com

Chartres House French Quarter, $$$ ChartresHouse.com

Domenica CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ DomenicaRestaurant.com

Gianna Restaurant CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ GiannaRestaurant.com

Irene’s Cuisine French Quarter, $$$$ IrenesNola.com

Josephine Estelle CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ JosephineEstelle.com

Liuzza’s Mid-City, $$ Liuzzas.com

Muriel’s Jackson Square French Quarter, $$$$ Muriels.com

Napoleon House French Quarter, $ NapoleonHouse.com

Pascal’s Manale Uptown, $$$$ PascalsManale.com

Restaurant R’evolution French Quarter, $$$$$ RevolutionNola.com

Tommy’s Cuisine CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ TommysNewOrleans.com

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Multiple Locations, $$$ VicentsItalianCuisine.com

LOUISIANA FARE

Acme Oyster House Multiple Locations, $$ AcmeOyster.com

Antoine’s French Quarter, $$$$$ Antoines.com

EFFERVESCENCE

Effervescence is the bright and airy sparkling wine lounge located on North Rampart Street along the edge of the French Quarter. Its extensive list of bubbly, plus wine flights, cocktails and menu of delicious small plates and elevated snacks make this a go-to celebration stop. Stop by on Sundays for brunch, but be sure to make a reservation as it regularly sells out.

TSUNAMI Tsunami sushi on Poydras Street in the CBD offers not artfully made sushi, small plates, salads and more, but is a great place for a bento box lunch or an early evening happy hour with daily specials. Tsunami is open Sundays when the Saints play at the Dome, making it a great pre-game stop.

74 NOVEMBER 2022

Arnaud’s French Quarter, $$$$$ ArnaudsRestaurant.com

Austin’s Metairie, $$$ AustinsNo.com

BIrdy’s Behind the Bower Garden District, $$ BirdysNola.com

Boucherie Carrollton, $$ Boucherie-Nola.com

The Bower Garden District, $$$ TheBowerNola.com

Brennan’s French Quarter, $$$$ BrennansNewOrleans.com

Brigtsen’s Riverbend, $$$$$ Brigtsens.com

Café Reconcile Central City, $$ CafeReconcile.org

Casamento’s Uptown, $$ CasamentosRestaurant.com

Clancy’s Uptown, $$$ ClancysNewOrleans.com

Cochon CBD/Warehouse District, $$ CochonRestaurant.com

Copeland’s Multiple Locations, $$ CopelandsofNewOrleans.com

Commander’s Palace Garden District, $$$$ CommandersPalace.com

Court of Two Sisters French Quarter, $$$$$ CourtOfTwoSisters.com

Crabby Jack’s Metairie, $ CrabbyJacksNola.com

Criollo French Quarter, $$$ CriolloNola.com

Dooky Chase Restaurant Treme, $$ DookyChaseRestaurant.com

Drago’s Multiple Locations, $$$$ DragosRestaurant.com

Emeril’s CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ EmerilsRestaurants.com

Galatoire’s French Quarter, $$$$$ Galatoires.com

Gautreau’s Uptown, $$$$$ GautreausRestaurant.com

Gris Gris Garden District, $$$ GrisGrisNola.com

Herbsaint CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ Herbsaint.com

House of Blues French Quarter, $$ HouseOfBlues.com/ NewOrleans

Jack Rose Garden District, $$$$ JackRoseRestaurant.com

Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Mid-City, $$ KatiesInMidCity.com

Mandina’s Mid-City, $$ MandinasRestaurant.com

Mother’s CBD/Warehouse District, $$ MothersRestaurant.net

Mr. B’s Bistro French Quarter, $$$$ MrBsBistro.com

Mulate’s CBD/Warehouse District, $$ Mulates.com

NOLA French Quarter, $$$$$ EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant

Palace Café CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ PalaceCafe.com

Ralph’s On The Park Mid-City, $$$ RalphsOnThePark.com

Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant French Quarter, $$$ RichardFiskes.com

Royal House French Quarter, $$$ RoyalHouseRestaurant.com

Saint John French Quarter, $$$ SaintJohnNola.com

St. Roch Market Upper 9th Ward, $$ StRochMarket.com

SoBou French Quarter, $$ SoBouNola.com

Tableau French Quarter, $$$ TableauFrenchQuarter.com

The Bistreaux French Quarter, $$ MaisonDupuy.com/dining

The Bombay Club French Quarter, $$$$ TheBombayClub.com

Toups’ Meatery Mid-City, $$$ ToupsMeatery.com

Tujague’s French Quarter, $$$$$ TujaguesRestaurant.com

PIZZA

Pizza Delicious Bywater, $ PizzaDelicious.com

Reginelli’s Pizzeria Multiple Locations, $$ Reginellis.com

Theo’s Pizza Multiple Locations, $$ TheosPizza.com

Pizza Domenica Multiple Locations, $$ PizzaDomenica.com

SEAFOOD

Borgne CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ BorgneRestaurant.com

Briquette CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ Briquette-Nola.com

Deanie’s Seafood Multiple Locations,$$$ Deanies.com

Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House French Quarter, $$$$ BourbonHouse.com

Don’s Seafood Metairie, $$$ DonsSeafoodOnline.com

Grand Isle Restaurant CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$ GrandIsleRestaurant.com

GW Fins French Quarter, $$$$$ GWFins.com

Kingfish French Quarter, $$$ KingfishNewOrleans.com

Le Bayou French Quarter, $$$ LeBayouRestaurant.com

Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Metairie, $$ AustinsNo.com

Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Multiple Locations, $$$ MrEdsRestaurants.com/ oyster-bar

New Orleans Creole Cookery French Quarter, $$$ NewOrleansCreoleCookery. com

Oceana Grill French Quarter, $$ OceanaGrill.com

Pêche CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ PecheRestaurant.com.

Pier 424 French Quarter, $$$ Pier424SeafoodMarket.com

Red Fish Grill French Quarter, $$$ RedFishGrill.com

SPECIALTY FOODS

Antoine’s Annex French Quarter, $$$ Antoines.com/AntoinesAnnex

STEAKHOUSE

Crescent City Steaks Mid-City, $$$$ CrescentCitySteaks.com

Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse French Quarter, $$$$ DickieBrennansSteakhouse. com

Doris Metropolitan French Quarter, $$$$ DorisMetropolitan.com

Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak French Quarter, $$$ Galatoires33BarAndSteak. com

La Boca CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ LaBocaSteaks.com

Mr. John’s Steakhouse Uptown, $$$ MrJohnsSteakhouse.com

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Multiple Locations, $$$$$ RuthsChris.com

The Steakhouse at Harrah’s CBD/WarehouseDistrict, $$$$$ HarrahsNewOrleans.com

WORLD

1000 Figs Faubourg St. John, $$ 1000Figs.com

Barracuda Uptown, $ EatBarracuda.com

Bayona French Quarter, $$$$$ Bayona.com

Bywater Brew Pub Bywater, $$$ BywaterBrewPub.com

Compére Lapin CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$$ CompereLapin.com

El Gato Negro Multiple Locations, $$ ElGatoNegroNola.com

Lucy’s CBD/Warehouse District, $ LucysRetiredSurfers.com

Lüke CBD/Warehouse District, $$$ LukeNewOrleans.com

Mona’s Café Mid-City, $ MonasCafeAndDeli.com

Patois Uptown,$$$ PatoisNola.com

Saba Uptown, $$$ EatWithSaba.com

Saffron NOLA Uptown, $$$ SaffronNOLA.com

Seaworthy CBD/Warehouse District, $$$$

SeaworthyNola.com

Shaya Uptown, $$$ ShayaRestaurant.com

MYNEWORLEANS.COM 75

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

Hall Piano Company HallPiano.com 901 David Drive, Metairie 504-736-0109

Experience the world’s finest high resolution player piano, Steinway & Sons SPIRIO, only at Hall Piano Company.

PERLIS Clothing Perlis.com

6070 Magazine Street, New Orleans 1281 N Causeway Blvd, Mandeville 8366 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge 800-725-6070

Burgundy peacock eyes are deliberately placed at alternating angles to highlight the natural gold iridescence of the feathers, creating an intricate and eye-catching patterned bracelet by Brackish. Each cuff is crammed with 24k gold plated, nickel free hardware.

Sazerac House Museum SazeracHouse.com 101 Magazine Street, New Orleans 504-910-0100

Crystal Decanter and Glass Set. Three-piece set featuring a Crystal Decanter and two crystal glasses, $150.

Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry At Lakeside Shopping Center LakesideShopping.com 3301 Veterans Memorial Boulevard, Metairie 14K yellow gold pave diamond paperclip link bracelet with toggle closure, $12,500.

SPONSORED 76 NOVEMBER 2022

Louisiana Children’s Museum Lcm.org 15 Henry Thomas Drive, New Orleans 504-523-1357

29-Piece Hape Perfect Pizza Wooden Playset. Packed with a mix of colorful toppings ready for young chefs to create this Italian delight for friends and family. It offers different ways of playing so little ones can take on different roles. $24.99.

NOLA Boards NolaBoards.com 4228 Magazine St. 504-256-0030

Tracks Board & Cheese Knife gift set, $50.

Indigo Boutique

ShopIndigoBoutique.com 605 Metairie Road, Ste C, Metairie 1795 Martin Luther King Blvd, Suite B, Houma 504-635-7874

A classic holiday look in four trendy styles! Pair with matching pants for the perfect stocking

Exterior Designs, Inc. ExteriorDesignsBev.com Octavia Street, New Orleans 504-866-0276

This holiday season, consider giving the gift of a landscaping makeover, maintenance or a newly designed courtyard. Scan the QR code to learn how Exterior Designs can wrap gift certificates, design plans or photos to help you create memorable holiday gifts.

SPONSORED MYNEWORLEANS.COM 77

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

Roux-Dolph & Co. RouxDolph.com

Start new traditions with these handmade towels featuring original artwork from Kelly Airhart. 16x24 in size and made from the softest microfiber blend, these towels make the perfect hostess gift, secret Santa gift, Pokeno gift or holiday decoration for your own home this season.

Auraluz Children’s Linens

4408 Shores Drive, Metairie 504-888-3313

ShopAuraluz.com

My Saint My Hero's mission is to bring faith, hope and purpose into everyday life. Their beautiful selection of wearable blessings make a wonderful holiday gift for those special ones in your life.

Historic New Orleans Collection Hnoc.org

Royal Street, New Orleans

Mississippi River Map wide-brim umbrella,

78 NOVEMBER 2022 SPONSORED
520
504-523-4662
$30.
MYNEWORLEANS.COM 79

Holiday Happenings

Many would agree that come Nov. 1, the holiday season is officially in full swing. As family comes to visit and out-oftowner friends make their rounds, filling up the itinerary is no challenge while the city is brimming with seasonal and celebratory activities. Restaurants across the city offer menus showcasing staple holiday dishes and festive cocktails. While entertainment is never lacking in this city, the winter months summon up their own spin on New Orleans’ art and music scene. Enjoying the season on a budget is also in the cards this year with hotels offering seasonal deals with unbeatable rates. Make this holiday season unforgettable with these local holiday happenings.

WHAT TO DO Art for All Free Admission Days presented by The Helis Foundation

This holiday, spend time with family and friends exploring New Orleans’ vibrant arts scene with The Helis Foundation’s Art for All program. Louisiana residents may enjoy FREE admission to the city’s most beloved museums and cultural institutions on select days during the week, including Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans Museum of Art, Contemporary Arts Center, Louisiana Children’s Museum, and New Orleans Botanical Garden.

Art for All is part of a range of arts initiatives presented by The Helis Foundation that are free and open to the public, including Poydras Corridor Sculpture Exhibition and Unframed.

Learn more about Art for All and other arts programming at thehelisfoundation.org.

WHAT TO EAT

The Commissary Market + Kitchen by Dickie Brennan & Company

The Commissary Market is stocked with fresh local produce, gourmet grocery items, specialty wine & spirits, grab & go family meals, housemade charcuterie and a selection of favorites from Dickie Brennan & Co.’s French Quarter restaurants like Gumbo Ya Ya, Turtle Soup and White Chocolate Bread Pudding. This Thanksgiving & Christmas, feed the entire family with a Holiday Feast from The Commissary. The feast comes with the whole bird & all the fixins’ and feeds 6-8 guests. Or, shop their online market for a la carte hams, turkeys, traditional holiday sides and pies.

The Commissary Kitchen offers lunch and dinner Wednesdays –Saturdays, and brunch on Sundays. Special events include Wednesday Trivia Nights, “Cork & Rind” Wine & Cheese Tasting Series and free live music on the patio Thursday evenings.

Dickie Brennan’s Family of Restaurants in the French Quarter are Palace Café, Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse, Bourbon House and Tableau. In 2019, Dickie Brennan & Company expanded citywide with Acorn Café adjacent to the Louisiana Children’s Museum, while in 2020, the company’s “Next Generation” of family chefs opened The Commissary Kitchen + Market in the Lower Garden District. To learn more about The Commissary and order online, visit thecommissarynola.com.

SPONSORED 80 NOVEMBER 2022
Virgin Hotels
New
Orleans

Briquette

Welcome to fall—with our Shaken Up NOLA Craft Cocktail classes with lunch & brunch—with delicious food and wine shared together at Briquette, the celebrated seafood destination from restaurateur Anna Tusa, Owner of New Orleans Creole Cookery. With Briquette, Tusa puts seafood and contemporary coastal cuisine at the center of the dining experience. Briquette is known locally for its enthusiasm for high quality, often hard-to-find wines and spirits and recently won the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence for its discerning, expansive wine list.

Learn how Briquette’s award-winning cocktails are made with Shaken Up NOLA Craft Cocktail Classes. The two hour experience includes craft cocktail tutorials, a history of each drink and recipe cards to take home. To explore all fall events, visit Briquette’s Facebook page.

Briquette is excited to announce its new Fall Hours open Wednesday - Monday, 5 - 9 p.m., including post-game Happy Hour following all Saints Games. Guests can enjoy a variety of small plates, discounted cocktails and beer. Briquette is located at 701 S. Peters Street in the Warehouse District. Book your table today by calling the restaurant at 504-302-7496 or via OpenTable.

New Orleans Creole Cookery

Fall is officially here, which means enjoying its weather in the beautiful French Quarter courtyard at New Orleans Creole Cookery. Owner Anna Tusa, also known for modern coastal eatery Briquette, presents diners a menu featuring classic New Orleans flavors in a fresh, reimagined space. Embodying the culture of Southern Hospitality, Tusa pairs great service with innovative food to provide guests an unforgettable experience.

Savor the cooler weather in New Orleans Creole Cookery’s courtyard and treat yourself to New Orleans classics like Jambalaya, Crawfish Étoufée and Shrimp Creole. Experience Game Day specials at the Oyster Bar & Courtyard Bar for all college games on Saturday and all NFL games on Sunday. Guests can enjoy specials including discounted oysters and appetizers.

Get a taste of the city’s world-famous food at New Orleans Creole Cookery, located at 508 Toulouse Street. For more information, reservations, or to book a private event, call the restaurant at 504-5249632 or visit neworleanscreolecookery.com

Where to Stay

The Royal Sonesta New Orleans

Join us for the return of Royal Snownesta, a seasonal celebration of the holidays at The Royal Sonesta New Orleans. Celebrate the season with culinary feasts featuring chef-inspired menus and festive cocktails at Restaurant R’evolution and Desire Oyster Bar plus holiday-themed live entertainment at The Jazz Playhouse. Create lasting memories for the entire family with Santa’s Pajama Party at Restaurant R’evolution.

Held on select weekends throughout December, this event features decadent delights for children and parents plus a visit from Santa himself! Take advantage of holiday savings and reserve a room with the Papa Noel package. Rates start at $159 per night and include complimentary overnight parking. Celebrate holiday cheer with Royal Snownesta and book your stay today online at sonesta.com/ royalneworleans or by calling 504-586-0300.

Virgin Hotels New Orleans

Virgin Hotels New Orleans, voted #1 Hotel in New Orleans & #12 in the South in this year’s Conde Nast Travelers’ Readers Choice Awards, is the perfect destination for this year’s holiday happenings. This boutique hotel located in the heart of Downtown New Orleans showcases the city’s character through food, music, art and fun around every well-dressed corner.

With the new year right around the corner, Virgin Hotels New Orleans is gearing up for the 2022 holiday season with a variety of activations. At The Pool Club, step into “A Very Tiki Holiday,” a tikiinspired wonderland with heaters, photo opportunities and a festive cocktail menu to match. Located on the first floor of Virgin Hotels New Orleans, Commons Club restaurant & bar gets into the holiday spirit with Holiday Bottomless Brunch every Friday of December with DJs spinning holiday tunes and bottomless Veuve Clicquot. Come “Home for the Holidays” and get up to 30% off when you book with promo code HOMEY.

For more information on reservations & bookings, please visit virginhotels.com/new-orleans. •

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The Commissary Market + Kitchen by Dickie Brennan & Company New Orleans Creole Cookery

Senior Care

physicians at The Skin Surgery Centre across Greater New Orleans, the Northshore and the Mississippi Gulf Coast are experts in skin cancer and Mohs surgery and are committed to best practices in guidance, consistency and communication.

To learn more about The Skin Surgery Centre and to schedule an appointment, visit theskinsurgerycentre.com.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana (BCBSLA) is committed to improving the health and lives of Louisianians. It can be hard to find information about your Medicare options, especially during annual enrollment, which runs through Dec. 7. To help, BCBSLA created “Medicare Made Easy,” a virtual resource for people 65 and older.

Get the answers you need from a trusted source that has served Louisianians for more than 85 years. Through videos and online educational events, Blue Cross’ in-house experts cover a wide variety of topics, including how to choose a Medicare plan, why you should have an annual wellness visit, and how to avoid fraud. Watch at your convenience from the “Medicare Made Easy” playlist at youtube.com/ BCBSLA. Connect on social media @BCBSLA to learn about upcoming virtual education events or get health and enrollment tips.

For more information on BCBSLA, visit bcbsla.com or call 1-800-495-2583.

SENIOR LIVING & CARE

Home Care Solutions

Home Care Solutions is a locally owned and operated company specializing in compassionate in-home sitting services, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Care as well as Aging Life Care Management™ services to help elderly loved ones extend their independence at home.

“Our mission is to help our clients age in place gracefully while maintaining as much independence as possible,” says Rachel Palmer, Business Development Coordinator. “In spite of current staffing shortages affecting the healthcare industry, we remain well-equipped with a dedicated team of highly-trained caregivers who collaborate closely with families to provide them peace of mind.”

It often seems like growing older is only associated with the aches and pains that can accompany it, but in reality, there are many aspects of aging to genuinely look forward to. After so many trips around the sun, those in their later years have a lifetime of wisdom under their belts, more time on their hands and less responsibilities to stress over. Ensuring that healthcare, housing and future plans are squared away safeguards the enjoyment of retirement and beyond. Browse this list of senior care resources to explore options for loved ones’ medical needs, living options and more.

MEDICAL CARE & COVERAGE

The Skin Surgery Centre

The surgeons at The Skin Surgery Centre are fellowship-trained in Mohs micrographic surgery: the most effective and advanced treatment for skin cancer today. This gold-standard treatment modality offers the highest potential for cure — even if the skin cancer has been previously treated by another method. Using the Mohs method, the surgeons are able to remove as little skin as necessary to clear the cancer. Their fellowship training includes skin reconstruction to preserve form and function and achieve an excellent cosmetic result.

Patients at The Skin Surgery Centre go from cancer to cure and repair, in a state-of-the-art facility, usually in just one day. The

Caregivers are carefully matched to meet your loved one’s needs and personality, and their familiarity with local resources saves you time and often saves you money while their compassionate understanding of the aging process relieves you of unnecessary distress. For more information, call 504-828-0900 or visit homecareneworleans.com.

Dependable In-Home Care

Aging in the home has always been the preferred choice for the elderly. However, many families experienced difficulties finding qualified caregivers during the pandemic due to the shortages of caregivers, unvaccinated caregivers or fear of exposure to Covid. Now these are mostly issues of the past. Dependable is fully staffed and ready to help find the caregiver you need, at times even with one day’s notice. Having helped thousands of families over the past 50 years, Dependable In-Home has earned its reputation as the go-to place to find home care. It is the only nationally accredited caregiver registry in the region.

Thousands of families have accessed our pool of highly vetted professional caregivers who can provide the help you need to care for your loved one at home. They can provide basic supervision, companionship, help with daily activities, meal preparation, transportation plus assistance in many other areas of home care.

Call Dependable today at 504-486-5044 to access the company’s vetted pool of over 100 experienced caregivers or visit dependablecare.net.

82 NOVEMBER 2022 SPONSORED

The Peristyle at Bucktown

Located at 1443 Seminole Avenue in the heart of Bucktown, the Peristyle at Bucktown is the newest of the Peristyle Homes located just one block from Lake Pontchartrain. Peristyle Residences offer Residential Assisted Living and Memory Care in the comfort of luxurious, intimate homes complete with private bedrooms. At The Peristyle at Bucktown, the best of both worlds is at your fingertips. The Peristyle at Bucktown offers senior care services in a true residence that larger assisted living communities can emulate, but never truly compare. Peristyle Residences prides themselves in providing the highest level of care, comfort and compassion to seniors, offering peace of mind to their loved ones.

The Peristyle at Bucktown is specifically designed and built for people living with Alzheimer’s and dementia and is now accepting priority reservations. Schedule a tour today at peristyleresidences.com or by calling 504-285-5188.

Poydras Home

With its ongoing expansion, Poydras Home will soon become Louisiana’s first Green House® Project community—this revolutionary care approach is focused on the fundamental principle that each resident should be the central decision maker in his or her daily life. With this expansion and transformation, Poydras Home will offer two new buildings with three homes each. The Green House model groups a smaller number of residents sharing each house led by dedicated Care Partners highly trained to make each day meaningful. This smaller community setup within the larger community has the added benefit of limiting COVID exposure.

Homes will feature open floor plans and increased access to Poydras Home’s beautiful grounds. Poydras Home’s Historic House will be rebuilt as the Center for Healthy Living, where all residents will enjoy yoga, a therapy gym, a library, meditative space and more. Poydras Home is pleased to be working with Eskew Dumez Ripple architects to ensure the structural changes will be progressive and rooted in established, aesthetic traditions.

For more information on Poydras Home’s services, visit poydrashome.com.

PLANNING & ARRANGEMENTS

Jacob Schoen & Son

Jacob Schoen & Son has been providing pre-need and funeral services to families in Greater New Orleans for over 147 years. Whether you are looking for funeral, cremation or memorial services, their mission is to offer a home, a comforting place to gather in remembrance and celebration of lives well lived.

The Schoen family and staff are committed to this vision and passionate about making sure your time with them is as memorable and uplifting as possible. They bring together decades of experience caring for families of all cultural and religious backgrounds. They pledge to treat you and your loved ones just like family, and they guarantee to offer services that meet your specifications while exceeding all of your expectations.

Jacob Schoen & Son invites you to compare the value and see the difference. Stop by and visit their one-of-a-kind space located at 3827 Canal Street, call them at 504-267-2924 or visit them at schoenfh.com. They are ready to discuss what innovative options they have available, and learn more about how they can help you or a loved one fulfill their wishes. •

MYNEWORLEANS.COM 83 SPONSORED

Legal Services

The world of law can be confusing and intimidating, particularly for those who have had no prior experience with legal matters. The good news, however, is that New Orleans and its surrounding areas are home to an abundance of highly-skilled attorneys and powerhouse law firms. For every legal issue imaginable there is a local lawyer, if not a team of them, ready to provide experience-backed advice and trusted representation. From wills and estates to family law, personal injury cases to complex business litigation, these attorneys and firms are ready to tackle just about every legal issue out there.

Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson LLP

Established in 1928, Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson LLP (BSW) is one of the oldest law firms in the state of Louisiana. The firm takes great pride in its long history of client service. With more than 75 attorneys, the firm is among the largest firms in the state and one of the larger law firms in the South. BSW’s clients range from individuals and start-up companies to Fortune 500 corporations, governmental entities and not-for-profit institutions.

Since the firm was established, two standards have remained constant: to strive for legal excellence and to be involved in local communities. Members of the firm have served as presidents, directors and officers of community and business organizations. BSW’s primary focus is growing and protecting each client’s business. Whether it is in litigation, negotiating contracts, advising on management restructures or assisting in the purchase or sale of a business, BSW attorneys possess the skill set to help their clients achieve their goals.

For more information, visit bswllp.com.

Chehardy Sherman Williams

A firm built upon The Power of More, Chehardy Sherman Williams has been fueled by its ability to offer unparalleled strength, support, and personalized service since 1989. Chehardy Sherman Williams provides every client the same accessible, reliable, and dedicated approach to solving legal issues by providing legal services in over ten practice areas to corporations, individuals, small businesses, and families.

Chehardy Sherman Williams attorneys are experts in providing comprehensive legal services to a range of healthcare clients, including providers, specialty hospitals, group practices, healthcare facilities, medical staff, pharmacies, and more.

Understanding the overwhelming nature of any legal matter, the Chehardy Sherman Williams team is committed to walking clients through every step of the process. The firm’s skilled attorneys prioritize open and honest communication to establish a trusted client-attorney relationship and provide superior legal counsel.

To learn how Chehardy Sherman Williams can do more for you, visit chehardy.com.

JJC Law Firm

Recognized throughout Greater New Orleans as a premiere litigation firm representing both individuals and businesses, JJC Law has earned its reputation as a trusted source for intelligent, respected and determined legal representation. While JJC Law accepts clients directly, the vast majority of its representations are through referrals and co-counsel arrangements with other lawyers. JJC Law specializes in litigation, and not all lawyers are able or willing to pursue cases when they do not settle early before litigation has begun.

A primarily plaintiff-oriented firm, JJC Law represents commercial clients for legal issues ranging from insurance coverage and breach of contract to maritime allisions/collisions and government contractor disputes. Cases involving individuals often include areas like injuries from maritime, motor vehicle, product defect and premises liability incidents in addition to first-party insurance claims.

To learn more about JJC or to request a consultation, visit jjclaw.com, call 504-513-8820 or connect on social media @jjclawfirm.

Melchiode Marks King LLC

Melchiode Marks King LLC (“MMK”) was founded on the idea that an experienced, dedicated and diverse group of attorneys could combine big firm capabilities with small firm agility and attentiveness to best serve their clients’ interests. By merging their decades of effort in a broad range of practice areas with technological advances and steadfast commitment to their clients, MMK’s attorneys consistently make this concept a reality.

This year, five MMK members were recognized as “Top Lawyers” by New Orleans Magazine: Jerry Melchiode (Construction Law), Kevin Marks (Admiralty & Maritime Law and Workers’ Compensation), Rich King (Construction Law and Insurance Law), Jennifer Simmons (Insurance Law) and Ben Pri-Tal (Construction Law). While awards are gratifying, the best endorsement is the loyalty of MMK’s clients, who have enthusiastically supported the firm since its inception. Whether through advice and counsel, negotiation or litigation, MMK’s tailored approach delivers successful outcomes for a wide array of clients. For more information, visit mmkfirm.com.

The Derbes Law Firm LLC

The Derbes Law Firm LLC’s ten attorneys represent clients in business and financial matters. Practice areas include complex and multiparty commercial litigation and transactions (contract drafting and negotiations, commercial leases, breach of contract litigation, real estate, construction law and employment law); individual and commercial bankruptcy (chapters 7, 13, and 11) for creditors, committees, trustees and debtors; business formation, break-up, liquidation, dissolution and member/shareholder disputes; commercial mediation services; end-of-life matters (estate and trust planning, successions, interdictions, and related litigation); representation before taxing authorities; and preparation of retirement orders (including QDROs).

The Derbes Law Firm is conveniently located for clients at 3027 Ridgelake Drive in Metairie. To learn more, visit derbeslaw.com or call

SPONSORED 84 NOVEMBER 2022

504-837-1230.

Frederick Bunol is responsible for this advertisement.

Esther L. Greenbaum LLC

The shifts in family dynamics that accompany divorce can be difficult and sometimes painful for the parties involved. To avoid the common problems largely responsible for the fear and suffering related to divorce, individuals going through the process need to understand the system and know what to expect. Counsel from an experienced family law attorney can be invaluable when making tough decisions and planning for the future. With more than 45 years of experience in domestic relations, Esther L. Greenbaum LLC is a small firm committed to helping people seeking advice about divorce and family law matters, including child custody, child and spousal support and property divisions.

During the initial consultation, Barbara J. Ziv and Esther L. Greenbaum will explain what they need to know about their client, why they need to know it, and what the client should expect from both the process and their attorney. Their clients can expect competence in family law and matters related to it, clear-cut billing and trouble-free accessibility.

For more information or to schedule a consultation, visit neworleansdivorces.com or call 504-525-4361.

Cristian P. Silva Law Office

When clients work with and put their trust in Attorney Cristian P. Silva, they quickly understand that their needs come first. A native Nicaraguan who speaks and practices in Spanish, English and French, Mr. Silva draws from his immigrant background providing his clients honest and effective representation.

Operating the only all-Hispanic law firm on the Westbank for over a decade, the Silva Law Office has represented clients in defensive immigration matters before the Immigration Court, the BIA, the U.S. 5th & 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, family-based immigration and crimmigation, the practice of advising clients facing criminal charges and the legal consequences on their immigration status.

To learn more about the Silva Law Firm or to get in touch, visit silvalawfirm.net or call 504-301-2549.

Morris Bart

In 1980, Morris Bart ran a simple ad on television. Since that time, his advertising and his law firm have grown to the extent where he has become a household name throughout Louisiana. However, Morris Bart, LLC is much more than just a name. For over 40 years, Morris Bart and his team of over one hundred attorneys fight hard to get the injured the compensation they deserve.

With offices statewide and throughout Mississippi and Alabama, Morris Bart, LLC is proud to be the largest personal injury firm in Louisiana and one of the largest in the United States.

If you or someone you know has been injured, call 855-GET-BART or go to morrisbart.com for 24-hour access. You know what to do: “One Call, That’s All!”

Sarah Wagar Hickman

A founding partner at Wagar Hickman, Sarah Wagar Hickman has had a passion for practicing law since she was a legal intern in high school. Since becoming an associate attorney in 2014, Sarah has gained a comprehensive understanding of the legal system and a thoroughness that sets her apart today. Sarah has years of experience in medical malpractice, products liability and commercial litigation, is a graduate of the National Institute of Trial Advocacy’s trial school and has performed award-winning work in medical malpractice.

Sarah now tackles primarily personal injury, more specifically medical malpractice and general casualty cases, where she puts her impressive background and passion for helping others to use. To learn more or schedule a free consultation, visit wagarhickman.com or call 985-888-8740.

Brittany V. Carter, Attorney at Law, LLC

Brittany V. Carter is a proud Southeast Louisiana native whose passion is to give clients a voice during difficult times with compassionate guidance and support. Her practice focuses on family law, estate law

and collections law and also offers notary public services. Since opening her practice in 2012, Brittany has served as an advocate for her clients, advising and keeping them informed to put them at ease. Brittany’s hands-on approach as a solo practitioner sets her apart as she provides efficiency and transparency throughout the process.

“Most people have no idea what to expect when they file for divorce or inquire about a will or succession,” she says. “I am the person they can turn to for guidance so that they enter into every proceeding informed and confident.”

Brittany also works to resolve disputes amicably outside of the courtroom as a preferred option for many clients, allowing them influence in their own lives. Brittany looks forward to advocating for clients for many years to come, proudly in her hometown in Louisiana.

Brittany is honored to have once again been voted a Top Lawyer by her peers. For more information, call 985-789-4508, email bcarterlaw@gmail.com, or visit brittanyvcarterattorneyatlaw.com.

Amanda Butler Schley

As a top-ranked business lawyer and founding partner at Business Law Group, Amanda Butler Schley has 14 years experience as an outsourced general counsel for growing companies in an array of industries. Throughout her legal career, Amanda has armed and protected boutique hotels, restaurateurs, family-owned businesses, breweries, artists, CEOs and serial entrepreneurs with the legal leverage needed to advance their objectives.

With a keen understanding of the business life cycle and its potential legal roadblocks and pitfalls, Amanda provides first-hand, informed solutions to protect her clients’ best interests.

To learn more about Amanda’s work and to schedule a consultation, visit lawgroup.biz or call 504-446-6506.

Blue Williams LLC

Blue Williams LLC, has been providing high-quality representation to clients throughout the Gulf South in commercial litigation, healthcare and construction law, and business matters since 1983. By recruiting motivated and experienced attorneys in diverse areas of law, Blue Williams is able to provide a full spectrum of services and create lasting solutions to the legal dilemmas faced by clients. The firm’s attorneys practice in seventeen areas of law, including commercial litigation, estate and tax planning, corporate law, healthcare law, construction litigation, insurance law, products and professional liability and more.

Blue Williams has a history of rising to the challenge and has defended clients in multi-million dollar exposure cases. The firm provides services to a broad spectrum of clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to international corporations, local businesses and individuals. Attorneys focus on each client’s individual needs and all available options.

For more information on Blue Williams’s commitment to providing lasting solutions, visit bluewilliams.com or call 504-831-4091.

Crull, Castaing & Lilly

The law firm of Crull, Castaing & Lilly, the successor of its esteemed late partner, F. Irvin Dymond, has engaged in all aspects of criminal defense, including state and federal charges, feloniesand misdemeanors. Its clients range from individuals to Fortune 500 corporations facing federal investigations and charges, allegations of public corruption against public officials, fraud and tax violations. The boutique, yet ever expanding, nature of the firm’s practice has provided efficient and effective results, whether by refusal or declination of charges, trials and/ or wise resolutions and settlements when necessary and advantageous. The firm is also proud of its experience and success in all fields of civil litigation, including major personal injury cases from the plaintiff side.

The mark of the firm is its extensive in-court trial experience, before criminal and civil juries, and in bench trials, led by Eddie Castaing, a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, and other accolades, with co-lead and support by Ed Lilly. Peter Castaing, Eddie’s son, joined the firm in 2019, after employment in insurance defense firms, and is a rising star in the practice. The lawyers at Crull, Castaing & Lilly stand ready to represent clients and protect their rights, of all kinds. Learn more at cclhlaw.com.•

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A Special Section of New Orleans Magazine WYES-TV/Channel 12 PROGRAM & EVENTS GUIDENOVEMBER 2022 THOMAS FALCONE PHOTO GREAT PERFORMANCES JOSH GROBAN’S GREAT BIG RADIO CITY SHOW FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25 AT 9PM Experience the world-renowned baritone performing songs from many musical genres alongside several special guest stars including Cyndi Lauper, Denée Benton, New York City Ballet principal dancer Tiler Peck and more.

PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHTS

WYES-TV’s broadcast streams simultaneously at wyes.org/live and on the WYES and PBS apps.

GREAT PERFORMANCES “New York Philharmonic Reopening of David Geffen Hall” Friday, November 4 at 9pm

The New York Philharmonic celebrates the reopening of its fully renovated home at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall with a triumphant performance of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, conducted by the Phil’s Music Director Jaap van Zweden. Also featured is the world premiere of a NYPhil commission by Puerto Rican composer Angélica Negrón. The opening of the state-ofthe-art facility will reaffirm the essential role of New York City’s cultural life, as well as mark a historic comeback for the world’s most dynamic city for the arts following the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo Credit: Chris Lee

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Lyle Lovett and His Large Band 8/24”

Saturday, November 5 at 11:30pm

See the long-awaited return of a favorite Texas son—singer, songwriter and ACL Hall of Fame legend Lyle Lovett— appearing with his iconic Large band to showcase 12th of June, his first new album in ten years. Lovett first appeared on ACL in 1985, and has notably appeared on the series more times than any act with the exception of Willie Nelson. He returns for his ninth headlining appearance on the ACL stage, after having been memorably inducted into the ACL Hall of Fame in 2019 by actor Sean Penn. Photo Credit: Courtesy Austin City Limits/Austin PBS. Photo by Scott Newton.

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “Taken Hostage”

Part 1: Monday, November 14 at 8pm Part 2: Tueday, November 15 at 8pm

Revisit the Iran hostage crisis, when 52 Americans were held hostage at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. Unfolding like a political thriller, the story is told through the eyewitness accounts of those who took part in the events. Pictured: Iranians burn the American flag on the roof of the occupied U.S. embassy. June 1980. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Reza / Getty Images

GREAT PERFORMANCES “Josh Groban’s Great Big Radio City Show” Friday, November 25 at 9pm

Captured during a three-night sold out run at the legendary venue in April 2022, the world-renowned baritone performs with music legend Cyndi Lauper; Emmy Award winner Rachel Brosnahan; and film, TV, stage and recording star Rita Wilson. Pictured: Josh Groban and Cyndi Lauper. Photo Credit: Thomas Falcone

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2022 D2

WYES SEASON OF GOOD TASTES announces its 30th year of wine pairing dinners at seven of New Orleans’ finest restaurants. Seats go on sale on Wednesday, January 4 at 8:00 a.m. at wyes.org. All wine pairing menus will be available soon at wyes.org/events.

YEARS!

NEW EVENT

Discover the real value of your antiques. If you’ve always wondered about the value of a treasured family heirloom, here’s your chance to find out.

Coming Saturday, February 4, 2023  WYES and New Orleans Auction Galleries will host  WYES ANTIQUES SHOWCASE at the WYES Paulette and Frank Stewart Innovation Center for Educational Media in New Orleans. Experts will be on hand to assess your antiques assets.

DETAILS COMING SOON AT WYES.ORG.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29

Please consider supporting WYES on GivingTuesday, a global generosity movement unleashing the power of radical generosity. Any amount is appreciated at wyes.org.

CELEBRATING 30
THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

SONG

Foundation

SUMMER NIGHTS

Arthur J. Gallagher Risk Management Services, Inc. Helaine and Ned Benjamin

Bourgeois Bennett LLC Marie and James Cahn

CAPTRUST Mary Clare and Danny Conwill Frances and Calvin Fayard Fidelity Bank

Freeport-McMoRan Foundation Katherine and Tony Gelderman Susan and Jimmy Gundlach

Imperial Trading Company

Jackson Offshore Operators

Jones Walker LLP Rick and Tricia Kirschman

Krispy Krunchy Foods / Allison Shapiro

Dandry and Bobby Dandry

Lisa and Philip Lapeyre

Jennifer and Dennis Lauscha

Liskow & Lewis

Juli Miller-Hart

Perlis Clothing

Darnell and Randy Philipson

Susu and Andrew Stall

Susan and Pierre G. Villere

ADDITIONAL THANKS TO

Jonathan McCall

Arnaud’s theBAR2GO Billy Kennedy/BRW Chemin a la Mer

Galatoire’s Hermann-Grimma + Gallier Historic Houses

Houmas House

National World War II Museum Pickapeppa Sauce

Riverboat Coffee

San Lorenzo/Hotel St. Vincent

Villere’s Florist

Vue Orleans

MEDIA

Gambel Communications | The New Orleans 100 Inside New Orleans

The New Orleans Agenda New Orleans Magazine

WYES
joins
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our generous 2022 gala sponsors
PRESENTING SEPTEMBER
Zemurray
ENTERTAINMENT Tia and Jimmy Roddy AUCTION SPRING FEVER Mrs. Robert H. Boh Patricia and Vernon Brinson Stephanie and Ryan Burks Karen and Henry Coaxum Cox Communications First Horizon Flower/Redd Family Hancock Whitney Jennifer and Fred Heebe Sandra and Russ Herman Sherry and Alan Leventhal Sheryl and Bob Merrick Britta and Everard Marks/Orpheum Theater Lori and Bobby Savoie Vulcan Materials Company

1 TUESDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Flight”

8pm

FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Children of Exile”

9pm

FRONTLINE “Putin’s War at Home” Defiant Russians push back against Putin’s crackdown on critics of the war in Ukraine. Facing arrest and imprisonment, the inside stories of activists and journalists refusing to stay silent and protesting the Kremlin’s war effort.

10pm

P.O.W.: PASSING ON WISDOM

Vietnam prisoners of war recall their experiences, including how the Naval Academy’s principles of leadership and camaraderie guided them through difficult circumstances.

11pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

2 WEDNESDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

NATURE “Woodpeckers: The Hole Story” Get an intimate look at what makes woodpeckers so special. With over 240 species of woodpeckers identified, explore their unique evolutionary journey and the powerful role they play in every ecosystem except Antarctica and Australia.

8pm

NOVA “Nazca Desert Mystery”

9pm

SECRETS OF THE DEAD “Decoding Hieroglyphics”

10pm

NATURE “Woodpeckers: The Hole Story”

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

10:30pm STEPPIN’ OUT 11pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

3 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

STEPPIN’ OUT covers the region's arts and entertainment scene with host Peggy Scott Laborde and guests.

7:30pm

BRITISH ANTIQUES ROADSHOW 8pm

MASTERPIECE “Miss Scarlet and the Duke, Season 2” (Pt. 3/6) ‘A Pauper’s Grave’

9pm

VIENNA BLOOD (Pts. 1-2/2)

11pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

4 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm

INFORMED SOURCES

7:30pm

LOUISIANA: THE STATE WE’RE IN 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm

WALL $TREET WRAP-UP WITH ANDRÉ LABORDE

5 SATURDAY 5pm

THE VOTE: LOUISIANA WOMEN LEAD 5:30pm

CHEF PAUL PRUDHOMME: LOUISIANA LEGEND celebrates the life of the restaurateur, author, entrepreneur and television personality, who passed away in October of 2015.

6pm

LAWRENCE WELK: STRIKE UP THE BAND

7pm

THE WAR (Pts. 1-2/7) is the story of the Second World War through the personal accounts of a handful of men and women from four American towns. Directed and produced by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.

9pm

GREAT PERFORMANCES “New York Philharmonic Reopening of David Geffen Hall” The New York Philharmonic celebrates the reopening of its fully renovated home at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall with a triumphant performance of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, conducted by the Phil’s Music Director Jaap van Zweden. Photo Credit: Chris Lee

11:30pm

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Lyle Lovett and His Large Band 8/24” See the long-awaited return of a favorite Texas son—singer, songwriter and ACL Hall of Fame legend Lyle Lovett—appearing with his iconic Large band to showcase 12th of June, his first new album in ten years. Photo Credit: Photo Courtesy Austin City Limits/Austin PBS. Photo by Scott Newton.

6 SUNDAY 2pm

MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 3” (Pts. 1-3/7)

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2022 D9
HIGHLIGHT
HIGHLIGHT

7pm MASTERPIECE “Miss Scarlet and the Duke, Season 2” ‘Angel of Inferno’ (Pt. 4/6) Eliza is hired to solve a case of blackmail and finds herself with a new rival.

8pm

MASTERPIECE “Magpie Murders” (Pt. 4/6) The plot of Alan’s new book and the lives of his acquaintances start to converge.

9pm

MASTERPIECE “Annika” (Pt. 4/6) Annika is called to solve an author’s death in Glasglow.

10pm

BROADCHURCH, SEASON 3 (Pt. 2/8)

11pm LA OTRA MIRADA “I Think of Me” (Pt. 7/13)

7 MONDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Vintage San Antonio” 8pm

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Election Collection”

9pm

INDEPENDENT LENS “Move Me” A dancer paralyzed with a spinal cord injury adapts to life with a disability.

Rosa Keller and former official with the Moon Landrieu administration Mary Zervigon and The Historic New Orleans Collection curator and historian Eric Seiferth.

11:30pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

8 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

VOTE 2022: ELECTION NIGHT SPECIAL With the control of the House and Senate hanging in the balance, PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff leads live coverage of the results as they come in. 10:30pm

BEYOND THE CANVAS 11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

9 WEDNESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm NATURE “American Ocelot”

10:30pm

THE VOTE: LOUISIANA WOMEN LEAD interviews include Chief Justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court Bernette Joshua Johnson, civil rights activist and former First Lady of New Orleans Sybil Morial, League of Women Voters New Orleans President Rosalind Cook, former U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, former Louisiana Representative Julie Stokes, daughter of civil rights activist

8pm

NOVA “Crypto Decoded” From Bitcoin to NFTs, what exactly are cryptocurrencies? And how do they work? Unravel the social and technological underpinnings of “crypto” – exploring the possibility that this new technology may change much more than just money.

WYES-TV/CHANNEL 12 PROGRAM GUIDE | NOVEMBER 2022 D10
5:00AM XAVIER RIDDLE AND THE SECRET MUSEUM 5:30AM ARTHUR 6:00AM MOLLY OF DENALI 6:30AM WILD KRATTS 7:00AM HERO ELEMENTARY 7:30AM ALMA’S WAY 8:00AM CURIOUS GEORGE 8:30AM DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 9:00AM ROSIE’S RULES 9:30AM DONKEY HODIE 10:00AM SESAME STREET 10:30AM PINKALICIOUS & PETERRIFIC 11:00AM DINOSAUR TRAIN 11:30AM ELINOR WONDERS WHY NOON SESAME STREET 12:30PM ROSIE’S RULES 1:00PM DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD 1:30PM LET’S GO LUNA! 2:00PM NATURE CAT 2:30PM WILD KRATTS 3:00PM ALMA’S WAY 3:30PM XAVIER RIDDLE AND THE SECRET MUSEUM 4:00PM ODD SQUAD 4:30PM ARTHUR 5:00PM MOLLY OF DENALI 5:30PM READY JET GO! 6:00PM PBS NEWSHOUR 9AM & 12:30PM ROSIE’S RULES The show aims to teach children concrete social studies lessons about how a community works, helping them develop their awareness of themselves as individuals and as part of a broader society. Photo Credit: Courtesy of © 2021-2023 Ruby Productions Inc. WEEKDAYS ON

9pm

SECRETS OF THE DEAD

10pm

NATURE “American Ocelot”

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

10 THURSDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

STEPPIN’ OUT covers the region's arts and entertainment scene with host Peggy Scott Laborde and guests.

7:30pm

BRITISH ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

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MASTERPIECE “Miss Scarlet and the Duke, Season 2” ‘Angel of Inferno’ (Pt. 4/6)

9pm

VIENNA BLOOD "The Melancholy Countess” (Pt. 1/2)

11pm

VIENNA BLOOD “The Devil's Kiss” (Pts. 1/2)

11 FRIDAY

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8:30pm

WALL $TREET WRAP-UP WITH ANDRÉ LABORDE

9pm

FOUNDED ON FRIENDSHIP & FREEDOM: THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM tells the story of how two University of New Orleans historians sought to salute the spirit of Americans who fought to preserve our freedom.

10pm

HER WAR, HER STORY: WORLD WAR II tells the stories of more than two dozen women’s experiences during the war. From members of the U.S. Women’s Army Corps to the civilian witnesses to the war in Europe, this hour-long film shows how women were equal to men in patriotism, service and steadfastness in critical moments. Narrated by actress Jane Lynch.

11pm

STEPPIN’ OUT 11:30pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

12 SATURDAY 5pm

FOUNDED ON FRIENDSHIP & FREEDOM: THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM 6pm

LAWRENCE WELK: DO YOU REMEMBER 7pm

THE WAR (Pts. 3-4/7) Directed and produced by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.

and hip-hop sounds makes his ACL debut. Photo Credit: Photo Courtesy Austin City Limits/Austin PBS. Photo by Scott Newton.

13 SUNDAY

2pm

MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 3” (Pts. 4-6/7)

7pm

MASTERPIECE “Miss Scarlet and the Duke, Season 2” ‘Quarter to Midnight’ (Pt. 5/6) Eliza is hired to solve a case of blackmail in the shady world of Victorian medicine and finds herself with a new rival – Patrick Nash, the owner of a private detective agency. Nash wants Eliza to join his company – or he will crush her business.

8pm

MASTERPIECE “Magpie Murders” (Pt. 5/6) Susan’s sister and Andreas have unexpected connections to Alan. Meanwhile, Pünd wraps up his investigation, promising, “Very soon all will be made clear!”

9pm

MASTERPIECE “Annika” (Pt. 5/6) Arriving at a murder scene on a party boat, Annika thinks of the Greek god of unrestrained celebration. From there, things only get more chaotic.

10pm

BROADCHURCH, SEASON 3 (Pt. 3/8)

11pm

LA OTRA MIRADA “The First and Last Word” (Pt. 8/13)

14 MONDAY

6pm

PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Junk in the Trunk 11”

7pm

INFORMED SOURCES Now in its 38th year, the weekly series hosted by Marcia Kavanaugh and produced by Errol Laborde, gives an in-depth look into the important news of metro New Orleans and Louisiana. Repeats Sunday mornings at 9:30am.

7:30pm

LOUISIANA: THE STATE WE’RE IN 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK

11:30pm

8pm

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “Taken Hostage” (Pt. 1/2) Revisit the Iran hostage crisis, when 52 Americans were

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AUSTIN CITY LIMITS “Cimafunk and the Tribe” The native Cuban with his sizzling blend of Afro-Cuban and AfroCaribbean music with American funk

held hostage at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. Unfolding like a political thriller, the story is told through the eyewitness accounts of those who took part in the events. Pictured: A hostage held at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, Iran is shown to a crowd by Iranian students. November 8, 1979.

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Zuma Press

10pm

NOLA UNCOVERED Explores the uniqueness of New Orleans’ architecture, food and music through the experiences of locals.

10:30pm

THE VOTE: LOUISIANA WOMEN LEAD

11pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

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6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Songs of the Past”

8pm

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE “Taken Hostage” (Pt. 2/2) For 444 days, the world watched as the United States received a daily barrage of humiliation, vitriol and hatred from a country that had long been one of our closest allies. The crisis would transform both the U.S. and Iran forever. The film details how the crisis degenerated into what is arguably the most consequential foreign policy debacle of the second half of the 20th century.

10pm

IN THEIR OWN WORDS “Jimmy Carter”

11pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

16 WEDNESDAY

6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

NATURE “Santa’s Wild Home”

Get an intimate look at the wildlife of Lapland, a region in northern Finland, the fabled home of Santa Claus and actual home of reindeer, great gray owls, wolverines, eagles, wolves, musk oxen, brown bears and more.

8pm

NOVA “Zero to Infinity” The concepts of zero and infinity didn’t always exist. They’ve been invented and re-invented by different cultures over thousands of years. Discover the surprising story of these key concepts that revolutionized mathematics.

9pm

SECRETS OF THE DEAD “The First Circle of Stonehenge”

10pm

NATURE “Santa’s Wild Home” 11pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

17 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR

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STEPPIN’ OUT Host and producer Peggy Scott Laborde welcomes regular guests Poppy Tooker, Alan Smason, plus new roundtable visitors every week to discuss New Orleans restaurants, arts and entertainment. Missed an episode? Head to WYES’ YouTube channel.

7:30pm

BRITISH ANTIQUES ROADSHOW 8pm

MASTERPIECE “Miss Scarlet and the Duke, Season 2” ‘Quarter to Midnight’ (Pt. 5/6) 9pm

VIENNA BLOOD

18 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm

INFORMED SOURCES

7:30pm

LOUISIANA: THE STATE WE’RE IN 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK

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DIAL 12 | January 2019 5:00AM MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD 5:30AM ARTHUR 6:00AM MOLLY OF DENALI 6:30AM WILD KRATTS 7:00AM P. ALLEN SMITH'S GARDEN HOME 7:30AM WOODSMITH SHOP 8:00AM AMERICAN WOODSHOP 8:30AM THIS OLD HOUSE 9:00AM ASK THIS OLD HOUSE 9:30AM KEVIN BELTON’S COOKIN’ LOUISIANA 10AM KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS 10:30AM CHEF PAUL PRUDHOMME'S ALWAYS COOKING 11:00AM LIDIA’S KITCHEN 11:30AM AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN FROM COOK’S ILLUSTRATED NOON COOK’S COUNTRY 12:30PM CHRISTOPHER KIMBALL'S MILK STREET TELEVISION 1:00PM PATTI’S MEXICAN TABLE 1:30 PM JACQUES PEPIN: HEART & SOUL 2PM SARA'S WEEKNIGHT MEALS 2:30PM LES STROUD'S WILD HARVEST 12:30pm CHRISTOPHER KIMBALL'S MILK STREET TELEVISION Each episode gives viewers the chance to meet cooks from around the world and see how their inspiration results in faster, easier and bolder recipes. SATURDAYS ON

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WALL $TREET WRAP-UP WITH ANDRÉ LABORDE looks at the past week’s market and brings local and national investment professionals to you. Have a question for André?

Email andre@wallstreetwrapup.info

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NEXT AT THE KENNEDY CENTER “A Joni Mitchell Songbook” The indomitable influence of Joni Mitchell is celebrated with an all-star lineup at the Kennedy Center, led by multi-Grammy Award winner Vince Mendoza and accompanied by the National Symphony Orchestra.

10pm

AMERICAN MASTERS “Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road”

11:30pm

STEPPIN’ OUT

19 SATURDAY

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NOLA UNCOVERED explores the uniqueness of New Orleans’ architecture, food and music through the experiences of locals. Produced and directed by David M. Jones.

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ODD JOBS Originally produced for WYES in 1987, this program is about “odd jobs” that evolved based on the geographic conditions of New Orleans: oyster shuckers, snowball entrepreneurs, and ferryboat pilots. Though these jobs may exist in other parts of the country, they are all part of what makes New Orleans unique. Produced and directed by David M. Jones.

6pm

LAWRENCE WELK: DO YOU REMEMBER

7pm

THE WAR (Pts. 5-7/7)

4pm MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 4” (Pts. 1/7)

6:30pm

BRITISH ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

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FINDING YOUR ROOTS “Watchmen”

20 SUNDAY

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MASTERPIECE “Downton Abbey, Season 3” (Pts. 7/7)

7pm

MASTERPIECE “Miss Scarlet and the Duke, Season 2” ‘The Proposal’ (Pt. 6/6) While Eliza and the Duke struggle with their relationship, private investigator Nash is shot just as Eliza agrees to work with him. As Eliza and Moses work to solve the attempted murder, they realize the real target of the shooting was Eliza herself. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Element 8 Entertainment and MASTERPIECE

8pm

MASTERPIECE “Magpie Murders” (Pt. 6/6) Susan cracks her case—not without mishap—then accompanies Pünd as he lays out the solution to Alan’s final book, as magpies watch from above.

9pm

MASTERPIECE “Annika” (Pt. 6/6) Annika goes for what looks like a one-way ride. A secret about Michael comes out.

10pm

BROADCHURCH, SEASON 3 (Pt. 4/8)

11pm

LA OTRA MIRADA “Way of the Cross” (Pt. 9/13)

21 MONDAY 6pm

PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW “Extraordinary Finds” (Pts. 1-2)

9pm

NEW ORLEANS FAIR GROUNDS MEMORIES looks at some of the owners, trainers and jockeys that have contributed to the track’s rich history.

10pm

POV “Midwives”

11:30pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

8pm

AMERICAN MASTERS “Buffy SainteMarie: Carry It On” Experience the story of the Oscar-winning Indigenous artist from her rise to prominence in New York’s Greenwich Village folk music scene through her six-decade groundbreaking career as a singer-songwriter, social activist, educator and artist. Photo Credit: Matt Barnes

10pm

THE LOST SALMON shares the declining numbers of the spring Chinook salmon up and down the West Coast.

11pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

23 WEDNESDAY 6pm

PBS NEWSHOUR

7pm

TUTANKHAMUN: ALLIES & ENEMIES (1-2/2) commemorates the 100th anniversary of the opening of King Tut’s tomb. Produced and shot on location by an all-Egyptian crew led by filmmaker and executive producer Hossam AboulMagd, the two-part special goes beyond examining Tut’s tomb and treasures. The film aims to share the Egyptian pharaoh’s story from his point of view and unpacks the short-lived human existence of the “Boy King.” Lead archaeologist Dr. Yasmin El Shazly and photographer Mahmoud Rashad explore Egypt and the Americas, meeting with historians, archaeologists

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SEASON FINALE

and scientists to inspect historical inconsistencies and delve into secrets surrounding Tut’s childhood and family.

9pm TUTANKHAMUN: ALLIES & ENEMIES (1-2/2)

11pm AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

24 THURSDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm STEPPIN’ OUT 7:30pm MASTERPIECE “Miss Scarlet and the Duke, Season 2” (Pt. 5-6/6)

10pm

MISS SCARLET & THE DUKE: SECRETS REVEALED goes behindthe-scenes of Season 2.

11:30pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

25 FRIDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm

INFORMED SOURCES 7:30pm

LOUISIANA: THE STATE WE’RE IN 8pm WASHINGTON WEEK 8:30pm

WALL $TREET WRAP-UP WITH ANDRÉ LABORDE

from many musical genres alongside several special guest stars including Cyndi Lauper, Denée Benton, New York City Ballet principal dancer Tiler Peck and more. Photo Credit: Thomas Falcone

11pm STEPPIN’ OUT 11:30pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY 26 SATURDAY 7:30am

DEMYSTIFYING DETOX

9pm

GREAT PERFORMANCES “Josh Groban’s Great Big Radio City Show” Experience the worldrenowned baritone performing songs

9:30am

KEVIN BELTON’S COOKIN’ LOUISIANA The holidays are coming! Order your autographed cookbook and DVD Favorites from the WYES Shop at wyes.org/shop. Photograph from Kevin Belton’s Cookin’ Louisiana by Kevin Belton. Photography by Denny Culbert. Reprinted by permission of Gibbs Smith.

10am

KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS

10:30am

CHEF PAUL PRUDHOMME’S ALWAYS COOKING! One of the country's most beloved chefs goes back to basics to present a compendium of timehonored cooking methods.

11am

RICK STEVES’ EUROPEAN CHRISTMAS From England to Wales, France, Norway, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Italy, you’ll see the bright Christmas markets, hear local choirs, share holiday traditions with families…and even play in the snow.

1pm

SUZE ORMAN’S ULTIMATE RETIREMENT GUIDE Join the acclaimed personal finance expert for essential advice on planning for and thriving in retirement.

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SUNDAYS ON 5:00AM MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD 5:30AM ARTHUR 6:00AM MOLLY OF DENALI 6:30AM WILD KRATTS 7:00AM HERO ELEMENTARY 7:30AM ALMA'S WAY 8:00AM WALL $TREET WRAP-UP WITH ANDRÉ LABORDE 8:30AM LOUISIANA THE STATE WE’RE IN 9:00AM FIRING LINE WITH MARGARET HOOVER 9:30AM INFORMED SOURCES 10:00AM VARIOUS PROGRAMMING 11:00AM KEVIN BELTON’S COOKIN’ LOUISIANA 11:30AM KITCHEN QUEENS: NEW ORLEANS NOON ANTIQUES ROADSHOW 1:00PM RICK STEVES' EUROPE 2:00PM DOWNTON ABBEY 9AM FIRING LINE WITH MARGARET HOOVER The weekly series brings together the brightest minds and freshest voices from across the political spectrum to engage in a contest of ideas about important issues confronting our nation. HIGHLIGHT

3pm MEMORY RESCUE WITH DANIEL AMEN, MD

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LAWRENCE WELK: TV TREASURES

27 SUNDAY 10am LONGEVITY PARADOX WITH STEVEN GUNDRY, MD

MOMENTS TO REMEMBER

GREAT PERFORMANCES “Andrea Bocelli Live in Central Park”

9pm

THE CARPENTERS: CLOSE TO YOU AND CHRISTMAS MEMORIES Richard and Karen Carpenter perform Christmas classics, including “The Christmas Song,” “Winter Wonderland” and “White Christmas.”

11pm

AMANPOUR AND COMPANY

29 TUESDAY 6pm PBS NEWSHOUR 7pm

YOUR DNA SECRETS REVEALED

8:30pm

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GREAT PERFORMANCES “Andrea Bocelli Live in Central Park” Accompanied by the New York Philharmonic under the direction of music director Alan Gilbert, the worldrenowned tenor performs from Central Park’s Great Lawn. Alongside legendary artists such as Céline Dion, Tony Bennett , Chris Botti, David Foster and more. Bocelli presents a varied repertoire that includes arias like “La donna ė mobile” and “Nessun Dorma” and fan favorites like “The Prayer” and “Time to Say Goodbye.” Photo Credit: Joseph Sinnott ***WYES has a membership offer for tickets to see Andrea Bocelli live on Saturday, February 11, 2023 at the Smoothie King Center. Two tickets plus subscription to New Orleans Magazine and WYES Passport from $480-$900. Pledge at wyes.org or call 504-486-7311.

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DANIEL EMMET AND PIA TOSCANO: SIMPLY THE BEST “American Idol” and “America’s Got Talent” finalists Pia Toscano and Daniel Emmet team up for a night of duets in Las Vegas.

CELTIC WOMAN: POSTCARDS FROM

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MISS SCARLET & THE DUKE: SECRETS REVEALED

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MYSTERIOUS WOMEN OF MASTERPIECE MYSTERY

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LONGEVITY PARADOX WITH STEVEN GUNDRY, MD Learn informative, lifechanging information that shows a stepby-step easy approach to feeling better and more youthful, no matter your age

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This year is the 50th anni versary of Popeyes Fried Chicken. Al Copeland, Jr., the late founder’s son now runs the business which consists of the spice distribution to the nationwide fleet of Popeyes, as well as running Copelands full-service restaurants. The chicken chain is now under the ownership of a Florida based company, but it certainly capitalizes on the Copeland legacy, even calling the business “Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen.”

According to Copeland, Jr., his dad would assess his personal weaknesses and strengths accordingly: he couldn’t sing, he couldn’t dance, but he had great tastebuds.

In the book “Secrets of a Tastemaker,” published to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Popeyes, Al, Jr. says that the product served at his dad’s 1972 original fast-food venture, called “Chicken on the Run,” located on Judge Perez Street in St. Bernard Parish, was undistinguished. “Big Al,” as the family referred to the founder, knew he had to give the chicken its own character. An internal debate began. Al would spend many hours experimenting on flavors. He would have taste tests—comparing the spicy with the normal. At first the verdict was inconclusive. The spicy certainly had a kick but there was concern that it was too hot for kids. Copeland was convinced that once customers tried the brand a few times they would grow to like it. That was proved one day when an irate customer came in and wanted a refund because the chicken was too hot. Copeland responded by giving the man some additional pieces and

Popeyes at 50

asked him to give the chicken a second chance. The man did, returned after a few days to buy more, and became a forever fan of the seasoned brand.

There were some subtle innovations too. Copeland noticed that another chain would fry its chicken and then keep it under a hot lamp, where it would get dry and lose its flavor. Copeland insisted that his chicken had to be battered, fried and sold within 30 minutes to keep it fresh.

Copeland and Chef Paul Prudhomme (operating the famed K-Paul’s restaurant) might not have realized it but they were redefining Cajun cuisine. The early Cajuns never heard of blackening their fish, as popularized by Prudhomme. Chicken served at home was frequently stewed, but if served fried it was rarely spiked with Copeland stye heat. Yet, because of Popeyes and Prudhomme, Cajun would come to be characterized as being very spicy; what might be

called nouveau Cajan.

One classic dish would be recre ated by Popeyes. From the begin ning a side dish was a take-off of the “dirty rice” that was common to Acadian meals. Being in rice country, the grain was plentiful and would originally be cooked with a mix of ground organ meats and perhaps bell pepper or whatever else the gardens provided. On the market, however, the term “dirty” is negative so Copeland changed it to “Cajun Rice,” a mixture of rice, seasonings and standard ground meat. To a new generation, spicy chicken and Cajun Rice were the bounty of the bayou country.

After a few years Popeyes would add another side dish, this one a modi fication of a New Orleans standard.

Warren LeRuth, an extraordinary chef who had operated “LeRuth’s,” a signature restaurant on the West Bank was hired by Copeland to do

product development. He wanted to create a better version of red beans and rice. In a city where practically every lunch counter sells the dish as a Monday tradition there is no shortage of recipes, but LeRuth’s version was better. He got the flavors right. Taste tests would frequently select the Popeyes version as the favorite.

In preparation for this column, for two days in a row I had lunch at a neighborhood Popeyes. On the first day I got two pieces of the spicy chicken and the next day, two pieces of regular. Also, on the first day I got two sides: one was Cajun Rice and the other the red beans. As good as the chicken can be, the two rice dishes are extraordinary, especially after I had the idea to mix the two together, creating a red beans and Cajun Rice combo. The world has been waiting for this.

After the second day I could report that the regular chicken is good too, not as overwhelming as the spicy but, still rich with a crunchy fried aroma. I was going to try different sides, but I was so overwhelmed by the Cajun and red beans dish from the previous day that I figured I could not do any better.

There are other stories about Copeland, including racing boats, Christmas decorations and a squabble about aesthetics with novelist Anne Rice, but it all began with the chicken. Copeland once offered this bit of advice: “Start with determination. Have a road map when you start out. Prepare a plan. Be determined. Don’t let anything stand in your way.”

To that he might have added, and when in doubt, add more spice.

104 NOVEMBER 2022 ARTHUR NEAD ILLUSTRATION
BY ERROL LABORDESTREETCAR