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november 2019


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november 2019 / VOLUME 54 / NUMBER 1 Editor-in-Chief Errol Laborde Managing Editor Ashley McLellan Art Director Tiffani Reding Amedeo Contributing Writers Fritz Esker, Kathy Finn, Dawn Ruth Wilson, Carolyn Kolb, Chris Rose, Eve Crawford Peyton, Mike Griffith, Liz Scott Monaghan, Lee Cutrone, Dale Curry, Jay Forman, Tim McNally, Robert Peyton Digital Media Editor Kelly Massicot Staff Writers Topher Balfer, Kelly Massicot Melanie Warner Spencer Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan Advertising Sales Manager Kate Henry (504) 830-7216 / Kate@MyNewOrleans.com Senior Account Executives Danielle Kiletico, Meggie Schmidt Account Executive Rachel Webber Director of Marketing and Events Jeanel Luquette Event Coordinator Abbie Dugruise Digital Media Associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264 Production Manager Emily Andras Production Designers Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney Special Projects Art Director Molly Tullier Patty Traffic Coordinator Lane Brocato Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager John Holzer Administrative Assistant Mallary Matherne Audience Development Claire Sargent WYES DIAL 12 STAFF (504) 486-5511 Executive Editor Aislinn Hinyup Associate Editor Robin Cooper Art Director Jenny Hronek NEW ORLEANS MAGAZINE Printed in USA A Publication of Renaissance Publishing 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 MyNewOrleans.com

For subscription information call (504) 828-1380

New Orleans Magazine (ISSN 0897 8174) is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC., 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005; (504) 828-1380. Subscription rates: one year $19.95; Mexico, South America and Canada $48; Europe, Asia and Australia $75. An associate subscription to New Orleans Magazine is available by a contribution of $40 or more to WYES-TV/Channel 12, $10.00 of which is used to offset the cost of publication. Also available electronically, on CD-ROM and on-line. Periodicals postage paid at Metairie, LA, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2019 New Orleans Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark New Orleans and New Orleans Magazine are registered. New Orleans Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in New Orleans Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the magazine managers or owners.

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Contents Local Color Marquee

Top Lawyers, p. 58

On the Cover: Lafitte Pig Sandwich at Ugly Dog Saloon & BBQ

Top Picks for November 24

Photograph by Marianna Massey

When the Past is Present 28

Persona Chef Kevin Belton 26

Education Chris Rose Struck by the Clock 30

Modine Gunch Family Thanksgiving 32

Joie d’Eve Going Too Fast 34

In Tune When Music Meets Food 36

Home Three’s a Crowd 40

92

Features

In Every Issue

Pit Perfect

Inside

New Orleans’ Top BBQ Spots 44

In Pursuit of Real Barbecue 14

Top Lawyers

Speaking Out

Our annual listing 58

Editorial, plus a Mike Luckovich cartoon 16

Julia Street Questions and Answers About Our City 18

Streetcar The Season of ‘99 136

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DIAL 12, D1 GREAT PERFORMANCES returns with its third annual “Broadway’s Best” lineup of acclaimed theatrical productions, premiering Fridays, November 1-29 at 8:30 p.m. on WYES. This fall’s lineup spotlights musicals, comedy and drama: “42nd Street,” “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s The King and I, “Red,” “Much Ado About Nothing,” and “Kinky Boots.” For all WYES programming and event info., go to wyes.org.

The Menu Table Talk A Modern Presentation 86

Restaurant Insider News from the Kitchen 88

Food A Cajun Theme 90

Last Call E-Z Zombie 92

Dining Guide Listings by Neighborhood 94


inside

In Pursuit of Real Barbecue Memories: in this case, an afternoon as a kid when our family was invited to someone’s backyard for a barbecue. Backyards were a big deal back then, as the suburbs expanded and new houses were built featuring spots of green in the back. A thing to do in the backyard was to have a barbecue, though few really knew how to do it. In this particular case, the yard chef lathered barbecue sauce over pieces of chicken which were placed on a grill that was way too close to the fire in the belly of the pit. The proximity of the sauce to the flame was so near that the sauce caught fire giving our meal a charred black coating. Pass the potato salad please. Away from the yard and into the restaurants, New Orleans developed slowly as a town for barbecue. There was a place called The Smokehouse that featured chicken cooked on a rotisserie and coated with sauce, though not at a flammable level. For the most part, though, our distinctive cuisine has been Creole, Cajun and generously from the sea. There are few culinary categories in which Texas ranks over Louisiana, but barbecue is one. I once took a barbecue tour of Houston where we were guided to several stops. Real barbecue is not something flamed on a grill, rather it is cooked slowly surrounded by a heat that is gentle but commanding. The cooking time should be measured in hours not minutes.

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All of the barbecue we were served that day in Houston was either pork or beef. Later in the day we were lectured by a published barbecue expert. He guffawed when I asked him about chicken. I was, after all, speaking heresy. Chicken, he explained, is not suitable for real barbecue because it is such a light meat. It literally cannot stand the heat. I thought about the generations of backyard barbecues with their menus built on folly. For our cover story we commissioned an experienced food writer to, over a few months, explore the town and report on the best barbecue. The good news is that we are no longer a smoky backwater. There are local places that can go arm to arm with the big boys in Texas. They are discoveries worth trying. And if you must have sauce, put it on after the cooking and not during.


meet the sales staff

Kate Henry Advertising Sales Manager (504) 830-7216 Kate@myneworleans.com

Meggie Schmidt Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7220 Meggie@myneworleans.com

Danielle Kiletico Senior Account Executive (504) 830-7250 Danielle@MyNewOrleans.com

Rachel Webber Account Executive (504) 830-7249 Rachel@MyNewOrleans.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com 1 6 november 2019 myneworleans.com


speaking out

Thanksgiving The New Orleans experience

On one weekend last month,

the opera Carmen was performed at the Mahalia Jackson Theater; nearby the Broadway roadshow of the musical “Wicked” was making a return engagement to the city. That Sunday, the Saints faced the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the Superdome—and won. To have a professional opera, a Broadway show and an NFL game all in such proximity to each other on the same weekend is certainly a sign of a city with a busy agenda. Then there were the various festivals, including Oktoberfest and another in tribute to the beignet, that are among those staged practically on a weekly basis. In this the month of Thanksgiving we pause to think about New 1 8 november 2019 myneworleans.com

Orleans. We know that there are the usual problems: crime, broken roads, street flooding and poverty. No city is perfect with its offerings. We do know that good cities provide opportunities to live, grow and experience enterprise and culture within an environment that is livable and pleasant. Overall New Orleans does that. Lately, this city seems to be at an accelerated pace with its amenities, including an enhanced and picturesque sculpture garden and an architecturally dazzling Children’s Museum. A new downtown hospital complex is bringing more health care and more jobs to the city plus triggering economic activity near downtown. Come November, the Saints are not alone in providing professional sports.

The New Orleans Pelicans enter that saved us. their new season as one of the To live in the United States is a most exciting teams in the NBA, gift; to be at home in New Orleans and the venerable Fairgrounds is a blessing. Thanksgiving is an American provides its winter season, “at the track.” holiday, in which a nation shares For all the wonders of New a common menu, including the Orleans, Katrina taught us how obligatory turkey and a pumpkin vulnerable we can be; yet the pie. But for those of us in southeast recovery underscored our Louisiana, our menu is resilience. embellished by oyster dressing, chicken and Part of that resilience is An original ©Mike Luckovich explained by our character, sausage gumbo and but, to be fair, a good part Cartoon for New anything sweet made Orleans Magazine of the explanation is due with pecans. The Thanksgiving table to our being an American city. Though the initial response epitomizes that while we are part to Katrina was slow, and feder- of the nation and prosper from its ally built levees were part of benefits, we also have our own the problem, in the end it was character. We experience the best the resources of the richest and of both worlds. And for that we most powerful nation of earth can be truly thankful.

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julia street with poydras the parrot

Lubber Grasshopper

Dear Julia, Of a recent trip to the Barataria Unit of Jean Lafitte National Park, I saw the biggest grasshopper I’ve seen in my life. My companion said it was called a Lubber or a Devil’s Horse. If these enormous insects are Lubber Grasshoppers, who or what is a Lubber? J.J. Boudreaux (Metairie) A “lubber” is a big, clumsy lazy person. The word is often used to refer to inexperienced sailors or people unaccustomed to shipboard life. Lubber grasshoppers, such as the Southeastern Lubber Grasshopper (Romalea microptera) you saw are flightless, huge and slow moving. They are native to the coastal south. Like other eye-catching insects, they are also toxic, so predators tend to leave them alone. They are not dangerous to people but, if alarmed, they are known to

release a nasty brown fluid to encourage a predator to leave them alone or spit them out.

Dear Julia Street, I am a native New Orleanian now living in Arkansas. Through my O’Shaughnessy family of N.O., I am related to Louisiana governor Michael Hahn who served during the Civil War. Through the years, the family story has been that Uncle Mike had a sister named Julia and that, as governor, he named a street in the city Julia Street. My question to you is “Is this a fact?” Marilyn Santa Cruz (Belle Vista, Arkansas) Sorry Marilyn, the fact is that Julia Street is clearly shown on a map Vicente Sebastián Pintado created in 1804, more than a quarter-century before Michael Hahn’s birth. I have

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have a question for julia? Send your question to: Julia Street, New Orleans Magazine, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 or email: Julia@myneworleans.com.

heard conflicting explanations of the street’s name origin and spelling; one version claims Julia honors Julien Poydras’ cook while another notes the name may have actually been Julie, which was Poydras’ nickname. Nearby streets - Poydras, Girod and Gravier - honor major property owners in the area. In late 1852, the city of New Orleans consolidated the municipal government and, in November of that year, the Commission Council passed ordinance 395 CC, which renamed a long list of city streets. At the time, there were found to be many instances in which long streets bore different names in each of the three former municipalities through which they ran. Consequently, it was decided to simplify matters by renaming some streets so each would have a single name rather than two or three throughout its length. Julia was one of the affected streets. A section formerly known as “Florida Walk,” around the long-vacant present day Plaza Tower building, was renamed Julia at that time and for that reason; it was the only part of the street to be named during Hahn’s lifetime. Unfortunately for family lore, neither he nor his regard for his big sister had anything to do with it.

Dear Julia, In reference to an article in the February 2019 issue about an old deserted theatre in the Uptown area.: in 1954, my family and I moved to 1930 Robert Street in the Uptown area. The deserted theatre was across the street from our home. Older neighbors in the block said they thought it had been a Vaudevillian theatre. In the early 1960s, it was torn down finally. Three private homes were built on the large lot. Sharon Stevens (Metairie) Thank you for confirming when the Fern was demolished. Originally a silent movie house, The Fern Theater survived into the talking era but it does not appear that vaudeville-type live variety shows played there or shared the bill with the movies. The Fern opened in the summer of 1917. Modern and well equipped, it was among the few local movie houses to feature a Fotoplayer, a semi-automated music and special effects instrument which combined elements of a player piano, a pipe organ and sound effects. The Fern closed in the mid-1940s.


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Local Color

greg miles photo fish courtesy of New Orleans Fish House

MARQUEE . PERSONA . education . MODINE GUNCH . JOIE D’EVE . IN TUNE

Chef Kevin Belton


marquee

November Our top picks for this month’s events by Fritz Esker

Dear Evan Hansen

Central City Festival

From Nov. 5-10, the Saenger hosts “Dear Evan Hansen,” a deeply personal, contemporary musical about a young man’s desire to fit in. The book is by Tony Award winner Steven Levenson and the score is by Grammy, Tony, and Academy Award winners Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. Information, SaengerNOLA.com

On Nov. 9, the Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard Merchants and Business Association will hold the annual Central City Festival. There will be a wide range of music, as well as cooking demonstrations and local food trucks. There will also be a youth dance contest and a youth 3-on-3 basketball contest with prizes. Information, AsheCAC.org.

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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The Bloody Mary Festival

From Oct. 16-Nov. 10, the NOLA Project will perform “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” in an immersive, outdoor experience at the New Orleans Museum of Art’s Besthoff Sculpture Garden. Come see an old classic told in a way you’ve never seen it before. Information, NOLAProject.com.

The Howlin’ Wolf will host The Bloody Mary Festival on November 2 and 3. Aficionados of the classic alcoholic beverage will be able to sample a wide variety of Bloody Marys, as well as local food items. Information, TheBloodyMaryFest.com


calendar Oct. 11-Nov. 10

Nov. 16

Higgins: The Man, The Boat, The War, BB’s Stage Door Canteen. Information, NationalWW2Museum.org.

MJ Live: Michael Jackson Tribute Concert, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com.

Oct. 31-Nov. 2

Congo Square New World Rhythms Festival, Congo Square. Information, JazzAndHeritage.org.

Nov. 16-17

Widespread Panic, UNO Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu. Nov. 2-3

Nov. 16-17

Hot Wheels Monster Trucks Live, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

Treme Creole Gumbo Festival, Armstrong Park. Information, JazzAndHeritage.org.

Nov. 3

Nov. 16

Oak Street Po-Boy Festival, Oak Street. Information, PoBoyFest.com.

Water Lantern Festival, City Park. Information, WaterLanternFestival.com.

Nov. 3

Gwar, The Joy Theater. Information, TheJoyTheater.com. Nov. 7

The Raconteurs, The Fillmore. Information, FillmoreNOLA.com. Nov. 7

RuPaul’s Drag Race: Werq the World Tour, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com. Nov. 8

Boudin, Bourbon, and Beer, Champions Square. Information, BoudinBourbonAndBeer.com. Nov. 9

Kevin Gates, UNO Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu.

Nov. 16

Fantasia: The Sketchbook Tour, UNO Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu. Nov. 17: For King and Country, UNO Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu. Nov. 19

The Elf on the Shelf, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com. Nov. 21 & 23

Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra: Mozart Requiem, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com. Nov. 22

Nov. 10: Bianca Del Rio: It’s

Jester Joke, Orpheum Theater. Information, OrpheumNOLA.com.

Pilobius in Shadowland The New Adventure, Mahalia Jackson Theater. Information, MahaliaJacksonTheater.com.

Nov. 12

Jonas Brothers: Happiness Begins Tour, Smoothie King Center. Information, SmoothieKingCenter.com.

Nov. 26

Incubus, The Fillmore. Information, FillmoreNOLA.com. Nov. 26

Nov. 13

Just Trust Elvis Costello & The Imposters, Saenger Theater. Information, SaengerNOLA.com. Nov. 13-16

Fete des Fromages, New Orleans Jazz Museum. Information, FeteDesFromages.com. Nov. 14-17

Hell Yes Fest, New Movement Theater. Information, ComedyNOLA.com.

The 1975, UNO Lakefront Arena. Information, arena.uno.edu. Nov. 29-30

Bayou Classic Weekend, Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Information, MyBayouClassic.com. Nov. 29-Jan. 1

Celebration in the Oaks, City Park. Information, NewOrleansCityPark.com

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persona

Kevin Belton Celebrity Chef By Ashley McLellan

Kevin Belton knows how to

cook up a good time in the kitchen. He often appears on WYES (and PBS stations across the country) and on WWLTV morning programs armed with the trinity, a larger than life laugh and sense of humor. This past September, the dapper chef was also featured in the pages of Vogue magazine alongside stunning models, musician Jon

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Batiste and members of the Mt. Kingdom choir, among others, in a spread honoring New Orleans culture. Is there anything this chef, educator, cookbook author can’t do? We wanted to find out how it all began and what’s next.

green pepper and then her going between the refrigerator and pantry to figure out what she was going to prepare while the Trinity was cooking.  

Q: What’s your first memory of cooking? I remember my mom

me how to cook scrambled eggs.  

starting to cook onion, celery and

Q: What did you learn about cooking

Q: What was the first thing you learned how to cook? Mom taught

from your mother and grandmother growing up? I remember the great conversations they had during cooking. I remember what was most important about their cooking was the love and care they put into each dish. You could feel and taste the love and care they put into every dish and to this day I feel the most important ingredient you can add is love. In fact, my

greg miles photo


Born/raised: New Orleans, Louisiana, Uptown. Education: Our Lady of Lourdes, Brother Martin and LSU. What are you reading right now: Michael Connelly, “Two Kinds of Truth.” Favorite place to get “take-out:” Venezia, Royal China and Central Grocery. Favorite Thanksgiving dish that you go back to for seconds: Oyster Dressing.

wife had heard me say “love is my secret ingredient” and she stamped it on a sterling silver spoon that I always have with me because that is what I feel is most important.    

Q: Your cookbooks and teachings are so welcoming and inspiring for home cooks. Do you think home cooks are as important to culinary history as award winning chefs, and why? YES, home cooks are as important because not everyone goes out to eat but everyone eats at home. Home cooks typically just don’t bring home awards or get the recognition that they should but I learned so much about life and cooking surrounded by my family cooking and eating. There are cherished memories that I will never forget that have greatly influenced me. I feel a responsibility to pass on our Louisiana culinary traditions, heritage and techniques on to future generations that I know will enrich their lives like it has mine. 

Q: What are some surprising misconceptions about New Orleans cooking when you are teaching outside Louisiana? I think there are two huge misconceptions. The first one being that our food/ recipes are complicated and that is not the case. The other misconception is that our food is spicy/hot but that is not the case either. It is flavorful and well seasoned.  

Q: What is your favorite thing to cook at home on the weekend for comfort food? I very rarely ever cook at home. My wife Monica does all the cooking at home and she has several dishes that at very comforting to me and my stomach.

Q: Do you have advice for a home cook getting ready to prepare to entertain during the holidays? Don’t bite more TRUE CONFESSION: Something people might not know about you: I am really shy and blush at the attention. I was a small baby (7 lbs. 13 oz. but 24 1/2 long, small in comparison).

than you can chew. Don’t plan to cook everything in your recipe file. Keep it simple, Plan ahead and prep as much as you can.

Q: You’ve been on TV, written books, taught cooking around the world. What’s the next thing you’d love to try that you haven’t yet? I would like to host a national show.

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education

When the Past is Present Teacher of the Year’s Perspective by Dawn Ruth Wilson

Two life-changing moments

hit award-winning teacher Christopher Dier at the age of 21. The first struck in a Constitutional law class in his senior year of college. He took the opposing side of a disagreement about arresting Vietnam War draftees for burning draft cards. His classmates argued laws must be followed. He supported the war resisters. “No one ever changed the world by following unjust laws,” Dier said. That exchange made him question going to law school, and that doubt led to his second life-changing moment: watching his mother teach history. “I saw the impact she was having,” he said. “I got into teaching to carry that on.” As it turned out, he followed in Lynne Dier’s footsteps so literally that he took her position teaching history at Chalmette High School when she retired. He even teaches in the same sunny classroom, Room 215. And as far as impacting students, the Louisiana Department of Education gave him its highest honor this year when it named him “2020 Teacher of the Year.” Not taking the commonplace approach to teaching world history is key to his success in the class-

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room, one of his former students told the award committee. Kelsey Billiot, now a Loyola University student, wrote in a letter of recommendation that Dier overcomes student resistance to learning history by going beyond the memorization of lifeless facts. “Every student who walks in his classroom immediately feels a sense of inclusion and sheer learning,” Billiot wrote. “They are nurtured and encouraged to be curious, to ask questions, and to seek answers for their own satisfaction.” Instead of monotone lectures about long past events that seem alien to teenagers, Dier assigns several documents describing the event. Each one provides a different perspective. Comparing the perspectives allows them to analyze and synthesize the material in the same way that historians draw conclusions. He also enlivens the material by incorporating events that are relevant to the students’ own culture. In a recent segment about Nazi Germany, for example, he related the story of Anthony Acevedo, a Mexican-American army medic who was captured during the Battle of the Bulge. Instead of being held at a POW

camp with other prisoners, he was sent to a concentration camp for “undesirables.” Acevedo wrote a real-time diary of his experiences of torture, starvation, and forced marching. “That hits my Latino students,” Dier said. That day in college discussing war protestors also carried forward. Dier’s favorite topics are resistance movements – Mohandas Gandhi’s struggle against British colonialism; Nelson Mandela’s fight against South African apartheid; student resistance to Adolph Hitler’s brutal reign; and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s struggle to secure Civil Rights. His students also benefit from the cultural curiosity that prompts him to visit sites of important

historical events. Over the summer, he traveled to Hong Kong where a contemporary resistance movement is taking place. While there, he met with student protestors conducting a hunger strike intended to pressure authorities to protect Hong Kong’s autonomy from mainline China. His coursework starts with the Aztec and Mayan civilizations of Central America and, if time allows, concludes with the rise of ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The frustrating part of teaching history is debunking the many unfounded conspiracy theories that profit-focused television programming perpetuates. As Dier suggested that, “people not watch the History Channel.”

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cheryl gerber photo


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chris rose

Stop the presses! I have an

idea. A really good one. But wait, I guess it’s too late. There are no presses to stop. The presses are gone, actually. Along with everything else that used to be part of the Times-Picayune building on Howard Avenue. That includes the iconic clock tower that graced – and defined – the newspaper’s campus since it was built in 1968, when the paper ditched its downtown digs for bigger space in Mid City. Admittedly, the Picayune’s main structure was an architectural eyesore – monolithic, impersonal, bulky, clunky, blocky and chunky. But while it was totally practical and utilitarian – which is what a newspaper should be, after all – the paper’s board of directors found its original design wanting of one particularly ambitious detail: “landmark recognition,” according to a story published in the paper shortly after the building opened. Hence, the tower was added to the plans at the last minute, a stolid, sturdy addition to the blueprint, looming seven stories above the building, its grounds, the railroad yards, the interstate, the projects, the cemeteries and Orleans Parish Prison, visible from all directions. The flourishing final touch, “symbolic of the traditions of a free press,” as the paper’s promotional ads later pronounced. (I’m no architectural expert – maybe I’m unable to divine the nuanced expressions of brick and mortar, but: “symbolic of a free press?” It was a clock tower, for crissake, not the Statue of Liberty.) But it did achieve its intended intent – true landmark recognition – during its 51 years, often the first notable structure on the city skyline encountered by visitors coming in from the airport and all

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Struck by the Clock Last days of a tower by Chris Rose

points west. And, as lagniappe, it had its own utilitarian feature: two large clocks, one facing north, one south, “for the convenience of vehicular traffic,” as its architect, Edward Silverstein, so utilitarianly described it. It had other architectural grace notes as well. The top of the tower – lit at night and imprinted with the name of the newspaper – rotated slowly so that all would know the provenance of this stoic landmark. It was also installed with electronic chimes that rang three times a day – 9 a.m., noon and 5 p.m. – like a factory whistle, just a bit softer for the tender dispositions

of newsroom employees, no doubt. When the chimes stopped ringing goes unrecorded, but it was long before I started working there in 1984. Eventually, the tower top stopped spinning. Symbolic of the building and perhaps the newspaper business itself, the lights eventually went out. And then, at some point a few years ago, the clocks stopped. When I last visited the property, the one facing south said 4:00. The one facing north said 4:15. A charming epitaph. And such a decidedly New Orleans characteristic; getting things wrong in the most delightful ways. And so

that’s when time stood still when the wrecking ball took it down in October. To clear the land for an indoor golf facility. Let that sink in. Golf. Indoors. Is that how lazy we’ve become as a society. Where will it end? Pretty soon they’ll make sports like surfing and rock climbing indoor activities so that nobody ever has to go outside and...oh, wait. Never mind. But I digress. Back to the tower. And an opportunity lost for our city. And my great, fantastic, forward thinking idea that it’s now too late to implement. And it was this: Lee Circle. That’s right. Why didn’t we secure the tower and move it to Lee Circle? Boffo, right? Relocated there, it could have salved the wounds of our intractable, bitter, divisive, hand-wringing civic discourse and dissent over what to do with the spaces vacated by Confederate monuments. Or, at least, that one. With the Times-Picayune clock tower installed there, it would represent – kinda, sorta, maybe – what both sides of the argument want to achieve, want to see put there, want to represent for our city. A link between the past, the present and the future. A beacon of hope, home, liberty, the free press and all that. Something meaningful, historic, nostalgic. And one clock could face north, the other one south. The implications are staggering. But, woulda, coulda, shoulda. It’s too late to implement my master plan, my grandiose scheme, my healing touch. Because the clock finally – and literally – ran out for the beloved Times-Picayune tower. It was a dark day in October. Apparently some time between 4:00 and 4:15.

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jason raish ILLUSTRATION


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modine gunch

Family Thanksgiving What could go wrong? by Modine Gunch

The Gunches usually have

Thanksgiving at my sister-in-law Gloriosa’s, seeing as she has the biggest house. Now, even though she’s a perfectionist and wound pretty tight, Thanksgiving is pretty easy on her. Her house is always clean, so she just has to set the table. Her brothers Lurch and Leech always get there early and go out back and deep fry the turkeys; my mother-in-law Ms. Larda makes the oyster stuffing; my sister-inlaw Larva brings the potatoes; my daughter Gumdrop brings the salad; my gentleman friend Lust brings the liquid refreshments, and the rest of us bring homemade pies that we won’t share the recipes to because they are from Walmart. Gloriosa always politely invites her in-laws, old Mr. Proteus and Ms. Sarcophaga, who live next door, but they always politely decline, ever since Ms. Sarcophaga ate Glorioda’s potpourri and had to be rushed to the hospital. Instead, Ms. Sarcophaga invites some lah-dee-da socialite friends and serves them vegetables with fake butter and cold smoked turkey and dry stuffing. But she won’t 32 november 2019 myneworleans.com

serve potpourri like SOME people. She mentions this every year, even though she knows it was an accident. It is a shame she had to get her stomach pumped, but even so, her breath smelled great for weeks. Last year, she decided she wants Proteus and Gloriosa to go over there for dessert with their kids, and meet her fancy friends. That means Gloriosa will have to leave us with all that pie, whilst she eats Ms. Sarcophaga’s dessert— probably diet Jell-O with prunes. “What could be worse?” she wails to me on the phone the night before. She soon finds out. She gets a text from the school. Her kids have lice. It happens in the best of families. Next morning she yanks all three kids, Momus, Comus and even baby Flambeau, out of bed at dawn; scrubs their heads with anti-lice shampoo, goes through their hair with a nit comb, and then she and her husband Proteus pick through each other’s hair like a couple of monkeys on the Nature Channel; strips the beds; washes the sheets in HOT water, and sprays all the furniture with

Death to Lice. She is still twitching when we all come trooping up the walk, and little Momus gives us a big hello, “Happy Thanksgiving! We don’t have lice no more!” All of us suddenly got itchy heads. So Gloriosa has to explain how she rushed to the all-night Walgreens for whatever gets rid of lice (they make it smell nice now, with lavendar) and how she picked and scrubbed and sprayed, so we can rest easy that everything is lice-free. We listen, and we all sit on the edges of our chairs and try not to scratch our heads. But after Lust breaks out the drinks, and we get football roaring on all the TVs (they got three, all huge) we gradually relax and forget about it and eat everything in sight, like usual. When we are just about to slice the pies for dessert, Ms. Sarcophaga summons. We tell them to go ahead; we’ll still be here when they get back; maybe there’ll be some pie left. So off they all go, feet dragging. Gloriosa uses the walk between

the houses to inform Comus and Momus that they are absolutely NOT to mention or even whisper the word “lice” during this visit. Ms. Sarcophaga introduces them around, sweet as saccharin. She actually scoops up Flambeau, like a loving grandmother. She’ll never do that again. They are all standing around, making polite talk, and Flambeau starts rooting through Ms. Sarcophaga’s hair with her fat little fingers. “Aren’t you sweet,” Ms. Sarcophaga says, “patting Grandmother’s hair.” But Flambeau ain’t patting, she is examining. Sarcophaga tries to put her down, but not quick enough. “LICE!” Flambeau sings out, with her hand still in Sarcophaga’s hair. Gloriosa tries to cover it up. “She’s saying ‘nice’!... Grandmother has nice hair, Flambeau? ” “LLLLICE!” yells Flambeau. The visit breaks up pretty quick after that, and Gloriosa’s little family gets back home before the pie’s gone. Happy Thanksgiving. Hope you didn’t lose your appetite.

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LORI OSIECKI ILLUSTRATION


myneworleans.com november 2019 3 3


JOIE D’EVE

Going Too Fast That thing about how quickly kids grow up? Yeah, it’s true By Eve Crawford Peyton

“I can’t wait till I have my own

room,” Ruby said wistfully the other day. Her stepbrother, Elliot, is a senior this year and will be going to college next year. Since she was maybe 8, she has been counting down to this moment, and it’s almost here. “What will you do?” I asked. Every week it changes. She has elaborate but ever-evolving plans of loft beds, color schemes, beanbag chairs and desks. She sends me Amazon links 34 november 2019 myneworleans.com

constantly. “Well,” she said, “I will be organized. My room is only messy right now because of Georgia. Once I don’t have to share with her, I will be super-tidy. I’ll arrange my clothes by color, like in a rainbow. And she won’t climb on my bed and get in my face when I’m trying to FaceTime my friends. And the best part is that I won’t have so much junk and toys around, so Milo can just sleep on my bed and not in his crate.”

And I started bawling. It basically. You were just born!” was the damndest thing. One “I AM ALMOST 13!” minute I was indulging her “EXACTLY!” room décor fantasies and the Thirteen years seems like a next, I was crying because I lifetime to her because it is her had suddenly had an elaborate lifetime. Thirteen years feels fantasy of my own. like nothing to me because I “Mom?” she said, alarmed. can still remember the smell of “Mom? Why are you crying? her neck folds when she would fall asleep on my shoulder What’s wrong?” I could barely choke out after nursing. How is she so my answer: “I just had this grown? How can I make it vision of like six years in the slow down? future, boo. And you’ve gone “I guess it’s just going so off to college, and Milo is so fast for me,” I said. “It doesn’t sad without you because he’s seem like it’s been that long been sleeping with you for since you were in second five years, and so grade, and in that same amount of it’s the first night you’re gone, and Excerpted from Eve time, you’ll be a he gets in your bed Crawford Peyton’s senior. And then and is missing you, blog, Joie d’Eve, which you’ll be gone.” appears each Friday on and then I get in MyNewOrleans.com I started crying with him, and again. “I guess … he and I are in I’m just not ready mourning together, like curled to be done raising you.” up in your bed, just being “Now you’re being even depressed together because more ridiculous,” she said. you’ve left us.” “You’re not going to be done She cocked her head at me. raising me when I go off to “I love you,” she said, “but college. You’re not ever going you’re crazy.” to be done raising me.” “I’m not crazy!” I said. And then I was crying again. “I’m a mom! Elliot is already Everyone told me how leaving, and that’s going fast it goes, even if I didn’t to be sad, and then you’re understand. going to leave before I even Why did no one tell me know it! You’re in seventh how much I would cry over grade now, and it feels like 10 the silliest things? minutes ago you were starting New moms, I know you’re kindergarten!” sick of hearing this, but: Man, “It feels forever ago I was it goes so damn fast. And also: Buy stock in Kleenex … or at starting kindergarten!” “It does not! It was yesterday least buy them in bulk.

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jane sanders illustration


myneworleans.com november 2019 3 5


in tune

must-see music NOVEMBER 1

Mavis Staples tips for Tulane at the Fillmore. NOVEMBER 1

Marc Broussard

Elephant Wrecking Ball rocks Howlin’ Wolf. NOVEMBER 1-2

Widespread Panic jams at the UNO Lakefront Arena. NOVEMBER 2

Starcrawler rocks Gasa Gasa. NOVEMBER 3

Anamanaguchi pops into One Eyed Jacks.

When Music Meets Food Festing in November

NOVEMBER 7

by Mike Griffith

The Raconteurs rock the Fillmore.

November is rapidly becoming one of the most raise money for Emeril’s foundation—you really can’t popular months for festivals and parties that bring go wrong with this one. If your clothes still fit by the middle of the month, together the music and food of New Orleans. Things kick off on the 2nd with the inaugural Abita Fall you have two more excellent ways wreck your diet. On Fest. This one-day festival will be held at the Abita the 16th the French American Chamber of Commerce Springs Trailhead (less than an hour from downtown) takes over the New Orleans Jazz Museum at the Mint and features eight solid hours of music, including for their Fête des Fromages. This year, the festival has performances by Marc Broussard, Flow Tribe, Bruce tapped the excellent Gypsy jazz band Harmonouche Daigrepont and more. What I like about this festival to kick things off. They’ll be followed by Meschiya is that it is designed to be a non-profit and family- Lake and The Little Big Horns, and then Sunpie and friendly means of getting more people out to explore the Louisiana Sunspots. this beautiful area. Kids under 10 are free, and the The Fête des Fromages ends in the mid-afternoon music and food will be accompanied by a rock wall, which will give you plenty of time to walk up to Armstrong Park for the newly combined forces of petting zoo, face paining and more. The very next day, Nov. 3, is the 13th Oak Street the Treme Creole Gumbo Festival and the Congo Po-Boy Festival. This festival is constantly voted Square Rhythms Festival. By bringing these two among the top food events in our city. Each year they events together, the Jazz and Heritage Foundation feature some of the best music the city has has created a two-day event on the 16th to offer (as of press the lineup for this year and 17th, which combines some of the was not available but we’ll have it in full on best food in our city with its best music. Playlist of mentioned Make sure to catch the African drumming the website). bands available You can keep your streak rolling with at: http://bit.ly/ and dance events, as well as the Mardi Boudin, Bourbon and Beer on the 8th. A InTune11-19. Gras Indian “battle.” bevy of celebrity chefs and mixologists from Taken all together this is an unreal all over the region descend on Champions Square collection of some of the best musicians our city has to present their spin on boudin dishes and bourbon to offer in great locations with imaginative food. We cocktails. These treats are always accompanied by a used to talk about November being a bit sleep around stellar musical lineup. This year, Trombone Shorty here, especially with the Thanksgiving lull at the end and Orleans Avenue are headlining, with Grace Potter, of the month, but it seems like those days are well Fruition and Motel Radio supporting them. It’s all to behind us now.

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36 november 2019 myneworleans.com

NOVEMBER 5

Angel Olsen brings indie folk to The Civic.

NOVEMBER 8

This Will Destroy You experiments at Gasa Gasa. NOVEMBER 9

Kero Kero Bonito pops into Republic. NOVEMBER 12

Dinosaur Jr. rocks Tipitina’s . NOVEMBER 13

Elvis Costello brings indie to the Saenger. NOVEMBER 26

Mikal Cronin rocks One Eyed Jacks. NOVEMBER 26

The 1975 rocks the UNO Lakefront Arena.

Dates are subject to change; email Mike@ MyNewOrleans.com or contact him through Twitter @Minima.


myneworleans.com november 2019 3 7


38 november 2019 myneworleans.com


myneworleans.com november 2019 3 9


home

The centerpiece of the sun-filled addition is a custom table with a brass base designed by Eric and Alyssa Kraemer and a walnut top by Port Street Woodworks. The matching console next to the window is actually an extra leaf for the table. The “Chain Man” on the far wall is by Amy Lansburg; the metal screen on the porch was designed and fabricated by Parasoleil in Colorado.

Three’s a Charm The third renovation of a Broadmoor house hits all the right marks by Lee Cutrone photographed by Greg Miles

“Any first floor in New Orleans post-Katrina

should be considered indoor/outdoor space,” said John Gonzalez, wryly referring to one of the guiding principles that influenced the recent renovation of the Broadmoor house he shares with his wife Tricia Weeks. 4 0 november 2019 myneworleans.com

The couples’ first floor flooded when the levees failed after Katrina, and protecting their century-old home from future water intrusion was at the forefront of their thinking. As parents of two grown daughters and collectors of art for more than three decades, the

couple (now empty nesters) also focused on designing a renovation that works for family gatherings and showcases their colorful stable of mostly primitive art. Having renovated the house when they first purchased the property in the mid 1990s and again after Katrina, the couple had other goals as well. They wanted to respect the original colonial revival architecture of the house, which they believe to have been built before the 1920s, based in part on the fact that it and several other houses in the neighborhood had World War I-era Victory Gardens. At the same time, husband and wife say their taste over the years has become increasingly modern and wanted to be free to surround themselves with things they like. Finally, they wanted to replace the rear addition made during the first renovation; it didn’t blend with the original architecture as hoped and its curved roof posed a problem for water and termites. The solution lay in something that John stumbled upon while doing research for the couples’ initial discussions with architect Caroline Ferguson, whom they hired for the job along with Edifice Builders. “In the UK, if you do an addition to an older building, you’re encouraged to pick a different style,” John said. “Matching the old materials was impossible and our personal aesthetic had moved more toward modern, so this was an opportunity to do something totally different. Caroline ran with that really well.”


Top, left: The footprint of the galley kitchen is original but the latest renovation added new counters and pale green cabinets designed to look like furniture. Paintings by Jimmy Lee Sudduth (top) and Willie Lamendola (bottom). Top, right: Tricia Weeks and John Gonzalez at home. Mural and painting on porch, both by local graffiti artists Dogslobber and Fat Kids From Outerspace. Landscaping by Marianne Mumford and Kim Alvarez of Landscape Images. Bottom, left: The original Neo Georgian façade of the house. Bottom, right: The homeowners had special plaques made to mark the level of the water after Katrina. The piano was inherited from Tricia’s family and the folk art above is by Willie Lamendola.

myneworleans.com november 2019 41


Top, left: Polka dot curtains repeat the circular motif of the antique light fixture salvaged from Ricca’s in the den. It was polished and rewired by Zito’s. Painting by Michael Guidry. Top, right: Architect Caroline Ferguson designed the walnut bookshelves for the library. The vintage table and chairs are Scandinavian and the photographs are by Lane Lefort. Bottom, left: Polka dot tiles by Mixed-Up Mosaics in NYC were based on a drawing by one of the couples’ daughters as part of the third-story renovation done for the girls. Bottom, right: The center hall of the second floor serves as a gallery space for the couples’ art. Paintings on right by Ruth Owens (foreground) and Raine Bedsole. Paintings on left (foreground to background) by Tony Nozero, Gary Komarin and Jimmy Lee Sudduth.


The living room’s elliptical Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams sofa is from Villa Vici. Painting over mantle by Drew Galloway, wooden skulls by Kelly Guidry.

The clean-lined glass and metal addition is a complete departure from the traditional brick façade that faces the street and is hidden from the front. Its beauty is appreciated from inside the house and from the large L-shaped back yard. The exterior of the addition is wrapped it an electroplated aluminum “skin” that John sourced after seeing it at a California hotel. The material, which serves as a rain screen and has an air pocket behind it that allows moisture to dry out, arrived measured and precut like Lincoln Logs that fit together. Inside the ground floor, wains coating of corrugated aluminum can be removed to allow walls of pecky cypress to dry. The pecky

cypress itself, which is original to the ground level, is indigenous to water environments and can also be taken apart and dried out if necessary. “This house was built in an era before air conditioning and they did things the way they did them for a reason,” said Tricia. “We took the best of the building practices of the early 20th century and then took some new things and tried to apply them thoughtfully.” The melding of old and new is continued throughout. In the living room, a custom marble mantle made in Italy when the house was built shares space with an elliptical sofa, a circular coffee table and mid-century modern style chairs, chosen to emulate the look of a contemporary Paris salon. In the library, a crystal chandelier original to the house is mixed

with modernist bookshelves and a console designed by Ferguson, and a vintage Scandinavian table and chairs. The centerpiece of the sun-filled addition is a custom table with a metal base designed by Eric and Alyssa Kraemer and a wooden top by Port Street Woodworks. The table is surrounded by acrylic Klismos chairs that gleam with light during the daytime hours. “We wanted to make it as comfortable and interesting and pretty as possible but also a little surprising,” said Tricia, who looked to designer Renee Laborde for window treatments and advice on decorating decisions, Louis Aubert for color selections and John Pecorino for curating and hanging art. Among the most surprising elements in the house are the way the couple repurposed materials and

the art they’ve collected over the years. The former includes using shutters from the outside of the house to make lockers for what is now a mud room and using wrought iron from windows as decorative insets along an inside stairwell. The latter includes a center hall that serves as a gallery space and collaborative mural on the patio by local graffiti artists Dogslobber (@dogslobber) and Fat Kids From Outerspace (@fatkids). The couples’ favorite spot is the second story porch that Ferguson designed as part of the addition. It also features a painting by the graffiti artists as well as a bead dog purchased from the LASPCA. “We love the porch,” said the couple. “We use it every afternoon. This entire addition is exactly what we wanted.”

.

myneworleans.com november 2019 43


In search

of great

BBQ


by Jyl Benson photography by Marianna Massey Food styling by Lauren Sanders

Pulled Pork Sandwich on brioche topped with coleslaw at McClure's Barbecue


T

hough largely unheralded outside of their respective neighborhoods, New Orleans has long had a smattering of barbecue restaurants that are respected and sought after for cooking low-and-slow over wood-fueled rigs.¶ “The purveyors and the customers were mostly black and the restaurants were located in black neighborhoods,” said Pete Breen, a Baltimore native and owner and founder of The Joint, which is recognized by many as New Orleans’ first “real” barbecue restaurant, when it opened in 2002.¶ “Ms. Hyster’s was my first New Orleans barbecue experience: the half chicken with green beans and baked beans. She also cooked some good pork and brisket. There was another spot, Podner’s BBQ on Felicity in Central City. H&P BBQ Masters at Elysian Fields and North Claiborne, and Adams BBQ on Franklin, between St. Claude and North Claiborne.  These spots were take-out only and specialized in untrimmed pork spareribs and chicken. All of these places served the meat basted in a sweet and smoky sauce. H& P and Adams didn’t survive the Katrina flood and Podner’s is gone.¶ “It’s important to note that there was a reasonably vibrant barbecue scene in New Orleans before we opened,” Breen said.¶ New Orleans culinary identity remains firmly tied to its own largely seafood-based Creole heritage, not barbecue, a tradition that belongs to Texas, Kansas City, the Carolinas, and Memphis, each of which has its own nuances and traditions. The result is local restaurants that may have offerings ranging across the region under one roof, often presented at the table via a caddy holding a collection of sauces that may include eastern North Carolina vinegar sauce, South Carolina-style mustard sauce, a thin Texas-style sauce made with beef broth and loads of black pepper, a thick tomato-based Kansas City-style sauce, and Alabamastyle white sauce among them.¶ Most area barbecue purveyors credit the Hogs for the Cause cooking competition for growing an interest in barbecue in New Orleans. What began in 2009 as a cookout at the Fly, an Uptown waterfront park, has grown into a major national competition fundraiser serving the families of pediatric brain cancer patients. This year the competition brought in a record $2,000,000.

This list is not in ranking order

Doobin Lubin sandwich at Blue Oak BBQ


Frey Smoked Meat Company

1 Blue Oak BBQ

Ronnie Evans Jr. and Philip Moseley started Blue Oak as a pop-up at Grits Bar and Chickie Chickie Wah Wah in July 2012. They had worked together at a barbecue joint in Vail, Colorado, where they thought they had learned all they needed to know. The purchase of a reverse flow pit brought them back to the beginning as they undertook the long and arduous task of learning how to cook a proper brisket. They opened their brick-and-mortar location near City Park in the spring of 2016. Though the barbecue here is serious and cooked over a variety of local oaks, the attitude is playful. St. Louis spare ribs fall off the bone, chicken with crisp, deeply lacquered skin is moist and flavorful on the inside. Thick, sturdy slices of brisket have an assertive smoked flavor and pulled pork arrives in a glistening pile. At the same time the potato salad is anything but ho-hum: It has a whipped consistency and a horseradish kick. Coleslaw is light and refreshing with a hint of fresh ginger. Macaroni and cheese is hit with roasted garlic. On the restaurant’s Instagram feed, sandwiches, which take a hefty share of the menu, are presented in an irresistible manner. The “Doobin Lubin,” features pulled pork and house smoked sausage, slaw, onions, pickles, and barbecue sauce. The “Pit Viper” features jerk pulled pork, slaw, and fresh jalapeno, and begs you to take a bite. “We have fun with our specials and incorporate different techniques and flavors to keep things interesting,” Evans said. “I see people focusing more on vegetables and more unique cuts of meat in the future.” Outstanding Barbecue: Half chicken with deeply lacquered skin; every sandwich on the menu. Sauces: Carolina-style with mustard, “House” (classic), and jerk. Outstanding Sides: Ginger coleslaw, cheese grits. Oddball Specialties: Smoked Kung Pao wings, Sichuan cracklins, BBQ nachos, and banana pudding.

900 N. Carrollton Ave., 822-2583, blueoakbbq.com.

don't forget

Barbecue sides, like macaroni and cheese and coleslaw, are a mainstay on many menus, but for back to basics, classic flavor don’t forget the essentials: a stack of dill pickles, a loaf of the freshest sliced white bread, like Bunny, and a roll of paper towels (we’ll allow Wet Wipes, as well).

2

Chef-owner Ray Gruezke, who hails from a fine dining background, discovered that his culinary talents extended to barbecue when he entered Hogs for Cause as a competitor. It makes sense: Gruezke’s great-great-grandfather, Andreas Frey, was a 19th century French Quarter sausagemaker. His great grandfather, Louis Frey, as the founder of L.A. Frey and Sons meat packing company, which operated for over 120 years. With a sleek industrial feel and a generous oak bar stocked with an abundance of beers on tap and vast selections of sipping whiskies, this Mid City destination is a fine tribute to the chef-pitmaster’s ancestor. In addition to the hefty smoked beef ribs for which Frey is known, the burgers and sandwiches on the menu are real standouts. The “BarB-Cuban” combines Frey’s pulled pork with ham, house pickles, and Swiss cheese on a hoagie roll with a splash of Frey’s N.O. Gold Sauce. The smoked chicken sandwich is finished with pepper jack cheese, Alabama white sauce, pickles, onions and lettuce. Burgers are offered as both “Fatties” (a half pound of meat cooked over an open flame) and “Flattie”s (2 quarter pound patties cooked over a flat-top griddle). Outstanding barbecue:

Smoked beef ribs, pulled pork, smoked chicken Sauce: Traditional, Alabama white (vinegar, mustard, horseradish), mustard-based NOLA Gold, the Big Oops (mistaken mash-up between NOLA Gold and Traditional), and a vinegar-based variety Best sides: Four varieties of macaroni and cheese, each served in a small individual skillet with a crisp top and creamy interior; potato salad made with red bliss potatoes and a kick of Creole mustard; grilled corn on the cob Oddball Specialties: “Pork Belly Poppers”; fried ribs (smoked, crusted with Panko crumbs, fried, and tossed in a sweet chili glaze); and a variety of decadent milkshakes including “Cookie Monster” and “Nutella-Resses.” 4141 Bienville St., 488-7427


3


Ugly Dog Saloon Ugly Dog Saloon brought on-site pit smoking to the Warehouse District in 1998 with a signature rub and a solid recipe for coleslaw that remains outstanding today. Today, in addition to pulled pork, ribs, and brisket slow cooked over pecan wood in an urban parking lot and offered as plates and sandwiches, the kitchen uses its barbecue to enhance quesadillas, nachos and more refined dishes like Burnt Ends and Grits, and a Brisket Panini. Outstanding Barbecue: Burnt

ends sandwich; smoked alligator sausage; smoked pulled chicken. Sauce: Traditional, tomato-based. Outstanding Sides: Coleslaw, a

chopped, rather than shredded version, combining a mixture of cabbages in a light creamy dressing with faint kicks of sesame, celery seed, and Creole seasoning. Oddball Specialties:

Smoked, then fried chicken wings served with Buffalo sauce; “Brisket Panini,� a pressed sandwich combining smoked, chopped brisket with grilled red onions, Swiss cheese and chipotle mayo. 401 Andrew Higgins Blvd., 569-8459, theuglydogsaloon.com.

Facing page: Top, left: Ugly Shrimp Po Boy with New Orleans BBQ Sauce. Top, Right: Lafitte Pig Sandwich. Middle: New Orleans Style half rack of ribs served with a biscuit.


4 The Joint A narrow, verdant seating patio is the backdrop for a massive, deeply blacked, chain-driven rig burning oak and pecan at The Joint on Mazant Street in the Bywater. In 2004, Pete and Jenny Breen opened the first incarnation of their barbecue restaurant a few blocks away on Poland Avenue. ¶ Eight years later the Breens moved to a roomier location, which is constantly packed due to top-notch barbecue at reasonable prices, and a popular bar housed in a space that reminds one of a juke joint. ¶ The signature dishes here are also the most popular: Dry rubbed loin back ribs; a smoked tomato and onion dressing (either creamy or vinaigrette) served with a dinner salad and w a choice of smoked meat; sliced brisket, pulled pork, and macaroni and cheese. ¶ The Breens eschew the competition scene. “Our approach has always been low and slow wood smoking of dry rubbed meats with sauce served on the side,” Pete said. “In recent years, we have worked to improve the quality of meats, utilizing antibiotic free, no hormones ever, vegetarian diet beef and chicken and also adding fresh vegetable options into the rotating side options. Other than that we’re just trying to mind our own business and run a comfortable neighborhood restaurant.” Outstanding Barbecue: Dry rubbed loin back ribs; Smoked Chicken Salad with tomato and onion vinaigrette); sliced brisket, pulled pork, smoked pork chaurice. sausage Sauce: Traditional, though light, tomato-based; vinegar-based. Best sides:  Lightly dressed, fresh coleslaw; skin-on red potato salad. Oddball Specialty Items:  Smoked pastrami; smoked tomato and onion vinaigrette; house-made peanut butter, key lime and pecan pies.

701 Mazant St., 949-3232.

L

et's put it out there: To call this traditional barbecue would be a misnomer. Michael Nelson is doing barbecue, sort of, but it is in no way traditional. Everything about this will fall into the “Oddball” category. Michael Nelson started at GW Fins in 2005 as Chef Tenney Flynn's sous chef. Flynn tossed the reins to Nelson in 2016, promoting him to executive chef. Like Flynn, Nelson is a nose-to-tail guy, using all parts of the fish and wasting none. "I think we're finally changing the way people think about fish. And it's fun! I'm having fun," he said. On Nelson's list of double-take dishes are his swordfish "ribs,” culled from the muscles and bones connected to a swordfish’s huge dorsal fin. Good barbecue benefits from low and slow spells on a rig due to their abundance of connective tissues, sinew and collagen. Somehow, Nelson made the connection with the swordfish's dorsal fin and a hog's ribs. " I consider swordfish the pork of the sea," he said. He applies a dry rub, smokes it over hickory, and slathers it with smoked jalapeño butter. The result is a “rack” of bony swordfish that peels apart easily into "ribs" of rich smoky meat. He coats them with a glaze and serves them with Southern sides like smothered greens, maques choux, GW Fins cornbread, and pickled vegetables. He is also developing a following of diners interested in the large primal cuts from other large fish. Like his "ribs" these cuts are dry rubbed, slow smoked on the bone, and slathered with smoked jalapeno butter. Looking for a trippy "barbecue" experience? This is it.

5

Outstanding "Barbecue":

Swordfish “ribs, and other fish steaks. Sauce: Smoked jalapeño butter. Outstanding Sides: Smothered greens, maques choux, cornbread, and pickled vegetables. Oddball Specialty: Everything Nelson "barbecues" is unorthodox but leave room for his coconut sorbet and Salt Malty ice cream pie. " You cannot stop eating this. It's the perfect combination of salt, sugar and umami. It hits every note. You will not be able to stop." He's right. It's evil. 808 Bienville St., 581-3467, gwfins.com


La 23 BBQ Bobby Monsted III, was a fishing guide before he opened a barbecue joint in a tiny building that hugs the Mississippi River levee across the highway from the entrance to the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base in Belle Chasse. Success came quickly, driven largely by patrons from the base across the road. Brett Palermo, an employee of several years, joined Monsted as a partner earlier this year. “Our items in the highest demand almost every day are smoked brisket and smoked barbecue beans,” he said. “We smoke our briskets all night. Our beans are slow cooked with chopped brisket and our beef sausages then finished off in our smokers.” The brisket is tender and flavorful; the oh-so-desirable burnt ends tossed in gratis. The smoked chicken has a lacquered skin that is close to black, with a juicy interior. Other standouts are a cold, mustardy coleslaw made from ribbons of colorful cabbage and carrot; and a well-balanced, creamy potato salad. The macaroni and cheese bears a pleasant, vaguely smoky flavor. It pairs nicely with a beef-based smoked sausage enlivened with jalapeño and cheese. Outstanding Barbecue:

Southern BBQ Plate: Swordfish ribs, collards, cornbread, pickled vegetables at GW Fins.

Sliced brisket, smoked chicken, smoked sausage. Sauces: Vinegar-based, mustard-based, and traditional tomato-based. Outstanding Sides: Slow cooked barbecue beans loaded with chopped brisket and beef sausages then finished off in the smoker; mustardy coleslaw; mac and cheese; and potato salad. Oddball Specialty: Though more convenient than odd, LA 23 offers whole smoked turkeys with dark lacquered skin for both Thanksgiving and Christmas. 9661 Louisiana 23, Belle Chasse, 657-3693, facebook.com/BBQ23.


7

Wego Smokin' BBQ

Outstanding Barbecue:

Hand-sliced beef brisket and familyrecipe smoked sausage. Sauce: Traditional tomato-based. Outstanding Sides: Savory

coleslaw. Oddball Specialty:

Smoked U-15 Gulf Shrimp in a New Orleansstyle barbecue sauce. "We offer them during Lent alongside our traditional meats. People in Westwego take Lent very seriously."

Left: Brisket and sausage plate with sides of pork 'n beans, coleslaw, Texas toast. Right: Pulled pork and ribs plate with sides of mac & cheese, Texas toast and jambalaya.


W

ego Smokin' consists of a small window in a vibrant yellow trailer behind which sits a massive smoke-belching iron barbecue rig that dwarfs the trailer. A most welcome awning over the order-taking window cuts the heat radiating from the crushed stone parking lot, where you will sit in your car awaiting fulfillment of your order. Recently, after such a wait a group of us drove away, our order secured in a series of bags and take-out containers. It was not long before weakness struck and someone grabbed a piece of brisket, took a bite, and passed it around the car. The meat, with a deeply hued char on the outside and a band of the tell-tale ruby hue imparted by a low and slow visit with the smoker, gave way to a tender, flavorful bite that needed no sauce to coax it along.¶ We attacked the remains of the order as we careened across the GNO bridge. As a link of Wego's signature smoked sausage—a family recipe combining brisket, pork, pepper-Jack cheese and a kiss of jalapeno—made its way around the car we became a convention of Bobbleheads, all "Oh, yeeeeeah"s and nodding noggins. It was rich, vaguely spicy, gooey with cheese, and a little greasy—as sausage should be. A forkful of fresh, savory coleslaw balanced by a sauce equally combining vinegar and mayonnaise and

finished with black pepper cut through it all.¶ This month marks a year in the barbecue business for the Matherne family: Timothy and Patricia, Timothy's son Anthony, the company's de facto spokesperson, and nephew, Austin.¶ "It’s been a roller coaster ride from day one, " Anthony said. "More comparable to the rockin' roller coaster at Disney World with Aerosmith blaring in our ears. My father came up with the idea on a whim.”.¶ The family spent six months at the kitchen table laboring over rubs and recipes. They tapped Anthony's cousin Austin, a former short order cook, to work as pitmaster. He cooks over a mixture of pecan and oak.¶ "We busted our butts and our finished product is Wego Smokin BBQ," Anthony said. "We haven’t all seen eye to eye, but through compromise we have all grown closer. We take no shortcuts and every single thing is made fresh every day. Barbecue is a funny business. There’s nothing easy about it. It intimidates people. A lot can go wrong at any given moment."¶ In recognition of their one year anniversary, the Mathernes plan to add seating, a second stationary smoker will follow within a few months, and a small, mobile unit for use at fairs and festivals will follow in a couple of years.¶ WeGo Smokin BBQ, 974 Avenue C (at Westbank Expressway), 346-2609


McClure's Barbecue

N

eil McClure grew up cooking whole hogs for family gatherings, and developed a passion for the pit immediately after Katrina when he was feeding first responders with a volunteer operation in Gulfport. A veteran of various New Orleans restaurant kitchens dating back to the early 1990s, he started a barbecue pop-up at the now closed Dante's Kitchen in the fall of 2011. McClure and his wife Abby Lorenz McClure opened their eponymous barbecue restaurant on Magazine Street in 2013 to an enthusiastic welcome from just about everyone. The exception: a few people from the neighborhood who were distressed to find their upholstery and draperies emitting the aroma of smoked meat rather than, presumably, their preferred soothing aromatherapy products. A tussle ensued and the McClures decamped to a new home inside the Nola Brewing Tap Room on Tchoupitoulas Street, where a wall of taps, a wooden bar and a dark pressed tin ceiling lend a fitting backdrop to McClure's hearty fare, most of which is cooked low and slow over a mix of pecan, oak, and cherry. McClure's house rub leans to the savory side, imparting a deep umami that reacts pleasantly with wood smoke. Here, ribs are hefty, St. Louis style and fall-from-the-bone tender. Pulled pork is smoky and flavorful without devolving into an overly-rich greasy puddle. The pork is an ideal counterpoint to silken, melted collard greens that swim in just the right amount of pot liquor. It should be noted the barbecue was not Neil McClure's first passion, which is reserved for fried chicken, and you will find that here, too. It is offered in several varieties: Original buttermilk, pepper jelly, with Alabama white sauce, and “Fire Chicken.”

Outstanding Barbecue: Ribs, pulled pork, whole hog, all sandwiches. Sauce: mayo-based Alabama, South Carolina (rosemary and mustard-based), sweet Kansas City, tomato-based Texas, NOLA East (hoisin and soy sauce); North Carolina (honey and vinegar-based). Outstanding Sides: Vinegar-based coleslaw; barbeque beans loaded with pulled pork; silken collard greens; white remoulade potato salad; Jambalaya loaded down with barbecued pork. Oddball Specialty: Fried chicken offered in four styles; smoked, then fried Asian wings, boudin balls.

3001 Tchoupitoulas St., 301-2367.

8


Jumbo Chicken Wings in Asian Sauce at McClure's Barbecue

Drink Up!

While cold beer is a natural beverage buddy with barbecue (we love Urban South’s Paradise Park), for a sophisticated take, try serving chilled Cava or Prosecco. Or serve up this year’s most fashionable cocktail, the Aperol Spritz, for a fresh take.

Walker's is open, more or less, from Wednesday through Saturday, unless there is a food festival somewhere, in which case you are out of luck. If they are open, you will crowd into a small vestibule with other hungry patrons, place your order at a window, and probably return to your car to wait. Despite the utilitarian nature of the place there is a decided elegance to Walker's food. The cochon de lait poor boy lives up to its considerable hype with hefty chunks of meat pulled from whole suckling pigs roasted for 12-hours, a light dress of gravy, and coleslaw spiked with Creole mustard on Leidenheimer bread. Greens are silken and flavorful, not runny. The potato salad, coleslaw, and smoked chicken are light on dressings, relying instead on vibrant fresh herbs and thinly sliced scallions for bright flavors. The slaw is bound with Wertie sauce, a bracing house concoction that brings Creole mustard into a blend that rides the line between creamy and vinegary. Both the potato and smoked chicken salads are enriched with hard-boiled eggs passed through a fine sieve. The later could easily be morphed into a fine hors d'oeuvres in a tonier setting. Home entertainers should take note.

9

Walker's Southern Style BBQ

The Walker family started Love at First Bite in 1992 as a roving catering business servicing food festivals throughout the U.S. In 2001, they introduced their smoked cochon de lait poboy at Jazz Fest and an enduring cult classic was born. The family opened their brick and mortar shop in 2004. The Walker's son, Jonathan, a classically trained chef, now oversees operation of the kitchen and the hickory and pecan-burning pits.

Outstanding Barbecue: Cochon de lait poboy, smoked chicken salad, massive pork spare ribs, smoked chicken wings. Sauce: Traditional, sweet tomato-based; and Wertie, a light Creole mustard sauced used on the coleslaw that also slays it on the smoked wings. Outstanding Sides: Silken greens; potato salad and coleslaw, both with herbs. Oddball Specialties: Smoked pork belly bites; macaroni and cheese loaded with smoked beef brisket.

10828 Hayne Blvd., 241-8227, cochondelaitpoboys.com.


O

pened in January 2016 as New Orleans' most comprehensive barbecue operation, the Central City BBQ campus sprawls over a full city block, often pressed into service as a location for community gatherings and festivals in addition to serving as a sensational barbecue destination. "Central City became a reality as a result of decades of friendship between myself and (chef) Aaron Burgau, of Restaurant Patois," said managing partner Marc Bonifacic. "I am a third-generation barbecue restaurant owner—my grandfather operated a family-owned barbecue shop in Chicago. I have to give credit to Aaron for really bringing this concept together." In addition to Bonifacic, the core team at Central City includes partner and consulting chef Burgau; Donna Tran, general manager and sometimes chef; and Pitmaster James Cruse, who joined the company last December. The signature dishes here are also their most outstanding: succulent, juicy prime brisket burnt ends served up as either a sandwich or a plate, and meltingly tender ribs, which have garnered a near-cult following since Cruse's team, the Bluff City Smokers, placed third in the world this year in the “Ribs� category at the BBQ World Championship, this past May in Memphis. Cruse's star seems hitched to a place of near-permanent ascendancy: He has carried the mantel of Grand Champion of Hogs for the Cause for the past three of five years. Bonifacic says the Crescent City's exclusive use of Louisiana oak in its collection of smokers, a willingness to use expensive prime brisket, and Cruse's ability to translate his hard-won championship barbecue techniques into restaurant cooking are at the crux of Crescent City's success. 1201 S. Rampart St., 558-4276, centralcitybbq.com.

10 Central City BBQ


Outstanding Barbecue:

Ribs, burnt brisket ends. Sauce: Vinegar-based; Alabama-style white, and traditional tomato-based. Outstanding Sides: Sweet, buttery spoonbread; creamy mac and cheese topped with crisp, smoked bacon; crisp Brussels sprouts, and house pickles. Oddball Specialty: Brisket Bombschopped brisket, smoked jalapeĂąos, smoked poblano peppers, and cheese fried up and served with house-made smoked jalapeno ranch.

Facing page: Brisket burnt ends. Top: Combo plate (Brisket burnt ends, ribs, umami pickles, sliced onions, white bread, mac and cheese topped with bacon, Creole slaw. Left: Sweet corn spoonbread Bottom: Crispy Brussels sprouts.


Top Lawyers M

ost people hope not to need them, but when they do, they want the good ones on their side. To help with that we present our annual list of Top Lawyers. The list was prepared by Detroit-based Professional Research Services. PRS provided this explanation of its methodology: The voting was open to all licensed attorneys in New Orleans. They were asked which attorney, other than themselves, they would recommend in the New Orleans area. Each attorney was allowed to recommend up to three colleagues in each given legal specialty. Once the online nominations were complete, each nominee was carefully evaluated on the basis of the survey results, the legitimacy of their license and their current standing with the State Bar Association of Louisiana. Attorneys who received the highest number of votes in each specialty are reflected in the following list. As always when making professional services choices, second opinions are encouraged. In the end, you’re the judge.

5 8 november 2019 myneworleans.com


Administrative/ Regulatory Law Metairie

Adam M. Stumpf Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5251

David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4137

New Orleans

Gregory Ernst The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-322-1368

Georges M. Legrand Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8490

Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0816

S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4122

Kevin A. Marks Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2432

Adelaida J. Ferchmin Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7083

André J. Mouledoux Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8480

Admiralty & Maritime Law New Orleans

Wilton E. Bland III Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8470 Alan G. Brackett Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8450 Philip S. Brooks Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-585-7648

Delos E. Flint Jr. Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Thomas D. Forbes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7041 Glenn G. Goodier Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8174

David L. Carrigee Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900

A. Gordon Grant Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-585-7681

Bert. M. Cass Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0643

Paul D. Hale Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0715

Robert C. Clotworthy Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8676

Christopher Hannan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8612

Stanley J. Cohn Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Scott R. Huete Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2439

Katharine R. Colletta Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7708 Alan R. Davis Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7088

Grady S. Hurley Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8224 R. Keith Jarrett Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4133

Kelly T. Scalise Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6110 William B. Schwartz Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 David B. Sharpe Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Daniel A. Tadros Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7054 Charles R. Talley Kean Miller LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-585-3046 Miles C. Thomas Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Jefferson R. Tillery Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8616 Jason P. Waguespack Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith 701 Poydras St. Floor 40 504-525-6802 Raymond T. Waid Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000

504-556-4042

David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Derek A. Walker Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7044

Robert S. Rooth Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7226

Brian D. Wallace Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9204 Cheryl Wild-Donde’Ville Waltzer Wiygul & Garside, LLC 14399 Chef Menteur Hwy. Suite D 504-254-4400

H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Floor 30 504-569-2908 Antitrust Law

Brett D. Wise Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4124

New Orleans

Mark R Beebe Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0436

Alternate Dispute Resolution Gretna

Sarah Pfeiffer Law Office of Sarah Pfeiffer 920 5th St. 504-366-4025 Mandeville Danny G Shaw ShawADR, LLC 3 Sanctuary Blvd. Suite 201 985-789-0701

Craig L. Caesar Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8616 Mark A. Cunningham Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8536

Metairie

Daniel E. Buras Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Patrick R. Follette Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4281 Zachary R. Smith Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5222 Alexander M. McIntyre Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5215 David G. Radlauer Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8210 Appellate Practice Chalmette

Bruce C. Dean Dean Law Firm LLC PO Box 127 504-202-7272 Covington

New Orleans Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0822 S. Gene Fendler Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4122

Lieu T. Vo Clark Law Office of Lieu T. Vo Clark 810 N. Columbia Suite A 985-238-1100 Metairie

Daniel E. Buras Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 myneworleans.com november 2019 5 9


Inemesit U. O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4291 Meghan E. Ruckman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Matthew A. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504 -830-4130 New Orleans

Kelly Brechtel Becker Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4067 Jennifer C. Deasy Jennifer C. Deasy, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300 Thomas M. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 504-569-0064 Michael R. Fontham Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0810 James M. Garner Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2102 Catherine Giarrusso Pipes Miles Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1800 504-322-7070 John Jerry Glas Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0627 Kathryn Gonski Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4029 Douglas L. Grundmeyer Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7028 Harry Simms Hardin III Jones Walker LLP

201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8170

504-962-4282

Gene W. Lafitte Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4135

Lee R. Adler Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9351

Joseph L. McReynolds Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0606

Edward H. Arnold III Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5204

New Orleans

Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4143 Thomas P. Owen Jr. Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Katie Seegers Roth Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4167 Leigh Ann Schell Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0489 Martin A. Stern Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0289 Raymond P. Ward Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0339 Jon W. Wise Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7549 Banking and Finance Law Metairie

Stephen D. Marx Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 George A. Mueller III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100

6 0 november 2019 myneworleans.com

William “Blake” Bennett Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4113 G. Wogan Bernard Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7289 Joseph P. Briggett Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Lauren E. Campisi McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2761 Ryan T. Christiansen Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4136 Philip deV. Claverie Sr. Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9223 E. Howell Crosby Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7212 Barry H. Grodsky Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8535

My toughest case

Making A New Life

Nadège Assalé Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea

T

he twin prospects of earning a decent living and acquiring skills that can “really make a difference in someone’s life” appealed to attorney Nadège Assalé, a native of Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa. She emigrated to the United States at age 18 to attend the University of Oklahoma, where she studied energy management and finance. Then she began working for Shell, supporting her family in her hometown while also attending night classes at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law. She initially worked in business as a contracts and joint ventures representative for some of Shell’s offshore assets, before moving into more of a commercial advisor role in divestment projects. Now she primarily works in oil, gas and energy transactions and regulations for Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea, a private practice. While working in the field of law undoubtedly presents unique challenges, Assalé said her toughest, ongoing case was leaving her home country, alone, as a teenager to make a life here to learn new customs and a new language. She only spoke French when she arrived, but says that through a good dose of humility, resolve, curiosity and optimism — along with discipline and “a heap of good luck” she was able to learn — and is still learning — to speak English. She says her strongest mentors along the way have been her father, her school director and professors, former bosses and lots of friends. She said the African proverb “It takes a village to raise a child” is apropos for her life and career in New Orleans. “Therein lies my responsibility to pay it forward,” she said. “Luckily the legal field is one that is replete with opportunities to do just that through the clients we help, our involvement in the community through pro bono work and the families we support.” – Sarah Ravits

William H. Langenstein III Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7037 Leon J. “Trey” Reymond III Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4028

Undergraduate: University of Oklahoma Law School: Loyola University New Orleans College of Law Year Graduated: 2008

Michael S. Ricci Ricci Partners, LLC photograph by craig mulcahy


101 W. Robert E. Lee Blvd. Suite 400 504-304-7115 Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2101 James A. Stuckey Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9239 Susan G. Talley Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0828 Frank A. Tessier Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3809 Robert P. Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3810 Susan M. Tyler Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8298 Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights/Insolvency and Reorganization Law Covington

Rachel T. Anderson The Law Office of Rachel T. Anderson, LLC 428 W. 21st Ave. 985-377-9271 Metairie

Frank DiVittorio Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans

Edward H. Arnold III Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5204 Alicia M. Bendana Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Christopher T. Caplinger Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Jonathan R. DeTrinis DeT Law Firm, LLC 4000 Bienville St. Suite C-1 504-722-9711 Douglas S. Draper Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3333 John M. Duck Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0226 J. David Forsyth Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1521 Elizabeth J. Futrell Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8260 Mark S. Goldstein Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Alan Goodman Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5465 Meredith S. Grabill Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Barry H. Grodsky Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8535 Jan M. Hayden Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8645 Philip K. “Kirk” Jones Jr. Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4132 Benjamin W. Kadden Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck,

6 2 november 2019 myneworleans.com

Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Omer F. “Rick” Kuebel III Locke Lord, LLP 601 Poydras St. Suite 2660 504-558-5155 Fernand L. Laudumiey IV Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7052 Tristan E. Manthey Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3314 Richard W. Martinez Richard W. Martinez APLC 3500 N. Hullen St. 504-525-3343 Carey L. Menasco Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4171 David J. Messina Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7055 Cherie Dessauer Nobles Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3318 Dena L. Olivier Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4144 William H. Patrick III Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3345 Stewart F. Peck Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

My toughest case

Arguing the Defense in Death Penalty Trials

Dane S. Ciolino A. R. Christovich Distinguished Professor of Law at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

I

t’s one thing to fight over money; another to fight over life or death. Dane S. Ciolino has done both – and much more. After working on Wall Street for a major firm at the beginning of his career, he returned to his hometown of New Orleans and began teaching at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law 25 years ago as the A. R. Christovich Distinguished Professor of Law. He teaches aspiring attorneys professional responsibility, evidence, advocacy and criminal law.  “I always wanted to be a university professor, and as it turned out, law is what I’m suited to teach,” he said. Ciolino has practiced in many areas, ranging from intellectual property to criminal law. He has also handled disciplinary matters before the Louisiana Supreme Court, the Louisiana Attorney Disciplinary Board and the Louisiana Judiciary Commission. For the past decade, Ciolino has remained focused on teaching and representing lawyers and and judges in various disciplinary, civil and criminal matters. “Basically I’m a lawyer’s lawyer,” he said. When reflecting upon the toughest cases of his career, Ciolino referred to three federal death penalty matters that he handled as a defense attorney. Challenges included grappling with emotions, including “the deep sympathy for the victims of murder and the even deeper antipathy toward their killers,” he said. It taught him that these cases “have little to do with law and almost everything to do with emotion.” The result of his fortitude as a lawyer? “No one has died on my watch.”– Sarah Ravits

R. Patrick Vance Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8194 Stephen L. Williamson Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-585-7698

Undergraduate: Rhodes College Law School: Tulane Law School Year Graduated: 1988

photograph by craig mulcahy


Bet-the-Company Litigations Metairie

Fred L. Herman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 George B. Recile Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans

Bernard J. Bagert The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-322-1368 Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-589-9720 Roy C. Cheatwood Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5266 Nancy S. Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5249 Ewell E. (Tim) Eagan Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-582-1115 Kent Lambert Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5252 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7241 Phillip A. Wittmann Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0804

Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8669 David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0920 Commercial Litigation Metairie

Matthew A. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans

Nancy S. Degan Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5249 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4148 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3340 Michael C. Mims Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6136 Kerry Murphy Lasky Murphy LLC 715 Girod St. Suite 250 504-603-1502 Richard G. Passler Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5440 Richard C. Stanley Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 Taylor C. Stone The Law Office of Taylor C. Stone, LLC 4130 Canal St. 504-717-4874

Biotechnology Law New Orleans

Paula J. Estrada de Martin Baker, Donelson, Bearman,

Commercial Transactions/ LLS Law

6 4 november 2019 myneworleans.com

Metairie

Adam M. Stumpf Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

My toughest case

A Lifetime of Patent Scrutiny

New Orleans

Brian Cowan Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6303 Natalie Taylor Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6315 Construction Law Metairie

Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4284 New Orleans

Keith J. Bergeron Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0789 Michael E. Botnick Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-679-9814 Terrence L. Brennan Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0605

Paula Estrada de Martin, PhD Baker Donelson Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz

P

aula Estrada de Martin is a life sciences and biotechnology patent attorney. The California native worked in New York for 10 years after obtaining her PhD from Yale University; then she relocated to New Orleans. Originally, she planned on attending medical school before deciding to pursue research and academia instead. From there, she pivoted to legal studies. As a life sciences patent law attorney, she helps obtain patents, which can present challenges, as there is intense scrutiny from patent examiners. Estrada de Martin’s focus is on both domestic and foreign patent prosecution for life science, biotechnology and plant fields, patent interferences, portfolio management, patentability assessment, non-infringement and invalidity opinions, and litigation to support life sciences and plant matters, among others. Estrada de Martin also advises public and private entities across the life sciences and biotechnology fields. On the fun side she is active in Carnival, participating in the MuffA-Lottas dance troupe and the Krewe of Nyx. – Sarah Ravits

Adrian A. D’Arcy Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445 Mark W. Frilot Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 985-819-8417 Elizabeth L. Gordon Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445 Shannon Skelton Holtzman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4148

Undergraduate & Master’s Degree: California State University-San Bernardino PhD: Yale University Law School: New York Law School Year Graduated: 2010

photograph by craig mulcahy


Michael Kurtz Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5259 John M. Landis Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0819 Christopher K. LeMieux Riess LeMieux 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1100 504-619-6190 Gerald A. Melchiode Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2970 Mark W. Mercante Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 985-819-8410

504-582-8266 Corporate Governance and Complaints Law Metairie

Jennifer A. Lee Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4110 Corporate Law Metairie

Lawrence E. Chehardy Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-2141 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0836 Richard P. Wolfe Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8182 Criminal Defense Non White-Collar Covington

Lieu T. Vo Clark Law Office of Lieu T. Vo Clark 810 N. Columbia Suite A 985-238-1100 Madisonville

Keith M. Couture Couture Law, LLC 337 Highway 21 Suite D 985-792-7746

New Orleans

Metairie

Jeffrey K. Prattini Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445

Keith M. Benit Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7582

Louis A. DiRosa Jr. The Law Offices of Frank D’Amico, Jr. APLC 4608 Rye St. 504-525-7272

Denise C. Puente Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Floor 30 504-569-2983

Shawn M. BridgewaterNormand Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7281

John Garrison Jordan Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Bryan C. Reuter Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580

Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0845

Lloyd N. “Sonny” Shields Shields Mott LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-581-4445

Abid Hussain Hussain Law LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 888-789-7250

H. Bruce Shreves Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1100 Poydras St. Floor 30 504-569-2908

Michael D. Landry Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0852

John W. Sinnott Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2116

Keith Naccari Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1876

Kelly E. Theard Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0667

J. Marshall Page III Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8248

Richard J. Tyler Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave.

Clayton J. White Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC

6 6 november 2019 myneworleans.com

New Orleans

Carolyn Cooper King and Cooper Law, LLC 829 Baronne St. Suite 200 504-581-9322 Frank G. DeSalvo Jr. Attorney at Law 739 Baronne St. 504-524-4191 Cody C. Loggins The Bagert Law Firm 650 Poydras St. Suite 2708 504-523-1117 George McGregor Jr. Burgos and Associates, LLC 3535 Canal St. Suite 200 504-321-6652 Craig Mordock Mordock Barber, LLC 7611 Maple St. Suite A3 504-342-2154 Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St.

Suite 3150 504-593-0811

504-680-6052

Ralph S. Whalen Jr Attorney at Law 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 504-525-1600

Peter M. Thomson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0811

Timothy T. Yazbeck Smith & Fawer, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3702 504-525-2200

Sean Toomey Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4118

Criminal Defense White Collar

Metairie

New Orleans

Walter F. Becker Jr. Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7046 Brian J. Capitelli Capitelli and Wicker Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 504-582-2425 Ralph Capitelli Capitelli and Wicker Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2950 504-582-2425 Edward J. Castaing Jr. Crull, Castaing & Lilly 601 Poydras St. Suite 2323 504-581-7700 Matthew S. Chester Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5231 Samantha P. Griffin Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0808 Pauline F. Hardin Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8110 Sara A. Johnson Sara A. Johnson Law 700 Camp St. 504-528-9500 Michael W. Magner Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8316 Avery B. Pardee Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8358 Kyle Schonekas Schonekas, Evans, McGoey & McEachin L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 1600

Elder Law Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Elsbet C. Smith Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans

Joel A. Mendler Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7885 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1519 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7854 Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law Metairie

Barry W. Sartin Jr. Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504- 962-4286 New Orleans John M. Wilson Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4160 Employee Benefits Law New Orleans

Jane E. Armstrong Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9244


Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000

Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0831

Timothy P. Brechtel Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8236

Ewell E. (Tim) Eagan Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-582-1115

H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7271 Susan K. Chambers Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8394

C. Peck Hayne Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-569-1858

Katherine Conklin McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2876

Aimee W. Hebert Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP 400 Poydras St. Suite 1812 504-522-1812

Edward F. Harold Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 504-592-3801

Harry R. Holladay Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7518

Robert W. Rachal Jackson Lewis P.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 1900 504-208-5847

Kenneth Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5258

Charles F. Seemann III Jackson Lewis P.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 1900 504-208-5843 Randye C. Snyder Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4033 René E. Thorne Jackson Lewis P.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 1900 504-208-1755 Michael S. Williams Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4093 Energy Law New Orleans

Nadège Assalé Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6125 Miles P. Clements Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9247

Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4156 Charles D. Marshall Jr. Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000 Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4052 Cynthia A. Nicholson Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-569-1658 Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4143 Dana M. Shelton Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0816

Matthew D. Simone Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4191 Paul L. Zimmering Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0818 Adam Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5210

Robert C. Lowe Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Kathleen S. Plemer Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7222 Robert P. Thibeaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3810 Family Law

Metairie

John D. “Dan” Miranda Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Peggy G. Vallejo Vallejo & Karr Law Firm 428 W. 21st Ave. 985-892-6855 Gretna

Sarah Pfeiffer Law Office of Sarah Pfeiffer 920 5th St. 504-366-4025

New Orleans

Louis E. Buatt Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4082 Daria Burgess Diaz Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0858 Greg L. Johnson Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4115 David M. Melancon Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2117 David W. O’Quinn Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2111 E. Blair Schilling Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-556-5533 Stephen W. Wiegand Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4192 Equipment Finance Law New Orleans

Nathan P. Horner Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard

Edith H. Morris Morris Lee & Bayle, LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1420 504-524-3781 Kim Ngan Nguyen Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Covington

Environmental Law

Elizabeth S. Meneray Meneray Family Law, L.L.C. 710 Carondelet St. 504-581-4334

David M. Prados Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Metairie

Jesse P. Lagarde Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4294 New Orleans

Suzanne Ecuyer Bayle Morris Lee & Bayle, LLC 1515 Poydras St. Suite 1420 504-524-3781 Giacomo Castrogiovanni Orleans Legal LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 840 504-516-2873 Jennifer J. Greene Scott, Vicknair, Hair & Checki, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1100 504-684-5200 Jeffrey M. Hoffman Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

Andrea L. Rubin Delaney, Robb & Rubin 3826 Canal St. 504-267-9700 Lacy M. Smith The Law Office of Lacy M. Smith, LLC 1820 St. Charles Ave. Suite 203 504-249-8242 Suzette Marie Smith Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Brooke C. Tigchelaar Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0862 Marc Winsberg Winsberg & Arnold, LLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2050 504-229-4999 Barbara J. Ziv Barbara J. Ziv, LLC 701 Poydras St. Suite 4100 504-525-4361

Mitchell J. Hoffman Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

First Amendment Law New Orleans

Steven J. Lane Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892

Lori G. Mince Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5273

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Scott Sternberg Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1887 Jack M. Weiss Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-581-7979 Gaming Law New Orleans

Thomas Benjamin Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5464 J. Kelly Duncan Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8218

Bryant S. York Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0803 Health Care Law

Suite 3600 504-566-5226

Suite 2500 504-299-3301

Suite 2000 504-584-9234

Peter E. Sperling Frilot L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3700 504-599-8015

Judy Y. Barrasso Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-589-9720

Douglas R. Holmes Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7263

Metairie

R. Christopher “Chris” Martin Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4293 Conrad Meyer Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4141

Perry R. Staub Jr. Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8513 Danielle Trostorff Degan, Blanchard & Nash 400 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-529-3333 Amy M. Winters Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8390 Immigration Law

Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0915

David R. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4110

Brian D. Wallace Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9204

New Orleans

New Orleans

Katy Caraway Caraway Leblanc, LLC 3936 Bienville St. 504-566-1912

Brandon Davis Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9312

General Service Law Metairie

Sarah J.L. Christakis Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4294 Anya Jones Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Elsbet C. Smith Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Government Relations Practice New Orleans

Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5201 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0420

Donna D. Fraiche Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5201 Monica A. Frois Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8615 A. J. Herbert III Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8514

Metairie

Elaine D. Kimbrell Ware Immigration 3850 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 555 504-830-5900

Kathleen Gasparian Gasparian Spivey Immigration 829 Baronne St. 504-262-9878 Rachael Jeanfreau Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5467 Leah Spivey Gasparian Spivey Immigration 829 Baronne St. 504-262-9878 Insurance Law

Kristin Beckman Pipes Miles Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1800 504-322-7070 Max J. Cohen Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Martha Y. Curtis Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2111 Sidney W. Degan III Degan, Blanchard & Nash 400 Poydras St. Suite 2600 504-529-3333 Richard N. Dicharry Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9232 Céleste D. Elliott Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Leah Nunn Engelhardt Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7081 Madeleine Fischer Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8208

Richard E. King Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2435 Wayne J. Lee Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0814 H. Minor Pipes, III Pipes Miles Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1800 504-322-7070 Stephen Miles Pipes Miles Beckman, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1800 504-322-7070 Marshall M. Redmon Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9208 Seth A. Schmeeckle Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Shaundra M. Schudmak Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Jay Sever Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9271

Metairie

Rene A. Louapre IV Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6306 Joseph J. Lowenthal Jr. Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8240 E. Paige Sensenbrenner Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0420 Margaret Silverstein Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave.

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Preston L. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4284 Zachary Smith Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Harold J. Flanagan Flanagan Partners LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2405 504-569-0062 Gus A. Fritchie III Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2106

New Orleans

Covert J. Geary Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8276

Drew Ballina Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St.

George B. Hall Jr. Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St.

William D. Treeby Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0807 Steven W. Usdin Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-589-9721 Edward “Drew” Voelker Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2932


myneworleans.com november 2019 6 9


Kristopher T. Wilson Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Matthew A. Woolf Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5262 Intellectual Property Law Metairie

Taylor M. Norton Norton IP Law Firm 345 Metairie Rd. 504-858-0198 New Orleans

Raymond G. Areaux Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3803 William P. Buckley Buckley Law Firm, L.L.C. 3723 Canal St. 504-323-5868 Stephen G. Bullock Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0822 Brad Harrigan Tolar Harrigan and Morris LLC 1055 St. Charles Ave. Suite 208A 504-571-5317 Lesli D. Harris Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP 400 Poydras St. Suite 1812 504-434-6727 Benjamin West Janke Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8607 Mary Ellen Roy Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9254 Michael Q. Walshe Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0881 International Arbitration New Orleans

Christopher O. Davis Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC

201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5251 Andrew T. Lilly Andrew T. Lilly, Attorney at Law 4907 Magazine St. 504-249-8670 Benjamin D. Reichard Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5274 Daniel A. Tadros Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7054 Labor and Employment Law Mandeville

Kevin S. Vogeltanz The Law Office of Kevin S. Vogeltanz, LLC 823 Carroll St. Suite A 985-377-9033 New Orleans

M. Nan Alessandra Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9297 Michael R. Allweiss Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 Stephen P. Beiser McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2756 Magdalen Blessey Bickford McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2726 Kim M. Boyle Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-679-5790 H. Michael Bush Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7271 Laura Lanier Catlett Catlett Law 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-521-7958 Walter W. Christy Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 504-529-3831

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Donna Phillips Currault Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-569-1862 Steven F. Griffith Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5225 Edward F. Harold Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3710 504-592-3801 Clyde H Jacob III Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave Suite 3710 504-312-4424 Rachael Jeanfreau Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5467 Kathryn M. Knight Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0915 Amelia Williams Koch Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5222 Frederic Theodore “Ted” Le Clercq Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504 593 0647 Sidney F. Lewis V Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8352 Julie D. Livaudais Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7007

Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2109

Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2104

Thomas J. “Tommy” McGoey II Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6101

Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0835

Ellis B. Murov Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0655

Philip B. Sherman Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-581-3234

Sarah Voorhies Myers Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7009 Kathlyn Perez Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8672 E. Fredrick Preis Jr. Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5470 Timothy H. Scott Fisher & Phillips, LLP 201 St. Charles Ave Suite 3710 504-529-3834‬ Howard Shapiro Proskauer Rose, LLP 650 Poydras St. Suite 1800 504-310-4085 Erin Wedge Latuso Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2100 504-799-4359 Rachel Wendt Wisdom Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0911 Land Use and Zoning Law

Melanie C. Lockett Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160

James L. Breaux Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4027

Eve B. Masinter Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5468

Jon F. Leyens Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8628

Richard E. McCormack Irwin Fritchie Urquhart &

Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter

New Orleans

Legal Malpractice Law New Orleans

James A. Brown Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4116 Gus A. Fritchie III Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2106 Melissa M. Lessell Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0689 Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0602 Carey L. Menasco Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4171 Lisa A. Montgomery The Montgomery Law Firm 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-267-9401 C. Lawrence Orlansky Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0842 William M. Ross Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-523-1580 John A. Stewart Jr. Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 Edward W. Trapolin Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700


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504-310-2115 William E. Wright Jr. Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0623 Mass Tort Litigation/ Class Actions Metairie

James M. Williams Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504 962-4287 New Orleans

Charles H. Abbott Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2100 504-565-7555 Neil C. Abramson Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4009 Betsy Barnes Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-599-3234 Dawn Barrios Barrios, Kingsdorf & Casteix, L.L.P. 701 Poydras St. Suite 3650 504-524-3300 Lawrence J. Centola Jr. Martzell, Bickford & Centola 338 Lafayette St. 504-581-9065 Celeste Coco-Ewing Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-589-9762 John Enochs Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-599-3368 Darryl J. Foster Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6304 Tim Gray Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 2100 504-799-4386 James C. Gulotta Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0817

Russ M. Herman Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892

Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

James Klick Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892

Stephen Herman Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892 Warren Horn Heller, Draper, Patrick, Horn & Manthey, L.L.C. 650 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-299-3340

Jeffrey A. Mitchell The Cochran Firm Metairie L.L.C. 3850 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite 1500 504-309-5000

Michael C. Luquet Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5441

Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

Tracey Rannals Rannals Law 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-500-0517

Anthony D. Irpino Irpino Law Firm 2216 Magazine St. 504-525-1500 Gerald E. Meunier Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Kerry J. Miller Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5252 Michael C. Mims Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6136 Douglas J. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2163 Stephen G.A. Myers Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2114 Richard Root Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-526-1135 Richard Sarver Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-589-9733 Charles B. Wilmore Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6113 Medical Malpractice Law Metairie

Rebecca J. Beck Chehardy, Sherman, Williams,

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New Orleans

Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates, PLC 4173 Canal St. 504-618-1596 Benjamin Biller Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6120 C. William Bradley Jr. Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6302 Richard Crisler Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6308 Robert J. David Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Crystal Domreis Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6313 Michael J. Ecuyer Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-522-2304 Monica A. Frois Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8615 Charles F. Gay Jr. Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0295

Kara Hadican Samuels Kara Hadican Samuels & Associates, L.L.C. 4004 Canal St. 504-558-9478 Peter E. Sperling Frilot L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3700 504-599-8015 Lydia Habliston Toso Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. 909 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-584-5461 Mergers and Acquisitions Law New Orleans Joseph L. Caverly Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0845 Louis Y. Fishman Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5250 Mark A. Fullmer Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9324 Edward George Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7253 Curtis R. Hearn Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8308 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8386 Leon J. “Trey” Reymond III Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4028

David C. Rieveschl Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0920 Scott T. Whittaker Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0836 Karl J. Zimmermann Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900 Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law Metairie

Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans

John T. Balhoff II Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2121 J. Dalton Courson Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0812 Katie Lynn Dysart Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8611 William T. Finn Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux L.L.C. 1100 Poydras St. Suite 3100 504-585-3808 Municipal Law Metairie

Inemesit U. O’Boyle Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4291 New Orleans

William D. Aaron Jr. Aaron & Gianna, PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3800 504-569-1807 Mark E. Hanna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand &


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Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-595-3000 Jamie F. Jacks Plauché Maselli Parkerson LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3800 504-322-2043 David A. Marcello Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2136

Floor 36 504-569-2900 Leon H. Rittenberg III Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-78455 Michael S. Williams Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4093 Oil and Gas Law New Orleans

Natural Resources Law New Orleans

Noel J. Darce Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0831 John P. Farnsworth Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0855 C. Peck Hayne Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-569-1858 Kenneth Klemm Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5258 John Y. Pearce Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-585-7674 Non-Profit/ Charities Law Metairie

Ryan P. Monsour Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-962-4230 New Orleans

Erin E. Kriksciun Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0975 Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St.

C. Peck Hayne Jr. Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-569-1858 Colleen C. Jarrott Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8664 Justin P. Lemaire Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0942 Charles D. Marshall Jr. Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000 Robert B. McNeal Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4052 James R. Morton Taggart Morton, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2100 504-599-8507 Cynthia A. Nicholson Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-569-1658 Joe B. Norman Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4143 Scott A. O’Connor Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4000 504-569-1860

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Edward B. Poitevent II Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0889 Natalie Taylor Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6315 Adam Zuckerman Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5210 On air Media Legal Analyst New Orleans

Dane S. Ciolino Loyola College of Law 526 Pine St. 504-975-3263 Personal Injury Litigation Covington

Peggy G. Vallejo Vallejo & Karr Law Firm 428 W. 21st Ave. 985-892-6855 Kenner

Stephen R. Rue Stephen Rue & Associates 3309 Williams Blvd. 504-517-8395 Metairie

Tommy J. Badeaux The Law Offices of Frank D’Amico, Jr. APLC 4608 Rye St. 504-525-7272 Louis A. DiRosa Jr. The Law Offices of Frank D’Amico, Jr. APLC 4608 Rye St. 504-525-7272 Jeffrey S. Gennusa Gennusa Firm, L.L.C. 3001 Division St. Suite 207 504-308-0301 Megan C. Kiefer Kiefer & Kiefer 2310 Metairie Rd. 504-828-3313 Matthew A. Sherman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504 -830-4130 New Orleans

Morris Bart Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 800-205-7284

Allan Berger Allan Berger & Associates, PLC 4173 Canal St. 504-618-1597 Lawrence J. Centola Jr. Martzell, Bickford & Centola 338 Lafayette St. 504-581-9065 Justin McCarthy Chopin Arguello Hope & Associates, PLLC 650 Poydras St. Suite 2010 504-684-2997 John Mark Fezio The Voorhies Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2810 504-303-8300 Michael Finkelstein Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-881-1906 Jonathan P. Friedman Silbert, Pitre & Friedman 909 Poydras St. Suite 2130 504-581-6200 Andrew J. Geiger Allan Berger & Associates, PLC 4173 Canal St. 504-618-1598 Mark P. Glago Glago Law Firm, LLC 909 Poydras St. Floor 29 504-500-2020 Matthew Hemmer Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-599-3339 Darleen M. Jacobs Jacobs, Sarrat, Lovelace, Harris & Matthews 823 St. Louis St. 504-522-0155 Brian Katz Herman, Herman & Katz, L.L.C. 820 O’Keefe Ave. 504-581-4892 J. Bart Kelly III Alvendia, Kelly & Demarest, LLC 909 Poydras St. Suite 1625 504-618-1601

504 593 0697 Glenn Lieberman Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-599-3225 Terry Loup Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-525-8000 Robert Manard Manard Law Firm 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2610 504-585-7777 Suzanne Montero Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1887 Scott C. Seiler Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4159 Scott Sternberg Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-1887 Cheryl Wild-Donde’Ville Waltzer Wiygul & Garside, LLC 14399 Chef Menteur Hwy. Suite D 504-254-4400 Product Liability Litigation New Orleans

Camala E. Capodice Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2196 Celeste Coco-Ewing Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-589-9762 Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2203

David W. Leefe Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4137

Robert S. Emmett Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5261

Raymond C. Lewis Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St.

Darryl J. Foster Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC


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1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6304 Mike Gertler Gertler Law Firm 935 Gravier St. Suite 1900 504-581-6411 Lynn Luker Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, L.L.C 909 Poydras St. Suite 2500 504-262-9063

504-596-6307 Richard Sarver Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-589-9733 Kelly T. Scalise Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-299-6110

Nancy J. Marshall Deutsch Kerrigan LLP 755 Magazine St. 504-593-0602

John W. Sinnott Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2116

David M. Melancon Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2117

Quentin F. Urquhart Jr. Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2107

Douglas J. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2163 Kim E. Moore Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2108 Stephen G.A. Myers Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2114 Colvin Norwood Jr. McGlinchey Stafford PLLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 1200 504-596-2707 David W. O’Quinn Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2111 John F. Olinde Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7241 Dwight C. Paulsen III Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6305 David E. Redmann Jr. Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700

Railroad Law Mandeville

Benjamin B. Saunders Davis, Saunders, & Miller PLC 450 N. Causeway Blvd. Suite D 985-612-3070

1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7059

Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2108

Real Estate Law Metairie

Malcolm A. Meyer Stewart Title Guaranty Company 113 Rosa Ave. 504-837-8113 New Orleans

Marguerite L. “Peggy” Adams Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4142 Lee R. Adler Phelps Dunbar LLP 365 Canal St. Suite 2000 504-584-9351 Elwood F. Cahill Jr. Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2103

New Orleans

Lillian E. Eyrich Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3201 504-582-1199

Alissa J. Allison Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5233

Paul C. Kitziger Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4126

Bradley R. Belsome Bradley Murchison Kelly & Shea LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-596-6309

Rose McCabe LeBreton Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Timothy F. Daniels Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2203

Jon F. Leyens Jr. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-8628

William H. Howard III Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3600 504-566-5275

Carl J. Little Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-304-5836

Kelly Juneau Rookard Irwin Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 400 Poydras St. Suite 2700 504-310-2214

J. Tyler Marquette Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5268

Ben Slater III Akerman, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2000 504-586-1241

Joseph Marriott Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-324-2677

Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, L.L.P.

Marie A. Moore Sher Garner Cahill Richter

Randy Opotowsky Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3201 504-582-1199 Eric O. Person Attorney at Law 1539 Jackson Ave. Suite 100 504-561-8612 Richard P. Richter Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2104 Michael R. Schneider Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0835 Steven C. Serio Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-586-5252

Jessica M. Vasquez The Vasquez Law Office 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-571-9582 Nicholas J. Wehlen Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0827 Securities/Capital Markets Law New Orleans

John C. Anjier Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4177 Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8386 Jessica M. Vasquez The Vasquez Law Office 400 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-571-9582 Tax Law

Leopold Z. Sher Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 2800 504-299-2101 Philip B. Sherman Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-581-3234 Robert M. Steeg Steeg Law Firm, LLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 3201 504-582-1199

New Orleans

Hirschel T. Abbott Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0809 A. Albert Ajubita Ajubita, Leftwich & Salzer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300 Robert S. “Bob” Angelico Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4112

Taylor C. Stone The Law Office of Taylor C. Stone, LLC 4130 Canal St. 504-717-4874

William M. Backstrom Jr. Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8228

Sterling Scott Willis Fishman Haygood L.L.P. 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4600 504-310-0264

Hilton S. Bell Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7000

Securities Regulation

Susan J. Burkenstock Elkins PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4400 504-529-3600

Metairie

P. J. Stakelum III Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans

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201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8386

Kenneth J. Najder Jones Walker LLP

Jaye A. Calhoun Kean Miller LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-293-5936


myneworleans.com november 2019 7 7


John W. Colbert Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0832 Paul D. Cordes Jr. Guarisco, Cordes & Lala, LLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 2355 504-587-7007 Gary J. Elkins Elkins PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4400 504-529-3600 James C. Exnicios Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4034

Robert E. Tarcza Tarcza & Associates 330 Carondelet St. Suite 300 504-525-6696 Daniel J. Walter Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0826 Christian N. Weiler Weiler & Rees, Attorneys at Law 909 Poydras St. Suite 1250 504-524-2944 John J. Weiler Weiler & Rees, Attorneys at Law 909 Poydras St. Suite 1250 504-524-2944

504-217-2006 Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006

909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7219 Carole Cukell Neff Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel 400 Poydras St. Suite 2550 504-582-1519

Cheryl M. Kornick Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4156 Brian Leftwich Ajubita, Leftwich & Salzer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300 Sheila L. Moragas Milling Benson Woodward, LLP 909 Poydras St. Suite 2300 504-569-7219 Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0838 Rudolph R. Ramelli Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8206 Richard J. Roth III Roth Law Firm 2727 Prytania St. Suite 14 504-525-7792

New Orleans

Louis Colletta Jr. Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7000 Gerard J. Dragna Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-595-3000 C. Michael Parks Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8487 Eric Winder Sella Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-595-3000 Brent A. Talbot Chaffe McCall, L.L.P. 1100 Poydras St. 2300 Energy Centre 504-585-7059 Edward “Drew” Voelker Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2932 Trusts and Estates

Laura Walker Plunkett Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0838

Marguerite L. “Peggy” Adams Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4142

S. Frazer Rankin Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990

Dara L. Baird Dara Baird Law 1615 Poydras St. Suite 900 504-865-9004

Jerome J. Reso Jr. Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-569-2900

Ashley L. Belleau Lugenbuhl, Wheaton, Peck, Rankin & Hubbard 601 Poydras St. Suite 2775 504-568-1990 Susan J. Burkenstock Elkins PLC 201 St. Charles Ave. Suite 4400 504-529-3600 David F. Edwards Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8184 Mervatt ElJaouhari Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC 935 Gravier St. Suite 2020 504-605-2463 Mark S. Embree Adams and Reese, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 4500 504-585-0247 Miriam Wogan Henry Jones Walker LLP 201 St. Charles Ave. 504-582-8436

Metairie

John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7854 Douglas L. Salzer Ajubita, Leftwich & Salzer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Suite 1500 504-582-2300

Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-830-4107 Steven E. Hayes Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100

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Corey M. Fitzpatrick Worker’s Compensation, LLC 3045 Ridgelake Dr. Suite 203 504-608-6776

New Orleans

Hirschel T. Abbott Jr. Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0809

Transportation Law Michael E. Guarisco Guarisco, Cordes & Lala, LLC 601 Poydras St. Suite 2355 504-587-7007

Brewster Law Firm LLC 433 Metairie Rd. Suite 2209 504-717-4971

Erin E. Kriksciun Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, L.L.C. 909 Poydras St. Suite 3150 504-593-0975

Leon H. Rittenberg III Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-78455 John A. Rouchell Baldwin Haspel Burke & Mayer, LLC 1100 Poydras St. Floor 36 504-585-7854 Mark S. Stein Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP 701 Poydras St. Suite 3600 504-517-8160 John D. Wogan Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4032

Meghan E. Ruckman Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Charles O. Taylor Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 New Orleans

Patrick J. Babin Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8445 J. Jacob Goehring Morris Bart, LLC 601 Poydras St. Floor 24 504-599-3245 Scott R. Huete Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2439 Mark D. Latham Liskow & Lewis 701 Poydras St. Suite 5000 504-556-4180 Lindsay F. Louapre Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504.655.3498

Venture Capital Law Metairie

Patrick K. Reso Chehardy, Sherman, Williams, Murray, Recile, Stakelum & Hayes, LLP 1 Galleria Blvd. Suite 1100 504-217-2006 Workers Compensation Law Covington

James G. Maguire Attorney at Law 6059 Argonne Blvd. 504-975-3038

Stephanie Griffith Beard Stephanie Griffith Beard, Attorney at Law 607 E. Boston St. Suite 207 985-809-1442

Sheila L. Moragas Milling Benson Woodward, LLP

Arthur J. Brewster

Metairie

Kevin A. Marks Melchiode Marks King LLC 639 Loyola Ave. Suite 2550 504-336-2432 Robert N. Popich Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-648-8455 Daniel P. Sullivan Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett 701 Poydras St. Suite 4250 504-595-3000 •


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sponsored Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr & Smith wishes to congratulate attorney Jason Waguespack on being named a Top Lawyer by New Orleans Magazine. Galloway is proud to be the counsel of choice for prominent local, national, and international businesses and insurers. The firm serves clients from 12 offices in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Texas, and Missouri. Its experienced practitioners provide counsel and representation in fields ranging from insurance defense and coverage, maritime and admiralty, bad faith, construction, corporate transactions, employer’s liability, mass torts, professional liability matters, and beyond. The firm provides innovative and solutions-driven representation and aggressive, effective advocacy. Galloway has been Top 10-rated for insurance defense by Martindale-Hubbell, rated an Index Value 5 of 5 by the ACC, and included in A.M. Best’s Recommended Insurance Attorneys Directory 2011-2018. Founded in New Orleans over 25 years ago, Galloway embraces the rich cultural heritage of the region and is proud to be part of its diverse community. For more information, visit GallowayLawFirm.com.

Legal Services

I

n movies and news, attorneys don’t always get the glory—they’re often portrayed as doing the devil’s work, scheming behind the scenes to take over this or take advantage of that. And while the devil is in the details, it’s digging through the details that often helps attorneys save the day and be heroes for clients—businesses trying to avoid frivolous lawsuits, workers injured due to company neglect, and inventors trying to protect their intellectual property. There are countless needs for the work lawyers do and protection is top priority. Protecting one’s rights, one’s property, one’s family—successfully navigating laws and contracts can be one of the most important ways to achieve the protection you, your business and family deserve. Greater New Orleans is home to a number of law firms, big and small, who specialize in a variety of practice areas, from worker’s compensation and divorce to maritime and admiralty, construction, insurance, transportation and much more. Established in 1928, Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. (BSW) is one of the oldest law firms in the state of Louisiana. The firm takes great pride in its long history of client service. With more than 75 attorneys, the firm is among the largest firms in the state and one of the larger law firms in the South. BSW’s clients range from individuals and start-up companies to Fortune 500 corporations, governmental entities, and not-for-profit institutions. Since the firm was established, two standards have remained constant: to strive for legal excellence and to be involved in local communities. Members of the firm have served as presidents, directors, and officers of community and business organizations. BSW’s primary focus is growing and protecting each client’s business. Whether it is in litigation, negotiating contracts, advising on management restructures, or assisting in the purchase or sale of a business, BSW attorneys possess the skill set to help their clients achieve their goals. For more information, visit www.BSWllp.com.

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Melchiode Marks King LLC (MMK) may only be in its fifth year of existence, but its attorneys have practiced together for decades, and recent accolades are a testament to both their talents and the breadth of services they provide to clients. This year, five MMK attorneys were recognized as New Orleans Magazine’s Top Lawyers: Jerry Melchiode (Construction Law), Kevin Marks (Admiralty & Maritime Law and Workers’ Compensation), Rich King (Insurance Law), Scott Huete (Admiralty & Maritime Law and Workers’ Compensation) and Drew Voelker (Insurance Law and Transportation Law). While awards are gratifying, the best endorsement is the loyalty of MMK’s clients who have enthusiastically supported the firm. It is this trust and commitment that inspires MMK to achieve successful outcomes while controlling costs. Through increased efficiency and advances in technology, MMK delivers big firm capabilities with small firm agility and attentiveness. For more information, visit MMKfirm.com. Barrasso, Usdin, Kupperman, Freeman & Sarver, LLC is a nationally recognized litigation firm known for trying challenging and high-stakes cases throughout the country. The firm has served as lead trial counsel in national multidistrict products liability cases and in mass actions for corporations and insurers hit with thousands of claims following chemical releases and natural disasters. The firm’s lawyers have tried dozens of cases nationwide for financial services companies after severe downturns in the bond and equity markets sparked a multitude of lawsuits. And this represents only a small part of what the firm does. Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver is, first and foremost, a firm of trial lawyers. The proof is in its track record of success. Benchmark Litigation has recognized this record by naming the firm the Louisiana Litigation Firm of the Year for six of the past seven years. For more information, visit BarrassoUsdin.com. Corey Fitzpatrick would like to thank all those who nominated him to the list of Top Lawyers in New Orleans Magazine. Corey and his colleagues at Workers’ Compensation, LLC pride themselves on providing excellent representation to their clients who were injured on the job and/or disabled from work. Since 1993, Workers’ Compensation, LLC has been committed to being the premier Workers’ Compensation and Social Security Disability firm in the State of Louisiana with offices in Metairie, Baton Rouge, Amite, Alexandria, and Monroe.


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sponsored “Since I started practicing in 2005, there have been monumental changes to the workers’ compensation laws that make it difficult for injured workers and general practitioners to navigate claims. We have adapted to ensure that we provide the most effective representation possible in this area of law. I’ve always made myself available to speak with lawyers in other practice areas who have questions, and in many instances, I have stepped in to help clients of other lawyers while maintaining the relationships between these clients and the lawyers who referred them,” says Fitzpatrick. To learn more about Workers’ Compensation, LLC, call 877-COMPMAN (877-266-7626) or visit WorkersCompLLC.com.

In 1980, Morris Bart ran a simple ad on television. Since that time, his advertising and his law firm have grown to the extent where he has become a household name throughout Louisiana. However, Morris Bart, LLC is much more than just a name. For over 35 years, Morris Bart and his team of over one hundred attorneys fight hard to get the injured the compensation they deserve. With offices statewide and throughout Mississippi and Alabama, Morris Bart, LLC is proud to be the largest personal injury firm in Louisiana and one of the largest in the United States. If you or someone you know has been injured, call 855-GET-BART or go to MorrisBart.com for 24-hour access. You know what to do: “One Call, That’s All!”

Stanley, Reuter, Ross, Thornton & Alford, LLC focuses on commercial litigation and on ethics and disciplinary matters. With a deep understanding of the Louisiana market, the firm regularly partners as co-counsel with other national attorneys and law firms or takes on the role of lead counsel in national matters within the Gulf South region. Stanley, Reuter, Ross knows that clients must resolve conflicts in a manner consistent with their business objectives and without the difficulty and expense of litigation when possible. The firm has assembled a task-force oriented team of resourceful lawyers with a wide variety of experience to achieve those solutions for clients. Practice areas include commercial disputes, appellate advocacy, intellectual property litigation, employment law, and utility regulation. The firm’s team prides itself on producing the same caliber of work-product that clients expect from much larger firms but with the increased attention and efficiency of a leaner staff, and their integrity has earned the respect of the bench and bar alike. For more information, visit StanleyReuter.com.

Fishman Haygood, based in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, represents the businesses, places, and people that drive commerce on the Gulf Coast and beyond. The firm tailors a broad range of business and litigation services to each client’s individual needs, whether the client is a large company with a multinational reach or a new and emerging enterprise. Fishman Haygood is known for high-stakes litigation, complex business transactions, and city-defining development work. Combining experience with a healthy skepticism about “the way it’s always been done,”​Fishman Haygood prides itself on finding solutions where others don’t. In 2019, Fishman Haygood was top ranked by Chambers USA and named to Best Law Firms by U.S. News & World Report. The firm congratulates attorneys Louis Fishman, J. Tyler Marquette, Kerry Miller, Lori Mince, Benjamin Reichard, E. Blair Schilling, Steven Serio, and Sterling Willis on being named Top Lawyers in New Orleans Magazine. For more information, visit FishmanHaygood.com.

Forman Watkins & Krutz LLP is a national law firm with offices in New Orleans, Houston, Jackson, Detroit, and New Jersey. Led by Tim Gray and Charles Abbott, the New Orleans office represents a number of corporate clients, including several Fortune 500 companies, in litigation in Louisiana and throughout the country. The office has doubled in size in the last three years and expects continued rapid growth. Primarily a litigation firm, Forman Watkins’ attorneys are trial ready. Since its inception in 1986, the firm has tried cases in over a dozen states with a winning percentage of over 83 percent. Most recently, in July 2019, Tim Gray obtained a defense verdict after an over two-week jury trial in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in a case in which plaintiff’s counsel asked for $69 million in closing argument. He was picking a jury in Plaquemines Parish less than two weeks later in a case that settled after jury selection. For more information, visit FormanWatkins.com.

Carver, Darden, Koretzky, Tessier, Finn, Blossman & Areaux, LLC congratulates Ray Areaux, William Finn, Frank Tessier, and Robert Thibeaux on being named Top Lawyers by New Orleans Magazine. Since the firm’s founding, Ray Areaux has lead the Intellectual Property Practice Group and grown its size and reputation to one of the premier IP practices in the Southeast. Also a founding partner, William Finn focuses on commercial litigation, commercial real estate developments and financings, defense of lender liability claims, debt enforcement actions, bankruptcy, and general business and corporate law. Frank Tessier, another founding partner, practices real estate, banking, corporate and oil and gas law. Robert Thibeaux practices in commercial finance with an emphasis on marine finance and leasing, equipment financing and leasing, aviation finance, asset based financing, factoring and real estate finance. Together with the firm’s other attorneys, these men are committed to providing clients with the highest standards of professionalism, innovative thinking and strong service. From offices across Greater New Orleans and in Pensacola, Florida, Carver Darden represents business clients throughout the region in both litigation and transactional business matters. For more information visit CarverDarden.com.

Lowe, Stein, Hoffman, Allweiss & Hauver, LLP, was formed in 1987 by attorneys who had previously worked at two of the largest law firms in the city of New Orleans. They brought with them the practices and high standards of the larger law firms and integrated that with a small-firm atmosphere, making them one of the most select boutique law firms in the city. The firm’s practice areas are diverse and include family law, tax and estate planning, insurance defense, employment law, civil rights litigation, workers’ compensation, and commercial litigation. The firm is AV Pre-eminent rated by Martindale Hubbell, and many of its attorneys have been recognized as Top Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and Best Lawyers in America among other various honors. The firm is dedicated to personal service and to meeting its clients’ needs as expediently and as inexpensively as possible. To find out more or schedule a consultation, call the firm at 504-581-2450 or visit LoweStein.com. 8 2 november 2019 myneworleans.com

The shifts in family dynamics that accompany divorce can be difficult and sometimes painful for the parties involved. To avoid the common problems largely responsible for the fear and suffering related to divorce, individuals going through the process need to understand the system and know what to expect. Counsel from an experienced family law attorney can be invaluable when making tough decisions and planning for the future. With more than 40 years of experience in domestic relations, Barbara J. Ziv, LLC is a small firm committed to helping people seeking advice about divorce and family law matters, including child custody, child and


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sponsored spousal support, and property divisions. During your initial consultation, Barbara J. Ziv and Esther L. Greenbaum will explain what they need to know about you, why they need to know it, and what you should expect from both the process and your attorney. Their clients can expect competence in family law and matters related to it, clear-cut billing, and troublefree accessibility. For more information or to schedule a consultation, visit NewOrleansDivorces.com or call 504-525-4361. For nearly three decades, the attorneys at Chehardy Sherman Williams Law Firm have been solving complex legal problems with skillful imagination. The firm’s experienced attorneys have breadth of knowledge, providing clients with a diverse array of perspectives in a variety of practice areas, from Business & Corporate Law to Healthcare Law, Personal Injury to Estate Planning, and all types of Litigation. Outside of the courtroom, community involvement has been a hallmark of Chehardy Sherman Williams. The firm’s attorneys are associated with charitable groups, educational institutions, industry councils, economic leaders, and civic organizations that make up a broad scope of the greater New Orleans community. This involvement and the firm’s dedication to individual and business clients has earned Chehardy Sherman Williams attorneys recognition among peers on a local and national level, and the firm has been ranked among the nation’s best. Chehardy Sherman Williams has offices in Metairie and Hammond. For more information on the firm’s practice areas, attorneys, and legal approach, visit Chehardy.com or call 504-833-5600. Jones Walker LLP is among the largest 120 law firms in the United States. With offices in Alabama, Arizona, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New York, and Texas, the firm serves local, regional, national, and international business interests and provides a full complement of legal services addressing the needs of a broad spectrum of global and domestic businesses. Jones Walker LLP is committed to providing excellent legal services to major multinational, public and private companies; Fortune® 500 companies; money center banks and worldwide insurers; and emerging businesses doing business in the US and abroad. Clients have recognized Jones Walker LLP for consistent excellence in areas such as client focus, anticipating client’s needs, and understanding the client’s business. The firm has been named to the 2019 Client Service A-Team by The BTI Consulting Group, which conducts hundreds of in-house counsel interviews to identify law firms providing top client service. For more information, visit JonesWalker.com. For nearly a century, Deutsch Kerrigan LLP has provided high quality, effective legal services that exceed client expectations. From its offices in New Orleans, LA, and Gulfport, MS, Deutsch Kerrigan represents local, national, and international businesses ranging in size from Fortune 500 companies to small, emerging businesses, organizations and individuals. Practicing in the areas of Civil Litigation, Commercial Litigation, Commercial Transactions, Construction Law, Labor & Employment Law, Marine & Energy Law, Professional Liability Law, and Toxic Tort & Environmental Law, the firm is equipped with up-to-date technologies and information that enable its team to inform clients of the latest legal news and emerging industry trends. As effective problem solvers, Deutsch Kerrigan’s 65+ legal counselors and trial attorneys view each client’s legal issue as their own, taking on a

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true partnership and working closely with the client or outside counsel to identify and achieve the best solution. Using a sensible approach to litigation, the firm helps clients resolve disputes by balancing desired business outcomes with what is smart economically. For more information, visit DeutschKerrigan.com. When you turn to Glago Williams for help after an accident or in the midst of an insurance dispute, not only will you receive sincere and trustworthy legal support, but you will also benefit from experience gained in over 2,500 cases and more than 160 trials. Managing Partner Mark Glago has focused on civil litigation his entire career, representing many people who have been seriously injured, endured the wrongful death of a loved one, suffered a major property loss, or become involved in a high-stakes business dispute. The firm is well prepared to handle complex class actions as well as representation of individual clients. Glago Williams’ notable trials and settlements demonstrate a willingness to go the distance when the evidence and legal precedent justify a recovery greater than the defense is willing to offer. Their dedicated, energetic staff prioritizes the problems and concerns of people who have suffered life-changing injuries and losses and collaborates actively and efficiently with other attorneys, qualified medical experts, and other professionals as necessary to build the best possible case. For more information, call 504-500-2020 or visit GlagoWilliams.com. Taggart Morton is a New Orleans-based law firm that provides a complete array of legal services to individuals and the business community. Traditionally, the firm’s primary practice involved representing companies engaged in regulated industries (including the healthcare, public utilities, insurance, transportation, media, communications, and technology fields). Taggart Morton’s attorneys now represent clients in business transactions, commercial litigation, and appellate practice, and even handle referred commercial cases and appeals from other firms. Taggart Morton’s attorneys are skilled in such specialized areas as business disputes, healthcare, insurance regulatory services, bankruptcy, employment, ERISA, antitrust and trade regulation, intellectual property, media/technology, workers’ compensation, real estate, and managed care law. Taggart Morton is small enough to provide a high level of personal attention to each of its clients, yet large enough to address almost any legal need its clients may have. The firm is also active in the community, and takes great pride in Barry H. Grodsky, who recently served as the 78th President of the Louisiana State Bar Association. For more information, visit TaggartMortonLaw.com. Fisher Phillips, LLP is one of the largest U.S. law firms representing management in the areas of labor, employment, civil rights, employee benefits, and immigration law. The firm has over 30 offices with more than 400 attorneys. Founded in 1943, the firm was one of the first in the U.S. to focus its practice on representing employers in labor and employment matters. Whether it’s a class action involving thousands of potential class members, a jury trial with exposure in the millions, or a union organizing effort or strike that could cripple a company, employers with their choice of employment lawyers choose Fisher Phillips to handle their most difficult and dangerous cases. Fisher Phillips congratulates Walter W. Christy, Clyde H. Jacob, III and Timothy H. Scott for being named as Top Lawyers in Labor and Employment Law and Edward F. Harold for being named a Top Lawyer in both Labor and Employment Law and Employee Benefits Law. For more information, visit FisherPhillips.com. •


The Menu TABLE TALK . RESTAURANT INSIDER . FOOD . LAST CALL . DINING LISTINGS

jeffery johnston photo

Baked Scallop with Garlic Butter Sauce at Daiwa


table talk

meet the chef

Toro Tataki cold smoked with apple wood chips

Originally from Hong Kong, Ken and Jay became fans of Japanese cuisine thanks in part to its strong representation in this cosmopolitan Chinese city. “Hong Kong is very fast-paced and on-trend,” Jay explained. “and Japan is just a short flight away. My husband worked with a lot of Japanese chefs early in his career which is where he found his inspiration.” The duo opened their Marrero location of Daiwa in 2013 and have been growing ever since.

A Modern Presentation Daiwa Sushi by Jay Forman

Many sushi restaurants are cookie-cutter,

offering interchangeable lists of the same sushi and sashimi choices. Perhaps they are differentiated by a selection of specialty rolls but, more often than not, one seems much like the other. This

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is most certainly not the case with Daiwa Sushi. Owned by the husband-and-wife team of Ken Wong and Jay Hui, Daiwa got its start in Marrero where it quickly outgrew its original footprint to eventually incorporate four private Karaoke

jeffery johnston photo


party rooms. A sleeper hit on the with a kimchee-based dressing. Westbank, this year they set their The “Baked Scallops with Garlic sights on ambitious new location Butter” sauce makes use of delicate at 4100 Veterans Blvd. and took needle mushrooms. Move on to over the former World of Beer unagi and splurge on toro if it tavern. If Marrero was a hidden is available. The “Toro Tataki,” gem, this new Veterans store puts flash-seared tuna belly that is them firmly on the map. cold-smoked in a bell jar that “Our aim is to respect the arrives at the table, is a memorable authenticity of Japanese cuisine dish. But even the fundamentals but use a more modern presenta- like Hamachi will be notable for tion,” Jay said of her menu. “We the quality of the sourcing. use the freshest ingredients. Our The bar menu sets Daiwa apart dishes well-balanced as well. Thanks to and not overpowered. the location’s prior And we make many of tenant, the space Daiwa, 4100 Veterans the components, like already offered a Memorial Blvd, Metairie, 281-4646; L, eel sauce, in-house.” copiously built-out D Wed.-Mon., closed Sizing up to their bar. Jay is building Tues., daiwasushi.com. a sake selection to new location came with a huge bonus – offer sake flights their account was substantial comprised of small batch sakes enough to order direct from the brewed in different cities across famous Tsukiji fish market in Japan. “Most are from small Japan. This advantage opened family businesses,” Jay said. She up a world of possibilities with also offers Japanese spirits – not sourcing. Selections vary based on just the usual whiskey but also availability but recently included Japanese rum, vodka and gin. Also Japanese skipjack and amberjack featured are Japanese craft beers as well as scallops and uni from like Hiachino. “Instead of every Hokkaido. “I love introducing new place having the same selection we types of fish to our customers,” Jay wanted to offer something unique. said. “You can taste the ocean.” This is a Japanese restaurant,” The menu is astonishingly large Jay said, “so we want it to offer a and diners can easily become complete Japanese experience.” overwhelmed. Along with sushi and sashimi there are rice bowls, cone-shaped snackable hand rolls, udon and possibly the city’s largest collection of specialty rolls. An omakase experience at the sushi bar is one way to be guided through. Another is to start with a few appetizers, pick your way through the fish specials, order some traditional items and branch out with some specialty rolls. Hidden Gem In any case, multiple visits are Asuka Sushi is a blink-and-younecessary to take full sample of miss-it sushi joint on Earhart Blvd. what is available. just a block down from Carrollton For appetizers, consider the Avenue in Gert Town. The location is “King Salmon Tartare,” chopped surprising, but so is the food. They salmon mixed with smelt roe make for a great take-out option for and scallions and drizzled with those in need of a quick sushi fix or champagne sauce, salmon roe else you can dine in and enjoy both and lemon slices. The “Kimchee sushi and offerings from the hibachi. Octopus Salad” features tender It is about as casual as it comes, the sections of octopus laid atop a bed ingredients are high quality, and it is of peeled cucumber and spiced a great value to boot.

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restaurant insider

News From the Kitchen True Food Kitchen, Em Trai Sandwich Co., NOLA Vegan Café by Robert Peyton

Pulled Chicken Pho

True Food Kitchen

Em Trai Sandwich Co.

Nola Vegan Café

True Food Kitchen, a national restaurant founded by health guru Dr. Andrew Weil and dedicated to food that “makes you feel better,” recently opened its first Louisiana location on Julia Street at St. Charles Avenue. The menu is focused on seasonal eats and includes essential nutrition information for each (vegan, gluten free and calories). But although the items are indeed healthy, there’s something for everyone, including cocktails that pack a delicious punch. True Food Kitchen, 801 St. Charles Ave., 558-3900, Mon.Thurs., 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; TrueFoodKitchen.com/NewOrleans.

Em Trai Sandwich Co. had a very short trip from its initial location inside the St. Roch Market to its new home in the New Orleans Healing Center. The menu includes pho, bao, salads and both poor boys and banh mi sandwiches. Sometimes the lines are blurred, as with the pulled pork banh mi and the smoked brisket that ends up in both bao and as an option for pho. Em Trai Sandwich Co., 2372 St. Claude Ave., 302-7772, Mon. – Sat., 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

We have another vegetarian option in town now that NOLA Vegan Café has opened Uptown. The small menu includes salads such as chickpea “tuna” with onion, carrots, cucumber, and garlic dill dressing, and a fried oyster mushroom poor boy served dressed on French bread. There’s a brunch from 9 to 12 on Saturday and Sunday that includes fried “chick-un” and waffles with rosemary infused maple syrup. Nola Vegan Café, 1923 Leonidas St.,240-7106, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Tues. – Fri., and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sat. and Sun.; Geauxnolavegan.com.

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jeffery johnston photo


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food

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styled by photographed by eugenia uhl


A Cajun Theme Planning for Thanksgiving Shrimp and Eggplant Dressing

by Dale Curry

Ingredients 1 ½ pounds heads-on shrimp

Sometimes the dressings outweigh the turkey at my family’s

2 small to medium eggplants

Thanksgiving table. There are those, including me, who must have oyster dressing. A simple cornbread dressing pleases those who don’t like oysters, and you might as well count the must-have mirliton casserole as a dressing because bread crumbs are a main ingredient. I also like to veer from the regular menu with at least one dish, something like a Cajun rice dressing, a new twist on fresh cranberries or a fancy French tart. One year we had a turducken that came from Lafayette. Cajun is this year’s angle, not that our deep-fried turkeys don’t qualify, but I’m substituting sweet potato-pecan pies for the regular pecan pies, and shrimp and eggplant dressing for the mirliton casserole. That is, if I don’t get talked out of one or both. You never know. For one reason, I love that both dishes contain local ingredients so we can’t go wrong. One year I baked a Yankee rhubarb pie and no one ate it. Could it have been that the rhubarb was grown a thousand miles away? No thanks. I think andouille, crab, Tasso, oysters and all the rest are the way to go. Cajun or Creole, mix it up. The accompanying recipes are good ones for taking a single dish to a gathering.

½ pound smoked andouille sausage 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 bunch green onions, chopped ½ bell pepper, chopped 2 stalks celery, chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon ground thyme ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 2 large eggs, beaten 4 cups French bread crumbs or 2 cups cooked rice 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley 2 tablespoons butter

RECIPEs

Directions

Sweet Pecan Potato Pie

Ingredients

Directions

1 9-inch pie shell, store-bought refrigerated or homemade

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Fit pie shell into a pie plate and crimp edges.

Sweet potato layer: 1 large sweet potato, baked ½ cup light brown sugar 2 medium eggs 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg ½ cup Half & Half 1 tablespoons bourbon 1 tablespoon butter, softened Pecan layer: 2 medium eggs 1 tablespoon flour ¾ cup dark corn syrup ¾ cup light brown sugar 2 tablespoons melted butter 1 teaspoon vanilla ¾ cups chopped pecans

2. In an electric mixer on medium, beat the sweet potato until fluffy. Mix in sugar and add eggs one at a time. Beat for 2 minutes. Gradually add cinnamon, nutmeg, Half & Half, bourbon and butter. Place mixture in bottom of pie shell and clean mixer. 3. For pecan layer, beat eggs on medium speed until fluffy. Add gradually while beating flour, corn syrup, brown sugar, butter and vanilla. Beat for 2 minutes. Stir in pecans. Pour over sweet potato layer and bake for 1 hour or until center is firm and toothpick comes out clean. Serves 6 to 8.

1. Peel and devein shrimp. If large, chop in halves or thirds. Place heads and peelings in a medium pot, cover with water and a top and simmer over low heat for 30 minutes to make stock. Easy Does it Looking for a few shortcuts preparing Thanksgiving dinner? Buy a couple containers of freshly chopped Trinity at the store. (That’s onions, celery, bell pepper and garlic ready to go in dressings and casseroles.) Have your guests bring all the desserts. Let the children set the table the night before. Use disposable baking containers for as many dishes as possible. Relax and enjoy!

2. While the stock simmers, peel and cube eggplants. Chop andouille and grind in a food processor. 3. Heat oil in a large pot and sauté onions, pepper, celery and garlic until limp. Stir in eggplant, seasonings and andouille, and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until eggplant is wilted, about 10 minutes. Strain stock and add 1 ½ cups stock and the shrimp to the pot and simmer for 3 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in eggs, breadcrumbs and parsley. 4. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Spoon dressing into dish and dot with butter. An hour or two before serving time, heat oven to 400 degrees and bake dressing for about 40 minutes or until it is beginning to brown on top. Serves 8 to 10.

myneworleans.com november 2019 9 1


last call

Fun With Zombies Roll out the rum by Tim McNally

We cannot prove whether

Ernest Gantt was born in New Orleans or not, but that is the legend. What is easier to prove is that this hospitality character became the renowned Donn the Beachcomber, opened an international string of Tiki-style restaurants and invented, after the repeal of Prohibition, a most popular drink, the Zombie. Jeff “Beachbum” Berry, proprietor and creative force behind Latitude 29, a Tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter, has followed in Donn’s footsteps and made a great success of Tiki culture in this Creole town. Proving again, maybe, that what goes around comes around, often in a very good way. For Donn the Beachcomber’s original recipe, visit MyNewOrleans.com.

E-Z ZOMBIE Adapted by Jeff “Beachbum” Berry 3/4-ounce fresh lime juice 1 ounce white grapefruit juice 1/2 ounce cinnamon-infused sugar syrup* 1/2 ounce 151-proof amber rum (such as Cruzan or Don-Q) 1 ounce dark Jamaican rum Shake well with ice cubes. Pour unstrained into a tall glass, if necessary adding more ice to fill.  Garnish with a mint sprig. *Cinnamon-infused sugar syrup Crush 3 cinnamon sticks and place in a saucepan with 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Lower heat, cover saucepan, and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove saucepan from heat and, keeping it covered, let sit at least 2 hours before straining and bottling. Will keep about a month in the fridge. Latitude 29, 321 N. Peters St., 609-3811, Latitude29nola.com.

9 2 novemebr 2019 myneworleans.com

eugenia uhl photo


dining listings H= New Orleans Magazine award winner

Bywater

H Pizza Delicious pizza 617 Piety St., 6768482, PizzaDelicious.com. Authentic New York-style thin crust pizza is the reason to come to this affordable restaurant, that also offers excellent salads sourced from small farms and homemade pasta dishes. Outdoor seating a plus. $ Carrollton Breads on Oak Bakery/Breakfast 8640 Oak St., 324-8271, BreadsOnOak.com. Artisan bakeshop tucked away near the levee on Oak St. serves breads, breakfast, sandwiches, 100 percent vegan. $ City Park Café NOMA AMERICAN 1 Collins Diboll Cir., NO Museum of Art, 482-1264, CafeNoma. com. Sleek bar and café in the ground floor of museum offers a thoughtful array of snacks, sandwiches and small plates that are sure to enchant, with a kids’ menu to boot. $ CBD/Warehouse District Balise Louisianian Fare 640 Carondelet St., 459-4449, BaliseNola.com. Chef Justin Devillier turns back the clock at this turn-of-the-century inspired bistro in the CBD. Carefully crafted fare fits well alongside the excellent cocktail and beer list. $$$

H BH Steak Steakhouse Harrah’s Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6111, HarrahsNewOrleans. com. Acclaimed chef John Besh reinterprets the classic steakhouse with his signature contemporary Louisiana flair. $$$$$

H Borgne Seafood 601 Loyola Ave., 613-3860, BorgneRestaurant.com. Coastal Louisiana with an emphasis on Isleños cuisine (descendants of Canary Islanders who settled in St. Bernard Parish) is the focus of this highvolume destination adjacent to the Superdome. $$$

H Cochon Louisianian Fare 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123, CochonRestaurant.com. Chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski feature Cajun and Southern cuisine. Boudin and other pork dishes reign supreme, along with Louisiana seafood and real moonshine Reservations recommended. $$

H Desi Vega’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 628 St. Charles Ave., 523-7600, DesiVegaSteaks.com. USDA Prime steaks form the base of this menu, but Italian specialties and a smattering of locally inspired seafood dishes round out the appeal. $$$ Drago’s Louisianian Fare Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras St., 584-3911, DragosRestaurant.com. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$

H Domenica Italian The Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-6020, DomenicaRestaurant.com. Authentic, regional Italian cuisine. The menu of thin, lightly topped pizzas, artisanal salumi and cheese, and a carefully chosen selection of antipasti, pasta and entrées features locally raised products. $$$$ Emeril’s Louisianian Fare 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393, EmerilsRestaurants.com. The flagship of superstar chef Emeril Lagasse’s culinary empire, this landmark attracts pilgrims 9 4 novemebr 2019 myneworleans.com

$ = Average entrée price

$ = $5-10 $$ = $11-15 $$$ = $16-20 $$$$ = $21-25 $$$$$ = $25 & up

from all over the world. $$$$$

H Herbsaint Louisianian Fare 701 St. Charles Ave., 524-4114, Herbsaint.com. Enjoy a sophisticated cocktail before sampling chef Donald Link’s menu that melds contemporary bistro fare with classic Louisiana cuisine. The banana brown butter tart is a favorite dessert. $$$$$

H La Boca Steakhouse 870 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-8205, LaBocaSteaks.com. This Argentine steakhouse specializes in cuts of meat along with pastas and wines. Specials include the provoleta appetizer and the Vacio flank steak. $$$

H Lüke World 333 St. Charles Ave., 378-2840, LukeNewOrleans.com. Germanic specialties and French bistro classics, housemade pâtés and plateaux of cold, fresh seafood. $$$

324-3658, Sac-A-LaitRestaurant.com. Cody and Sam Carroll’s shrine to Gulf Coast and Louisiana culinary heritage melds seafood, game, artisan produce, and craft libations in an ambitious menu that celebrates local and southern cuisine. $$$$ The Grill Room AMERICAN Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-6000, GrillRoomNewOrleans.com. Modern American cuisine with a distinctive New Orleans flair, the adjacent Polo Club Lounge offers live music nightly. Jazz Brunch on Sunday. $$$$$ Tommy’s Cuisine Italian 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103, TommysNewOrleans.com. Classic Creole-Italian cuisine is the name of the game at this upscale eatery. Appetizers include the namesake oysters Tommy, baked in the shell with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper. $$$$$

Mother’s Louisianian Fare 401 Poydras St., 523-9656, MothersRestaurant.net.Locals and tourists alike endure long lines to enjoy iconic dishes such as the Ferdi poor boy and Jerry’s jambalaya. Come for a late lunch to avoid the rush. $$

Central City Café Reconcile Louisiana fare 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157, CafeReconcile. org. Good food for a great cause, this nonprofit on the burgeoning OCH corridor helps train at-risk youth for careers in the food service industry. $$

Mulate’s Louisianian Fare 201 Julia St., 5221492, Mulates.com. Live music and dancing add to the fun at this world-famous Cajun destination. $$

H Café Degas French 3127 Esplanade Ave.,

Palace Café World 605 Canal St., 5231661, PalaceCafe.com. Cassic New Orleans restaurant, the Dickie Brennan and Palace Cafe team evolve traditional Creol dishes. Enjoy specialty cocktails and small plates at the Black Duck Bar. $$$

H 1000 Figs World 3141 Ponce De Leon St.,

H Pêche Seafood 800 Magazine St., 5221744, PecheRestaurant.com. Award-winning southern-inspired seafood destination by Chef Donald Link serves whole roasted Gulf fish from its massive, wood-burning oven, and an excellent raw bar. $$$

HRed Gravy Bakery/Breakfast 4125 Camp St., 561-8844, RedGravy.com. Farm-to-table brunch restaurant offers a creative array of items such as Cannoli Pancakes and Skillet Cakes, as well as delectable sandwiches and more. Homemade pastas and authentic Tuscan specialties round out the menu. $$ H Restaurant August AMERICAN 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 299-9777, RestaurantAugust.com. James Beard Awardwinning menu is based on classical techniques of Louisiana cuisine and produce with a splash of European flavor set in an historic carriage warehouse. $$$$$ Rock-N-Sake Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 823 Fulton St., 581-7253, RockNSake. com. Fresh sushi and contemporary takes on Japanese favorites in an upbeat, casual setting. $$$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099, RuthsChris.com. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution. There are also great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Sac-A-Lait Seafood 1051 Annunciation St.,

Faubourg St. John 945-5635, CafeDegas.com. Salad Niçoise, Hanger steak and frites are served in a lovely enclosed courtyard at this jewel of a French bistro. $$ 301-0848, 1000Figs.com. Vegetarian-friendly offshoot of the Fat Falafel Food Truck offers a healthy farm-to-table alternative to cookiecutter Middle Eastern places. $$ French Quarter Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 724 Iberville St., 522-5973, AcmeOyster.com. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$

H Arnaud’s Louisianian Fare 813 Bienville St., 523-5433, ArnaudsRestaurant.com. Waiters in tuxedos prepare Café Brûlot tableside at this storied Creole grande dame; live jazz during Sun. brunch. $$$$$ Arnaud’s Remoulade Italian 309 Bourbon St., 523-0377, Remoulade.com. Home of the eclectic menu of famous shrimp Arnaud, red beans and rice and poor boys as well as specialty burgers, grilled all-beef hot dogs and thin-crust pizza. $$ Antoine’s Louisianian Fare 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422, Antoines.com. This pinnacle of haute cuisine and birthplace of oysters Rockefeller is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant. (Every item is à la carte, with an $11 minimum.) Private dining rooms available. $$$$$ Antoine’s Annex Specialty Foods 513 Royal St., 525-8045, Antoines.com/Antoines-Annex. Serves French pastries, including individual baked Alaskas, ice cream and gelato, as well as panini, salads and coffee. Delivery available. BB King’s Blues Club Barbecue 1104 Decatur St., 934-5464, BBKings.com/new-orleans. New Orleans outpost of music club named for the famed blues musician with a menu loaded with BBQ and southern specialties. Live music and

late hours are a big part of the fun. $$$ Bayou Burger Burgers 503 Bourbon St., 5294256, SportsBarNewOrleans.com. Sports bar in the thick of Bourbon Street scene distinguishes its fare with choices like Crawfish Beignets and Gator Bites. $$ Bourbon House Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. Local seafood, featured in both classic and contemporary dishes, is the focus of this New Orleans-centric destination. And yes, bourbon is offered as well. $$$ Bayona World 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455, Bayona.com. Chef Susan Spicer’s nationally acclaimed cuisine is served in this 200-year-old cottage. Ask for a seat on the romantic patio, weather permitting. $$$$$ Brennan’s Louisianian Fare 417 Royal St., 525-9711, Brennansneworleans.com. Chef Slade Rushing’s innovative Cerole menu borrows influences from French and Spanish ancestry with modern updates and distinct seasonal offerings. $$$$ Broussard’s French 819 Conti St., 581-3866, Broussards.com. Creole-French institution also offers beautiful courtyard seating. $$$$

H Cane & Table Gastropub 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112, CaneAndTableNola.com. Open late, this chef-driven rustic colonial cuisine with rum and “proto-Tiki” cocktails make this a fun place to gather. $$ Chartres House Italian 601 Chartres St., 586-8383, ChartresHouse.com. This iconic French Quarter bar serves terrific Mint Juleps and Gin Fizzes in its picturesque courtyard and balcony settings. Also famous for its fried green tomatoes and other local favorite dishes. $$$ Court of Two Sisters Louisianian Fare 613 Royal St., 522-7261, CourtOfTwoSisters.com. The historic environs make for a memorable outdoor dining experience. The famous daily Jazz Brunch buffet and classic Creole dishes sweeten the deal. $$$$$ Criollo Louisianian Fare Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 681-4444, CriolloNola.com. Next to the famous Carousel Bar in the historic Monteleone Hotel, Criollo represents an amalgam of the various Louisiana cultures, with a contemporary twist. $$$ Crazy Lobster Seafood 500 Port of New Orleans Place, Suite 83, 569-3380, TheCrazyLobster.com. Boiled seafood and festive atmosphere come together at this seafood-centric destination overlooking the Mississippi River. Outdoor seating a plus. $$$ Creole Cookery Seafood 508 Toulouse St., Suite C110, 524-9632, NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com. Crowdpleasing destination in the French Quarter offers an expansive menu of Creole favorites and specialty cocktails served with New Orleans flair. $$$ Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 841 Iberville St., 581-1316, Deanies.com. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

H Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House


Seafood 144 Bourbon St., 522-0111, BourbonHouse.com. Classic Creole dishes, such as redfish on the halfshell, and an Oyster Bar. Its extensive bourbon menu will please aficionados. $$$$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 716 Iberville St., 522-2467, DickieBrennansSteakhouse.com. Nationally recognized steakhouse serves USDA Prime steaks and local seafood. Validated Parking next door. $$$$

H Doris Metropolitan Steakhouse 620 Chartres St., 267-3500, DorisMetropolitan.com. Innovative steakhouse plays with expectations and succeeds with modernist dishes like their Classified Cut and Beetroot Supreme. $$$$ El Gato Negro World 81 French Market Place, 525-9752, ElGatoNegroNola.com. Central Mexican cuisine along with handmuddled mojitos and margaritas made with freshly squeezed juice. A weekend breakfast menu is an additional plus. $$ Galatoire’s Louisianian Fare 209 Bourbon St., 525-2021, Galatoires.com. Friday lunches are a New Orleans tradition at this worldfamous French-Creole grand dame. Tradition counts for everything here, and the crabmeat Sardou is delicious. Note: Jackets required for dinner and all day Sun. $$$$$ Galatoire’s 33 Bar & Steak Steakhouse 215 Bourbon St., 335-3932, Galatoires33BarAndSteak.com. Steakhouse offshoot of the venerable Creole grande dame offers hand-crafted cocktails and classic steakhouse fare and inspired dishes.

Reservations accepted. $$$

Bourbon Street. $$$

H GW Fins Seafood 808 Bienville St.,

Muriel’s Jackson Square Italian 801 Chartres St., 568-1885, Muriels.com. Enjoy local classics while dining in the courtyard bar or any other room in this labyrinthine, rumoredto-be-haunted establishment. $$$$

581-FINS (3467), GWFins.com. Owners Gary Wollerman and twice chef of the year Tenney Flynn provide dishes at their seasonal peak. On a quest for unique variety, menu is printed daily. $$$$$ House of Blues Louisianian Fare 225 Decatur St., 310-4999, HouseOfBlues.com/ NewOrleans. Good menu complements music in the main room. World-famous Gospel Brunch every Sunday. Patio seating available. $$ Irene’s Cuisine Italian 539 St. Philip St., 529-8881. Long waits at the lively piano bar are part of the appeal of this Creole-Italian favorite beloved by locals. Try the oysters Irene and crabmeat gratin appetizers. $$$$ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen Louisianian Fare 416 Chartres St., 596-2530, ChefPaul.com/ KPaul. Paul Prudhomme’s landmark restaurant helped introduce Cajun food to the nation. Lots of seasoning and bountiful offerings, along with reserved seating, make this a destination for locals and tourists alike. $$$$

H Kingfish Seafood 337 Charters St., 5985005, KingfishNewOrleans.com. Regionally inspired seafood dishes with carefully sourced ingredients and southern influence is the focus at this chef-driven French Quarter establishment. $$$ Le Bayou Seafood 208 Bourbon St., 5254755, LeBayouRestaurant.com. Blackened redfish and Shrimp Ya-Ya are a just a few of the choices at this seafood-centric destination on

Napoleon House Italian 500 Chartres St., 524-9752, NapoleonHouse.com. Originally built in 1797 as a respite for Napoleon, this family-owned European-style café serves local favorites gumbo, jambalaya and muffulettas. A Sazerac or Pimm’s Cup are perfect accompaniments. $ NOLA Louisianian Fare 534 St. Louis St., 522-6652, EmerilsRestaurants.com/NolaRestaurant. Emeril’s more affordable eatery, featuring cedar-plank-roasted redfish; private dining. $$$$$ Oceana Grill Seafood 739 Conti St., 5256002, OceanaGrill.com. Gumbo, poor boys and barbecue shrimp are served at this kid-friendly seafood destination. $$ Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro Gastropub 720 Orleans Ave., 523-1930, OrleansGrapevine.com. Wine is the muse at this bistro, which offers vino by the flight, glass and bottle. A classic menu with an emphasis on local cuisine. $$$

H Patrick’s Bar Vin Gastropub 730 Bienville St., 200-3180, PatricksBarVin.com. This oasis of a wine bar offers terrific selections by the bottle and glass. Small plates are served as well. $$ Pier 424 Seafood 424 Bourbon St., 309-1574, Pier424SeafoodMarket.com. Seafood-centric

restaurant offers long menu of traditional New Orleans fare augmented by unusual twists like “Cajun-Boiled” Lobster. $$$ Port of Call Burgers 838 Esplanade Ave., 523-0120, PortOfCallNola.com. It is all about the big, meaty burgers and giant baked potatoes in this popular bar/restaurant – unless you’re cocktailing only, then it’s all about the Monsoons. $$

H Restaurant R’evolution Italian 777 Bienville St., 553-2277, RevolutionNola. com. An opulent place that combines the local flavors of chef John Folse with the cosmopolitan influence of chef Rick Tramonto. Chef de cuisine Jana Billiot and executive sous chef Gabriel Beard are in charge of day-to-day operations, which include house-made charcuterie, pastries, pastas and more. $$$$$ Red Fish Grill SEAFOOD 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200, RedFishGrill.com. This vibrant, seafood-centric polished-casual landmark delivers innivative twists on casual New Orleans seasfood, including local favorites BBQ oysters and double chocolate bread pudding. $$$ Rib Room AMERICAN Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046, RibRoomNewOrleans.com. Old World elegance, house classic cocktails and Anthony Spizale’s broad menu of prime rib, stunning seafood and on Sundays a jazz brunch. $$$ Richard Fiske’s Martini Bar & Restaurant Louisianian Fare 301 Dauphine St., 5860972, RichardFiskes.com. Just a few steps off of Bourbon Street is this relaxing bar featuring an innovative menu with dishes like Crawfish, Jalapeno-and-Bacon Mac and Cheese garnished

myneworleans.com november 2019 9 5


with fried oysters. Live music a plus. $$$ Royal House Louisianian Fare 441 Royal St., 528-2601, RoyalHouseRestaurant.com. Sat and Sun. Poor boys, jambalaya and shrimp Creole are some of the favorites served here. Weekend breakfast and an oyster bar add to the crowdpleasing appeal. $$$ SoBou Louisianian Fare 310 Chartres St., 552-4095, SoBouNola.com. There is something for everyone at this “Modern Creole Saloon.” Decidedly unstuffy with an emphasis on craft cocktails and wines by the glass. Everything from $1 pork cracklins to an extravagant foie gras burger on an accomplished yet eclectic menus. $$

H Tableau Louisianian Fare 616 S. Peter St., 934-3463, TableauFrenchQuarter.com. Gulf seafood such as Redfish Bienville and classic Creole brunch dishes like eggs Hussard are the highlights of this Dickie Brennan restaurant that shares space with Le Petite Théâtre. $$$

H The Bistreaux Louisianian Fare New Orleans Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000, MaisonDupuy.com/dining.html. Dishes ranging from the casual (truffle mac and cheese) to the upscale (tuna tasting trio) are served in an elegant courtyard. $$ The Bombay Club Louisianian Fare Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., 577-2237, TheBombayClub.com. Popular martini bar with plush British décor features live music during the week and late dinner and drinks on weekends. Nouveau Creole menu includes items such as Bombay drum. $$$$ The Pelican Club AMERICAN 312 Exchange

9 6 novemebr 2019 myneworleans.com

Place, 523-1504, PelicanClub.com. Serves an eclectic mix of hip food, from the seafood “martini” to clay-pot barbecued shrimp and a trio of duck. Three dining rooms available. $$$$$

H Tujague’s Louisianian Fare 823 Decatur St., 525-8676, TujaguesRestaurant.com. For more than 150 years this landmark restaurant has been offering Creole cuisine. Favorites include a nightly six-course table d’hôté menu featuring a unique beef brisket with Creole sauce. $$$$$ Garden District Commander’s Palace Louisianian Fare 1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221, CommandersPalace.com. The grande dame is going strong under the auspices of James Beard Award-winner chef Tory McPhail. Jazz Brunch is a great deal. $$$$ District Donuts Sliders Brew AMERICAN 2209 Magazine Street, 570-6945, DonutsAndSliders. com. Creative sliders (hello, pork belly) and super-creative donuts (think root beer float) are the hallmarks of this next-generation café. $ Hoshun Restaurant Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 1601 St. Charles Ave., 302-9716, HoshunRestaurant.com. A wide variety of Asian cuisines, primarily dishes culled from China, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia. Private dining rooms available. $$

H Mr. John’s Steakhouse Steakhouse 2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697, MrJohnsSteakhouse.com. Wood paneling, white tile and USDA Prime Beef served sizzling in butter are the hallmarks of this classic New

Orleans steakhouse. $$$

tomatoes and roasted duck. $

Metairie H Andrea’s Restaurant Italian 3100 19th St., 834-8583, AndreasRestaurant.com. Osso buco and homemade pastas in a setting that’s both elegant and intimate; off-premise catering. $$$

Deanie’s Seafood Seafood 1713 Lake Ave., 831-4141, Deanies.com. Louisiana seafood, baked, broiled, boiled and fried, is the name of the game. Try the barbecue shrimp or towering seafood platters. $$$

Acme Oyster House Louisianian Fare 3000 Veterans Blvd., 309-4056, AcmeOyster.com. Known as one of the best places to eat oysters. $$ Austin’s Louisianian Fare 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., 888-5533, AustinsNo.com. Mr. Ed’s upscale bistro serves contemporary Creole fare, including seafood and steaks. $$$ Boulevard American Bistro AMERICAN 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-2301. Classic American cuisine including steaks, chops and more is augmented by regional favorites like Boulevard Oysters at this Metairie bistro. $$$ café B AMERICAN 2700 Metairie Road, 9344700, cafeB.com. Ralph Brennan offers New American bistro fare with a Louisiana twist at this family-friendly neighborhood spot. $$$ Caffe! Caffe! AMERICAN 3547 N. Hullen St., 267-9190. & 4301 Clearview Parkway, 885-4845. CaffeCaffe.com Healthy, refreshing meal options, and gourmet coffee and espresso drinks create a tasteful retreat for Metairie diners at a reasonable price. $ Crabby Jack’s Louisianian Fare 428 Jefferson Highway, 833-2722, CrabbyJacksNola.com. Outpost of Jacques-Imo’s. Famous for its fried seafood and poor boys including fried green

Don’s Seafood seafood 4801 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 889-1550, DonsSeafoodOnline.com. Metairie outpost of historic local seafood chain that dates from 1934. Features an array of Cajun and seafood classics like their original ‘Jacked Up’ Oysters and seafood platters. Don’t miss their happy hour specials. $$$ Drago’s Louisianian Fare 3232 N. Arnoult Road, 888-9254, DragosRestaurant.com. This favorite specializes in charbroiled oysters, a dish they invented. Great deals on fresh lobster as well. $$$$ Mr. Ed’s Seafood and Italian Restaurant Seafood 1001 Live Oak St., 838-0022, AustinsNo.com. Neighborhood restaurant specializes in seafood and Italian offerings such as stuffed eggplant and bell pepper. Fried seafood and sandwiches make it a good stop for lunch. $$ Ruth’s Chris Steak House Steakhouse 3633 Veterans Blvd., 888-3600, RuthsChris. com. Filet mignon, creamed spinach and potatoes au gratin are the most popular dishes at this steak institution, and great seafood choices and top-notch desserts. $$$$$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 4411 Chastant St., 885-2984, Metairie, VicentsItalianCuisine.com. Snug Italian boîte


packs them in, yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$ Mid-City

H Crescent City Steaks Steakhouse 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271, CrescentCitySteaks.com. One of the classic New Orleans steakhouses. Steaks, sides and drinks are what you get. $$$$ Five Happiness Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 3605 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935, FiveHappiness.com. This longtime Chinese favorite offers up an extensive menu including its beloved mu shu pork and house-baked duck. $$ Gracious Bakery + Café Bakery/Breakfast 1000 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, Suite 100, 301-3709, GraciousBakery.com.Boutique bakery offers small-batch coffee, baked goods, individual desserts and sandwiches on breads made in-house. Catering options available. $

H Katie’s Restaurant and Bar Louisianian Fare 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582, KatiesInMidCity.com. Creative poor boys, local dishes such as gumbo and Sunday brunch make this a neighborhood favorite. $$

H Liuzza’s Italian 3636 Bienville St., 4829120, Liuzzas.com. Classic neighborhood joint serves favorites like the “Frenchuletta,” stuffed artichokes and andouille gumbo. Kid’s menu offered. $$

H Mandina’s Louisianian Fare 3800 Canal St., 482-9179, MandinasRestaurant.com. Though the ambiance is more upscale, the food and seafood dishes make dining here a New

Orleans experience. $$

H Mona’s Café World 3901 Banks St., 482-7743. Middle Eastern specialties such as baba ganuj, beef or chicken shawarma, falafel and gyros. The lentil soup and desserts, such as sticky sweet baklava, round out the menu. $

H MoPho Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 514 City Park Ave., 482-6845, MoPhoNola.com. Vietnamese cuisine meets southern Louisiana in this upscale casual hybrid by chef Michael Gulotta. Mix-and-match pho and an interesting poor boy menu rounds out the appeal. $$$ Parkway Bakery and Tavern AMERICAN 538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047, ParkwayPoorBoys. com. Featured on national TV and having served poor boys to presidents, it stakes a claim to some of the best sandwiches in town. Their french fry version with gravy and cheese is a classic at a great price. $ Ralph’s On The Park louisianaian fare 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000, RalphsOnThePark. com. A modern interior and contemporary Creole dishes such as City Park salad, turtle soup, barbecue Gulf shrimp and good cocktails. $$$

H Toups’ Meatery Louisianian Fare 845 N. Carrollton Ave., 252-4999, ToupsMeatery. com. Charcuterie, specialty cocktails and an exhaustive list of excellent à la carte sides make this restaurant a carnivore’s delight. $$$ Multiple Locations Café du Monde Bakery/Breakfast CafeDuMonde.com. This New Orleans institution has been serving fresh café au lait, rich hot chocolate and positively addictive

beignets since 1862 in the French Market 24/7. $ CC’s Coffee House Bakery/Breakfast CCsCoffee.com. Coffeehouse specializing in coffee, espresso drinks and pastries. $ Copeland’s Louisianian Fare CopelandsofNewOrleans.com. Al Copeland’s namesake chain includes favorites such as Shrimp Ducky. Popular for lunch. $$ Little Tokyo Asian Fusion/Pan Asian LittleTokyoNola.com. Multiple locations of this popular Japanese sushi and hibachi chain make sure that there’s always a specialty roll within easy reach. $$ Martin Wine Cellar AMERICAN MartinWineCellar.com. Wine by the glass or bottle to go with daily lunch specials, burgers, soups, salads and deli-style sandwiches. $ Mr. Ed’s Oyster Bar & Fish House Seafood MrEdsRestaurants.com/oyster-bar.A seafood lover’s paradise offers an array of favorites like shrimp Creole, crawfish etouffée, blackened redfish and more. A raw bar featuring gulf oysters both charbroiled and raw. $$$ Reginelli’s Pizzeria pizza Reginellis.com. Pizzas, pastas, salads, fat calzones and lofty focaccia sandwiches are at locations all over town. $$

H Ruby Slipper Café Bakery/Breakfast TheRubySlipperCafe.net. Homegrown chain specializes in breakfast, lunch and brunch dishes with unique local twists such as bananas Foster French toast and barbecue shrimp and

grits. $$ Theo’s Pizza TheosPizza.com. The crackercrisp crust pizzas are complemented by a broad assortment of toppings with local ingredients at cheap prices. $$ Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill AMERICAN ZeaRestaurants.com. Drawing from a wide range of worldly influences, this popular spot serves a variety of grilled items, appetizers, salads, side dishes, seafood, pasta and other entrées. Catering services available. $$$ Riverbend

H Boucherie Louisianian Fare 1506 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-5514, Boucherie-Nola. com. Serving contemporary Southern food with an international angle, chef Nathaniel Zimet offers excellent ingredients presented simply. $$ Brigtsen’s Louisianian Fare 723 Dante St., 861-7610, Brigtsens.com. Chef Frank Brigtsen’s nationally famous Creole cuisine makes this cozy cottage a true foodie destination. $$$$$

HCarrollton Market AMERICAN 8132 Hampson St., 252-9928, CarrolltonMarket. com. Modern Southern cuisine manages to be both fun and refined at this tasteful boîte. $$$ Upper 9th Ward St. Roch Market Louisianian Fare 2381 St. Claude Ave., 615-6541, StRochMarket.com. Historic St. Claude Marketplace with open dining space houses a broad collection of independent eateries including craft cocktails and more. $$ Uptown

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Audubon Clubhouse AMERICAN 6500 Magazine St., 212-5282, AudubonInstitute.org. B, A kid-friendly menu with local tweaks and a casually upscale sandwich and salad menu. $$ Bouligny Tavern Gastropub 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810, BoulignyTavern.com. Carefully curated small plates, inventive cocktails and select wines are the focus of this stylish offshoot of John Harris’s nationally acclaimed Lilette. $$ Camellia Grill AMERICAN 626 S. Carrollton Ave., 309-2679. A venerable diner whose essential character has remained intact and many of the original waiters have returned. Credit cards are now accepted. $ Casamento’s Louisianian Fare 4330 Magazine St., 895-9761, CasamentosRestaurant.com. The family-owned restaurant has shucked oysters and fried seafood since 1919; closed during summer and for all major holidays. $$ Clancy’s Louisianian Fare 6100 Annunciation St., 895-1111, ClancysNewOrleans.com. Their Creole-inspired menu has been a favorite of locals for years. $$$

H Coquette French 2800 Magazine St., 265-0421, CoquetteNola.com. The food is French in inspiration and technique, with added imagination from the chefs. $$$ Dick and Jenny’s Louisianian Fare 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., 894-9880, DickAndJennys. com. A funky cottage serving Louisiana comfort food with flashes of innovation. $$$$

H Gautreau’s Louisianian Fare 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant. com. Upscale destination serves refined

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interpretations of classics.

recommended. $$$

upscale dishes peppering the menu. $$$

H La Crêpe Nanou French 1410 Robert

Pizza Domenica pizza 4933 Magazine St., 301-4978, PizzaDomenica.com. A pizza centric spinoff of the popular Restaurant Domenica brings Neapolitan-style pies to Uptown. Excellent salads and charcuterie boards are offered as well. $$

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine Italian 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313, VicentsItalianCuisine. com. Snug Italian boîte packs them in yet manages to remain intimate at the same time. The cannelloni is a house specialty. $$$

St., 899-2670, LaCrepeNanou.com. Classic French bistro fare, including terrific moules and decadent dessert crêpes, are served nightly at this neighborhood institution. $$$ La Petite Grocery French 4238 Magazine St., 891-3377, LaPetiteGrocery.com. Elegant dining in a convivial atmosphere. The menu is heavily French-inspired with an emphasis on technique. $$$ Lilette French 3637 Magazine St., 895-1636, LiletteRestaurant.com. Chef John Harris’ innovative menu draws discerning diners to this highly regarded bistro. Desserts are wonderful as well. $$$$$

H Magasin Asian Fusion/Pan Asian 4201 Magazine St., 896-7611, MagasinCafe.com. Pho, banh mi and vegetarian options are offered at this attractive and budget-friendly Vietnamese restaurant. Café sua da is available as well. $ Pascal’s Manale Italian 1838 Napoleon Ave., 895-4877, PascalsManale.com. A neighborhood favorite since 1913 and the place to go for the creation of barbecued shrimp. Its oyster bar serves freshly shucked Louisiana oysters and the Italian specialties and steaks are also solid. $$$$

H Patois World 6078 Laurel St., 895-9441, PatoisNola.com. French food, with influences from across the Mediterranean as well as the American South, all filtered through the talent of chef Aaron Burgau. Reservations

H Shaya World 4213 Magazine St., 8914213, ShayaRestaurant.com. James Beard Award-winning menu pays homage to Israel at this contemporary Israeli hotspot. $$$

H The Company Burger Burgers 4600 Freret St., 267-0320, TheCompanyBurger.com. Custom-baked butter-brushed buns and freshground beef patties make all the difference at this excellent burger hotspot. Draft beer and craft cocktails round out the appeal. $

Warehouse District Lucy’s World 710 Tchoupitoulas St., 5238995, LucysRetiredSurfers.com. Island-themed oasis with a menu that cherry-picks tempting dishes from across the globe’s tropical latitudes. Popular for lunch, and the after-work crowds stay into the wee hours. $

The Delachaise Gastropub 3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, TheDelaichaise.com. Cuisine elevated to the standards of the libations is the draw at this lively wine bar and gastropub. Food is grounded in French bistro fare with eclectic twists. $$ H Upperline AMERICAN 1413 Upperline St., 891-9822, Upperline.com. Consummate hostess JoAnn Clevenger presents this nationally heralded favorite. The oft-copied fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade originated here. $$$$ H Wayfare AMERICAN 4510 Freret St., 3090069, WayfareNola.com. Creative sandwiches and southern-inspired small plates. $$ Ye Olde College Inn AMERICAN 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-3683, CollegeInn1933. com. Serves up classic fare, albeit with a few

If you feel that a restaurant has been misplaced, please email Managing Editor Ashley McLellan at Ashley@MyNewOrleans.com


myneworleans.com november 2019 9 9


Dining & Entertainment

sponsored

Black Duck Bar

Briquette

Commander's Palace

605 Canal St., New Orleans 504-523-1661 Palacecafe.com/black-duck-bar

701 South Peters, New Orleans 504-302-7496 BriquetteNOLA.com

1403 Washington Ave., New Orleans 504-899-8221 CommandersPalace.com

Palace Café’s Black Duck Bar has THE new happy hour. Their Creole Caribbean menu has a plethora of offerings for $7 weekdays between 3 and 7pm. Small plates, sandwiches, salads and cocktail flights are all included in the special.

Executive Chef, Guy Sockrider creates a coastal contemporary menu utilizing a large charcoal grill to highlight fresh fish and seafood. Handcrafted cocktails and a well curated wine list are accompanied by small plates perfect for sharing.

This December, during the holiday season, enjoy an intimate lunch with your closest friends and family in Commander’s private wine room. Executive Chef Tory McPhail will create a Haute Creole menu that you will never forget, paired with wines by Wine Guy Dan Davis.

Galatoire's 33 Bar & Steak

Hoshun

Justine

215 Bourbon St., New Orleans 504-335-3932 Galatoires33BarandSteak.com

1601 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504-302-9171 HoshunRestaurant.com

225 Chartres St., New Orleans 504-218-8533 JustineNola.com

Whether stopping in for a short visit or a comfortable stay, Galatoire's "33" Bar & Steak offers classic, hand-crafted cocktails and the finest wines and spirits, alongside USDA prime steaks from the dinner menu and lighter fare at Bar "33".

Chinese or Japanese? Can't decide? Hoshun is your answer, offering an extensive menu from classic Chinese dishes to Japanese sushi and everything in between (like Vietnamese pho or pad Thai). Stick with one cuisine, or mix and match. Open daily until 2 a.m.

Justine is a Parisian-style brasserie by husband-and-wife team Justin and Mia Devillier. Combining the sophistication of a brasserie with the playfulness of the French Quarter, Justine honors the technique and simplicity of French classics in a bustling, multi-roomed restaurant with vibrant decor and grand presentation.

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sponsored

Mr. Eds

New Orleans Creole Cookery

3701 Iberville St., New Orleans 504-488-6582 KatiesInMidCity.com

910 West Esplanade Ave. Kenner 504-463-3030 1001 Live Oak, Metairie 504-838-0022 MrEdsRestaurants.com

510 Toulouse St., New Orleans 504-524-9632 NewOrleansCreoleCookery.com

Katie's is known as one of New Orleans' favorite neighborhood restaurants. Serving daily specials and menu favorites like Katie's homemade crab cakes topped with lump crabmeat and remoulade. Open for lunch and dinner Monday-Saturday and Sunday brunch.

Mr. Ed’s has been a local favorite since 1989, offering home-style cooking, Italian cuisine, seafood favorites and Mr. Ed’s Famous Fried Chicken. Open MondaySaturday for lunch and dinner. Daily lunch specials and catering are available as well. Mr. Ed also oversees Austin’s Restaurant in Metairie and The Pearl Room in Harahan.

Savor authentic Creole dishes prepared by chef John Trinh, formerly of Eleven 79. Delight in traditional dishes such as gumbo, shrimp Creole and crawfish etouffée, as well as an oyster happy hour Monday-Friday, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Enjoy handcrafted cocktails and signature drinks in the historic French Quarter.

Orleans Grapevine

Parkway

Red Gravy

720 Orleans Ave., New Orleans 504-523-1930 OrleansGrapevine.com

538 Hagan Ave., New Orleans 504-482-3047 ParkwayPoorBoys.com

125 Camp St., New Orleans 504-561-8844 RedGravyCafe.com

Enjoy true New Orleans atmosphere in a beautiful, tropical courtyard. Orleans Grapevine serves high quality cuisine and one of the largest selections of wine by the bottle or by the glass. Don't miss the popular Bacon Happy Hour, where you'll enjoy free bacon with your cocktails and wine. 4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m. to midnight daily.

Parkway can now take your phone orders no matter how busy or long the line is. Our new call in kitchen makes it easy to call, pickup, and enjoy some of the best poorboys in town! Serving fried Louisiana Oysters on Mondays and Wednesdays.

Join us for our November 21st or our December 19th Wine & Dine Dinners featuring 4 seasonal, traditional courses with pairings from various wineries. $90 per person. Call to reserve today!

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DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Katies


Dining & Entertainment

sponsored

Royal Frenchmen Hotel & Bar

Seaworthy

Tito's Ceviche and Pisco

700 Frenchmen, New Orleans 504-619-9660 RoyalFrenchmenHotel.com

630 Carondelet St., New Orleans 504-930-3071 SeaworthyNola.com

5015 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-267-7612 TitosCevichePisco.com

The Royal Frenchmen Hotel Bar is a unique spot amongst the bustle of Frenchmen Street. Located at the corner of Royal and Frenchmen Streets, the bar offers fine craft cocktails, local beers and free live music nightly. $3 Martinis daily from 4pm until 7pm.

Just in time for the return of Autumn, Seaworthy is bringing back brunch. That means endless libations and dishes worth waking up for — every weekend from 11am-3pm.

Intimate Peruvian restaurant in uptown New Orleans with premier handcrafted cocktails, heart-healthy Peruvian wine, a variety of melt in your mouth ceviches, tiraditos, savory meat and seafood.

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THE NEW ORLEANS ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION PROMOTIONAL SECTION

Home and Neighborhood Tour featuring

Bayou St. John Saturday, November 9, 2019 from 10 AM - 4 PM Photographed by Michael Mantese

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THE NEW ORLEANS ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION PROMOTIONAL SECTION

NOAF 2019 Home and Neighborhood Tour featuring Bayou St. John

N

ew Orleans is a city of incredibly diverse homes, buildings, and people, all playing their role in defining the many character-filled neighborhoods they call home. The New Orleans Architecture Foundation wants to begin celebrating those neighborhoods with you, beginning with Bayou St. John. The Bayou St. John neighborhood offers much of what the city is revered for: a rich history, music throughout the year, great local food, and a wide array of architectural styles. On Saturday, November 9th, the New Orleans Architecture Foundation invites you to explore this neighborhood with us! The tour features five homes along the Bayou including the newly renovated McDonough 31 school, recently converted into luxury apartments, and access to abbreviated tours of the Pitot House hosted by the Louisiana Landmarks Society for an additional fee. The featured homes would not be the same if not for the storied history of the Bayou and other neighborhood treasures that make this such a special place in New Orleans! Along with the homes on the tour, we encourage guests to stop by some of the neighborhood spots and businesses that help define the character of the area.

Honorary Co-Chairs Elizabeth and James Landis Home and Neighborhood Tour Committee Sarah Busch Terri Hogan Dreyer Mike Grote Beth Jacob Nick Marshall Paula Peer Joel Pominville

TICKET INFORMATION Tickets can be purchased in advance online at noaf.org/events or the day of the tour at the Pitot House at 1440 Moss St, New Orleans, LA PRICES Friends of NOAF: $20 each General Advance: $30 each On the Day of the Tour: $35 NOAF MISSION The New Orleans Architecture Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing public appreciation of architecture and design through advocacy and education. NOAF offers a comprehensive program of architecture tours, exhibitions and public lectures for the community to learn about and engage the incredible architecture of this city. We strive to play a larger role in New Orleans by partnering with community groups, universities and other valued partners, engaging them on pressing issues in architecture and the built environment.

LEARN MORE BY VISITING NOAF.ORG/EVENTS

We’re never too old for field trips and never too local for sight-seeing.

FRIENDS OF NOAF Becoming a Friend of NOAF gives you primary access to NOAF programs and events, while allowing us to continue expanding our reach and impact in our community. Become a Friend of NOAF today and enjoy discounted entry to this tour! Find out more atnoaf.org/friends. PAY US A VISIT Our office is located in the Center for Architecture and Design, at 1000 St Charles Avenue, which allows for lectures, exhibits and events for our organization, our partners and the public. Flexibility of the space allows us to provide higher visibility for architecture and design. We are proud to have a permanent home and a visible presence in the heart of New Orleans!


THE NEW ORLEANS ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION PROMOTIONAL SECTION

FEATURED HOMES 1. Kathie and Walter Leger 1454 Moss Street 2. Cathy and Mark McRae 1347 Moss Street 3. Elizabeth and James Landis 1001 Moss Street 4. Newly renovated McDonogh 31 school (Rendon Apartments) 800 North Rendon Street 5. Jenny and Jack Carey 1240 Moss Street HQ. Pitot House 1440 Moss Street For a full map of the homes, visit noaf.org/events

1454 Moss Street Known as the Musgrove-Wilkinson house, the raised center-hall residence at 1454 Moss Street was once home to Englishman Robert Musgrove and his wife Elma, daughter of early Bayou St. John resident Evariste Blanc. Hugh Wilkinson, former law partner of Governor Huey P. Long and president of the Louisiana State Bar Association, acquired the home in 1935. Wilkinson enlarged the dormers, extended the first-floor rear rooms, and built out a basement-level clubroom he called Hugh’s Café, complete with a stone fireplace and magnificent wood-paneled bar from the original Harmony Club on St. Charles Avenue. The home’s elegant 19th century Greek Revival architecture and bayou frontage attracted current owners Walter and Kathie Leger, who purchased the property from the Wilkinson family in 2016. In addition to making structural repairs, upgrading electrical systems, and painting, the Legers restored the millwork in the basement bar, which will be on view during the NOAF tour. Recent Renovation: Shoring, Richard Earles Construction; painting, Audubon Painting & Renovation


THE NEW ORLEANS ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION PROMOTIONAL SECTION

1347 Moss Street The raised Greek Revival center-hall home at 1347 Moss Street was built c.1850 for lawyer Christoval Morel and his wife, the former Cornelia d’Hebecourt. Between 1897 and 1935 the property changed hands multiple times, and even housed one of New Orleans’ first film studios (19151919) and the Audubon Athletic Club (1928). In 1935, Dr. Elizabeth Wisner, director of the newly established School of Social Work at Tulane University and daughter of famed philanthropist Edward Wisner, purchased 1347 Moss Street where she lived until 1976. When current owners Mark and Cathy McRae acquired the property in 2011, they were pleased to find that most of the home’s distinctive architectural features remained intact despite the variety of former uses. The McRaes worked with architects Terri and Ian Dreyer of NANO LLC to make needed exterior repairs and update several interior rooms including the family room, music room, and master suite. Recent Renovation: Architect and interior designer, NANO LLC; contractor, Concordia Group; landscaping, Vista Landscaping

1001 Moss Street The contemporary façade of 1001 Moss Street gracefully ties together what were originally two separate residences: an early 19th century Creole cottage that by the mid-1930s had received a Dutch Colonial update, and a 1960s modern slab-on-grade dwelling. Under previous owner Eric Hess, these two structures were connected in 2007 with a glass atrium, and an attached garage designed by Terrell Fabacher was added the following year. When Elizabeth and James Landis acquired the property in 2017, they worked with architect Michael Bell to plan a complete renovation that would visually unify and update the home’s varied components. On the Bayou St. John façade, this included the addition of a new front gallery and changes to the roofline. On the rear of the home, the first-floor kitchen and breakfast room were reconfigured to maximize the connection to the back yard, and a new office was added to the second floor. Throughout the renovation the owners were careful to preserve elements of the building’s layered past, including the original briquette-entre-poteaux (brick-between-post) construction still visible in the kitchen. Recent Renovation: Architect, Bell Architecture; contractor, Africk Construction; interior decorator, Meg Bradley Design

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THE NEW ORLEANS ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION PROMOTIONAL SECTION

800 North Rendon Street The former McDonogh 31 school at 800 North Rendon Street opened in the fall of 1906. Plans were prepared by Andry & Bendernagel, the firm where city architect E. A. Christy—credited with designing countless public schools, firehouses, and other civic buildings in Orleans Parish--had worked as a draftsman early in his career. Like many of the city’s public schools constructed during the first decades of the 20th century, the building combines elements of the Beaux-Arts and Craftsman styles. Abandoned after Hurricane Katrina, the structure sat vacant until a recent renovation completed in 2019 converted the former classrooms into 26 apartments ranging in size from 600 to 1,400 square feet. The developer worked with Trapolin-Peer Architects and Ryan Gootee General Contractors to rehabilitate the building using state and federal historic tax credits. Several historic features were retained including the characteristically wide corridors, original wood windows and trim, paneled classroom doors and transoms, wood floors, and separate girls’ and boys’ entrances. Recent Renovation: Architect, Trapolin-Peer Architects; contractor, Ryan Gootee General Contractors; landscape architect, Spackman Mossop Michaels; landscaping, Vista Landscaping

1240 Moss Street Hidden behind the 1920s-era Craftsman-style facade of 1240 Moss Street stands an earlier mid- to late-19th century raised center-hall cottage. The home and its once expansive grounds had previously belonged to the Larose family, commission merchants who managed a small fleet of ships and conducted business from their property along the bayou. In 2015, owners Jack and Jenny Carey undertook a major renovation of the home with the assistance of Jack’s father, Clif Carey, a retired architect, and his mother, Shauna Carey. The front double parlors were preserved while the rear rooms, in poor condition, were rebuilt with a reconfigured open floor plan. Additional living space was gained by converting the previously unfinished attic into two new bedrooms, a play area, and a bathroom. Heart pine and cypress boards salvaged during the renovation were creatively reused for flooring, custom built-ins, and new kitchen countertops. Much of the demolition and construction was completed by Clif, Shauna, and Jack over the course of the 18-month renovation. Recent Renovation: Architect, Clif Carey


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1. Aucion Hart 1525 Metairie Rd., Metairie 504-834-9999 AucoinHart.com

2. Haunted History Tours 723 St Peter, New Orleans 504-861-2727 HauntedHistoryTours.com

3. Southern Refinishing 708 Barataria Blvd, Marrero 504-348-1770 SouthernRefinishing.com

Beautiful in more ways than one. This holiday, find classic diamond jewelry hand-crafted by Aucoin Hart Jewelers on Metairie Road.

These are the tours you've heard about. Recommended by The Travel Channel as “New Orleans #1 Tour ... A MUST DO!� Gift Certificates are available for these popular Ghost, Vampire, Voodoo, Cemetery, Pub Crawl, French Quarter and Garden District Tours.

Give a gift card to Southern Refinishing this holiday season. With the refinishing/restoration process, your worn out fixtures and tile can be restored to their original luster in less than a day. You can even change the color of your fixtures and tile to have the bathroom of your dreams.

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4. Benton Tree Service 504-896-0820 BentonTreeService.com Benton Tree Service has a great team of experts committed to providing the best service. Our team is involved in the community, donating over 400 trees to various nonprofits throughout the metro area. Help us in giving back this holiday season by donating to St. Michael Special School. Mention you saw us in New Orleans Magazine for your FREE estimate.


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5. Chateau Drugs & Gifts 3544 W. Esplanade Ave. St. Metairie 504-889-2300 ChateauDrugsRx.com Come in and check out our festive Nora Fleming items! Choose one of our many wooden platters with holiday minis to make any food tray look ready to host for any event. Holiday minis $13.50. Wooden platter $65.

6. Jaci Blue 2111 Magazine St., New Orleans 504-603-2929 JaciBlue.com Easy, versatile, and sensual — this dress will become a treasured go-to. With a rose gold zipper at the front, a flattering pleat back detail and pockets with hidden zips, practicality and style have found their union. $128 available in sizes 1X-3X.

7. Perlis 1281 N Causeway Blvd, Mandeville 8366 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge 6070 Magazine Street, New Orleans 600 Decatur, French Quarter Perlis.com The Crawfish Logo Cotton/ Cashmere Blend 1/4 Zip Sweater is the perfect weight for southern weather ... warm but not too heavy. Also available in new colors including walnut, charcoal and flannel all with contrasting inner neck trim.

8. Queork 839 Chartres St., New Orleans 3005 Magazine St. New Orleans Chartres: 504-481-4910 Magazine: 504-388-6804 Queork.com Carriage Saddle Bag $219. Fall 2019 Welcomes the newest styles of cork handbags to QUEORK including this Carriage Saddle Bag complete with detachable leather strap available in stores or online.

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9. Fleur d'Orleans 3701 Magazine St. 504-899-5585 818 Chartres St. 504-475-5254 FleurdOrleans.com

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Dress up the season with sterling silver cuff links $160. 10. Home Malone 4610 Magazine St. 504-766-6148 629 N Carrollton Ave. 504-324-8352 HomeMaloneNola.com Shotgun house crafted with plaster and mirrors and made in New Orleans. Measures 9 in W x 12 in T. 11. Auraluz 4408 Shores Drive, Metairie 504-888-3313 ShopAuraluz.com MY SAINT MY HERO's mission is to bring faith, hope and purpose into everyday life. Their beautiful selection of wearable blessings make a wonderful holiday gift for those special ones in your life.

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12. Konnie's Gift Depot 859 Brownswitch Road, Slidell, LA 985-643-8000 “Bird of Paradise” by Circle E Candles has been an all time favorite fragrance for many years among many candle lovers. Bird of Paradise is a magical blend that defies description. Circle E is revamping their line and will discontinue the 28oz size and replace it with a 22oz size. Konnie’s has purchased a large supply of the 28oz size and is pleased to offer them for the Holidays. This may be your last chance to get the larger 28oz candle. See Bird of Paradise as well as the other Circle E fragrances at Konnie’s Gift Depot in the “Country Club Plaza.” 13. Martin Wine 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie 3827 Baronne St., New Orleans MartinWine.com Nothing says southern hospitality like a NOLA gourmet food basket, featuring our special New Orleans labelled wines! From Franco's famous Hurricane Cocktail Mix to our locally made Butter Pecan Praline Cookie and more, give a little piece of home for the holidays this year. $59.99. 14. Historic New Orleans Collection 520 Royal St. 504-598-7147 hnoc.org/shop Greek Key Medium Cuff by Brandi Couvillion 1” x 6” $245. Local jewelry designer—and architecture enthusiast—Brandi Couvillion designed this piece exclusively for The Historic New Orleans Collection as part of the Seignouret-Brulatour Collection. Each piece in this collection draws inspiration from the architectural details of THNOC’s new exhibition center at 520 Royal Street, which includes the meticulous restoration of the Seignouret-Brulatour building. The collection also includes earrings, necklaces, cufflinks and additional bracelets in other designs and finishes. 15. Cristy Cali 504-407-5041 CristyCali.com Queen of Hearts Toggle Bracelet and Queen of Hearts Ring. The secret message behind this piece is to treasure your heart, follow your heart, protect your heart and respect your heart. We are all royalty in our own lives. Remember to be true to yourself and love yourself, because without self love, you cannot love others unconditionally.

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sponsored

Senior Care

I

t’s easy to worry about loved ones who’ve worried over us from the time we were born. As we grow older, our responsibilities shift into caretaker roles—eventually mom and dad need a little extra help, whether it’s getting to and from the grocery, doing home maintenance, or remembering to take their medications. As older adults see a shift in needs, knowing where to turn to satisfy those needs can save families a lot of time and unnecessary stress. From home care specialists who can help with daily tasks and provide companionship to retirement communities who foster relationships and active lifestyles, to experts in healthcare who can assist with insurance, medications, and medical equipment, there are a number of resources available for area seniors. The following local businesses have experience in these areas and welcome your consideration when pursuing assistance for your loved ones.

Care & Companionship in the Home This year, Dependable In-Home Care celebrates 50 successful years of providing proven dependability through referrals of quality caregivers at affordable costs. As the only nationally accredited caregiver registry in the region, Dependable In-Home Care accreditation board has high standards for caregivers. Accreditation requires caregivers have a minimum of two years of experience, a national background check, drug screen, TB test, and carry professional liability insurance. “No other care providers in the area can match our credentials. We provide access to a vetted pool of nearly 175 experienced professional caregivers, certified nursing assistants, and LPNs,” says Joni Friedmann-Lagasse, Owner. With over 100,000 successful referrals, Dependable In-Home Care has helped thousands of families find the high-level companionship, supervision, care and support their loved one needs, from daily activities like meal prep and transportation to bathing, dressing, and mobility assistance. After experiencing firsthand the challenges families face when caring for a loved one, Joni’s mother founded Dependable in 1969, and Joni has been at the helm for over 40 years. A founding member of the CRSB accreditation board, Joni served as its Chairmen from 2012-2014. For more information, visit DependableCare.net. 1 1 4 november 2019 myneworleans.com

Home Care Solutions, newly acquired by Poydras Home, specializes in compassionate in-home care, Alzheimer’s care, and Aging Life Care Management™ services to help your elderly loved ones extend their independence at home. They are committed to providing the highest quality of care, keeping loved ones safe and comfortable while giving families peace of mind. Caregiver’s are carefully matched to meet both your loved one’s needs and personality. Home Care Solutions Care Managers navigate the care of your loved ones with expertise and heart and are experienced advocates with creative solutions for complex situations and all care concerns. Care Managers’ familiarity with local resources saves you time and often saves you money while their compassionate understanding of the aging process saves you unnecessary distress. Home Care Solutions, a licensed Personal Care Attendant Agency, is a member of Home Care Association of America and Aging Life Care Association™. Call 504-828-0900 or visit HomeCareNewOrleans.com. Home Care Solutions would be honored to assist your family in navigating elder care. Home Instead offers peace of mind for families of aging adults who wish to remain in the home. A local franchise owned by a New Orleans native, Home Instead offers the added benefit of staff who understand New Orleans’ culture and hospitality. Home Instead New Orleans has a team of fully trained CAREGiversSM who provide the care and companionship your loved one deserves. CAREGivers provide support through non-medical services like meal preparation, transportation, personal care, medication reminders, and more, while working in tandem when needed with healthcare providers, home health, and hospice. “Most older adults want to stay home, the place they know and love,” says Owner Lisa Rabito. “Our focus is to build relationships first.” Available from eight hours a week to 24 hours a day, CAREGivers can take your loved one to church, the salon, and their weekly bridge game, or care for bed-bound clients who need full personal care, all while providing safety and companionship. Aging adults no longer in the home can also request Home Instead services at the retirement community or nursing facility where they reside. For more information, visit HomeInstead.com/339 or call 504-455-4911.


sponsored As a ministry of the Archdiocese of New Orleans, Notre Dame Health System has a long history of caring for others. Notre Dame knows well the unique needs of area seniors and provides a continuum of healthcare services including home care, independent care, assisted living, skilled nursing and rehabilitation, memory care, home health, and hospice care, all steeped in a rich, Catholic-based tradition. Community and home-based care is available in the Greater New Orleans area. Hospice services through Notre Dame Health System are offered in several areas of Louisiana, including New Orleans and Baton Rouge, as well the Mississippi Gulf region. The spectrum of services provided by Notre Dame allows them to tailor care for all. Notre Dame Health System prides itself on employing the most talented and dedicated teams of healthcare professionals, administrative personnel, volunteers and support staff. To learn more and find out if Notre Dame Health System is a good fit to serve your loved ones, visit NotreDameHealth.org.

Retirement Living & Communities Poydras Home is a Life Plan Community offering independent living, assisted living, and nursing care in the heart of Uptown New Orleans. Poydras Home is known for its quality of care and innovative programs that allow residents to enjoy life to the fullest with emphasis on including residents experiencing Alzheimer’s and dementia. “Poydras Home has tapped into the New Orleans arts community to bring exceptional depth and variety to these residents,” says CEO Erin Kolb. Music is a big part of life at Poydras Home. Poydras Home has forged a relationship with Loyola University and integrated Music Therapy student internships into its Life Enrichment Program for residents. Music Therapy students are paired with individual Poydras Home residents. The students complete a song history with their resident, perform/listen to each song together, and engage in discussion about the song and any memories the resident may have associated with it. The students then create a song booklet for the resident to keep with lyrics and notes from their conversations. The students also create playlists for the resident for more relaxation or reminiscence. For more information, visit PoydrasHome.com or call 504-897-0535. As an award-winning and full-service retirement community, Lambeth House offers the best of all worlds—Independent Living for active adults (ages 62+) plus a full continuum of care, including Assisted Living, Nursing Care, and Memory Care in the event it’s ever needed. With an exceptional approach to living and a focus on active aging, Lambeth House offers a full array of amenities including the fitness center with a stunning indoor, salt-water swimming pool, an art studio, meditation room and garden, fine and casual dining options, and engaging activities and social events. Nonresidents (55+) can access Fitness Center memberships, and Lambeth House’s Wild Azalea Café is open to the public for breakfast and lunch, Tuesday-Saturday. Nestled in the heart of Uptown and overlooking the Mississippi River and Audubon Park, Lambeth House offers luxurious accommodations and was awarded the Design for Aging Merit Award by the American Institute of Architecture for the attention to detail in its last expansion. For more information or a tour of the community, call 504-865-1960 or visit LambethHouse.com. The region’s newest option in senior living, The Blake at Colonial Club, is currently under construction at the corner of Jefferson Highway and Colonial Club Drive in Harahan. The Blake offers resort-style amenities such as a salon and spa, a chef-led dining program, a full service bar and lounge, and an espresso and ice cream bar. Residents participate in activities and outings such as onsite live music and trips to festivals and theatrical performances.

Options for Assisted Living include one- and two-bedroom apartments with 10-foot ceilings, walk-in closets, and traditional millwork. Balconies and porches overlooking the landscaped courtyards are also available. Pricing will be based on service needs and apartment selection; however, the high-end community will be affordable and competitive with other options in the area. Reservations are currently being accepted. For more information, call 504-737-7770 or visit BlakeLiving.com/colonialclub.

Health Insurance Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is devoted to its mission to improve the health and lives of Louisianians. Founded in New Orleans in 1934, the company remains committed to those roots with a new office in the Central Business District and a full-service, regional office in Metairie. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana has offices in every major Louisiana city to serve its customers. True to its mission in its 85th year of service to Louisiana, Blue Cross offers a portfolio of Medicare plans designed to meet the healthcare needs and budget for customers who are eligible for Medicare. To find out more, visit bcbsla.com/medicare. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. It is a private mutual company, owned by its policyholders, with an independent Louisiana Board of Directors and no shareholders.

Planning & Arrangements Today, how you are remembered and celebrated is within your control. Savvy seniors are planning ahead, and whether to ease the burden on loved ones or to simply have a say, choosing the right funeral home makes all the difference. Jacob Schoen & Son has been helping New Orleans families create lasting memories for their loved ones for over 145 years. Whether in your time of need or as a resource to help walk you through the process of preplanning, the Schoen family and staff are here and available to help navigate the intricate details of beliefs, family, and wishes to create the perfect celebration. They bring the ease, comfort, and peace of mind needed to allow you, your family, and friends to remember, grieve, and console. Located at 3827 Canal Street in a newly renovated mansion, Jacob Schoen & Son invites you to stop by and see what is new, discuss what innovative options are available, and learn more about how they can help you or a loved one realize their wishes and create lasting memories. Call 504-267-2924 to set up a tour.

Pharmacies & Medical Equipment Generations of families have turned to Patio Drugs for assistance in managing their healthcare needs. Family owned and operated since 1958, Patio Drugs helps customers understand their medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, and provides free prescription delivery throughout East Jefferson. A full-service pharmacy and the oldest independent pharmacy in Jefferson Parish, Patio Drugs is also a leading provider of home medical equipment. For everything from a Band-Aid, to medication, to a hospital bed, Patio Drugs is the one-stop source for your family’s healthcare needs. In addition to providing retail and medical equipment, Patio Drugs can assist with long-term care as well as specialty and compounding services. Patio Drugs is accredited by The Joint Commission in Home Medical Equipment, Long Term Care, and Consultant Pharmacy Services. Their Compounding Pharmacy is PCAB accredited through ACHC. Patio Drugs is located at 5208 Veterans Boulevard in Metairie. For more information, call 504-889-7070. Patio Drugs, “Large Enough to Serve You, Yet, Small Enough to Know You.” • myneworleans.com november 2019 1 1 5


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Westside offers full-service, in-house x-rays, as well as physical therapy services with access to new rehabilitation equipment. Same day appointments can be accommodated. For more information, visit WestsideOrtho.com or call 504-347-0243.

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Thibodaux Regional Sports Medicine Center, located in Lafourche Parish, is committed to providing student athletes and coaches with the tools needed for a safe and successful season. One unique aspect of care offered through the Center is use of its advanced concussion technology, which provides physicians with concrete data to help determine when an athlete is ready to return to sports following an injury. In addition to concussion management, comprehensive treatment and rehabilitative services are offered for all types of injuries, with an end goal of helping athletes return to the same level of competition performance. “Thibodaux Regional’s sports medicine program also offers educational seminars that focus on nutrition, conditioning, equipment fitting and reconditioning, and specific health topics such as concussion and athletic injury rehabilitation,” says Larry D‘Antoni, ATC, LAT, Coordinator, Thibodaux Regional Sports Medicine Center . To learn more about the sports medicine program at Thibodaux Regional Health System, call 985-493-4502 or visit thibodaux.com.

Serving the West Bank and Greater New Orleans region, Westside Orthopaedic Clinic provides superior general orthopaedic treatment with a specialty in spinal care. The clinic has been in operation since 1961, making it one of the longest standing orthopaedic clinics in the city. Dr. Ralph. Katz is a board certified and fellowship trained orthopedic specialist who has performed over 1,000 minimally invasive procedures with consistently excellent outcomes. For the right patient who has failed conservative treatment (e.g. medication, physical therapy, injections), a minimally invasive microdiscectomy can be done in an outpatient setting with an incision that can be covered by a band-aid. The procedure typically takes less than an hour. Most patients can return to normal activities within three to six weeks. Additionally, Dr. Katz performs cervical and lumbar spinal fusions, utilizing small incisions with minimally invasive systems. He is one of few local surgeons who perform both cervical and lumbar disc replacements.

Children’s Hospital New Orleans’ Orthopedic Center is committed to providing comprehensive and compassionate care for pediatric, adolescent, and young adult patients. Orthopedic residents from several medical centers complete pediatric rotations at Children’s Hospital to train with the largest group of board certified orthopedic surgeons in the area. Established in 1955, it contains the region’s largest and most experienced pediatric orthopedic team. In its specialty clinics last year, the hospital recorded more than 24,000 visits, treating the full spectrum of orthopedic conditions—ranging from fractures and sports-related injuries to scoliosis, hip conditions, limb length discrepancies, and cerebral palsy. The center blends cutting-edge treatments and innovative surgical approaches with prompt, familycentered care. A specialized critical care spinal unit is available to all patients who undergo a spine related surgical procedure. The center’s team is committed to providing the best possible care for every patient. For more information about the Orthopedic Center at Children’s Hospital, visit chnola.org/orthopedics. •

Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine s a medical specialty, orthopedics and sports medicine covers a vast number of conditions and injuries. Sports fans know well the injuries their favorite athletes are prone to, from torn ligaments and broken bones to sprained ankles and tennis elbow. Meanwhile, older adults know well the pain of aging joints and commonly think of the specialty as the home of knee and hip replacements. And yet parents of young children who have spinal or limb length disorders know the specialty as the place to turn for advanced treatment. When conditions of the musculoskeletal system arise and may require specialized treatment, seeing an orthopedist is a common recommendation from primary care physicians. South Louisiana is home to numerous experts in the field, from experienced surgeons specializing in minimally invasive treatments to experts in care for athletes and orthopedic surgeons who work specifically with children.

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streetcar by errol laborde

The Season of ‘99 As season openers went it was

promising. The Saints began the 1999 season on the road against the Carolina Panthers. Featuring a squad that carried two Heisman trophy winners: Danny Wuerffel, a quarterback out of the University of Florida, and Ricky Williams, a University of Texas running back who broke so many records during his college career that the Saints were willing to give away all their draft choices to get him as a first round pick. (The move was so sensational that Sport Illustrated magazine shocked the sports world with a cover about the Saints football marriage for which Head Coach Mike Ditka wore a tuxedo and Williams agreed to wear a wedding dress.) Opening day made the excitement seem worthwhile. The Saints won 19-10. Williams in his rookie debut had modest success carrying the ball 10 times for 40 yards. Wuerffel, sat on the bench playing back up, along with rookie 1 3 6 november 2019

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Jake Delhomme from the University of Louisiana-Lafayette. Starting at quarterback was Billy Joe Tolliver a nine-year veteran out of Texas Tech. All was good as the team flew back to New Orleans and the season looked bright. Unfortunately, there were still 15 more games to play. A week later, the Saints lost their home-opener to the San Francisco 49ers. That was followed by an unusually early BYE week and then a string of 14 games, of which the Saints lost 12. (The only remaining victories were a revenge battle on the road against the 49ers and, sweetest of all, a Christmas Eve win against the Cowboys in Dallas.) Overall, though, it was a miserable season. Since the three wins were all away games, the home fans were denied a Saints victory in the Dome. I remember being at a Saints a game during that era at which there were maybe 30,000 fans. The Dome was

totally quiet as each team traded exchanges of three downs and a punt, with lots of incomplete passes along the way. Finally, one fan with a deep raspy voice bellowed “boring!!” which was heard throughout the Dome. The crowd issued its loudest cheer of the game. Or maybe the second loudest. There was one member from the Saints sideline that was usually the star of the day. It was Fetch Monster, an Australian Shepard dog who never failed in her job of running onto the field after a kickoff to fetch and return the kicking tee. The crowd loved it. Other than Fetch, the cheers were few. This was not the Saints worst season. That would have been in 1980 when the team finished 1-15 beating only the New York Jets on the road in the snow. There were three two-win seasons and one other threewin year, but 1999 was the most disappointing, especially since Ditka had already won a Superbowl earlier in his career for the Chicago Bears. His success, we hoped, would be transferable. But Ricky Williams was injured often and Wuerffel was a bust. The talent just never galvanized. As the season wore on owner Tom Benson ran an ad in the Times-Picayune apologizing for the team’s performance and promising better days. Only one player on that team would eventually achieve Superbowl glory. Jake Delhomme, the backup rookie quarterback from ULL would eventually be traded

to Carolina, where as starting quarterback he led the team to the 2004 Superbowl against the New England Patriots. The Patriots won but it was a thriller decided by a last second field goal. On January 2, 2000, the Saints closed out the ’99 season losing at home to Carolina 45-13. The team they had defeated on opening day handed them a 32-point loss on the final day. It was the Saints worst beating of the season. Three days later Tom Benson must have felt like the loneliest man in the world as he fired Ditka and the entire coaching staff (which included Danny Abramowicz, one of the of the original Saints) and the entire front office. It was a clean sweep. The press hounded Benson for allowing this disaster to happen. The critics included those voices who had urged him to hire Ditka in the first place. In the following 2000 season, the Saints, under new head coach Jim Haslett, finished on top of their division and for the first time ever won a playoff game before being eliminated. Nine years later, on the 10th anniversary of Ditka’s last team, the Saints won the Super Bowl. No one is yelling “boring” anymore and if they do they could not be heard over the crowd noise. Fetch Monster was also released as part of the 1999 purge, but at least now fans can cheer the kicks rather than just the tee.

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ARTHUR NEAD Illustration


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

New Orleans Magazine November 2019  

New Orleans Magazine November 2019