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MEET OUR SALES TE AM

Lisa Picone Love Sales Manager 830-7248 Lisa@myneworleans.com

Samantha Shiff Account Executive 830-7226 Samantha@myneworleanscom

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales 830-7215 Colleen@myneworleans.com

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CO N T E N T S

Features

On the Cover

Photographed by Jeffery Johnston Learn all about New Orleans’ performing arts scene, starting on pg. 41.

41 OnStage New Orleans’ guide to performing arts BY KATHY FINN

48

Whole Health 10 local health heroes for your whole family BY KELCY WILBURN

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(Standing) Senior Director of Programs Timeka Junius and Chairs Kathryn Brennan McLeod and Peggy Laborde and (seated) Honoree Founder Jana Napoli and Chair Hattie Moll (not pictured Chair Susan Brennan) for “Just Say YAYA 30th Anniversary Gala.” On Friday, November 16, YAYA (Young Aspirations/Young Artists) will celebrate 30 years of creativity with a cocktail party at the YAYA Arts Center in Central City, at 3322 LaSalle St., at its “Just Say YAYA 30th Anniversary Gala.” Chairs Susan Brennan, Peggy Laborde, Kathryn Brennan McLeod and Hattie Moll promise fabulous food and drinks, live music, a silent auction and an exhibition of work by YAYA artists past and present. In addition to honoring 30 years of YAYA Artists, this event will also honor Founder Jana Napoli. Call 529-3306 or email meg@yayainc.org for more information and to purchase tickets. Special thanks to YAYA’s Executive Director Meg Miles for her invaluable assistance.


CO N T E N T S

In Every Issue

20 8 & 10 EDITORS’ NOTES

12 MAKING A DIFFERENCE

NAMI New Orleans: Looking beyond the stigma and reaching out

14 KIDS PLAY

Tulane Football & the Riptide Kid’s Club: Fun for even the youngest fan

16 WHAT’S HOT

Art

18 ON THE MENU

Craving Crab: Chef Baruch Rabassa shares Gautreau’s Blue Crab and Heirloom Tomato Salad

20 THE DISH

First Breath of Fall: Dine outside – finally

56 VINTAGE WEDDING

Dorothy Henican Weds Dr. Charles Emile Heidingsfelder: October 23, 1965

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40

PHILANTHROPIC FUN

62 58 WITH THIS RING

Geary – Philips True Patriots The National WWII Museum honored dedication to America’s freedom and democracy. 22 Strong Southern Women The Ogden Museum of Southern Art celebrated strong female voices in abstract art. 24 Leaning Into Literacy One Book One New Orleans campaigned for literacy and honored author Elizabeth Williams and chef Susan Spicer. 26 Luminous Service Arnaud’s Restaurant hosted a benefit for Lighthouse Louisiana. 28 Friendly Competition New Orleanians competed to support the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 30

Women Helping Women Bridge House / Grace House recognized female role models. 32 Medical Missionaries Dedicated to Ms. Jane M. Gisevius, the 16th “Mission Possible Gala” enabled NOMMS to provide medical aid to those in need. 34

60 YOUNG BLOODS

Happy Johnson: CEO & Co-Founder, Team Happy Foundation

61 STUDENT ACTIVIST

Lucy Claire Galloway: Academy of the Sacred Heart

62

Tasting Temptations NOWFE has raised more than $1 million for local nonprofit organizations. 36

SHOP TALK

Sharing Shakespeare The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane welcomed 200 to its opening night festivities. 38

SHOP TALK

For Heart’s Sake The American Heart Association hosted a gala devoted to building healthier lives and communities. 40

66 ONSTAGE CALENDAR

April L. Watson: Proprietor, The Shard Shop

63 Danielle Conrad: Owner, Wildflower Boutique

64 SNAPSHOTS

72 NOSTALGIA

The World’s Champion Speed Contest: The Speed Derby of 1941 lasted two months.


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OCTOBER 2018 VOL. 23 ISSUE 5 Editorial EXECUTIVE EDITOR Bev Church EDITOR Morgan Packard Griffith ART DIRECTOR Ali Sullivan CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mirella Cameran SOCIETY COLUMNIST Catherine Freeman FOOD & DINING COLUMNIST Jyl Benson WEB EDITOR Kelly Massicot EVENT PHOTO COORDINATOR Jeff Strout

Advertising VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan

(504) 830-7241, Colleen@MyNewOrleans.com SALES MANAGER Lisa Picone Love (504) 830-7248, Lisa@MyNewOrleans.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Samantha Shiff (504) 830-7226, Samantha@MyNewOrleans.com

Marketing DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND EVENTS

Cheryl Lemoine EVENT COORDINATOR Abbie Dugruise DIGITAL MEDIA ASSOCIATE Mallary Matherne

For event information call (504) 830-7264

Production PRODUCTION DESIGNER Emily Andras,

Rosa Balaguer, Meghan Rooney TRAFFIC MANAGER Topher Balfer

Administration CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Todd Matherne PRESIDENT Alan Campell EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Errol Laborde VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Colleen Monaghan OFFICE MANAGER Mallary Matherne DISTRIBUTION MANAGER John Holzer SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER Brittanie Bryant

For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231

A Publication of Renaissance Publishing, LLC 110 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Ste. 123 Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, © 2018 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. St. Charles Avenue is not responsible for photos or artwork and assumes that all releases have been cleared upon submission to the magazine. St. Charles Avenue is published monthly by Renaissance Publishing, LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Ste. 123, Metairie, La. 70005, (504) 828-1380. Subscription rate: one year $17.95, two year $31, three year $43 — foreign rates vary call for pricing. It is the policy of this magazine to employ people on the basis of their qualifications and with assurance of equal opportunity and treatment regardless of race, color, creed, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or handicap.

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B E V ' S N OT E

Young Aspirations/Young Artists (YAYA) is 30 years old and what a celebration they’re planning for Friday, November 16! Thanks so much to our cover models Peggy Laborde, Kathryn Brennan McLeod, Hattie Moll and Timeka Junius (and not pictured Susan Brennan)! We are especially honored to have the founder of this amazing organization, Jana Napoli, whose caring, creativity and belief in young people made YAYA an organization that’s as vital today as it was 30 years ago! Timeka Junius started as a YAYA artist and is now the Senior Director of Programs. What an accomplishment! “Just Say YAYA’s 30th Anniversary Gala” will feature a cocktail party at the YAYA Art Center honoring the generations of artists who have passed through the doors with fabulous food, drinks, live music, a silent auction and an exhibition of work by YAYA artists past and present! Be sure to get tickets to the Patron Party, 6 to 7 p.m., and the gala, 7 to 11 p.m. Call 529-3306 or email meg@yayainc.org for tickets. Be sure to check out What’s Hot for Art themed around the concept of smoke. Whether it’s wafting, billowing, simmering or smoldering, these pieces could hang on your wall or be put on a pedestal. Everyone cares about our family’s health, so you don’t want you to miss our feature that spotlights 10 vendors who will give us the latest tips and trends to keep us safe and healthy. I want to give you an update on Southern Rep Theatre and their new home housed in a multi-stage theatre complex at the former St. Rose de Lima Church. Their exciting 32nd season will include bold world and regional premieres, as well as the best of Broadway, offBroadway and classic plays. Artistic Director Aimee Hayes is proud of the series as well as Southern Rep’s unique position as a sector leader, creative force and an important resource for contemporary American theatre. Southern Rep is also proud of their new “Care for Creatives” programming initiative, which offers low-cost mental health self-care and wellness events for artists with the N.O. Musician’s Clinic’s “You Got This” program. Wellness workshops are available for registration now. The full 2018-2019 Care for Creatives schedule is available online at SouthernRep.com/care-for-creatives. Call 523-9857 for general inquires about Southern Rep Theatre programs and information on its new venue! Thanks to everyone who’s attending “Wine Dine & Design” and Bastion, and to all of the vendors and supporters, like James Michalopoulos who donated a magnificent painting!  It is starting to look like cooler weather is near, so go out and enjoy City Park, Audubon Park and biking with the blue bikes!

Beverly Reese Church

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“Key to the Cure 2018” is October 10, benefiting the Louisiana Cancer Research Center. Co-Chairs Olivia Manning, Patricia Brinson and Louellen Berger (pictured) promise a night filled with fun and, along with Steven Putt and Carolyn Elder of Saks Fifth Avenue, to raise a record amount to find a cure for cancer! We have all been touched by this disease, and this is your chance to shop, listen and dance to great music, eat fabulous food from over 30 restaurants and see

a terrific fashion show put on by Saks! Saks will donate 10 percent of all sales from October 10 from 6-9:30 p.m., and on October 11 and 12. Their motto is “As you shop more ... We give more!” Tickets start at $75; Patrons start at $250 and go up to $20,000 and up. Make checks out to LCRC and mail to LCRC/ KTTC, 1700 Tulane Ave., 10th Floor, New Orleans, LA 70112; or call 888-7608. You can buy tickets at the door, but you want to get them now!


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M O R G A N ' S N OT E

October The nonprofit events season is in full swing as I write (I’m attending four events next week!), and it’s only going to get busier until the holidays roll in and a difference kind of time management has to happen. It is always hard to make time for our family’s health, but it’s better to prevent and have a plan in case of emergency than try to make the best decisions during one. Our feature gives you information on 10 of the best “health heroes” around. I want to draw your attention to Susan G. Komen New Orleans’ “Race for the Cure” on October 20. The Race for the Cure® Series is the world’s largest and most successful education and fundraising event for breast cancer ever created. Call 455-7310 to learn more and register today. October is probably my favorite month of the year. The weather is finally what most of the rest of the country calls fall. Halloween is so much fun, and in New Orleans we celebrate it for a least a week! I love pumpkin everything – foods, smells, decorating; if that makes me “basic” I don’t care. (Trust me and try a Cinderella Latte; it’s like a PSL, but sub in white chocolate for half the pumpkin flavor.) And I have way too many coats for this climate, and I love wearing them! Another thing I love, especially during fall, are the cordials at Emeril’s Delmonico. The Elixir of the Seven Powers is truly made for cooler weather (ask about what goes into this to be amazed), but the Limoncello and (off menu) Blood Orangecello are fabulous on a hot day – or just because! They have other cordials on and off menu, so be sure to ask your bartender (at their great happy hour) or your server for what’s available.

Morgan Packard Griffith

3 “Standing Stronger Together,” benefiting Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, la.events@ ppgulfcoast.org, 407-1786 4 “Top Chef Reconcile,” benefiting Cafe Reconcile, 934-1637 5 “City Stars Soiree,” benefiting Junior Achievement of Greater New Orleans, 569-8657 5 30th annual “The Justice For All Ball,” benefiting The Pro Bono Project, 581-3480, 501auctions.com/jfab 5 “Greenway Soirée,” benefiting Friends of Lafitte Greenway, LafitteGreenway.org/ Soiree2018 5 “Tremé Fall Festival Patron Party,” benefiting The Historic Faubourg Tremé Association, TremeFest.com 5 “Scales & Ales,” benefiting Audubon Aquarium of the America,   AudubonNatureInstitute. org/scales-and-ales 6 Third annual “Beignet Fest,” benefiting Tres Doux Foundation,  BeignetFest.com 6 “‘Newton Howard: Painter of the Sportsman’s Paradise’ and ‘New Southern Photography’ Opening Reception,” benefiting the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 539-9631 6 “Asian-Pacific American Society Annual Fundraising Gala,” APASNola.com 6 “NAMIWalks,” benefiting NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) New Orleans, 896-2345, NAMIWalks.org/NewOrleans 9 “Baubles and Bubbly for Beethoven,” benefiting Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, 861-9028

9 “An Evening of Desire,” benefiting the Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival, TennesseeWilliams.net, 581-1144 10 “2018 Saks Fifth Avenue Key to the Cure,” benefiting Louisiana Cancer Research Center, 888-7608 11 “33rd Annual Catholic Foundation Dinner,” cf.arch-no.org/annualdinner, 596-3044 12 “Magic in the Moonlight & the Moonlighters,” benefiting Botanical Garden Foundation, 483-9386 12-14 Fifth annual “WWII Air, Sea & Land Festival 2018,” benefiting The National WWII Museum, Commemorative Air Force and Greater New Orleans Sports Foundation, 528-1944 extension 313, AirSeaLandFest.com 13 “Dancing Grounds Showdown,” benefiting Dancing Grounds, 535-5791, DancingGrounds. com/Showdown 13 “Louisiana Walks for Parkinson’s,” benefiting Davis Phinney Foundation, (720) 259-0907, DPF.org, ParkinsonsWalk.org 13 “UNCF Walk For Education,” benefiting UNCF, 581-3794 13 “Spirit of the Vieux Carré Patron Party & Gala,” benefiting the Vieux Carré Commission Foundation, 342-4760, VCCFoundation. org/2018Gala 14 “Feast at the Board of Trade,” benefiting Parkway Partners Program, 620-2224 16 “Appetite for Art,” benefiting Upturn Arts, 390-8399 19-21 “Ghosts in the Oaks,” benefiting Friends of City Park, 483-9376

20 “Race for the Cure,” benefiting Susan G. Komen New Orleans, 4455-7310 20 “Center Celebration: A Sweet and Saucy Night at the J,” benefiting New Orleans Jewish Community Center, 897-0143 20 “O What a Night!,” benefiting the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 539-9631 21 “Fete du Jardin – Big Fun on the Bayou,” benefiting Louisiana Landmarks Society, 482-0312 22-28 “Crescent City Chamber Music Festival,” benefiting Young Leadership Council, CrescentCityChamberMusicFestival.com 24 “Bewitching Affair Luncheon,” benefiting New Orleans Garden Society, 430-4937 24 11th annual “Fall Gala: Lambeth House Foundation Toasts the Tricentennial” presented by Guardian Angel Hospice, benefiting Lambeth House, 865-1960 extension 170 25 “Cocktails for KID smART,” benefiting KID smART, 940-1994 25 61st annual “Weiss Awards,” benefiting New Orleans Council for Community and Justice, 522-3760 26 “Signature Chefs Auction,” benefiting March of Dimes, 376-7228 27 “Deo Gratias,” benefiting Saint Joseph Seminary College, (985) 867-2284, sjasc.edu 31 “Juliette Low Leadership Luncheon,” benefiting Girl Scouts Louisiana East, GSLE.org/ LeadershipLuncheon


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MAKING A DIFFERENCE

NAMI New Orleans Looking beyond the stigma and reaching out By Catherine Freeman

Years ago, a doctor and I were having a conversation about mental illness when he shared a profound analogy I’ve never forgotten. Asking if I would take my children to an eye doctor if they had vision issues, I quickly replied yes, of course. He then inquired if I would take my children to visit a psychiatrist if they were having mental struggles. I debated silently to myself the cons of having a mental illness diagnosis attached to my child before I replied that, depending on the severity I would consider it. This doctor graciously pointed out how I was allowing the unwarranted stigma associated with mental illness to negatively affect a decision that should be just as immediate as seeking treatment for a physical ailment. Whether from personal experiences, relationships or the news, it’s obvious mental illnesses can strike anyone at any time. Currently affecting around 450 million people worldwide, mental illness can disrupt a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. And yet as serious as this is, the stigma associated with mental illness often causes individuals to feel shame in seeking help. One organization has been offering mental illness support locally for 40 years and strives to no longer be the best kept secret in town. This grassroots organization providing free or low-cost services to over 5,000 local individuals each year is NAMI New Orleans, the local affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. NAMI New Orleans offers

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NAMIWalks with Tulane’s NAMI on Campus team

support not only to people living with mental illness, but also to the families and caregivers of people living with mental illness. While they do provide high quality psychological services, what sets them apart from other mental health organizations are their peer supported or led programs. Programs for individuals living with mental illness range from a peer-run Drop-In Center Uptown, to weekly peer-led support groups called NAMI Connection, to their 10-week education course taught by trained members living in recovery, NAMI Peer-to-Peer. “When I was able to realize that my family member was doing the best he could, I felt less angry and more accepting. I was able to see the person versus the illness,” said a participant in the NAMI Family-to-Family 12 week program, an education course taught by trained family members. There are also NAMI Family Support Groups led by family members offered monthly at three regional NAMI locations as well as their Family Guide: A Roadmap to Resources and Support available online or in print and Suicide Bereavement Counseling for adults who have lost a loved one to suicide. Because individuals living with mental illness and their families often feel

isolated and misunderstood, NAMI New Orleans works tirelessly on education and advocacy initiatives at the local, state and national levels to bring recognition to and awareness of these disorders. Their Mental Healthcare Navigation Team provides personalized assistance in navigating the complicated mental healthcare system by calling a NAMI New Orleans representative and their Mental Health First Aid, an eight-hour training that teaches people how to identify, understand and respond to signs of a mental health problem or crisis. By helping our community understand mental illness is like any other medical condition, early intervention is key, and mental illness is treatable, NAMI New Orleans is empowering us all to look beyond the stigma and reach out for help. n

A little more … Change minds with a second line at the ninth annual “NAMIWalks” on Saturday, October 6, at Audubon Park. To find more information or register for free, call 896-2345 or visit NAMIWalks.org/NewOrleans.


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K I DS P L AY

Tulane Football & the Riptide Kid’s Club Fun for even the youngest fan By Brittany Kennedy

In our sub-tropical climate, the arrival of “fall” can be hard to pinpoint. Temperatures don’t begin falling until well after kids start school, and sipping a pumpkin spice latte in a sweater isn’t something we can do until November (if we ever can do it at all). So, for most of us in the South, “fall” means one thing and one thing only: It’s time for football. In South Louisiana there’s no lack of football to watch, with several high school and college teams nearby, not to mention our beloved Saints, who always manage to thrill (even if they disappoint) us every season. Like all great sports experiences, timing, cost and overwhelming atmospheres don’t always make these events family-friendly. Luckily, in our own backyard, Tulane University has gone to great lengths to make football game days an experience for fans both young and old as it celebrates five years being back Uptown after years of playing the Superdome. “Our goal is community outreach and bringing fans in of all ages, particularly our youngest ones,” says Matt Thompson, Assistant Director of Marketing and Promotions at Tulane Athletics. This outreach includes having a “Family Fun Zone” option for season tickets for $300 (which includes two adult and two children tickets) as well as an on-campus tailgating atmosphere that’s both familyfriendly and easily accessible for local fans. The game day experience all takes place in Tulane’s LBC quadrangle, just off Freret

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Street going toward Claiborne Avenue toward Yulman Stadium. Ample green space and pedestrian walkways allow strollers to pass easily, kids to wander freely and even room to throw a football around before game time. Almost every week (especially for Saturday games), there are bouncy houses and other inflatables for older kids. The atmosphere is warm and, like most campuses on game day, it’s easy to make friends and find yourself being welcomed with a plate of food and opinions on the upcoming game. While it can be hard for a young family to commit the time and energy to a full season of any sport, even if you aren’t a season ticket holder, any young fan can also join (or be gifted a membership to) the Riptide Kid’s Club. For $20 kids get a T-shirt, backpack, Frisbee and rally towel, as well as entrance to select Tulane events throughout the year and invitations to special events, including the designated Kid’s Club football game on October 20 versus Southern Methodist University that will feature a few pre-game events and gifts for members. The membership this year even comes with an Audubon Zoo pass. The biggest hit in our house, however, has been the membership card and the yearly birthday card from Riptide himself, which makes kids feel connected to something bigger than themselves. Even after the football season ends,

members enjoy entrance to select games and events, including volleyball, men’s and women’s basketball and baseball. Even for the littlest fans that don’t know anything about sports, these games offer a great opportunity to teach kids about sitting down, paying attention and learning the rules of the game. The particular benefit of basketball and volleyball is that they’re fast-moving sports played indoors, which means short attention spans stay engaged and weather is rarely a factor (a boon if you have a young baby in tow). Since the campus is compact and the facilities fairly new, concessions and bathrooms are always at hand and there’s ample to staff to help. All in all, Tulane has given families an easy, and affordable, way to spend some quality family time during those weekends during the school year when the days get shorter and we all need a break a from the daily grind by watching the old gridiron. n

Just the Facts ... Tulane’s remaining home football games: October 20, November 20 and November 24 (times TBD) Ticket and Kid’s Club Information: 861-WAVE (9283), TulaneGreenWave.com


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W H AT ' S H OT

Art By Amy Gabriel

Whether wafting, billowing, simmering or smoldering, the concept of smoke as featured in works of art can conjure up ideas like ritual and renewal, or even showmanship and celebration, all of which are the cornerstone of the resilient Crescent City spirit.

� � �


W H AT ' S H OT

1. The smoke element in Ida Floreak’s “Censer” (16x20-inch) is a nod to the examination of religious fascination with the natural world. Claire Elizabeth Gallery, 131 Decatur St., 309.4063, ClaireElizabethGallery.com 2. The torch bearers in all their glory shine in “Lighting of the Flambeaus” (12x12-inch). Billy Solitario Fine Art, 4531 Magazine St., 905-4175, BillySolitario.com 3. Artist Katrine Hildebrandt utilizes actual smoke and hand burnt lines with walnut ink on paper to create Glow Expand (12x22-inch). Martine Chaisson Gallery, 727 Camp St., 302-7942, MartineChaissonGallery.com 4. Karoline Schleh’s smoke and graphite composition “Smoke Songs” (22x30-inch) features backwards writing to convey the reflective mindset of how words, information and styles are impermanent and shift through time. Callan Contemporary, 518 Julia St., 5250518, CallanContemporary.com

5. The swirling, stylized teal line design using semigloss glaze brings Joseph Fortune Meyer’s vase to life (c. 1910-1930). Newcomb Art Museum of Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb Circle, 865-5328, NewcombArtMuseum.Tulane.edu

6. A puff of exhaust gives the smooth ride pictured in “Camera on d’Eyes” (28x22-inch) all the more gusto. Michalopoulos Gallery, 617 Bienville St., 5580505, Michalopoulos.com 7. The New Orleans sky, as depicted in Carlos Mendieta’s “The Dark End of the Street” (10x7-inch) evokes the sensation of a smoky sky gathering over the rooftops. Where Y’art, 1901 Royal St., 325-5672, WhereYart.net

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ON THE MENU

Craving Crab Chef Baruch Rabassa shares Gautreau’s Blue Crab and Heirloom Tomato Salad Blue Crab and Heirloom Tomato Salad with avocado, beets, radish and chili lime vinaigrette 1 pound picked jumbo lump crab 2 large heirloom tomatoes, diced medium ½ cup beets, boiled and diced ¼ cup radish, julienned ¼ cup sunflower sprouts 1 cup *avocado purée (recipe below) 1 cup *chili lime vinaigrette (recipe below) 4 pieces crispy flatbread of choice Salt and pepper to taste TOSS crab with 1/3 vinaigrette let sit for 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Toss tomatoes with 1/3 vinaigrette and let sit 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Spread avocado purée on flatbread. Place seasoned tomatoes on top of avocado. Place crab on top of tomatoes. Garnish with beets, radish and sprouts. Drizzle remaining vinaigrette around salad. Serves 4

Avocado Purée 1 medium ripe avocado 1 medium lime, juiced 1 Tablespoon olive oil Salt and pepper to taste In a food processor COMBINE all ingredients and purée. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Chili Lime Vinaigrette

GAUTREAU’S 1728 Soniat St., 899-7397, GautreausRestaurant.com

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WISK together lime juice, olive oil and salt and pepper. Add rest of ingredients. Let sit for 20 minutes.

PHOTOS BY JE FFERY J OHNSTON

1 teaspoon serrano chili, diced small 1 Tablespoon red pepper, diced small 1 Tablespoon yellow pepper, diced small 1 Tablespoon shallot, small dice 1 Tablespoon cilantro, chopped 1/3 cup lime juice 2/3 cup olive oil Salt and pepper to taste


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THE DISH

First Breath of Fall

Duck confit with bacon jam, goat cheese and micro arugula from Cooper Vine.

Dine outside – finally By Jyl Benson

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PHOTO BY MIK E LIR E T TE

With the first refreshing breaths of cooling autumn air and the turning of the leaves – to the extent that leaves actually change here – we can welcome a season for outdoor dining. After a long summer spent huffing frigid Freon fumes and running about in tank tops, we can finally dress up a bit and enjoy dining al fresco once again. My personal favorite place for outdoor dining is Café Degas. The patio dining room at this charming French bistro is built around gardens and a tree trunk, lending the space the feel of a tree house and an ever-present air of romance. The verdant, picturesque view of Alcee Fortier Park, located just across graceful Esplanade Avenue, lends itself well to long lingering meals of shared charcuterie boards, steak frites and, for bunch, omelets with fines herbes and lumps of crabmeat. Café Degas is a top destination for an exceptionally good happy hour, offered Wednesdays and Thursdays, 3-6 p.m. Plates of assorted pâtés with saucissons, fig mustard and cornichons are offered for $6; plump, expertly fried oysters with creamy aioli are also $6; classic escargot arrive swimming in garlic butter


for $5; and a hearty portion of Moules au Fenouil and frites is available for $8. Glasses of quality French wines, both still and sparkling, a daily house cocktail and glasses of Nola Blonde beer are $5. So dear to my heart, The Southern Food & Beverage Museum (SoFAB), New Orleans’ institution devoted to the preservation and perpetuation of the food of the American South, will present the 2018 Contemporary Issues in Food & Drink Lecture Series presented by Domino Foods: “Edna Lewis, Southern Food, & Identity: A Conversation with Sara Franklin & Liz Williams.” The food of the South resonates with the heartbeats of the people who have developed and eaten it. From the outside it’s Southern food. From the inside, it’s food. On October 18, Sara Franklin and Liz Williams will explain the role of Edna Lewis in introducing America to Southern Food, and shaping the way we see the South and its food. Following the discussion SoFAB will host a great number of southern cookbook authors, who will sign and discuss their books. Authors include Elizabeth Williams, Poppy Tooker, Kit Wohl,Yvette Jemison, Beth D’Addono, Justin Nystrom and Cynthia Nobles. Admission to the lecture is free, but please RSVP to secure your spot. n CAFÉ DEGAS, 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635, CafeDegas.com COPPER VINE, 1009 Poydras St., 208-9535, CopperVineWine.com THE SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM, 1504 Oretha C. Haley Blvd., 569-0405, For reservations: NatFAB.org/events/ edna-lewis-conversation

Try This: Culinary entrepreneur Kyle Brechtel (Fulton Alley and Bonfire Catering) recently opened Copper Vine, a new wine bar concept with a state-of-the-art wine tap system in the historic, circa 1876, Edwardian building that once housed Maylie’s Restaurant. There is an expansive, lush, sexy tropical courtyard decked out with bench seating, throw pillows, rugs and elegant minimalist outdoor furniture. Thirty wine varietals are available on tap. Wine flights allow for vertical exploration of flavors and varietals, and a Coravin system allows guests to taste 20 higher end and exotic wines that aren’t typically poured by-theglass. There are eight local beers on tap, as well as a strong cocktail program. Chef Mike Brewer, formerly with Brennan’s, Commander’s Palace and his award-winning sandwich spot The Sammich (where he took home the crown as the 2015 King of Louisiana Seafood) is heading up the kitchen with a solid gastro pub approach. Snacks start at a thrifty $4 and include deviled eggs topped with jumbo lump crab meat; beef carpaccio with hot sauce-pickled strawberries, pea shoots, snow peas and shaved radish; and farm-raised Murder Point oysters with pineapple-mint gelée topped with Cajun caviar. Flatbreads include duck confit with bacon jam, goat cheese and micro arugula as well as escargot with shiitake mushrooms, housemade bacon, pork trotter marinara, preserved lemon and charred onion. There are also inventive, interesting soups and enticing entrées, like chicken fricassee with crawfish boil peanuts and boudin rice, and Cajun bouillabaisse. I am not much on desserts, but the goat cheesecake with basil ice cream sounds pretty irresistible.

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PHIL ANTHROPIC FUN

True Patriots

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The National WWII Museum honored dedication to America’s freedom and democracy. By Shelby Simon

Courage, sacrifice, initiative and generosity – demonstrated in the areas of leadership, service to country, community and education – are key qualities of the honorees recognized at The National WWII Museum’s “American Spirit Awards.” The multi-day series of events celebrating individuals and organizations whose work reflects the values and spirit of those who served our country during the WWII years benefits educational programming at the museum. A Patron Reception was held on Thursday, June 7, in the Chinoiserie rooms of Windsor Court Hotel, the Official Hotel of the “American Spirit Awards.” Recipients of the museum’s highest honor, the American Spirit Award, were Maurice R. “Hank” Greenberg, now deceased Senator John McCain and Gary Sinise. In addition to the American Spirit Award, the 2018 American Spirit Medallion, bestowed upon individuals who demonstrate unselfish commitment and contributions to their community, state or nation, was presented to community leaders Susan Hess and Archie Manning, as well as cultural ambassador and public servant Adair Margo. The medallion recipients accepted their awards during the “American Spirit Awards Luncheon and Leadership Forum” in partnership with Stephens, where 51 students from each state and Washington D.C. were presented the Billy Michal Student Leadership Award in recognition of their outstanding community service. Notable speakers included Paul Hilliard, Museum Chairman of the Board of Trustees; John Hairston of Hancock Whitney (Presenting Sponsor); Stephen J. Watson, President & CEO at The National WWII Museum; Gordon “Nick” Mueller, Museum President & CEO Emeritus, who introduced Florence Davis of the Starr Foundation accepting on behalf of Hank Greenberg; Jim Courter, Museum Immediate Past Chairman of the Board of Trustees who introduced Gary Sinise; and Richard C. Adkerson, who introduced Senator John McCain’s daughter, Meghan McCain, who gave a touching speech about her father. A three-course meal was designed by top chefs of Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group including chef Slade Rushing of Brennan’s Restaurant. A performance by The Temptations Review with Special Guest Theo Peoples closed out the Gala on Friday, June 8. Mr. Paul Hilliard, Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the museum, and Mr. Todd Ricketts, Museum Trustee, served as Event Co-Chairs. n

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Event at a Glance

1. American Spirit Award Honoree Gary Sinise, Sylvie Légère and Todd Ricketts 2. American Spirit Medallion Honoree Archie and Olivia Manning 3. American Spirit Medallion Honoree Adair Margo with James Clement Jr. and Dorothy Clyne 4. Meghan McCain and Chairman of the Museum's Board of Trustees Paul Hilliard 5. Museum President & CEO Emeritus Nick and Beth Mueller with Debbie and Joe Exnicios 6. Jennifer Knight, Museum President & CEO Steven Watson and Chip Knight

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “American Spirit Awards 2018,” benefiting The National WWII Museum WHERE: The National WWII Museum WHEN: Thursday-Friday, June 7-8


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Strong Southern Women

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The Ogden Museum of Southern Art celebrated strong female voices in abstract art. By Shelby Simon

Honoring strong female voices in abstract art in the American South, this year’s “Magnolia Ball” celebrated the Ogden Museum of Southern Art exhibition, “The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction.” The Whole Drum Will Sound was drawn primarily from the Ogden’s permanent collection. Chairmen included David T. Baker, Andrew Freeman, Chad Graci, Jessie Schott Haynes and Emily Shaya. The kickoff party took place at Bond Moroch. At the “Magnolia Ball,” a handmade arch composed of colorful hoops in varying sizes and illuminated by twinkling lights adorned the building entryway, designed by Ogden Museum staff. Guests enjoyed a VIP lounge and O lounge, both decorated with bright accents and modern furniture. Guests visited food stations, enjoyed the photo booth, perused the silent auction and danced to an impressive music lineup including: DJ G-Cue, DJ Kelly Green, DJ Legatron Prime, DJ RedStylez, DJ Heel Turn, DJ Crushed Velvet and The Original Pinettes Brass Band. The event’s 20 restaurant sponsors included Aunt Sally’s Pralines, Buddy B’s, Chais Delachaise, Dickie Brennan & Co., Eat New Orleans, Highly Seasoned Catering, Manolito, Marjie’s Grill, Meauxbar, Messina’s Catering, Nirvana Indian Cuisine, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Palate New Orleans, Restaurant R’Evolution, Saba, Salon by Sucre, Silk Road, St. James Cheese Company, Taceaux Loceaux and Wayne Jacob’s Smokehouse. The silent auction included 100 items. Two very popular items were Bow Out by Alexis Walter and a seven-night stay in Asheville, North Carolina. The art included in the auction was by women artists living and working in the American South. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Chairmen Andrew Freeman, Jessie Schott Haynes, David T. Baker and Chad Graci 2. Annie Fife, Kara Fisher, Chairman Emily Shaya and Chris Robertson 3. Mike Schott, David Kerstein and museum Director William Pittman Andrews 4. Andrew Folse and artist Natalie Domingue 5. Kristen Nelson, Artist Sarah Martzolf and Hayley Bumpas 6. Bonnie Maygarden and Kennth Wu

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: “Magnolia Ball,” benefiting the Ogden Museum of Southern Art WHERE: The Ogden Museum of Southern Art WHEN: Saturday, June 9


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Leaning into Literacy

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One Book One New Orleans campaigned for literacy and honored author Elizabeth Williams and chef Susan Spicer. By Shelby Simon

Enabling ongoing literacy outreach programming, “Juleps in June” supported the efforts of One Book One New Orleans, as well as for their festival, “Words & Music: A Literary Feast.” The event honored Elizabeth M. Williams, author of OBONO’s 2018 book selection, New Orleans: A Food Biography and chef Susan Spicer. Pam Georges Dongieux hosted at her Garden District home, decorated beautifully with flowers she herself arranged. Mariana Oldenburg beautifully designed the event programs. Donated catering was provided by Tujague’s and Seed, as well as beer provided by Second Line Brewing, wine from Martin Wine Cellar and of course mint juleps, with fresh mint provided by The ACORN Farm. Olive Blue Catering prepared classic New Orleans dishes, including red beans and rice and passed appetizers. New Orleans recording artist Kristin Diable provided musical entertainment. A festive hat contest offered prizes for the winners, Catherine Whitney and Kate Fatan Burgun: a signed Susan Spicer cookbook and lunch for two, donated by Bayona. Claudia Lynch served as the hat contest judge and provided the prizes for the runners up. Additionally, Trashy Diva provided a gift card as a door prize to one lucky patron. OBONO Executive Director Megan Holt served as Event Chair. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Michelle Diboll, Angie Bowlin and Chair Megan Holt 2. Kirk E. Lee, Honoree Elizabeth M. Williams and Honoree chef Susan Spicer 3. Jason Berry, Stacey Balkun and Maurice Carlos Ruffin 4. Keith Burnstein, Kristin Diable and David Clemons 5. Joan Hyman and Elizabeth Hyman 6. Lindsey Jakiel Diulus, Stephanie Powell, Jermaine Smith and Karl Hartdegen

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: “Juleps in June,” benefiting One Book One New Orleans WHERE: Home of Pam Georges Dongieux WHEN: Friday, June 1


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Luminous Service

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Arnaud’s Restaurant hosted a benefit for Lighthouse Louisiana. By Shelby Simon

A sold out “Soirée de Lumière” brought 200 patrons to a summer cocktail chic experience in The Count’s Ballroom in Arnaud’s Restaurant to benefit Lighthouse Louisiana. Décor featured cream and yellow roses accented by peacock feathers created by Flowers by Steve. These arrangements filled the ceramic centerpiece bowls, which were hand painted by the Lighthouse Louisiana visually impaired community. A three-piece jazz band greeted guests for the cocktail hour. Board Chair Brian Capitelli welcomed attendees, and Mark Romig served as emcee with David Briggs. Arnaud’s Restaurant served a five-course menu specially created for the evening by owner Katy Casbarian. Delicacies included shrimp Arnaud; fresh asparagus and Brie soup; sautéed filet of Gulf fish; and a dessert of cheesecake with peaches and cream. Fred Holley of Republic Distributing and Trudi Briede of the Goldring Family Foundation sponsored the evening’s spirits, which included wine pairings with the dinner menu and French 75s to celebrate Arnaud’s 100th. Each guest received a mini bottle of champagne tied with gold glitter bows. Lead tables were decorated with Arnaud’s French 75 glasses filled with locally handmade fleur-de-lis chocolates. At the lead sponsor table, Capital One Bank, guests received chair pillows patterned in a gold fleur-de-lis print. The silent auction featured 25 packages, including a gold and abalone necklace by Kendra Scott and unique handpainted pottery by Lighthouse Louisiana clients. Additional prize highlights featured an autographed basketball signed by the 2018 Pelicans and two round trip fares from Southwest Airlines. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Board Chair Brian and Jen Capitelli 2. Arnaud’s Owner Katy Casbarian with Chad and Vanessa Berg 3. Bonnie Cahoon, Bonnie Rault and Robert Sarpy 4. Jessica Turner and Fred Holley 5. Charlie Marts, Tabatha George Marts and Sara and Ryan Gootee 6. Dawn Lopez with Reece and Jessica Wilson

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PHO TOG RAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

WHAT: “Soirée de Lumière,” benefiting Lighthouse Louisiana WHEN: Friday, June 8 WHERE: Arnaud’s Restaurant


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Friendly Competition New Orleanians competed to support the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. By Shelby Simon

A philanthropic competition to support the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s blood cancer research, “Man & Woman of the Year” brought together motivated and dedicated New Orleanians to bring their best in honor of two local children who are blood cancer survivors. The 10-week campaign culminated in the “2018 New Orleans Man & Woman of the Year Grand Finale Gala,” which honored the individuals who have fundraised the most. The 2018 honorees included: Brittney Ankersen, Sissy Blewster, John Bukaty, Dr. Kyle Coleman, Dr. Frank Deus, Katye Fayard, Will Gottsegen, Karl Hoefer, Mike Hollis, Scott Hutcheson, Juliana Mazza, Parke McEnery, Peter Moss III, Ayesha Motwani, Darryl Reginelli, Dr. Skylar Souyoul, Karen Tipton, Steve Watson, Laura Wilt and John Young. Performances by the 610 Stompers, Where Y’acht Band and the Amelia Airhawts Cabin Krewe created a festive air within the World War II Museum. Center Plate Catering provided cuisine. Chris Bellone and Amy Edmond served as Co-Chairs. The gala, which hosted 650 patrons in attendance, also featured an auction with prizes including trips to Aspen, Colorado, and Orange Beach and Destin, Florida. Highlights included original art, antique diamond jewelry and a dinner with Mary Matalin, James Carville and Mitch and Cheryl Landrieu. The most popular item of the night was a dinner at the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum for 15 catered by several James Beard Award winning and nominated local chefs and restauranteurs. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Honorees Ayesha Motwani and Dr. Frank Deus 2. Frank Maselli, Honoree John Young and Kurt Evans 3. Dr. Leslie, Lexie, Honoree Will, Andrew and Dr. Brad Gottsegen

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: “The Man & Woman of the Year Grand Finale Gala,” benefiting Leukemia & Lymphoma Society WHERE: U.S. Freedom Pavilion, National World War II Museum WHEN: Thursday, June 14


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Women Helping Women Bridge House / Grace House recognized female role models. By Shelby Simon

The 23rd annual “Women of Substance Luncheon” honored local female role models for the many women in the Bridge House / Grace House substance abuse treatment program who are striving to become sober and self-sufficient. The luncheon features three primary honorees centered around the unifying theme and who possess the ideals Grace House women look for in a role model. The 2018 Honorees were: Meaghan Ryan Bonavita, Dress for Success Board President; Kelly Commander, Command Construction and BHGH Board Treasurer; and Dr. Mignonne Mary, The Remedy Room Founder. Three additional 2018 award recipients included Juanita Marino, presented with the Richard “Buzzy” Gaiennie Award; Dr. William Robinson, presented with Volunteer of the Year; and Katherine Madere, awarded Alumna of the Year. Mike Morris sang as guests arrived and performed “Amazing Grace” at the start of the program. Mark Romig served as emcee. Susan Rodriguez gave an invocation before lunch was served. A raffle offered a prize of an Electra Women’s Light Blue Cruiser 1 from GNO Cyclery. The live auction featured a week in Hilton Head, South Carolina in a private, golf course home. The silent auction held more than 150 items, including dinner for six at Herbsaint, a limo charter from Limousine Livery, four club seats to a 2018-2019 Pelicans game and jewelry from Adler’s and Kendra Scott. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Alumna of the Year Katherine Madere, BHGH Executive Director of Development Kevin Gardere and 2018 Honoree Meaghan Ryan Bonavita 2. 2018 Honoree Dr. Mignonne Mary, Stephanie Haynes and Parker Sternbergh 3. Walton Goldring, BHGH Executive Director of Clinical Services Michelle Gaiennie, Volunteer of the Year Dr. William Robinson and Richard “Buzzy” Gaiennie Honoree Juanita Marino

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PH OT OG RAPHED BY KARL KRATZBERG

WHAT: 23rd annual “Women of Substance Luncheon,” benefiting Bridge House / Grace House WHERE: Audubon Tea Room WHEN: Friday, May 18


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Medical Missionaries

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Dedicated to Ms. Jane M. Gisevius, the 16th "Mission Possible Gala" enabled NOMMS to provide medical aid to those in need. By Shelby Simon

The New Orleans Medical Mission Services hosted the 16th annual “Mission Possible Gala,” which allows the organization to deliver medical expertise and treatment to the underprivileged population of foreign countries by providing services, treatment and supplies with dignity and self-esteem to program recipients and participants. Archbishop Gregory Aymond delivered the invocation at the Patron Party. Frederick J. Mikill II, CEO and Board Member, emceed and made introductions of the Board of Directors of NOMMS. The Volunteer of the Year Award was presented by Dr. Tom Kennedy to Bonnie McAskill for her many volunteer activities, including spearheading the organization of the Medical Instrument Room and going on numerous missions. The Outstanding Corporate Sponsor Award was presented by Tom Kennedy to Mr. and Mrs. Felix Sherman with Ambrosia Bakery of Baton Rouge for providing desserts to the gala since its inaugural year. Throughout the event, a slideshow was shown displaying mission photos from the past year. Food for the event was coordinated by Marie Hasney and Lisa Hasney of Fleur De Lis New Orleans Cuisine/The Catering Connection. Alan Franco with Republic Liquor provided alcohol. Angelina Vicknair served as silent auction auctioneer, and Chuck Mutz as black-tie auctioneer. Four silent auction tables included more than 300 items including art, jewelry and gift certificates for restaurants and hotels. The Live Auction featured prizes such as tickets and a suite at a Pelicans game, an invitation to the Krewe of Orpheus’ Annual Dinner Gala on Lundi Gras, vacation packages, a ride in a WWII Basic Trainer Plane and more. Pumpkin Parker and Jessica Schulman served as Gala Co-Chairs. This year’s gala was dedicated to NOMMS loving friend and long-time board member, Ms. Jane M. Gisevius Esq., who passed away after a very short illness earlier in the year. n

WHAT: “Mission Possible 2018 Gala,” benefiting New Orleans Medical Mission Services Inc. WHERE: Generations Hall WHEN: Saturday, June 23 1. Jennifer Ansardi, Co-Chairs Jessica Schulman and Pumpkin Parker and Jeff Parker 2. NOMMS Founder and CEO Fred Mikill with Silent Auction Chair Sunny Kijko, Archbishop Gregory Aymond and Board Member Ralph Senner 3. Honorees Cheryl and Felix Sherman

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Event at a Glance

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Tasting Temptations NOWFE has raised more than $1 million for local nonprofit organizations. By Shelby Simon

The "Grand Tastings" at the New Orleans Wine & Food Experience showcased wines from around the world and food served by some of New Orleans' finest chefs. Wine connoisseurs rubbed elbows and compared palates with winemakers, asked questions and tasted special appellations from across the globe, while novice wine drinkers enjoyed the experience of trying new wines and learning what about different styles, varieties and price ranges. In addition, attendees chatted with well-known and up-and-coming chefs in the culinary world. The Fleur de Lis Culinary Awards were bestowed duing the "Grand Tastings." Best of Show honors were awarded to Restaurant R'evolution's chef Jana Billiot for Savory and to DTB's chef John Hill and pastry chef Jessica Shoemaker for Sweet; Gold awards were awarded to Hyatt's chef Jonah Nissenbaum for Soups and Stews; Tsunami's chef Jared Graves for Seafood; Hyatt's chef Aleksandre Nadirashvili for Meat and Poultry; Miti at Black Penny's chef Octavio Ycaza for Lagniappe; and Tsunami's chef Salita Natasine for Dessert. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Mary Sonnier and chef Michael Gulotta 2. Chef Stephen Fried, Aimee Brown and chef Julie Ricks 3. Jim Fein and Honoree chef Jana Billiot

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFF STROUT

WHAT: “Grand Tastings,� benefiting New Orleans Wine & Food Experience WHERE: New Orleans Convention Center WHEN: Friday, May 25


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Sharing Shakespeare The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane welcomed 200 to its opening night festivities. By Shelby Simon

In 1994, responding to the lack of a Shakespeare-focused theatre in New Orleans, four Tulane University professors established the Tulane Summer Shakespeare Festival, which evolved into the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the festival, Tulane’s Lupin Hall was the site of the opening night party for Shakespeare’s All’s Well That Ends Well. The event was sponsored and chaired by the Advisory Board of the Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Approximately 200 patrons attended the performance and enjoyed wine and light bites. The Shakespeare Festival also produced Macbeth this season, which will be remounted in January 2019 for the Annual Performance for the Schools. The mission of the festival is to produce professional classical theatre with a primary focus upon the works of Shakespeare, utilizing local, national and international talent to celebrate Shakespeare’s brilliant insight into the human condition. The goal of the programming is to provide the people of the Gulf South both entertainment and educational resources of the highest quality, honoring Shakespeare’s legacy. n

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Event at a Glance

1. Martin Sachs, Christina Albers and Mike Kuczynski 2. Jenn Jacobs, Capt. Bob Phillips, Cassie Worley and Juan Barona 3. Ted Martin with Caroline and Arthur Nead

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEF F ST ROUT

WHAT: “Opening Night Party,” benefiting New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane WHERE: Lupin Theater, Tulane University WHEN: Friday, June 1


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For Heart’s Sake The American Heart Association hosted a gala devoted to building healthier lives and communities. By Shelby Simon

The “2018 Heart & Soul Gala” brought 300 attendees to celebrate the lifesaving work of the American Heart Association and continue the work of fighting cardiovascular disease. An original painting by Maya Irimpen was showcased as guests walked into the Hyatt New Orleans Hotel, a motif from the event invitations and program. An ivy wall with swirls of red roses served as the backdrop for the red carpet photos. The John Eubanks Duo provided entertainment for the silent auction and cocktail party. Stormy the Band entertained patrons in the ballroom. The Hyatt provided catering for the event. Vicky and Peter Sperling served as Event Chairs; Arlene and Alan Philipson served as Open Your Heart Chairs; and the event honored the Philipsons in memory of Andy Philipson. Scott Walker served as Emcee, and Chuck Mutz was the Auctioneer. Key auction prizes included diamond earrings from Friend & Company and a three-night stay at Raiwasa Private Resort in the beautiful Fiji Islands. n

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WHAT: “2018 Heart & Soul Gala,” benefiting American Heart Association WHERE: Hyatt New Orleans Hotel WHEN: Saturday, June 16 1. Co-Chairs Vicky and Peter Sperling 2. Honorees Arlene and Alan Philipson 3. Kristina Larson, Reina Renee, Reagan Charleston and Beverly Matheney

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIL RUBMAN

Event at a Glance


Jefferson Turner and Ricky Graham, who starred in “Growing Up New Orleans Style,” will bring “Gone Pecans!” to Rivertown in November.


ONSTAGE FRONT & CENTER

town in Texas. An epic family fairytale, “Into the Woods” comes in March, followed by the grand musical comedy “Me & My Girl,” and later, the blockbuster musical “Mamma Mia!” “It’s local theatrical entertainment at its best,” Fouchi promises. See rivertowntheaters.com for details.

BROADWAY IN NEW ORLEANS _______

FESTING ON THE FRINGES _______ For a taste of the diverse performance talent that bubbles under the surface in New Orleans, sometimes it’s a good idea to get off the beaten track. The New Orleans InFringe Fest offers plenty of opportunities to experience performances that developed outside the mainstream. The annual festival will premiere daring theatre performances from Nov. 7 through 11. Every afternoon through late evening will bring more than 30 shows under the banner “Favor the Bold,” in venues in the Marigny, Bywater, St. Roch and Arabi neighborhoods, Performances will run the gamut from musicals and post-modern takes on the classics to original multimedia shows, burlesque, comedies and dramas. You’ll find both professionals and amateurs offering up an array of creative expression aimed to stimulate and entertain. InFringe bills itself as the only full-scale festival for performance arts in New Orleans. Check the website – infringefest.com – for complete details of dates, times and locations that include AllWays Lounge, Backyard Ballroom, Café Istanbul, Happyland Theater, Marcer Manor, The Tigermen Den and The Valiant Theatre & Lounge. Some of the InFringe performers may be future denizens of more established stages, and the festival aims to keep the talent pool full through its children’s programs. Experienced dramatic artist Cammie West

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recently took over as director of children’s programming for the fest. West, who also is an enrichment teacher at Harriet Tubman Charter School, oversees shows created by and for kids. See the website for details.

RIPPING GOOD TIMES AT RIVERTOWN _______ “What a year this is at Rivertown Theaters,” co-artistic/managing director, Kelly Fouchi said of the 2018-19 lineup at Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts. Now in its seventh season under the direction of Fouchi and Gary Rucker, Rivertown continues to be one of the area’s leading stages for live musical drama, including crowd-pleasing revues and Broadway hits. Fouchi notes the recent addition of a seventh show to the lineup – a Ricky Graham-written satire-musical revue.  New Orleans’ favorite musical comedy creator and star, Graham will serve up “Gone Pecans!” in November, in celebration of the city’s tricentennial. He will team up with his favorite partners in comedy, Varla Jean Merman, Sean Patterson and Jefferson Turner. And Graham promises the show will reveal why “Ya gotta be nuts to live in New Orleans!” As always, Rivertown’s diverse season is designed to appeal to theater-goers of all ages. Following Graham’s show, “Greater Tuna will take the stage in January, bringing irreverent comedy about the third-smallest

Hungry for Broadway but not interested in a trek to Manhattan? The Saenger Theater, as always, has you covered. This season’s shows pack a big entertainment punch with October, alone, bringing Disney’s “Aladdin;” an intoxicating mix of music and dance by Michael Flatley; and Grammy-winning soul singer Maxwell, with a mix of music and video entertainment that includes a film written and directed by Jay Z. Great live entertainment continues on dates throughout the fall, and in January, let the blockbusters begin. “Les Miserables” hits the stage Jan 8-13, followed by “The Book of Mormon” in February, and “Hamilton” in March. See saengernola.com for updated details, and get your tickets early.

MAHALIA JACKSON SHIFTS GEARS _______ A beautiful space known for hosting some of the city’s best classical performances, including main-stage opera and ballet events, the Mahalia Jackson Theater for Performing Arts is jazzing things up this fall. The first Friday in October brings the Sweet Soul Music Tour to the stage, featuring Betty Wright and other soul favorites. And in November, a hit summer competition brings its act to New Orleans, when the best dancers from the television series “So You Think You Can Dance” take the stage. The show will feature the top 10 finalists from the 2018 competition, so be ready to see them tear up the stage, and watch the website for news of all-star guests who will join them. A holiday spectacular featuring the 610 Stompers will get the season rolling in early December. Then, in January, the 10th anniversary tour production of “Rock of Ages,” an energetic party of a show, will take the stage. Check mahaliajacksontheater.com for all the details.


ONSTAGE

SCRAPPY THEATER GROUP KEEPS IT COMING

The NOLA project presented “Men in Boats” in 2018.

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uring the 14 years since its founding, the NOLA Project has become one of the best-known theatre companies in New Orleans. Sometimes against the odds, the group has managed to continue mounting fresh productions and remain responsive to local audiences. One reason for its staying power is the agility it has shown in terms of content and staging. Having launched in the shadow of Hurricane Katrina, the troupe from day one focused on giving expression to both the anguish and hope that then imbued the local population, and in the absence of better stages, they simply presented their dramas in outdoor settings. Over time, NOLA Project embraced the idea of alternative stages in a bigger way, copresenting with other organizations, such as Southern Rep Theatre, to put on shows that showed their dramatic chops while entertaining a recovering city. One of NOLA Project’s most successful alignments has been with New Orleans Museum of Art, and when it comes down to it, what better place to stage creative works than amid some of the finest visual art works in the city? NOLA Project has frequently staged productions both inside the museum and outside, amid the installations and statuary of the Sidney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. This fall, the troupe presented “The Revolutionists”

in NOMA’s great hall, and in the spring they will stage “The Henchmen,” an original work by troupe member Michael Aaron Santos, in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden. In between those productions, NOLA Project will in October present “The Pillowman,” a sharp look at the life of an author in a totalitarian state, at Lusher’s Lion’s Gate Theater. And in January, they will offer a new “immersive” musical comedy that takes place in a fictional eatery called Jimmy’s All-American Beefsteak Place. Entitled “Stockholm Syndrome,” the play will open at The Little Gem Saloon on Poydras Street. “The 2018-19 slate offers our community a wildly varied collection of stories meant to inspire and ignite the human imagination,” says Artistic Director A.J. Allegra. “Each production is fiercely imaginative and utterly theatrical in its creation. These are all stories meant to be seen, heard and felt together.” Check the group’s website, nolaproject.com, for details on all their upcoming productions. Meanwhile, showing that local audiences are responding well to performing arts, including classical works, seen in alternative venues, the New Orleans Opera Association continues its 12-year practice of staging performances in local taverns. The association’s Opera On Tap series has proven popular with many patrons who enjoy the idea of sipping a brew in a casual setting while enjoying

some of the city’s finest operatic voices. The free, 90-minute casual concerts of opera, Broadway hits and more generally occur on Wednesdays and rotate between The Rusty Nail and the lounge of Four Points by Sheraton in the French Quarter. “We have found that the Opera on Tap concerts have had many benefits for the New Orleans Opera,” says Carol Rausch, chorus master and music administrator. “They are a great way to demystify opera ... and they are a fun, casual way to promote each of our upcoming productions, as well as to raise awareness about the art form in general.” In a still bigger departure from the opera’s tradition of performing its full season at its home base in the Mahalia Jackson Theater for Performing Arts, the organization this season will stage two of its main-stage productions in alternative venues. Rameau’s “Pygmalion” will open on the stage of Le Petit Theatre in November. And in April, Lera Auerbach’s “The Blind” will take the stage in the historic Marigny Opera House.

CRIPPLE CREEK RUNS DRY _______ One of New Orleans’ most intellectually vigorous theater groups delivered the sad news several months ago that its end was drawing near. Cripple Creek Theater Company announced it would soon close up shop. “Cripple Creek sought to create a new kind of theatrical space, one where our mission informed the way we chose, organized and produced our art,” founder Ian Hoch wrote in May. He said that the troupe had “traveled the narrow road of thoughts and action” as it tried to give voice to society’s woes. “At times this road was imperfect, at other times impenetrable, but we never strayed from it, staying firm in our belief in our ability to make our unique kind of theatre, together.” Citing the troupe’s inability to raise enough funds to cover another season, Hoch said that Cripple Creek’s 2018 season, which it recently completed, would be its last.


ONSTAGE

HOME AT LAST

international opera star Marisol Montalvo

The church that now is the home of Southern Rep.

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t was a long time coming, but after several years of playing the role of a transient theater company, Southern Repertory Theatre finally has settled into a permanent home. The long vacant St. Rose de Lima Church at 2541 Bayou Road, near Gentilly Boulevard, has been reborn as a performing arts center that also encompasses the former St. Rose de Lima elementary school. A partnership between the Rose Community Development Corp. and Alembic Community Development enabled the makeover of these vacant, historic properties in a $12 million project funded by a number of community investment organizations and local donors. The 1.5 acre site is slated to become a hub for arts, education and entrepreneurship, and fittingly, Southern Rep has become an anchor tenant, with its offices, stages and all support activity now headquartered within the former church. Though new theater amenities have been installed, the stained glass windows and vaulted ceiling clearly hearken to the building’s past and provide a unique setting for the city’s foremost live theater organization. Southern Rep’s artistic director, Aimée Hayes has launched the fall season with the regional premiere of “A Doll’s House, Part 2” (through Oct. 21) a new play by Lucas Hnath. When the central character, Nora, knocks on the door of the house she left 15 year ago the family is in

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for a surprise. Critically acclaimed in its recent Broadway run, where it garnered eight Tony Award nominations, this bold comedy stars Jessica Podewell as Nora Helmer, Trey Burvant as Torvald, Liann Pattison as Anne Marie, and Sarah Durn as Emmy. Southern Rep’s second main-stage production continues to make the most of local talent with a holiday musical created by Leslie Castay and Ian Hoch. “Mandatory Merriment” is a festive, raucous musical that veers off the traditional holiday track for an evening of song, comedy and cocktails featuring an all-star cast of local entertainers. In the spring, New Orleans’ own Troi Bechet stars in the world premiere of her own work, “Flowers for Halie,” a celebration of gospel icon and local native Mahalia Jackson. And in between those works, Southern Rep presents “The Wolves” by Sarah DeLappe and “Azul,” a play by New Orleans native Christina Quintana. Followers of another local stage veteran will be elated to know that New Orleans’ only live, continuing soap opera has moved right along with Southern Rep into its new location. Now in its eighth season, “Debauchery!” by Pat Bourgeois will unfold monthly on Southern Rep’s Lagniappe Stage at its Bayou Road home. Follow the ongoing story and enjoy the laughs from “Debauchery,” on Oct. 17, Nov. 14 and Dec. 12.

STARS COME OUT AT NOCCA Producer Mark Cortale has announced a star-studded lineup for the sixth season of his Broadway @ NOCCA concert series, putting three marquee names next to one of opera’s big stars. Internationally acclaimed soprano Marisol Montalvo presents her show “Mad Scene” in its local debut on Nov. 1. It’s the autobiographical tale of the insane challenges faced by an American opera singer as she performs on some of the world’s most prestigious stages. The show has William Hobbs at the piano and is directed by Jeffery Roberson. On Dec. 15, Christine Ebersole, a two-time Tony Award winner for “Grey Gardens” and “42nd Street,” performs a concert with Seth Rudetsky as pianist and host. Rudetsky will assume the same role on Jan 31 and March 29 for concerts by Tony Award winner Jessie Mueller and Tony nominee Jeremy Jordan. All proceeds from the shows will benefit The NOCCA Institute. Check the website broadwaynola.com for complete details.


ONSTAGE PROFILES

SOUTHERN REPERTORY THEATRE

RIVERTOWN THEATERS FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS LE PETIT THÉÂTRE DU VIEUX CARRÉ

THE NOLA PROJECT

2541 BAYOU ROAD, NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504.522.6545 WWW.SOUTHERNREP.COM

325 MINOR ST., KENNER 504-461-9475 WWW.RIVERTOWNTHEATERS.COM

616 ST. PETER ST., NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504-522-2081 WWW.LEPETITTHEATRE.COM

900 CAMP ST., NEW ORLEANS 504-302-9117 NOLAPROJECT.COM

Finally at home in a beautifully renovated former church, Southern Rep is christening the new performing arts center with a rich fall season. See the lineup below, and check the website for up-to-date details about each upcoming performance.

An expanded line-up of Tony Awardwinning Broadway musicals, comedy classics and new local works is on tap this season, with artistic directors Gary Rucker and Kelly Fouchi masterminding the entertainment. Fresh off a great run of “The Music Man,” check out these upcoming shows.

Artistic Director Maxwell Williams promises “wild swings around the geographical and emotional map” this season. “All of our plays this year are either based on or inspired by works of literature,” he says.

A vigorous troupe that has carved a must-see niche for itself during 15 seasons, The NOLA Project’s mission is to present works that “inspire and ignite the human imagination.” Check the website regularly for up-to-date details of the dates and locations of their productions.

UPCOMING:

“Satchmo at the Waldorf” (Oct. 5-21). A one-man, three-character journey into the heart and mind of jazz legend Louis Armstrong is set in a backstage dressing room at New York’s Waldorf Astoria Hotel in 1971. The poignant play was born from Terry Teachout’s writing of Armstrong’s biography.

UPCOMING: “A Doll’s House, Part 2” (Oct. 3-21). The regional premiere of Lucas Hnath’s bold, insightful and heartfelt comedy in which the central character, Nora, knocks on the door of the house she left 15 years ago. Directed by Aimée Hayes. “Mandatory Merriment: An Untitled Holiday Musical” (Nov. 28-Dec. 23). Created by Leslie Castay and Ian Hoch, this festive and raucous musical puts traditional holiday plays on notice. Musical direction by Alan Payne, featuring an all-star cast of local favorites. “The Wolves” (Jan. 9-Feb. 3). A regional premiere of Sarah DeLappe’s Pulitzer Prize finalist play has nine young women gearing up for battle on the soccer field in a precisely drawn portrait of adolescent fear, fury and ferociousness. Directed by Aimée Hayes. “Azul” (March 27-April 14). In partnership with the Saints & Sinners Literary Festival, New Orleans native Christina Quintana’s debut play has New Yorker Zelia facing the loss of her Cuban-born mother and struggling to center herself. A world premiere. “Flowers for Halie” (May 8-26). Written by and starring New Orleans’ own Troi Bechet, this new celebration of the Queen of Gospel, Mahalia Jackson, illuminates the struggles and triumphs of an American icon.

“Gone Pecans!” (Nov. 2-18). Directed by and starring Ricky Graham, this musical and comedic celebration of the New Orleans tricentennial shows why “ya gotta be nuts to live here.” Also staring Sean Patterson, Varla Jean Merman and Jefferson Turner. “Let it Snow!” (Dec. 7-23). Rich Arnold directs the Big Easy Boys and Babes in a spectacular holiday revue. Tight musical harmonies, slick dance moves and a big-band orchestra will get the family in the mood for the season with holiday standards and classics. “Greater Tuna” (Jan. 11-27). Welcome back to Tuna, Texas, as a hilarious, irreverent comedy unfolds about a small town where the Lion’s club is too liberal and Patsy Cline never dies. Directed by Gary Rucker and Sean Patterson. “Into the Woods” (March 15-31). The Brothers Grimm hit the stage in an epic fairytale about wishes, family and the choices we make. Gary Rucker directs this visually enchanting show. “Me & My Girl” (May 3-19). This award-winning show whisks you back to the glittering 1930s, with rousing songand-dance production numbers that complement the side-splitting comedy. “Mamma Mia!” (July 11-21). The hugely popular show brings along ABBA’s hits to help tell the story of a young woman’s search for her birth father in a Greek island paradise.

UPCOMING:

“A Christmas Carol” (Dec. 7-23). Charles Dickens’ heartwarming Victorian classic features artists from the newly launched Young Conservatory Program and is filled with magic, ghosts, and holiday cheer. “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” (Jan. 18-Feb. 3). An uproarious hit tells of low-born Monty Navarro, who finds out that he’s eighth in line for an earldom in the lofty D’Ysquith family. Figuring his chances of outliving his predecessors are slight, he sets off on a ghoulish path. “Baby Doll” (March 15-31). With the Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival, Le Petit presents a regional premiere based on one of Williams’ one-act plays. The dark comedy is set amid the desires, desperation and prejudices of two rival Mississippi cotton gin owners. “The Pianist of Willesden Lane” (May 10-26). Grammy-nominated piano virtuoso Mona Golabek presents a show based on the true story of her mother’s journey and life as a young musician in London during the Blitz in World War II. Golabek performs music from Bach, Beethoven, Chopin and Rachmaninoff.

UPCOMING: “The Pillowman” (Oct. 18-Nov. 3). Known for his acerbic wit and frank dialogue, Martin McDonagh’s play centers around the interrogation of an author in an unnamed totalitarian state and the gruesome content of his short stories. At Lion’s Gate Theater, Lusher Charter School. “Stockholm Syndrome” (Jan. 16-Feb. 9). An immersive musical comedy in which the employees and patrons of Jimmy’s All-American Beefsteak Place find themselves in the midst of a hostage crisis – and a love story. At The LIttle Gem Saloon. “The Henchman: A Shakespeare Story” (May 8-26). Set 15 years after “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Michael Aaron Santos’ exciting sequel reveals the true story of Jacob, the little changeling boy who Oberon and Titania quarreled over many years ago. In NOMA’s Besthoff Sculpture Garden. Also watch for the return of NOLA Project’s “Rough Draughts,” a monthly play-reading series held at various locations where brews are consumed. Check the website for details. The NOLA Project is an ensembledriven theatre company that strives to challenge, entertain, and engage diverse New Orleans audiences through high-quality and innovative performances of relevant great works, the development and production of new plays, and comprehensive educational opportunities for aspiring theatre artists. STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 45


ONSTAGE PROFILES

SAENGER THEATRE

THE JOY THEATER

JEFFERSON PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY

1111 CANAL ST., NEW ORLEANS 800-218-7469 WWW.SAENGERNOLA.COM

1200 CANAL ST., NEW ORLEANS 504-528-9569 WWW.THEJOYTHEATER.COM

6400 AIRLINE DRIVE, METAIRIE BOX OFFICE: 504-885-2000. WWW.JPAS.ORG.

The home of Broadway in New Orleans, the majestic Saenger regularly hosts performances by national touring musical companies. Between the big musical shows, see big-name concerts and solo entertainers. Check the website for the full lineup.

The grand art deco theater regularly hosts hot bands and popular comedians at a location on the Canal Street streetcar line in downtown New Orleans. An entirely renovated 10,000-square-foot multipurpose venue, the Joy features live music concerts, comedy shows, theatrical productions, and offers spaces to host private parties or corporate events. With fully re-purposed sound and lighting systems, the space holds up to 1,200 guests with a flexible seating plan that can be configured in a variety of ways.

At home in the beautiful Jefferson Performing Arts Center, Artistic Director Dennis Assaf offers a line-up of shows sure to excite. Performances are also on tap at Westwego Performing Arts Theatre and Teatro Wego on the West Bank.

UPCOMING: Disney’s “Aladdin” (through Oct. 7). The timeless story of Aladdin in a thrilling new production filled with unforgettable beauty, comedy and breathtaking spectacle. “School of Rock” (Oct. 30-Nov. 4). A wannabe rock star posing as a substitute teacher turns a class of straight-A students into a guitar-shredding, mind-blowing rock band. “On Your Feet!” (Nov. 27-Dec. 2). The Emilio and Gloria Estefan Broadway musical takes you inside the real story of this groundbreaking musical couple. “Elf, the Musical” (Dec. 18-23). It’s the hilarious tale of an orphan child who mistakenly crawls into Santa’s bag of gifts and is transported back to the North Pole. “Les Miserables” (Jan. 8-13). Direct from its acclaimed Broadway return, with glorious new staging and dazzling scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo, “Les Miz” is born again. “The Book of Mormon” (Feb. 5-10). See why this outrageous comedy has been called the best musical of this century. “Hamilton” (March 12-31). Come see what all the excitement is about. The story of America’s Founding Father as it has never before been told. “Come From Away” (May 28-June 2). A new musical about the remarkable true story of 7,000 stranded passengers and the small town in Newfoundland that welcomed them.

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UPCOMING: Anderson East (Oct. 5). An encore world tour, with the Black Pumas. Dirty Heads (Oct. 6). Presented by 92.3 and WCP Presents, with Jukebox the Ghost and Just Loud. Chvrches (Oct. 11). With Lo Moon. Rupaul’s Drag Race (Oct. 12). WERQ the World. Iliza Shlesinger (Oct. 19). A Winter Circle Production. Thievery Corporation (Nov. 2). A Winter Circle Production, with Julian Marley. Underoath (Nov. 4). Erase Me Tour with Dance Gavin Dance and The Plot in You. Postmodern Jukebox (Nov. 15). Back in Black and White. John Butler Trio (Dec. 5). The Home Tour. Atmosphere (Dec. 6). Plus deM atlaS, The Lioness and DJ Keezy. 6lack Presents (Dec. 15). From East Atlanta with Love Tour, plus Summer Walker. The Steeldrivers (Jan. 19). A Winter Circle Production.

UPCOMING: “Shear Madness” (through Oct. 28). A whodunit that begins like any other at the Shear Madness salon. Join the fun as the audience matches wits with the suspects to catch the killer in this wildly popular comedy. (Westwego Performing Arts) “Peter Pan” (Oct. 9-28). Broadway’s timeless musical whisks you to a place where dreams are born and no one ever grows up. (Jefferson Performing Arts) “The Santaland Diaries” (Nov. 30-Dec. 23). When a wannabe actor arrives in New York City, the only job he can find is at Macy’s, working in Santaland as an elf. (Teatro Wego) “White Christmas” (Dec. 7-16). Irving Berlin’s classic brings a dazzling score with well-known standards, in an uplifting musical for the holiday season. (Jefferson Performing Arts) “Dreamgirls” (Feb. 8-24). A sweeping inspirational journey through 20th century American popular music is a hugely entertaining look at the entertainment industry. (Jefferson Performing Arts) The Irish Tenors (March 16). Since 1998, Finbar Wright, Anthony Kearns and Ronan Tynan have presented sold-out shows from New York to Sydney Australia. (Jefferson Performing Arts) “South Pacific” (April 5-14). The exotic Rogers and Hammerstein musical remains as entertaining today as it was decades ago. (Jefferson Performing Arts)


ONSTAGE CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE PROFILES

LOUISIANA PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

NEW ORLEANS OPERA ASSOCIATION

NEW ORLEANS BALLET ASSOCIATION

1010 COMMON STREET AND ORPHEUM THEATRE NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504.523.6530 WWW.LPOMUSIC.ORG

935 GRAVIER ST., SUITE 1940 NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504.529.3000, 800.881.4459 WWW.NEWORLEANSOPERA.ORG

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS NEW ORLEANS BOX OFFICE: 504.522.0996 WWW.NOBADANCE.COM

Under director and principal conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto, the LPO is at home in the grand Orpheum Theater, while continuing to perform concerts at other venues. Check the website for details of all events.

Artistic Director Robert Lyall leads the opera in a 75th anniversary season filled with drama, grandeur and thrilling voices, performed in the Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts.

The central Gulf region’s premiere presenting organization dedicated to dance, the association offers a season of main stage and educational programs featuring world-class dance companies and artists.

UPCOMING:

UPCOMING:

UPCOMING:

Nielsen’s Clarinet Concerto (Oct. 12). LPO’s principal clarinetist Chris Pell masterfully tackles Nielsen’s Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, followed by a performance of Brahms’ Symphony No. 4.

Puccini’s “Turandot” (Sept. 28, 30). The majestic lyric opera is set in ancient China during the age of fables and features a large cast, grand choruses and fairy tale bursts of color and excitement. At Mahalia Jackson Theater.

Diavolo: Architecture in Motion (Sept. 22). The troupe has wowed millions by presenting dance as extreme sport and defying gravity with awe-inspiring, daredevil movement on a playground of oversized architectural structures. It’s a spectacle led by Paris-born maverick Jacques Heim. At Mahalia Jackson Theater.

Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony (Oct. 18). Stravinsky’s “Danses concertantes” opens the program. Violinist Jennifer Koh performs a new concerto, and the orchestra presents Mozart’s Symphony No. 41, one of the greatest in classical music. Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 (Nov. 15). Violist Nadia Sirota performs Nico Muhly’s Viola Concerto, followed by Tchaikovsky’s symphonic metaphor for the inevitability of fate. “Pictures at an Exhibition” (Nov. 29). Pianist Anne-Marie McDermott performs Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 2, and the LPO performs Mussorgsky. “Scheherazade” (Jan. 10, 12). Cellist and BBC Young Musician of the Year Sheku Kanneh-Mason brings his superb talents to Louisiana for the first time to perform Elgar and Rimsky-Korsakov. Mahler’s Ninth Symphony (Jan. 17). Violinist Kikka Chooi presents Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 3, contrasting with Mahler’s deeply personal Ninth. Visions of Vienna & Salzburgh (Feb. 14). Mozart and Strauss highlight the program. The Fantastical Imagination (March 14). Violinist Vladim Gluzman performs “The Infant Minstrel and His Peculiar Menagerie.” St. John Passion (March 28). Bach is center stage, featuring tenor Frank Kelly, soprano Sarah Shafer, Mezzo-soprano Abigaile Nims and others.

Rameaus “Pygmalion” (Nov. 8-11). Renowned sculptor Pygmalion carved an ivory statue of a woman so beautiful that he fell in love with it. Enjoy the richness and splendor of the court of Louis XIV. At Le Petit Theatre. Mozart’s “Abduction from the Seraglio” (Feb. 8, 10). Captured by pirates and sold to the Pasha of Istanbul for his harem, Constanza, her maid Blondchen and their manservant Pedrillo have all but given up hope when Belmonte, her noble fiancé, appears with a plan to help them escape. At Mahalia Jackson Theater. Lera Auerbach’s “The Blind” (April 4-7). A unique 12-voice acapella opera is based on a haunting play of Flemish Symbolist writer Maurice Maeterlinck. An “immersive theater” production. At Marigny Opera House. Verdi’s “Rigoletto” (April 26, 28). The Duke of Mantua is the personification of the axiom that “absolute power corrupts absolutely.” The fast-paced drama leads us to a grimly tragic conclusion. At Mahalia Jackson Theater.

Dance Theatre of Harlem (Oct. 20). Putting power on pointe with gorgeous works by George Balanchine, Darrell Grand Moultrie and Christopher Wheeldon, the evening concludes with a triumphant restaging of the seminal 1974 ballet, “Dougla.” At Mahalia Jackson Theater. Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (March 22-23). Returning for the first time in almost a decade, the dancers celebrate 60 years of bringing the African American experience and dance traditions to the world’s stages. Directed by the charismatic choreographer Robert Battle, the dancers set the stage on fire. At Mahalia Jackson Theater. Bodytraffic (April 5-6). The Los Angelesbased company has blazed onto the international dance scene with a10-member ensemble performing high-energy, humorous, jazzy and boldly theatrical performances. Co-presented with The NOCCA Institute at Freda Lupin Memorial Hall, NOCCA. 50th Anniversary Evening of Stars (Jan. 26). NOBA kicks off its golden anniversary year with a star-studded evening, celebrating 50 years of bringing dance to life in New Orleans. At Mahalia Jackson Theater.

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WHOLE HEALTH 10 LO C A L H E A LT H H E R O E S FO R YO U R W H O L E FA M I LY BY KELCY WILBURN

O

ctober is a month often designated for increasing health awareness, and from the pink breast cancer awareness cleats and sweatbands we see Saints players don to the mailers and commercials advertising this year’s flu shots, we’re reminded left and right of the appointments we need to schedule. While family members face some of the same health concerns, men, women, kids and senior adults also face a number of unique health challenges determined by age and other factors. This month, we’ve consulted a variety of specialists in a number of fields for tips on increasing health and wellness while learning about the latest procedures and technological offerings. For kids, pediatric care is particularly important. Well child checkups are necessary for ensuring normal growth and development. They also provide protection through vaccinations and provide guidance for parents. According to Dr. Allison Cragin, Pediatrician at CrescentCare, other common reasons to visit the pediatrician include common childhood illnesses such as colds, asthma and allergies. At CrescentCare, Cragin sees children from birth to age 18. Additionally, she works with children who have special needs and are living with Down syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, autism and other developmental and genetic disorders. The pediatric team of providers at CrescentCare consists of general pediatricians, an infectious disease specialist, an adolescent medicine team, family medicine physicians and a pediatric and adolescent psychiatrist. According to Cragin, stickers, snacks and books from the Reach Out and Read literacy program add some fun to the patient experience. “In pediatrics, one of the most important prevention topics is healthy living in childhood. I counsel parents at every well visit on providing healthy, fresh foods; limiting sugary drinks; and promoting daily family fitness and play,” says Cragin. “It is important to establish a healthy lifestyle early in life to prevent obesity and the common illnesses that come with it.”

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When illness or injury strikes your child after hours, a trip to the emergency room isn’t only a hassle, it’s often unnecessary. Locally, Children’s Hospital recently initiated the Children’s Hospital Virtual After Hours Clinic (VAHC). With the VAHC, remote care is offered to families as a convenient alternative to traveling to see a doctor for minor issues that may occur in the evening or on weekends. A secure video conferencing platform allows the parent, patient and provider to communicate via video. For children aged 1 year to 18, the VAHC is useful for a number of conditions, with some of the most common being insect bites and rashes. Children’s Hospital encourages parents to send photos for better resolution, but the video conference is helpful for allowing doctors to gauge the demeanor and activity level of the child. With that information, the pediatrician can give medical advice and call in prescriptions as needed. Other conditions commonly treated via the Virtual After Hours Clinic include pink eye and non-critical conditions that parents aren’t certain will require in-person attention. Children’s Hospital’s VAHC is also helpful for new parents who are on high alert for anything out of the ordinary as it pertains to their baby. A video conference can help ease their minds about conditions that may seem uncommon to them but that are very common to pediatricians. For parents with multiple kids, the video visits are much easier than bringing the whole crew to the doctor’s office. When adults need the guidance of a physician, care often starts with their family medicine practitioner. At Crescent City Physicians, Inc., a subsidiary of Touro Infirmary, Dr. Jennifer Driver offers primary care and generally focuses on patients aged 17 and older. “Family practitioners often treat more than people think. Yes, we perform your yearly physical but are also well trained to manage chronic illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, migraine and more. We also treat acute issues including sinus infections, minor injuries, and the list goes on,” says Driver. According to Driver, nearly half of adults in the U.S. have hypertension, and one-third are at risk for diabetes. These high numbers lead to those conditions being the most common conditions that she encounters. “I believe there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach, and try to take patients differences into account to design custom treatment plans. That approach often starts with tests to understand a person’s overall risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack,” Driver says. “To lower their values, they may attempt lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise, but often a more intensive therapy is needed to reach a certain goal,” she says. Helping people lose weight is the business of Ingrid Rinck, who founded Sensible Meals on the Northshore in 2014 after her son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. “The best way to lose excess weight is to decrease the calories you’re taking in,” says Rinck. “Yes, fad diets work, but they aren’t sustainable; it’s essential for your long-term success to find a program that offers options for foods you look forward to eating and can maintain on weekends and into the future,” she says.

Sensible Meals offers families portioned, calorie-restricted meals with a variety of meal types to satisfy your goals: Weight Loss, Double Protein, Paleo and Vegetarian. The meals are either delivered to your door (nationwide) or made available for pickup at 11 convenient local pickup locations. “Understand that food equals fuel. Our meals tap into your stored fat, allowing you to use your excess fat as fuel,” says Rinck. Families seek out Sensible Meals for more than just its weight benefits; the conveniently prepped meals also allow for less time food shopping, cooking and cleaning. Oral health is a big part of family health, and regular visits to the dentist shouldn’t be overlooked or avoided. Preventative dental care plays an important role in the maintenance of oral health, which often translates to a healthy smile. Elizabeth Riggs Dentistry is a restorative and cosmetic practice on Magazine Street focused on comprehensive dental care. Dr. Riggs recommends brushing twice daily, flossing daily, having your teeth cleaned regularly (to be determined by both dentist and hygienist) and eating healthy. “Proper nutrition plays a strong roll in maintaining a healthy mouth,” says Riggs. In addition to offering cleanings and dental screenings to patients of all ages, Riggs

treats patients with lost, missing or unhealthy teeth, as well as patients with a desire to improve their overall function and aesthetics. “It may come as a surprise that we treat patients with neuromuscular problems stemming from tension or teeth-grinding, as well as bruxism. These problems can lead to breakdown of the entire masticatory system, causing TMJ problems, tension headaches, migraines and, of course tooth loss,” says Riggs. “We also help patients who have problems with sleep due to snoring. Having studied the science of sleep and jaw relations, we’re able to fabricate appliances that can eliminate snoring and apnea altogether,” she says. As one of our five senses, sound helps define our world. Hearing doesn’t just affect how we navigate the world, it also helps us appreciate the tone and emotions of family. At Associated Hearing, audiologists assess hearing levels and issues in patients of all ages. From infants in hospitals and children in school to workers in loud factories and senior adults with hearing loss, a wide spectrum of patients and hearing issues are encountered by audiologists like Dan Bode., Au.D. According to Bode, the biggest issue faced by someone with a hearing problem is clarity.

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“When you’re out there and listening to someone talk you might miss some of the cues – we start losing tonality and ability to hear inflections and quality of words.” Bode references speech voids wherein simple words can be mistaken, e.g. “road” and “rose” or “wife” and “white.” “Those kinds of errors and omissions can cause difficulties, especially in communication with couples and at work and in various environments where you’re required to listen,” says Bode. At Associated Hearing, audiologists are able to intricately evaluate a person’s hearing function and identify what and how effectively you hear, how different environments affect your hearing, what aural rehabilitation steps can be taken and much more. Technological advances in hearing aids offer flexibility and convenience for users who can integrate usage of their mobile device and services like Life Alert with their hearing aid. Like sound, sight also helps us navigate both family interactions and the world around us. Many people know the local brand KREWE for its stylish sunglasses, but the brand offers both optical and sun options at its New Orleans stores, 1818 Magazine St. and 809 Royal St. “The Lower Garden District store is more focused on optical, which is where my office is based,” says Optometrist Dr. Kim Ta. “At KREWE we’re focused on making getting an eye exam easier by offering appointments via text, while also providing an environment that’s relaxed,” says Ta. At KREWE, Ta can screen for ocular conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy. She can treat conjunctivitis (pink eye), styes, red eyes, dry eyes and eye-related allergies, as well as perform foreign body removals. “Most people think that an optometrist can only prescribe glasses and contacts. However, optometrists are trained to examine overall ocular health as well as diagnose and manage diseases of the eye,” says Ta, who treats patients ages 5 and older. A health concern that has ruined many a family vacation or long car ride is the dreaded culprit of lower back pain. A common occurrence in adults, it can make daily tasks difficult to accomplish and affects quality of life. Often, an orthopedist’s expertise is sought for a diagnosis and options for treatment. Low back pain and cervical pain with or without associated disc herniations are two of the most common conditions treated by Dr. Ralph P. Katz at Westside Orthopaedic Clinic, a full-service orthopaedic clinic located in Marrero. A specialist in minimally invasive spine surgery, kyphoplasty and cervical disc surgery, Katz also performs surgery for neurological disorders. Katz offers cervical disc replacements along with new

50 ST. CHARLES AVENUE OCTOBER 2018

technologies and minimally invasive surgeries such as a lumbar surgery with a smaller incision and shorter recovery time, “Which means getting back to activities quicker,” says Katz. To maintain orthopaedic health, Katz recommends a healthy diet, exercise and a positive frame of mind. In the area of robotic-assisted surgery, a change on the Northshore brings brand new technologies to patients. Formerly Fairway Medical Center, Avala is the first hospital in Louisiana to perform robotic-assisted surgeries on the spine, hip and knee, according to Dr. K. Samer Shamieh, Chairman of the Board. “Our brand new robots – the Globus Excelsius GPS used for spine surgeries and the Mako used for total hip and total knee surgeries – have a state-of-the-art navigation-guided system using CT scans to perform a personalized surgical experience for each patient. This personalized service enhances the safety and accuracy of surgery for our patients,” says Shamieh. A 21-bed hospital servicing the Northshore and surrounding community, Avala is home to a multitude of different specialty surgeons including bariatric, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, endoscopy, pain, gynecology, plastic, reconstructive and general surgery. Self image and confidence are other factors important for overall health, and specialists in aesthetics are often sought for physical enhancements that can take off years or take off pounds. As a facial plastic surgeon, Dr. Sean Weiss does a lot of what you’d probably expect: facelifts, necklifts, brow lifts, eyelid surgery, nose reshaping and facial fillers, to name a few. As a double boardcertified specialist focused on aesthetic enhancements of the face, head and neck, Weiss offers a vast and comprehensive amount of facial rejuvenation services. Most commonly, Weiss sees patients looking to alter an oversized or crooked nose or who are facially looking to turn back the hands of time. Treatments for the nose include rhinoplasty surgery to create balance or “liquid rhinoplasty” using injectable fillers to reshape and sculpt the nose. With facial aging, Weiss takes a comprehensive approach, combining surgical and non-surgical treatments for achieving natural appearing outcomes and enhanced self image. Another dilemma faced by a significant number of people is hair loss. According to Weiss, plateletrich plasma injections can significantly improve the quality and quantity of hair growth without the need for daily medication. He performs these injections and also performs the ARTAS robotic hair transplant procedure when follicular unit grafting is needed to restore hair to a more youthful and confident status.  With all of this expert advice, hopefully your family can take some steps towards improved health this month. Taking control of your concerns now means improved quality of life, not just for yourself, but for those around you as well.

ASSOCIATED HEARING, INC. 433 Metairie Road, Suite 101 Metairie 833-4327 AssociatedHearingInc.com

AVALA 67252 Industry Lane Covington (985) 809-9888 Avala.com

CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL VIRTUAL HOURS CLINIC CHNola.org/ telemedicine-clinic

CRESCENTCARE 3308 Tulane Ave. 207-2273

CRESCENT CITY PHYSICIANS 3525 Prytania St., Suite 301 897-8118 Touro.com

KREWE 1818 Magazine St. 684-2939 KREWE.com

DR. ELIZABETH RIGGS 3442 Magazine St. 891-1115 SmilesByRiggs.com

SENSIBLE MEALS EatSensibleMeals.com

DR. SEAN WEISS –FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY 2201 Veterans Blvd., Suite 408 Metairie 814-FACE (3223) SeanWeissMD.com

WESTSIDE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC 1301 Barataria Blvd. Marrero 347-0243 WestsideOrtho.com


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V I N TA G E W E D D I N G

Dorothy Henican Weds Dr. Charles Emile Heidingsfelder October 23, 1965 By Bev Church

Dot and Charles Heidingsfelder, both lifelong New Orleanians, met while they were in high school. Dot went to Sacred Heart and college at Barat in Lake Forrest Illinois. Charlie attended Jesuit High School and then Loyola University and dental school. They dated for eight years, then when Charles was going into the Air Force he asked Dot if she would marry him and go with him to be stationed in Wichita, Kansas. She decided to go to graduate school for a year and then get married! They went to Adler’s to pick out the ring

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and the wedding plans began with her mom, Mrs. Ellis Henican, at the helm. They were married at 11 a.m. at the Most Holy Name of Jesus Church on St. Charles Avenue with the reception at Mr. and Mrs. Claiborne Perrilliat’s home on Octavia Street. Dot chose a gown of pale ivory satin and Alençon lace, and featured a long veil of rose point lace over illusion. Her bouquet was made of white butterfly roses with Stephanotis and lilies of the valley. Her bridesmaids’ gowns had bodices of green velveteen with a matching panel

cascading down the back of the candlelight brocade long skirts. They carried wreaths of ivory sweetheart roses and ivy with a single glamelia. After the reception, they were off to New York City for their honeymoon complete with Broadway shows, dinners at special restaurants and sightseeing. After Captain Doctor Charles Heidingsfelder finished his time with the Air Force in Wichita, they moved back to New Orleans, where Charles opened his dental practice and became to all of us “Dr. Charlie!” n


V I N TA G E W E D D I N G

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WITH THIS RING

Geary– Philips By Megan Holt

When Elizabeth Ashley Geary moved to Los Angeles, she was focused on graduate school, not romance. She and some friends joined a dating app just to meet new people. Michael Kent Philips was also using the app, and he and Libby “swiped right” for each other! After a few months of getting to know each other over text messages and phone calls, the couple finally met in person for a concert at the House of Blues, and they never needed the app again. Three and a half years later, Michael asked Libby’s father for her hand in marriage. With his future father-inlaw’s blessing, he set about planning the perfect proposal. He decided on a trip the Cayman Islands, where his parents had gotten engaged, and invited both of their families to be part of the surprise. Michael’s parents invited Libby to go on a trip with the Philips family for “Michael’s mother’s birthday;” meanwhile, Libby’s family secretly flew in. After Michael popped the question and Libby said “yes!,” everyone celebrated the newly engaged couple. The wedding festivities took place in Libby’s hometown of New Orleans. Before the big day, Libby pampered her bridesmaids with a luncheon on the lawn of Longue Vue House and Gardens catered by Ralph Brennan Catering Company and coordinated by Z Event Company. The Roosevelt Hotel was the perfect choice for the rehearsal dinner. After a cocktail hour on the roof with passed appetizers and the Roosevelt’s signature beverage, the Sazerac, guests enjoyed a seated dinner in the beautiful historic Blue Room. On April 21, 2018, Libby walked down the aisle of the chapel at the Academy of the Sacred Heart, where she had gone to school from Nursery through 12th grade, to Pachebel’s “Canon in D Major.” In his white linen suit, Michael beamed

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when he saw Libby in a custom wedding dress made by Kate McDonald, and their smiles continued as they were married by Reverend Monsignor Christopher H. Nalty and Reverend Gregg Grovenburg, S.J. After the ceremony, guests were off to Arnaud’s for the reception. Libby loved the idea of a garden party with lots of white, peach and pink flowers, and Z Event Company made her vision come to life. They created a garden party for Libby right in the middle of the French Quarter by blocking off part of Bourbon and Bienville streets to create an additional space for the “Garden Room.” It was in full splendor with lounge seating, grass turf, hedge walls and suspended florals. Guests sipped Arnaud’s signature cocktail, the French 75, with a nasturtium floating in it, and marveled as the mixologist created the couple’s custom cipher in foam on top of a second signature drink! The menu included a smoked

Pompano station, a truffle mac and cheese bar, boudin wontons with pepper jelly sauce and many more amazing items. Bittersweet Confectioners worked the garden party theme into a six-tier wedding cake adorned with fresh flowers, and they created a tribute to Michael’s alma mater with a groom’s cake shaped like Stanford University stadium. For their first dance, Michael and Libby chose “Be Young, Be Foolish, Be Happy,” and guests danced the night away to the music of Surround Sound. The music stopped only briefly, when Michael’s groomsmen serenaded Libby with Sigma Chi’s “sweetheart song” and presented her with white roses. After the honeymoon of a lifetime in Bora Bora, Libby and Michael returned to New Orleans, where they live in the French Quarter. Libby is a Tax Accountant at Ernst and Young and Michael is founder and CEO of One80, a healthcare app. n


WITH THIS RING

Bride’s Dress: Custom wedding dress by Kate McDonald, Wedding Belles New Orleans Bridesmaids’ Dresses: Amsale light blue chiffon dresses, Wedding Belles New Orleans Groom’s Attire: White linen suit, Perlis, with a light green, peach and pink tie, Vineyard Vines Groomsmen’s Attire: White linen suits, Perlis, with peach and pink ties, Vineyard Vines Bridesmaids’ Gift: Watercolored Jenny Yoo silk robe Engagement Ring: Diamond solitaire on a diamond crusted band, Friend and Company Bride’s Wedding Band: Diamond crusted band, Friend and Company Groom’s Wedding Band: Simple gold band, Friend and Company Coordinator: Z Event Company Florist: Kim Starr Wise Invitation: Scriptura Photographer: A Bryan Photography of Birmingham, Alabama Videographer: Bride Film Hair: H2O Hair Salon Makeup: Flawless Bride

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YO U N G B LO O DS

Happy Johnson CEO & Co-Founder, Team Happy Foundation By Lindsay Mack

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and enticing to kids. To reach them, the team has also written and published four children’s books geared toward second graders: Backyard Bayou, The Adventures of Happy and Big Wanda, Fearless Delta Fox and What About Pickles? The books teach kids about environmental stewardship, storm protection and even disaster preparedness for pets. Since its creation, the Team Happy Foundation has taught 4,000 kids in 50 local schools how to build a hurricane preparation kit, as well as champion the restoration of Louisiana wetlands. Through the books and presentations, this nonprofit is working to help today’s kids understand the importance of disaster preparedness and environmental sustainability. Plus, Team Happy Foundation has put 45,000 volunteer hours toward home rebuilding in New Orleans, in addition to the organiza-

tion’s many more programs. The teen tricentennial platform they’ve incorporated, titled The Next 300, encourages the young people of New Orleans to consider their city’s future on their own terms. “Through Instagram and a series of short documentaries, youth in the Lower 9th Ward have a dynamic stage to voice their vision for the future of our beloved city,” says Johnson. Their opinions about the city’s future are inspiring and hopeful, and this project deserves recognition. n

Get Involved To learn more about the organization and to inquire about volunteer opportunities, visit TeamHappy.org, Instagram.com/ TheNext300 or Facebook.com/HappyJohnson.

PHOTO BY CHERY L G ERBER

First responders are the definition of everyday heroes. Trained to help others during natural disasters and other catastrophes, these workers are indispensable. Fortunately, one New Orleans organization is dedicated to inspiring the next generation of first responders – and they work right here in the city. Happy Johnson and his crew at Team Happy Foundation are all about advocating first responder jobs to today’s youth. CEO and Co-Founder Happy Johnson got the idea for this organization through his personal experience. “As the youngest black male driver of an emergency response vehicle in my relief unit after Hurricane Katrina, my team had a desire to increase diversity within the disaster response field,” says Johnson. Team Happy Foundation was created to make the first responder field accessible


STUDENT ACTIVIST

Lucy Claire Galloway Academy of the Sacred Heart By Mallory Lindsly

“I’ve learned that it’s important to give back to the community as part of being a good citizen,” says Lucy Claire Galloway, a graduated senior from Academy of Sacred Heart. “Everyone has the responsibility to help each other and to help the community.” While in high school Galloway started a club at Sacred Heart called Hearts in Homes, where students visited assisting living homes and interviewed the residents.The students would record the interviews and give those recordings to their family members to keep as an oral history. Galloway says, “Sacred Heart has taught me from a young age about the importance of giving to others. It is important to remember because we can get caught up in our own lives and forget about those who need help.” One of Galloway’s rewarding volunteer experiences while in high school was traveling with Amigos for Christ to Nicaragua to build a school with her classmates. While they were there, the volunteers worked on the school, visited with the families and played with the children after working. “We should always try to help those in need when we can. Any act of service, big or small, can make a difference in someone’s life,” says Galloway. While in New Orleans, Galloway volunteers with the

Miracle League. Here, she has the opportunity to play baseball with disabled children on Saturdays. Each volunteer has a buddy throughout the season and the pair becomes close friends. Kitty Mattesky, Galloway’s sixth grade English teacher, inspired her to become an activist. After the sixth grade, Galloway traveled to Sacred Heart School in Connecticut to help feed the homeless in the Bronx for a week. “Even though I was only 12, I remember Mrs. Mattesky talking about the importance of these summer trips and feeling inspired to go and help,” says Galloway. Galloway is currently a freshman at the University of Texas at Austin and is majoring in Computer Science. She hopes to one day use technology to better people’s lives. She is interested in assistive technology for the disabled. n

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S H O P TA L K

April L. Watson Proprietor, The Shard Shop By Mirella Cameran

Tell us about what happens at The Shard Shop? The Shard Shop is a friendly make-your-own glass art boutique located in the heart of the Irish Channel on Magazine Street. We teach you how to design your own glass art using a mosaic-like technique placing glass on canvas or board, resulting in beautiful, sparkly, unique art. We use recycled wine bottles, sea glass, tumbled glass, broken shards,and cast-a-way pieces from glass blowers, and capture it all in a clear, glossy resin. Our friendly art instructors help guests find their creative souls. We live by the motto: “Anyone can be an Artist.”

How do customers like it? Our guests love it because it’s easy. A class takes about an hour. We offer as much or as little help as you’d like. We have stencils, idea books and sample art. You’re only limited 62 ST. CHARLES AVENUE OCTOBER 2018

What kind of customers do you have? Our customers are the most amazing people. They are locals and tourists, from ages 5 to 95. They include everyone from kids who celebrate their birthday with us to Mardi Gras krewes, families, groups of friends – anyone who wants to learn something fun and new and create something beautiful. Is there anything you’d like to tell us about that’s coming up or we wouldn’t know about it? We are the place to party! We offer kids, adult and corporate parties. If you book your office holiday party before October 31, you’ll get a free $100 gift certificate. We’re also offering new workshops this fall including dirty pour classes, geode art classes and a “Pimp Your Mirror” two-day workshop to makeover your mirror by adding glass and resin. Make it sparkle! n THE SHARD SHOP 3138 Magazine St., Suite C 309-2581 ShardShop.com/nola

PHOTO BY J EFFERY J OH NSTON

How long have you been open? We’ve been open a year and half. The first day we opened we pulled people in off the street to make art for free. Everyone we had in that day was thrilled and they took to social media. We haven’t stopped since!

by your imagination. People surprise themselves every day.


S H O P TA L K

Danielle Conrad Owner, Wildflower Boutique By Mirella Cameran

When did you open the store? I opened Wildflower Boutique at the end of October 2017, right on the cusp of the upper Metairie Road business boom.

PH OTO BY J EFFERY JOHNSTO N

Tell us about the lines you carry? Wildflower carries trendy clothing, shoes and accessories for women. We carry statement pieces and everyday basics at affordable prices. Lately, our jewelry has become insanely popular! We carry the highly sought after line Bauble Bar, as well as Kendra Scott. Tell us about what sets you apart? Growing up, I spent a lot of time in my mom’s boutique, which is located in a small town. She mastered selling to a large age range, since it was one of the few shops around. I strive to do the same by creating a mother/daughter shopping experience where they can both find something they like – or at least agree on!

What are your favorite items in store right now? We are gearing up for my favorite season: fall! Some current favorites include soft, cozy sweaters, flare jeans and faux fur jackets. Who is your clientele? We try to cater to a vast group of women, from high school girls needing dresses for school functions, to women needing a casual dinner or date outfit, or a wedding guest dress. What is coming up or in the store that you are excited about right now? We recently secured the brand Sole Society, which carries comfortable, trendy shoes as well as purses. I’m also excited for the Kendra Scott Winter 2018 Collection, which will launch this month. n WILDFLOWER BOUTIQUE 2700 Metairie Road, Suite C, Metairie 218-8996 Instagram @wearWildflower

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S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 1

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1. Orleans Parish Medical Society and Jefferson Parish Medical Society sponsored a “Meet-And-Greet” for area health professionals and medical students in April. The event featured presentations from John Wales M.D., President, JPMS; Barbara McAneny M.D., President-Elect, American Medical Association; Jay Kaplan M.D., FACEP, Medical Director of Care Transformation, LCMC Health; Hallet Watz M.D., Chief Medical and Compliance Officer, MedData; and George Ellis M.D., President, Orleans Parish Medical Society (OPMS). 2. Joel and Mary Funderburk and Erica and James Reiss hosted a cocktail party at the Funderburks’ home in April to benefit the building of the Bastion Community of Resilience, a planned neighborhood in New Orleans for returning warriors and their families with lifelong rehabilitative needs. 3. Bastion Founder Dylan Tête poses with Jennifer and Benjamin Kadden at the “Building Bastion” cocktail party in April. The event celebrated the success of Phase 1 of the project and raised funds for the next steps. 4. Mexican Ambassador Gerónimo Gutiérrez Fernández joined Ileana Suquet, President of the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation, Lorena Salazar, Director of the Mexican Cultural Institute and Carlos Ponce, Consul of Mexico in New Orleans at the “Inauguration Ceremony of the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans” in April. 5. Mexican-American artist Blanca Rosa Maldonado celebrated the inauguration of the Mexican Cultural Institute with Belinda Flores-Shinshillas and Elena Countis. 6. Lisa McKenzie introduced members of You Night Advisory Board at the “Battle of the Models” in April. Miranda Webb, Sarah Cottrell, Dr. Joyce Varghese, Carmen Medine, Kelly Villars P.T., Michael Holmes, Holley Haag and Dr. Katherine Williams. The annual event is one of many during a year-round program focusing on the emotional and mental issues women experience after a cancer diagnosis.

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S N A P S H OT S By Marie Gabriel 7

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7. Cancer survivors Sandy Hicks, Nancy Thayer, Z Ordonne, Janell Blei, Mary Jolicouer, Joy Newhouse, Selena Barthelemy, Alison Condon and Marie Campo went up against professional models at You Night’s yearly runway competition, “Battle of the Models.” The 2018 theme, “Fierce Beauty: Revolution,” represented the battle the women have fought against cancer and the fighting spirit that they each possess. 8. Byron Adams, Sr. Marjorie Hebert, Archbishop Gregory Aymond and Tommie Vassel attended the “Archbishop Hannon Community Appeal End of Campaign Celebration” at the Archbishop’s home in April. 9. Moon and Verna Landrieu are pictured at Archbishop Gregory Aymond’s home for the “Archbishop Hannon Community Appeal End of Campaign Celebration.” 10. The Zeus’ Rescue team and their tiny puppies celebrated “GiveNOLA Day” in May. 11. Delia Young, Jessica Schulman, McKenzie Lovelace, Rupa Jolly, Allison Tiller, Kate Sullivan and Rabia Cattie posed together at the American Cancer Society’s “Belles & Beaus Announcement Party” for the 2018 honorees. 12. Niki Mouton, Desiree Dugas West, Nicole Mara Tomeny and Nicole Giardina attended the “Belles & Beaus Announcement Party” at The Shops at Canal Place in May.

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PERFORMING ARTS

October By Fritz Esker

Through October 7

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Take a magic carpet ride into the world of Disney with this stage adaptation of the hit animated musical. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

The Christian band responsible for hits like “I Can Only Imagine” bring their fan favorites on a tour of over 20 cities. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com

Comedian Hannibal Burress, who has starred in TV shows like Broad City and movies like Tag, brings his critically acclaimed stand-up act to New Orleans. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

ALADDIN

Through October 28

MERCYME’S THE IMAGINE NATION TOUR

SHEAR MADNESS

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3-18

Chris Pell masterfully tackles Carl Nielsen’s “Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra,” followed by Brahms’ “Symphony No. 4.” Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com

It is a day like any other at the Shear Madness salon until the lady upstairs is murdered and the audience gets to join in the fun of figuring out whodunit. Westwego Performing Arts Theater, 177 Sala Ave., 885-2000, JPAS.org A DOLL’S HOUSE PART 2

In a new sequel to the classic play, Nora returns to the home she left 15 years earlier and faces regret, reconciliation and recrimination. Southern Rep Theatre, 2541 Bayou Road, 523-9857, SouthernRep.com 5-21

SATCHMO AT THE WALDORF

This extraordinary one-man, threecharacter play journeys into the heart and mind of beloved New Orleans jazz legend Louis Armstrong. Le Petit Théâtre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081, LePetitTheatre.com 10

FALL OUT BOY – M A N I A TOUR

Multi-platinum, Grammy-nominated band Fall Out Boy goes on tour in support of their new album, titled M A N I A. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com 12

RON WHITE

The cigar-smoking, scotch-drinking comedian from the “Blue Collar Comedy Tour” returns with a new stand-up show for mature audiences. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

66 ST. CHARLES AVENUE SEPTEMBER 2018

CHRIS PELL PLAYS NIELSEN’S CLARINET CONCERTO

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DEBAUCHERY!

New Orleans’ live, ongoing soap opera continues as sisters Chanel and Cartier continue their outrageous adventures. Church of Yoga NOLA, 1480 N. Rocheblave St., 522-6545, SouthernRep.com 18

MOZART’S JUPITER SYMPHONY FEATURING VIOLINIST JENNIFER KOH

Acclaimed violinist Jennifer Koh performs “Trouble,” a concerto composed specifically for her by Vijay Iyer. Orpheum Theater, 129 Roosevelt Way, 523-6530, OrpheumNOLA.com 18

KEVIN HART – THE IRRESPONSIBLE TOUR

Movie star and global comedy sensation Kevin Hart unveils hilarious new material as part of his world tour. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive, 587-3663, SmoothieKingCenter.com 18

LORD OF THE DANCE: DANGEROUS GAMES

The Lord of the Dance series continues its intoxicating mix of music and dance that fuses the traditional with the contemporary. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com

HANNIBAL BURRESS

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ALICE IN CHAINS

Alice in Chains, one the iconic bands of the 1990s alternative rock movement, performs live at the Saenger for one night only. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 24

MAXWELL: 50 INTIMATE NIGHTS LIVE FEATURING MARSHA AMBROSIUS

Maxwell, one of the architects of the “neo-soul” musical genre, embarks on a 50-city American tour to debut new material as well as sing his beloved hits. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 26

LAUREN DAIGLE – LOOK UP CHILD TOUR

Lafayette-born contemporary Christian artist Lauren Daigle performs a night of faith-based music. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com October 30-November 4 SCHOOL OF ROCK

This musical adaptation of Richard Linklater’s hit film tells the story of a slacker music teacher who forms his own rock band with his students. The Saenger Theater, 1111 Canal St., 525-1052, SaengerNOLA.com 31

ED SHEERAN

Pop superstar Ed Sheeran of “The Shape of You” fame hits the Crescent City as part of his world tour. MercedesBenz Superdome, Sugar Bowl Drive, 587-3805, MBsuperdome.com


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STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 69


PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Ace and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718.

70 ST. CHARLES AVENUE OCTOBER 2018

PREMIER


PROPERTIES

STCHARLESAVENUE.COM 71


N OS TA LG I A

The World’s Champion Speed Contest The Speed Derby of 1941 lasted two months. By Seale Paterson

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stands were often packed. To keep up with the races when away from the venue, updates were broadcast on WDSU at 10 a.m., noon, 4:30 p.m. and 10:10 p.m. Special entertainment kept the crowds entertained. Acrobats, vaudeville performers, comedians, dancers and live bands provided entertainment both day and night. Elaborate performances with special props, scenery and lights were featured daily, running the gamut from athletic to comedic to absurd: The Gay Nineties Revue, A Nite in the Insane Asylum, Mystery Wrestling Match and The Street Car Scene were just a few of them. Two racing couples were even married in elaborately costumed ceremonies during the months-long racing period. Jam Bombshell Derby special events

involved 20 teams racing around the track, trying to lap members of the competing teams or forcing them into the center of the track, where a fall would cause an immediate disqualification. Winning teams would receive a cash prize at the end of each match. The Speed Derby ended after about two full months at the end of September with a large gala ball. By then, the last contestants had racked up about 1,500 hours of racing; the winners received $2,000 in cash prizes. n

One of the creative entertainments provided for the audience involved two women encased in ice – thawing. The Tomb of Ice participants, most often young ladies in bathing costumes, but also sometimes the Master of Ceremony, were monitored by medical staff during their thaw.

IMAGE APPEARS COURTESY OF CHARLES L. FRANCK / FRANCK-BERTACCI PHOTOGRAPH ERS C OLLE CT ION , THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEAN S COLLECTION , 1979.325.184.

The Speed Derby of 1941, billed as the World’s Champion Speed Contest by Creator and Master of Ceremony King Brady, opened on July 31 in the Municipal Auditorium. The main event consisted of 50 men and women, in 22 couples teams and six solo racers, competing in a months-long endurance race around a track on the auditorium floor. Some competitors were sponsored, racing in shirts branded with logos, including Jax Beer and The Court of Two Sisters. Contestants would walk, run and jump for 24 hours a day, with 45 minutes of race and 15 minutes off every hour. The last ones still racing would win. Audiences came and left at all hours of day and night, paying admission prices between 15 and 30 cents; the air-cooled


Profile for Renaissance Publishing

St. Charles Avenue Magazine October 2018  

St. Charles Avenue Magazine October 2018