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50th annivers ary issue

50 things we love about acadiana A lo ve le tte r to t h e r e g i on, c e l e b r at i n g the 50th annive rs ary of Acadiana Profile mag azine

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#30

Shucks! in Abbeville


features Célébrer le mode de vie acadien

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50 things we love about acadiana Our love letter to the region, celebrating the 50th anniversary of Acadiana Profile magazine by Topher Balfer photos by Denny Culbert

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Going Coastal

Top Lawyers

Hope down the coast for summer fun in Alabama, Mississippi and Florida

386 Lawyers in 46 Specialties

by Cheré coen

Profiles by fritz esker por traits by romero & Romero


april/may volume 37 number 2

lagniappe . . ...................................... 06

A little Extra

la musique...................................... 84

Golden Grace The Lost Bayou Ramblers are found by the Grammys, nabbing a shiny statue on the cusp of 20 years as a band

note de l’editeur............................. 10

Editor’s Note lettres d’amour.............................. 12

Becoming Cajun A shuttle ride in Houston sets a young teen on the course to learn his culture

les personnes . . ................................ 86

culture

nouvelles de villes. . ....................... 14

News Briefs

les ar tistes...................................... 79

food+drink sur le menu..................................... 29

Cozy Cuisine The Cabin in Burnside serves up lunch and brunch with a heavy side of atmosphere de la cuisine................................... 32

Herbal Bouquet Elevate sweet and savory dishes with fresh herbs

home+style la maison.. ...................................... 19

Dream Spaces Serene elements and muted fields of color bring relaxed elegance to a soigné country home near Breaux Bridge

recettes de cocktails.. ................... 34

A Pamplemousse Pick-Up It’s fizzy-hour time for forbidden fruit

pour la maison.............................. 24

Bonne nuit, beaux rêves! Follow these expert upgrades to design your bed like a pro À la mode . . ..................................... 26

Delicate Subjects Petite, belle bijoux for any occasion

The Grand Pigs-Periment Lafayette chef Paul Ayo’s new bacon-themed eatery, Avec Bacon Cafe, is innovative both in concept and execution

The candied oysters at SHUCKS! in Abbeville are the perfect balance of salty and sweet, with a feta and bleu cheese crumble and sugar cane pepper glaze topping off the signature char-broiled oysters. Take our advice — you’ll want the full dozen.

ON THE COVER:

Never Too Late To Paint Lue Svendson leaves her brushmark on the Acadiana art scene

en français, s’il vous plaît........... 88

Warren Perrin À la poursuite de la justice


lagniappe

awards

A Little Extra

LEARN FRENCH Anniversaire

(n.) a comemorative celebration of a yearly event. example: Cette année, Acadiana Profile marque son anniversaire d’or, avec 50 ans de couverture du meilleur du sud de la Louisiane. translation: This year, Acadiana Profile marks its golden anniversary, with 50 years of covering the best of South Louisiana.

Where is your favorite place to visit or thing to do when traveling along the Gulf Coast?

Errol Laborde Managing Editor Melanie Warner Spencer Associate Editor Ashley McLellan Copy Editor Liz Clearman Ar t Director Sarah George Lead Photographer Danley Romero digital media editor Kelly Massicot Editor in Chief

— Colleen

Vice President of Sales Colleen Monaghan (504) 830-7215 / Colleen@acadianaprofile.com Sales Manager Rebecca Taylor (337) 298-4424 / (337) 235-7919 Ext. 230 Rebecca@acadianaprofile.com account executive Bićh Lê Fraley (828) 260-5706 Bich@acadianaprofile.com intern Kelsy Chauvin

marketing

Cheryl Lemoine Whitney Weathers digital media associate Mallary Matherne For event information call (504) 830-7264

Director of Marketing & Events Event Coordinator

“Oh my! I have so many! I really enjoy Bay St. Louis. Old Town Bay St Louis has great little shops and yummy places to grab a bite to eat; my favorite is The Blind Tiger. I also like to vacation to the Florida beaches, and I like finding new spots to go camping in Mississippi.” — Mallary

Bronze Will Kalec for Magazine Writer of the Year Silver Sarah George for Cover Gold Denny Culbert for Magazine Photographer of the Year

adver tising

DID YOU KNOW?

As Acadiana Profile celebrates its anniversary of bringing the best coverage of food, home, events and culture of South Louisiana, we raise a glass to other 50th birthday celebrations across the state: the anniversary of Louisiana Special Olympics, the founding of the Council for the Development of French in Louisiana (CODOFIL), and the premiere of the debut of the film “Les Acadiens de la Dispersion” by Acadian filmmaker Leonard Forest, to name a few. Bon anniversaire everyone!

2017

EDITORIAL “I love casino hopping to the Scarlet Pearl, Beau Rivage, Hard Rock and Golden Nugget casinos. I also love dining at Mary Mahoney’s Restaurant and visiting the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art.”

Gold Sarah George for Art Direction of a Single Story “I’d say my favorite place to visit in general would be the beach. Nothing beats taking a trip in the summer down the coast to Pensacola feeling the wind in your hair, sun on your skin and sand between your toes.”

production Production manager

— Demi

Jessica DeBold

Production Designers

Traffic

International and Regional Magazine Association

Emily Andras Demi Schaffer Molly Tullier manager Topher Balfer administration

John Holzer Mallary Matherne Subscription Manager Brittanie Bryant For subscriptions call (504) 830-7231 Chief Executive Officer Todd Matherne President Alan Campell Executive Vice President Errol Laborde Distribution Manager

office manager

Gold Sarah George for Overall Art Direction Gold Cheré Coen and Denny Culbert for Food Feature

2016

Bronze Will Kalec for Magazine Writer of the Year Bronze Danley Romero for Portrait Series Silver Denny Culbert for Photo Series Gold Denny Culbert for Magazine Photographer of the Year Gold Sarah George for Art Direction of a Single Story Gold Sarah George for Overall Art Direction

110 Veterans Blvd. / Suite 123 / Metairie, LA 70005 / (504) 828-1380 / (877) 221-3512 128 Demanade / Suite 104 / Lafayette, LA 70503 / (337) 235-7919 ext. 230 Acadiana Profile (ISSN 0001-4397) is published bimonthly by Renaissance Publishing LLC, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005 (504) 828-1380 and 128 Demanade, Suite 104, Lafayette, LA 70503 (337) 235-7919 ext. 230. Subscription rate: One year $10; Foreign Subscriptions vary. Periodicals postage paid at Lafayette, LA, and additional mailing entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Acadiana Profile, 110 Veterans Blvd., Suite 123, Metairie, LA 70005. Copyright 2017 Renaissance Publishing LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The trademark Acadiana Profile is registered. Acadiana Profile is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork, even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed in Acadiana Profile are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the magazine or owner.

Finalist Magazine of the Year


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ĂŠquipe de vente

Rebecca Taylor Sales Manager (337) 298-4424 (337) 235-7919 Ext. 230 Rebecca@AcadianaProfile.com

Colleen Monaghan Vice President of Sales (504) 830-7215 Colleen@AcadianaProfile.com

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note de l’editeur

Français, S’il Vous Plaît,” (page 88) columns this year, David Cheramie is in full swing I nonhisa “En series exploring the history of the Council for the Development of French in Louisiana

Edtior’s picks

You’ve Got to Check this Out

Spirited tours

Fans of Yellowfin Vodka, which launched in the Spring of 2017 with its first batch, will be happy to hear that the distillery is now open to tours. The artisanal vodka is made by Sulphurnative Jamison Trouth and distilled with locally-grown cane sugar. Yellowfin Distillery, 1716 East Burton St., Sulphur, yellowfindistillery.com

cultural icons

On April 19, the ICON Arts & Cultural Awards kicks off at the Acadiana Center for the Arts. The honorees span the arts, business and culture and proceeds from the event go to the ABC Fund, which provides business and finacial support to indiviuals throughout the region dedicated to music, culture and the arts. acadianacenterforthearts.org

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acadiana profile april/may 2018

(CODOFIL), in recognition of the organization’s 50th anniversary. Its mission of supporting, celebrating and growing francophone communities in Louisiana has played an integral role in preserving the state’s cultural heritage. CODOFIL was created in 1968 by the Louisiana state legislature and has made a great impact on the communities it serves. That year, another entity dedicated to supporting and celebrating a distinct aspect of Louisiana culture was created by Robert Angers, a businessman and veteran newspaperman. Angers launched a general-interest magazine focusing on the Acadiana region and its Cajun food, history and culture. That magazine was of course Acadiana Profile. In 1985, Robert Angers’ son Trent Angers took the helm, then in 2011, the magazine was purchased by Renaissance Publishing. Today, Acadiana Profile holds the distinction of being the longest-running lifestyle magazine in the state, something of which we are pretty sure the founder would be proud. We are definitely quite proud to be the keepers of the flame. Longevity of this sort is unusual for magazines, especially given the business climate of media. We attribute Acadiana Profile’s success and endurance to many factors (including the blood, sweat and tears of its founders, current owners and staff past and present), such as the endless wealth of interesting and talented people we cover, our ever-interested readers and, most importantly, Cajun culture itself. As the current managing editor, I’m tasked with honoring the past, keeping the content relevant to present and holding a candle to the winds of the future. My job is made much easier by always having this culturally rich place to draw upon. The most difficult part then isn’t filling the pages, because there are more great stories to be written than we have space to publish. Rather, the biggest challenge is making sure we get it right. To do that, we push to ensure that every issue stays true to Robert Angers’ vision of celebrating the culture. Using French, particularly Cajun French, and featuring an entire column, Cheramie’s “En Français, S’il Vous Plaît,” in our pages is a cultural touchstone we deem essential to the magazine’s mission. Additionally, we get out there and soak up as much of the inspired cuisine, indigenous music and beautiful prairies bayous, marshes and swamps, all of which is the inspiration behind our “50 Things We Love About Acadiana,” feature — our love letter to the region that has given us so much. Cheers to another 50 years!

Melanie Warner Spencer, Managing Editor (504) 830-7239 | Melanie@AcadianaProfile.com


lettres d’amour

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: David Cheramie writes “En Français, S’il Vous Plaît,” for Acadiana Profile and has authored three books of Louisiana French poetry. He is the former director of CODOFIL and currently the CEO of the Bayou Vermilion District.

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Becoming Cajun A shuttle ride in Houston sets a young teen on the course to learn his culture by David Cheramie illustration by Christina Brown

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remember the day I started becoming Cajun. One would think I was born Cajun, but I was not; I had to become one. Even though I can trace my Acadian roots back to the 1785 arrival of Acadian refugees; even though my parents and grandparents spoke French as their first and sometimes only language; and even though we lived in south Louisiana, I was not yet Cajun. It started around my 13th birthday when my parents brought me to Astroworld in Houston. We were in the shuttle bus on our way from our hotel to the amusement park. I was sitting next to them as they were speaking French to each other, probably talking about something they did not want me to know about as usual. I paid them no mind because they did it all the time, as did most adults then; I was too excited about all the fun rides I was going on to care. I did notice when my mother began speaking in English to some other riders on the shuttle, friendly chitchat between strangers on vacation. She told them, and I remember it as clear as if we were still sitting there, “We’re from Louisiana. We’re Cajuns.” I thought to myself, “So that’s what we are.” Edwin Edwards was in his first term, so I was familiar with the word. But for some reason, I only then understood that it applied to me. Until that time, I always thought of myself as just an American, maybe a little different from the rest of America I only knew from TV, but American nonetheless. That moment began my inexorable journey to becoming Cajun. It was a long process that later brought me to learn my ancestors’ language and then to appreciate and even revel in the music I once dismissed, like so many others, as nothing but “chanky-chank.” The cooking part I already had down pat, having been raised on gumbo and jambalaya, red beans and sausage, white beans and fried fish, foods I later learned were called “ethnic” by some. At school, the cafeteria ladies who spoke only French prepared meals that would have brought Anthony Bourdain to tears. By choice, I came to assume the mantle of my culture, one that I could have easily rejected as many of my peers had. In that way, I did not become less American, but an American with a little lagniappe. Learning to love my Cajun culture has been a wild roller coaster ride. Navigating through the bayous, fighting coastal erosion, speaking French, despairing about it, singing “Jolie Blonde,” and stirring flour and oil to the correct shade of roux all ground me in this culture of which I am as much a product as a producer. All because one a little boy overheard his mother say he is Cajun. n


nouvelles de villes news by Lisa LeBlanc-Berry calendar by Kelly Massicot

calendar

Ascension, St. James

New Perspective

3 Festivals for April

Recent celebrity sightings at a dozen South Louisiana filming locations, from Donaldsonville to New Orleans, have tongues wagging about the upcoming Netflix movie, “The Highwaymen,” that wraps in April. Oscarwinner Kevin Costner and Oscar-nominated Woody Harrelson star as the cunning, legendary Texas Rangers who gunned down Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow in Bienville Parish in 1934. Director John Lee Hancock (“The Blind Side”) is implementing a bold new script setting the record straight about the ruthless robbers who were glamorized in the 1967 “Bonnie and Clyde” classic. The new narrative is from the lawmen’s perspective. Of the reported $49 million budget, $34.8 million is being spent in state, with $10.4 earmarked for Louisiana payroll. “The Highwaymen” is scheduled for an October release.

1 Ac adiana Po-Boy Festival Lafayette

Held the first Sunday of April each year, the Acadiana Poboy Festival celebrates the tasty sandwich while promoting the culture and hospitality of Acadiana through music and food. Over 25 local vendors will be in attendance, as well as crafts, live entertainment and activities for all ages.

2 Festival International De Louisiane Lafayette

Celebrating its 31st year, Festival International de Louisiane holds the largest international music and arts festival in the U.S. Over the five-day festival, festivalgoers can catch workshops, theater performances, visual art displays, music and food.

3 Downtown Lake Charles Crawfi sh Festival lake charles

Each April, the Crawfish Festival is held in promotion of the history of crawfish, awareness of the season and how Louisiana has benefitted from the seafood industry. Visitors can experience games, music and local restaurants and food vendors.

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Cool School Plans are underway and bids are going out for a new Billeaud Elementary School in Broussard that will be located at the corner of Fairfield Drive and Marteau Road. The two-story, 91,000-square-foot school will be designated as the centerpiece of a large new residential and commercial development.

Broussard

Lafayette

It’s a Geaux If you’ve been looking for the new Surfside Poke, the owners decided to change the name to Poke Geaux before opening it in the former Wok-A-Licious slot (4302 Ambassador, Suite 102). There’s been no change on the Hawaiian-inspired menu, featuring raw fish and build-your-own bowls. The young staff is superfriendly. A snazzy new seafood restaurant with a sleek bar and a dining area resembling a boat, Fiery Crab (2330 Kaliste Saloom Road; fierycrab.com) opened in March, and specializes in low country-style boiled seafood that’s served in a bag. Also new and seafood-centric are two all-you-can-eat spots, Sushi Masa (at the former Copeland’s, 3920 Ambassador) and Wasabi Grill & Sushi (Caffery Center, 4510 Suite H on Ambassador and Kaliste Saloom). Coming soon to that area is LaserTron, a multi-level laser tag arena inside Acadiana Lanes (3227 Ambassador).

acadiana profile april/may 2018

Lafourche

Tops in Tourism The state tourism commission awarded Louisiana’s Cajun Bayou (the Lafourche Parish tourist commission) Convention Bureau of the Year. President and CEO, Timothy Bush, says 2018 will see the completion of a renovation at the visitors center that will include a true interpretive exhibit with virtual reality components.


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nouvelles de villes news by Lisa LeBlanc-Berry calendar by Kelly Massicot

Scott

Book Bliss The new West Regional Public Library is now under construction in Scott (513 Old Spanish Trail; westregionallibrary.blogspot. com), measuring around 17,000-square-feet, with an anticipated opening in the first quarter of 2019.

calendar

3 Festivals for May

1 Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival Breaux Bridge

Power to the Megawatt

Since 1960, the “Crawfish Capital of the World” has been celebrating crawfish and Cajun culture. Visitors can join in on Cajun dance contests, Cajun music workshops, and, of course, lots of crawfish. (Additional information in the middle of this page.)

Calcasieu Entergy Louisiana LLC has broken ground on a 994-megawatt electricity generation plant in Westlake. Recent developments are requiring the need for more electricity, according to Gov. John Bel Edwards’ office, since approximately $55 billion in new industrial construction projects have been launched in Southwest Louisiana since 2012, with billions more investments planned over the next decade. For the new natural gas-fired Lake Charles Power Plant, Entergy Louisiana will make an $872 million capital investment in a project that mirrors the St. Charles Power Plant. Economists predict that the region will surpass 300,000 in population by 2020.

2 Sunset Herb and Garden Festival Sunset

Lafayette

For 22 years, the Sunset Garden Club has sponsored the St. Landry parish Herb and Garden Festival. Admission is $5 and guests can peruse yard art, herbal products, plants and flowers.

Hail to the Chefs

3 Starks Mayhaw Festival Starks

Each year, the Starks Business & Civic Association holds the Mayhaw Festival in hopes of community unity and to provide a positive image of Starks. The festival hosts a jelly contest, live auction, car show, carnival rides, food and more.

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Breaux Bridge

Crawfish Dreams Put on your sturdiest dancing shoes before heading to the May 4-6 Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival (bbcrawfest.com) in Parc Hardy, where 30 sizzling hot Cajun, swamp pop and zydeco bands will have both young and old twirling until midnight. Try to top that 55-pound record (in 1994) at the Saturday afternoon crawfish-eating contest (Tip: Judges consider technique and will put any runaway mudbugs right back on your tray).

acadiana profile april/may 2018

Being selected as a James Beard semifinalist is comparable to receiving an Oscar nomination. Manny Augello of Bread & Circus Provisions was the only chef from Acadiana that was named as a semifinalist for Best Chef South. The other eight chefs were from New Orleans, which also had nominations in seven other categories. What’s so remarkable this year is that an unprecedented number of chefs from Louisiana (more than any other state) were among the semifinalists selected for Best Chef South in 2018. New Oil Discovery Chevron has announced a “major” oil find about 100 miles southeast of Port Fourchon (located on the southern tip of Lafourche Parish). Chevron’s “significant oil discovery” is sparking optimism among locals hoping to bring back lucrative offshore work.

Terrebonne, Lafourche


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home+style Inspiration, dĂŠcoration et accessoires chic pour la vie

la maison

Dream Spaces Serene elements and muted fields of color bring relaxed elegance to a soignĂŠ country home near Breaux Bridge by Lisa LeBlanc-Berry photos by Chad Chenier

Due to the layout of the house, the master bath presented a challenge because it was windowless. A variety of reflective materials were incorporated to create a brighter space, including antiqued glass inserts in cabinet doors, a wall-to-wall vanity mirror with polished countertops, and such tile accents as the inlay details by New Ravenna Mosaics from Stafford Tile and Stone.


home + style

The living room windows open onto the outdoor kitchen/patio areas that are surrounded with picturesque landscaping and subtle lighting effects by LAND Architecture. “Lighting has the ability to transform and impact a space, while adding a custom feel,” says Michelle Camalo, senior designer with Ty Larkins Interiors. She added a round, contemporary chandelier in a bronze finish with solid clear glass drops by Visual Comfort. “I’m a big advocate for mixing old and new furniture pieces, light and dark fabrics and a variety of different textures and materials,” she says. An antique Biedermeier chest (circa 18151820) flanks the limestone fireplace.

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la maison

A

fter the birth of their first daughter, and the news of another baby on the way, Broussard residents Jett and Angelle Dueitt decided they needed more space for their growing family. After all, wasn’t it time to build that dream house they had longed for? But the location had to be just right.

acadiana profile april/may 2018

“A composition’s visual interest is the balance of contrasting elements,” says Camalo. She stylishly calibrates a cohesive feel while balancing the living room’s melange of contemporary motifs with suitable antiques.

They envisioned a home with a soft, modern vibe accented with hints of Old World influences. It would be chic and sophisticated, yet comfortable and kid-friendly. Bathed in natural light, the rooms would flow seamlessly in the open floor plan.


A busy career couple, the Dueitts wanted the new residence to be near Angelle’s family in her native Breaux Bridge. A commercial real estate agent, it didn’t take long for her to find seven beautiful acres bordering her home town. Once the property was selected, their dreams began turning into reality. The design incorporated sleek lines and

a neutral color palette as the backdrop for their pastel-hued paintings, so that the regional art itself would distinguish the nuance and colors of each space. Angelle had reconnected with designer Michelle Camalo, a friend from high school, after she moved back to Lafayette in 2011.

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“Angelle knew me, and she was familiar with my style, so there was already a level of trust,” says Camalo, the residential design manager of Ty Larkins Interiors’ Lafayette location. “We were on the same page about the vision and design elements from day one.” Their organized collaboration accelerated during the building phase. The primary goal was to create a familyfriendly environment that could easily transition into an elegant, yet comfortable entertaining space. “We had a furniture layout plan before the slab was even poured. This gave us complete control in the placement of everything from the very beginning,” says Camalo. “We had already selected new furniture for the living and dining rooms, breakfast area and kitchen, so upon completion, we were ready to install.” To accommodate the owners’ practice of frequent entertaining, the kitchen needed a durable countertop surface. “We selected a beautiful, natural quartzite, which is impervious to stains,” says Camalo. “Angelle wanted a light color scheme, but she still wanted the kitchen to be

a touch traditional, so we antiqued the cabinetry with a gel stain, used a ledger stone backsplash and incorporated a limestone-style hood.” Since the kitchen opens onto the living room and patio, Camalo extended the limestone finish to the fireplace, then turned her attention to the foyer and dining room. “We added depth to the foyer with a groin vault ceiling painted in a dark color with a metallic overlay,” she says. “In the dining room, we added trim pieces mimicking boiserie paneling to the walls to create dimension.” Camalo implemented custom light fixtures to enhance all areas of the four-bedroom home. “We wanted all of the spaces to be beautiful and cohesive, but above all, highly functional to meet all of their family’s needs,” she says. The Dueitts now have three daughters who are enjoying the new house that borders their beloved hometown. “I especially love that our house is so light and airy inside, even on a gloomy day,” says Angelle. n

Left To unite the dining room’s décor, hues from a painting by Tony Mose are picked up in the upholstered velvet of French dining room chairs flanking a gray wash pedestal table; an iron chandelier in a Belgian white finish is by Suzanne Kasler. Right Benjamin Moore Classic Gray with a gel stain finish was used for the kitchen cabinets; open frame-style pendants in an antique gold finish from Visual Comfort illuminate the kitchen island.

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home + style

pour la maison

ABOUT THE designer: Born and raised in Lafayette as the daughter of antique dealers, Paige Gary specializes in producing classic interiors customized with one-of-a-kind pieces.

Bonne nuit, beaux rêves! Follow these expert upgrades to design your bed like a pro steps

Well Arranged

by Marie Elizabeth Oliver photo by Romero & Romero

1 Choose a neutral coverlet and sheets as your base.

2 Arrange about three layers of pillows in descending sizes and contrasting colors.

3 Use a coordinating print in your pillow shams to tie your color palette together.

4 Add a textured throw on the foot of your bed to ground the look.

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U

pgrading your sleep space could actually result in more restful slumber, according to the National Sleep Foundation. While there’s no magic color or bedding that’s proven to cure tossing and turning, research reveals the most important thing is to create a space that gives you a sense of warmth and calm. Designer Paige Gary could not agree more. She says although her job as a decorator is to focus on how things look, when it comes to designing a bed, her primary focus is how it’s going to make you feel. “There’s a fine line between the two,” says Gary. Her go-to starting point is a neutral, Matelassé-style coverlet because it’s versatile, washable and doesn’t show wear. For sheets, she follows a similar checklist and opts for a premium brand, such as Peacock Alley. Gary incorporates cozy,down feather pillows to bring in color accents and create layers of contrast. For example,

acadiana profile april/may 2018

if you have dark walls, she suggests a light headboard and then a row of Euro shams spanning the entire width of the bed. Gary says you get plenty of bang for your buck with custom shams in a bold fabric. “A fabulous print — like ikat — can tie everything together,” she says. About three layers of coordinating pillows in descending sizes should do the trick, says Gary. This is the minimum amount with the most impact. “If there [are] too many they might never make it back on the bed,” she says. Gary suggests completing the look with a textured coverlet in a rich fabric, like velvet, at the foot of the bed for added warmth and another pop of color. Considering you’ll likely spend one third of your life sleeping, splurging on these added comforts could go a long way. n


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home + style

necklaces

The details

1 simple & detailed

Seasonal swap: Trade in your winter accessories for these light and airy pieces, perfect for your warm weather wardrobe.

a la mode

Delicate subjects Petite, belle bijoux for any occasion by Ashley Hinson photo by Romero & Romero

14-karat matte gold necklace adorned with delicate flecks of tiny gold beads. The Y-neck chain is finished with a small square pendant that houses a beautiful quatrefoil design. Dianna Rae.

2 2 black beauty

This piece features a 14-karat gold vermeil chain dotted with pyrite. The adjustable neck allows the piece to rest high on the clavicle or low across the chest. Dianna Rae.

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3 southwestern design

This necklace goes all in on the boho theme. Fine details like delicate discs and small, nude beads lead the eye to a crescentshaped pendant. Neighbors Pharmacy.

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5

4 simple stunner

1

A beautiful vermeil piece, this is a shorter take on the lariat Y-necklace and features a colored sapphire drop at its center. Dianna Rae.

4 perfectly balanced

This necklace combines dainty crystal-clear beads with a singular gold-toned spike. Neighbors Pharmacy.

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H

igher temperatures bring light. Lighter days, lighter layers and lighter accessories to accompany the lighter mood of spring and summer. This year, we are trading maximalist for minimalist pieces that make understated statements by catching the light, letting you shine. Neighbor’s Pharmacy, 6770 Johnston St., Lafayette, 337-7067706, neighborspharmacy.com • Dianna Rae Jewelry, 500 Settlers Trace Blvd. #1, Lafayette, 337-706-7316, diannaraejewelry.com. n

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food+drink Ça c’est bon

sur la menu

Cozy Cuisine The Cabin in Burnside serves up lunch and brunch with a heavy side of atmosphere by Jyl Benson photos by Denny Culbert

10-ounce bone-in porkchop ribeye, dusted with house seasoning and glazed with a bourbon, root beer and pecan sauce. Served over sweet potato cornbread and dirty rice.

bourbon pecan chop:


food + drink sur la menu

menu

4 Dishes to Try 1 Crab au Gratin

Lumps of crabmeat bound in a creamy Mornay sauce with a topping of broiled, melted cheeses.

2 The Cabin Sampler

Fried Louisiana catfish strips, battered and fried crab claws, crawfish tails, gator tail, and hand-battered onion rings.

3 Chicken Salad Croi ssant

House-made chicken salad with crunchy vegetables, pecans and raisins on a toasted croissant.

4 Bourbon Pecan Chop

10-ounce bonein pork ribeye, dusted with house seasoning, glazed with a bourbon, root beer, and pecan sauce and served over sweet potato cornbread & dirty rice.

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acadiana profile april/may 2018

The Cabin is a popular destination for homey daily lunch specials, which are posted on the website at the beginning of each month. It is also a popular destination for weekend brunch.


I

still remember the first time I spotted The Cabin on the side of the road. It was probably the mid1970s and my parents must have been out for an extended Sunday drive. I would have been staring bored and, no doubt, complaining endlessly from the back seat. These slow drives could radiate up to 100 miles from New Orleans — our home base — and were the joy of my obsessive mother in her never-ending, and never fulfilled, quest to identify a suitable exterior paint color for our home. Back at home the paint was left to peel and peel as we drove and drove. That’s another story. The Cabin has its own. The Cabin would have arisen, mirage-like, from the side of Highway 44, cutting like a sword through the tedium. It remains today a collection of buildings both refined and rustic, united by old brick pathways, covered galleries and porches, and gardens of sugarcane and azaleas adorned with ancient agricultural tools. The added bonus of a general store would have held the promise of treasures and candy. I simply had to investigate and my demands grew so vehement as to compel my parents, accustomed to tuning me out, to pull over and allow me to explore. What is now a folksy and welcoming restaurant and event venue was once one of the 10 original slave dependencies of Monroe Plantation, built in the late 1830s. Every effort has been made to keep the property within the period in which it was first built and Al and Theresa Robert often harvested fabrications from nearby plantations and other structures in the restoration of the property. The restrooms were fabricated from a cypress water cistern and the partitions within were repurposed from the Old Crow Distillery in New Orleans, which was demolished in 1970. “My husband has spent a lifetime saving and restoring old buildings,” said Theresa Robert. “The Cabin represents almost 50 years of his efforts.” The Cabin’s main dining room, built onto the back of the original structure, was designed to resemble a garconniere, the detached cylindrical plantation-era structures where families warehoused their rowdy bachelor sons. Within the space a cathedral-style cypress ceiling soars dramatically overhead supported by four massive beams that were manufacturer’s rejects the Roberts obtained in exchange for a bottle of Old Crow bourbon. James Schexnaydre is responsible for the creation of “Rock ,” the massive alligator he sculpted from a century-old sinker cypress log harvested from the mud of the Amite River in 1988. Through the French doors and across the courtyard stands the restored Schoolhouse, the first black Catholic school in Louisiana, built in 1865 by the sisters of the Sacred Heart.n

Bonus Bite

From just below Baton Rouge all the way to just west of New Orleans, Highway 44 (aka The Great River Road) twists along bordered on one side by the verdant Mississippi River levee. A beautiful drive, it is stocked with plantation homes, gardens and historic sites. Theresa Robert operates The Cajun Village Cottages (thecajunvillagecottages.com), a collection of cozy bed and breakfast cottages, few miles upriver from The Cabin. The property includes eight Acadian-style shotgun houses dating back to the early 1900s. Robert salvaged the buildings from the historic Spanish Town area of downtown Baton Rouge. Each is authentically restored and appointed with appropriate period antiques.

Fish Special: Blackened speckled trout over fried grit cake and sautéed spinach topped with a crawfish cream sauce.

The Cabin 5405 LA-44 Burnside 225-473-3007 thecabinrestaurant.com

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Rather than using only parsley, you might like to use equal parts of chopped mint and parsley.

for the tabbouleh:

food + drink de la cuisine

Herbal Bouquet starter

Tabbouleh

Elevate sweet and savory dishes with fresh herbs by Marcelle Bienvenu photo & styling by Eugenia Uhl

1 Place 1 cup fine bulgur (No. 1) into a large glass or ceramic dish and stir in 1 cup of lemon juice and 2 cups water. Cover bowl and set aside at room temperature until most of the liquid has been absorbed and bulgur is tender, about 2 hours.

2 Drain bulgur in a sieve, gently pressing to remove excess liquid. Transfer to a clean glass bowl and add 3 bunches scallions (trimmed and chopped), 3 cups chopped parsley (about 2 bunches), 3 large ripe tomatoes (chopped), ⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil and ⅓ cup lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper and stir to blend.

y

ears ago when I heard a chef say that a $10 dish could become a $30 dish simply by adding fresh herbs, I was instantly hooked on the idea of growing my own. I was familiar with mint, which my Aunt Belle always added to her pitcher of homemade lemonade that she and I often enjoyed sitting under the ancient oak tree in her backyard. Her sister, Tante Mae, kept flat-leaf parsley in a small pot in her kitchen window. Gumbos, rice dressing, jambalaya and chicken fricassee were always garnished with the herb, which she explained added not only flavor and color but also aided in digestion. As I happily skipped along in my culinary career, I became enamored by the flavor of fresh sweet basil added to Italian sauces. Basil, a member of the mint family, also added aroma and zest to a caprese salad composed of thick slices of tomatoes and mozzarella cheese drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette dressing. Roasted chicken, a Sunday favorite of mine, was enhanced by the addition of thyme to the pot. A few leaves of lemon thyme sometimes found its way into my gin and tonic. Tarragon is a necessary ingredient in making béarnaise sauce. Rosemary, chives, dill and cilantro are mainstays in my herb garden. Now that warmer weather has arrived, it’s time to enjoy a leisurely alfresco supper , accented with fresh herbs, of course, to enjoy on my screen porch overlooking Bayou Teche. n

Refrigerate until ready to serve. Makes 6 to 8 servings

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Roasted Chicken With Garlic Accompaniments can be as simple as leaves of Bibb lettuce dressed with a Dijon mustard-based vinaigrette and toasted French bread, or steamed asparagus sprinkled with minced hard-boiled eggs. 2 chickens, each about 3 1/2 pounds, quartered ¼ cup olive oil 3 sprigs of fresh rosemary (or tarragon or thyme) 2 teaspoons salt (more or less to taste) ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ½ teaspoon cayenne 3 heads of garlic, cloves separated and peeled 2 cups Vouvray wine There were not many Sunday dinners at my mother’s that didn’t include roasted chicken. Preheat oven to 350 F. In a large bowl, toss chicken and oil to coat evenly. Arrange chicken pieces in a single layer in a large roasting pan. Pinch off the leaves from sprigs of rosemary and sprinkle evenly over chicken. Sprinkle with salt, black pepper and cayenne. Scatter and tuck garlic cloves over and in between chicken pieces. Pour in wine. Cover the pan tightly with a lid or foil. Bake for about 1 hour or until the juices run clear. Uncover the pan and baste chicken with pan juices. Continue baking until the skin of chicken becomes lightly browned, 15 to 20 minutes. Serve immediately with garlic cloves and pan juices. Makes 8 servings

the desser t

3

main course

Rosemary Shortbread To store herbs in the refrigerator, slightly dampen (sprinkle) paper towels with water. Loosely roll the herbs in the towels and store in the crisper.

acadiana profile april/may 2018

1 Beat 1 cup butter (softened) at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add ¾ cup sifted confectioners sugar and ¼ cup cornstarch, beating well. Stir in 1¾ cups all-purpose flour and 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh rosemary. Dough will be stiff.

2 Divide dough in half. Shape one portion of dough into a 6 ½-inch circle on an ungreased baking sheet. Crimp edges with a fork. Cut dough into 8 wedges but do not separate.

3 Repeat the procedure with remaining dough. Cover and chill for 1 hour. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Bake for about 30 minutes or until barely brown. Cool for 5 minutes on baking sheet then remove wedges to a wire rack to cool completely. Makes 16 wedges


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food + drink recettes de cocktails

The sweet, pungent aroma of basil pairs nicely with tart grapefruit and complements the light, botanical taste of lavender

flavor:

A Pamplemousse Pick-Up It’s fizzy-hour time for forbidden fruit recipe

Fobidden Fizz

by Lisa LeBlanc-Berry photo by Romero & Romero

1 Place 1½ ounce Skyy Texas Grapefruit Vodka, ½ ounce lavender simple syrup, ½ ounce fresh lemon juice and ¼ ounce Rabarbaro Zucca aperitif in a rocks glass.

2 Add one scoop of ice and shake vigorously for 6 seconds. Then double strain over a rocks glass filled with fresh ice.

3 Top with 2-3 oz. Q Sparkling Grapefruit soda to fill the glass. Garnish with a fresh grapefruit wheel and 3 leaves of fresh basil.

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P

rohibition-era cocktails are flowing at Delano Wine Bar, the sexy, upscale Lake Charles modernist hub with lavender lighting, live music and a courtyard suited for spring bliss. New owner, Remy Deville, is a devoted mixologist who created the retro craft cocktail, Forbidden Fizz, with mixologist Amber Jay. Notes of grapefruit (aka “forbidden fruit”) vodka, lemon, lavender and a tinge of effervescence bring an invigorating, refreshingly tart balance of bitterness, aromatics and fizz. “Due to its history, I thought naming this grapefruit-based vodka cocktail ‘Forbidden’ would be in line with my classic cocktail theme,” Deville says. Although vodka didn’t arrive until a year after Prohibition ended in 1934, it’s America’s top spirit today (32%

acadiana profile april/may 2018

of the market). Mixologists find its use to be far-reaching. Case in point: “The Lannisters Send Their Regards” vodka-sherry craft cocktail, imbibed in an iron throne at Washington D.C.’s Game of Thrones pop-up bar. “I chose the Prohibition era because drinking was more about the liquor and less about the mixers,” says Deville. “My goal is to bring back the classics with a boozier twist.” Carve out a garnish wheel from a pamplemousse (French for “grapefruit”), shake up a Forbidden Fizz and imagine those cocktail-drinking flappers kicking off the Jazz Age as you savor the flavor. n

Delano’s Wine Bar. 1301 E McNeese St., Lake Charles. 337-478-8090


FOOD & DRINK

Hawk’s Restaurant [ RAYNE The drive out to this

things we love about acadiana Our love letter to the region, celebrating the 50th anniversary of Acadiana Profile magazine [ To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Acadiana Profile,

we’re reflecting on all the ways that the region has grown, thrived and transformed into the cultural heart of Louisiana. With its unrivaled music and entertainment, nature and culture and — our personal favorites — food and drink, Acadiana is a place like no other. We present to you 50 Things We Love About Acadiana. We hope you love them, too.

By Topher Balfer / Photos by Denny Culbert

“middle of nowhere” restaurant may be a deterrent for some, but those braving the journey will find what some locals have called the best, biggest and cleanest crawfish in Acadiana. There is even a helpline that a lost traveler can call to find their way. 415 Hawks Road / 337-788-3266 / hawkscrawfish.com

FOOD & DRINK

Crying Eagle Brewery [ LAKE CHARLES Prepared

in “the heel of the boot,” this local brewery crafts its beers with unique flavors and ingredients, from the sweetness of grapefruit to the bitterness of coffee. They are best known for their Calcasieu Common, Louisiana Lager and Ready to Mingle brews, but the ever-changing menu always promises something new. 1165 E. McNeese St. / 337-990-4871 / cryingeagle.com


Original boudin links and customer-favorite crunchy boudin balls are served in heaping portions at Billy’s Boudin. For anyone unable to make the trip to the storefront, Billy’s will carefully package and ship any of its delicacies.

FOOD & DRINK

FOOD & DRINK

Judice Inn

Billy’s Boudin & Cracklins

[ LAFAYETTE You

won’t find fries on the menu or ketchup on the table — this family-owned restaurant hasn’t served either since opening in 1947. But add-ons aren’t needed, as the burgers are something of local legend for their perfect level of seasoning and a “secret sauce.” 3134 Johnston St. / 337-984-5614 / judiceinn.com

[ SCOTT This is the place

to go if you’re in search of that legendary cuisine found only in southern Louisiana: boudin. A favorite among Acadiana natives, Billy’s also serves up its famous homemade recipe in boudin pistolettes, crawfish boudin, boudin rollups and crunchy boudin balls. 523 Apollo Road / 337-232-1114 / billysboudin.com

OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Acadiana Park Nature Station [ LAFAYETTE Nestled in the woods of Acadiana Park is this 150-acre facility

dedicated to environmental education and research. Visitors can enjoy tours of a 6-mile nature trail, night hikes, nearby camping and a 9.5-mile paddle down the Bayou Vermilion. 1205 E Alexander St. / 337-291-8448 / naturestation.org

OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Lakeview Park & Beach [ EUNICE For the

family on a road trip, this is the perfect place to hitch up the RV (or rent a cabin) and enjoy amenities like free WiFi, a movie theater, water slides and playgrounds. While the kids are busy, adults can enjoy a 13-acre fishing pond and live music. 1717 Veterans Memorial Highway / 337-457-2881 / lvpark.com

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ENTERTAINMENT

Feed & Seed [ LAFAYETTE This

100-year-old building, formerly a feed store, is now home to a large wooden dance floor. The rustic warehouse space is used for art, live music and dance, and the space has recently become licensed as an events hall. The unique atmosphere continues into an outdoor patio and bar. 106 N. Grant St. / 337-330-4860 / feedandseedlafayette.com

FOOD & DRINK

Poche ’s Market FOOD & DRINK

The French Press [ LAFAYETTE The French-American

ENTERTAINMENT

Blue Moon Saloon

menu and expert preparation have made French Press the premier breakfast spot in Lafayette. Stop in Tuesday through Sunday for brunch, or try some of Chef Justin Girouard’s intimate dinners on Friday and Saturday evenings. The early bird gets the worm here — tables tend to fill up fast. 214 E. Vermilion St. / 337-233-9449 / thefrenchpresslafayette.com

[ BREAUX BRIDGE

Since 1962, Poche’s smokehouse has turned out speciality meats like boudin, tasso, stuffed chicken and more. Daily specials are available in the eatery’s cafeteriastyle dining room. Several of their famous meats are now offered for retail sale so that diners can bring their next meal home. 3015 Main Highway A / 337-332-2108 / poches.com

[ LAFAYETTE For

the best in honky tonk culture and live roots music, look no further. More than just a venue, this is the place where travelers, artists and musicians come to celebrate their culture and share a drink, all before settling in for the night in the saloon’s guesthouse. 215 E. Convent St./ 337-234-2422 / bluemoonpresents.com

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acadiana profile april/may 2018

OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Jungle Gardens [ AVERY ISLAND Adjacent to the Tabasco

factory is a 170-acre garden that runs along Bayou Petite Anse. The botanicals found in the garden come from around the world and can be observed, along with rich local wildlife, on a walk through the garden. Bird tours are available by reservation. Louisiana 329 and Main Road / 337-369-6243 / junglegardens.org

A perfectly-cooked sunny-side-up egg and béchamel sauce top the Croque Madame at The French Press, along with grilled Black Forest ham, gruyere cheese and herbed aioli. The restaurant combines Cajun, French and Italian flavors for bold twists on classic dishes.


FOOD & DRINK

Alzina’s Cajun Kitchen [ GALLIANO Make

your reservations now — diners can expect to wait as long as a year before they can sit down with Alzina Toups for a home-cooked meal at her own table. Her classic Cajun dishes have been called some of the best in the world and have kept visitors waiting for their chance to dine with her for over 40 years. 117 E. 132 St. / 985-632-7200

OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Rip Van Winkle Gardens NEW IBERIA The peacefulness and serenity of these lush gardens and sprawling lawns may lull you into a 20-year sleep if you’re not careful. Peacocks roam free and ancient oaks tower overhead, and the architectural marvel that is the Joseph Jefferson Mansion is available for tours. Coins from Jean Lafitte’s treasure, which was buried on the island, are on display inside. 5505 Rip van Winkle Road / 337-359-8525 / ripvanwinklegardens.com

ENTERTAINMENT

Tabasco Factory Tours & Country Store [ AVERY ISLAND Every pepper used to make

world-famous Tabasco sauce is grown and harvested on Avery Island. Visitors can see how the sauce is made in the factory tour and museum before heading over to the Tabasco Restaurant, where every dish is seasoned with those signature peppers. 32 Wisteria Rd. / 337-373-6129 / tabasco.com/visit-avery-island

FOOD & DRINK

Bread & Circus Provisions [ LAFAYETTE Aside from the aesthetic appeal of the

modern, industrial decor, this farm-to-table restaurant offers some of the most unique meals and cocktails in the area. The menu features a combination of Cajun and international foods. Stop in for a deli-style lunch or visit later for a candlelit dinner. 258 Bendel Road / 337-408-3930 / bandcprovisions.com

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FOOD & DRINK

ENTERTAINMENT

Acadiana Center for the Arts [ LAFAYETTE Known as

the cultural hub for arts and programming in the Lafayette area, ACA boasts more than 9,000 square feet of gallery space and a 300-seat auditorium for live music, dance and theater. The center also participates in free ArtWalks on the second Saturday of every month.101 W. Vermilion St. / 337-233-7060 / acadianacenterforthearts.org

Shade Tree Cafe [ BROUSSARD

Sit under the sun or the stars and enjoy heaping portions of homemade food at this outdoor cafe. A grand oak tree standing over the lawn provides just enough shade, but it’s not uncommon for guests to sprawl out on the grass. The food is spectacular, and the atmosphere is unrivaled. 219 S. Eola Road / 337-839-2803

FOOD & DRINK

FOOD & DRINK FOOD & DRINK

Poor Boy’s Riverside Inn

Ember Grille & Wine Bar [ LAKE CHARLES Boasting the most

[ BROUSSARD Poor Boy’s has come a long way from its

inception as a snowball cart. Now with full-service restaurants in both Lafayette and New Iberia, the family-owned business continues its legacy of serving generous portions of signature items like crabmeat au gratin and broiled stuffed lobster. 240 Tubing Road / 337-837-4011 / poorboysriversideinn.com

40

acadiana profile april/may 2018

extensive wine cellar around, the fine dining experience at Ember will satisfy your craving for gourmet cuisine in a luxurious setting. Enjoy live entertainment seven days a week while you sample the classic Louisiana fare and delicious house-made desserts. 777 Ave L’Auberge / 337-395-7565

Rita Mae ’s Kitchen [ MORGAN CITY The appeal

of this tiny establishment comes largely from the humble, cozy atmosphere inside, but that’s not to say that the food isn’t spectacular. With a management and cooking staff with decades of experience, dishes like the seafood gumbo and fried pork chops pack some of the best flavors in town. 711 Federal Ave. / 985-384-3550


OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Chicot State Park [ VILLE PLATTE With 6,400 acres of hills and a 2,000-acre man-made lake, this is the largest of

The industrial-chic decor at Ember Grille & Wine Bar creates a warm, comforting atmosphere that enhances the presentation of its high-quality cuisine.

Louisiana’s state parks. The freshwater is perfect for fishing largemouth bass, bluegills and red-ear sunfish, and a hiking and backpacking trail will take travelers through several campsites where they can stop to enjoy the unique ecosystem. 3469 Chicot Park Road

Served with potatoes and corn and seasoned just right, Prejean’s boiled shrimp is just one way to enjoy this Cajun favorite. The restaurant also serves fried shrimp and Carenco Kicking Shrimp, which consists of crispy panko-coated shrimp served over Sriracha cabbage slaw and drizzled with a sweet chili sauce.

FOOD & DRINK

City Bar [ MAURICE No list

is complete without mention of City Bar’s famous Cajun Bloody Marys, made up of the same special blend of seasonings and flavors they’ve served since 1927. A friendly staff and delicious drinks make this local watering hole the perfect place to spend a late night. 8401 Maurice Ave. / 337-893-1968

FOOD & DRINK

Prejean’s [ LAFAYETTE

ENTERTAINMENT

Grand Opera House of the South [ CROWLEY Once abandoned, the newly-renovated and

ornate decor of this opera house lends to the grandeur of the entertainment featured there, be it live theater, dance or music. Notable performers include 2018 Grammy Award winners The Lost Bayou Ramblers (see our profile in La Musique on page 84), and in its early days hosted Clark Gable, Enrico Caruso and Babe Ruth. 505 N. Parkerson Ave. / 337-785-0440 / thegrandoperahouse.org

The award-winning culinary team at this Lafayette landmark is the most decorated of any restaurant in the South. Since 1980, the combination of fresh seafood, wild game and nightly live music have spun an atmosphere of magic and tradition. This one is not to be missed. 3480 N.E. Evangeline Throughway / 337-896-3247 / prejeans.com

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Bayou Teche Brewing’s Swamp Thing IPA packs a punch with its citrusy flavor, which is achieved by blending a Pilsner malt with hops including Mosaic, Citra and Chinook. This signature brew and more are available for tasting in the brewery’s tap room.

FOOD & DRINK

A-Bear’s Cafe

OUTDOORS & HISTORY

[ HOUMA This mom-and-pop

establishment founded by Curly and Jane Hebert is one of the oldest restaurants in Houma. The building is completely made of cypress and comes right out of a Cajun memory. A-Bear’s offers filling portions of gumbo along with live music and dancing on Fridays. To top it off, they’ve got some of the friendliest staff around. 809 Bayou Black Drive / 985-872-6306

FOOD & DRINK

Bayou Teche Brewing [ ARNAUDVILLE Stop by this local brewery for a selection of beers specially designed

to complement Cajun cuisine — like the LA 31 Biere Pale Ale, which pairs perfectly with red beans and rice or boiled crawfish. Tours and live music are available on weekends, while the tap room is open for tasting every day. 1106 Bushville Highway / 337-754-5122 / bayoutechebrewing.com

ENTERTAINMENT

Pat’s Fisherman’s Wharf Restaurant [ HENDERON Come for the food (stuffed crabs and spicy gumbo), but

stay for the entertainment. Pat’s hosts live Swamp pop and Zydeco musicians every weekend at the Atchafalaya Club, and for those staying out late for a long night of dancing, Pat’s Edgewater Inn is just a stone’s throw away. 1008 Henderson Levee Rd. / 337-228-7512 / patsfishermanswharf.com

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acadiana profile april/may 2018

Cajun Music Hall of Fame [ EUNICE

Admission is free to this museum, which is owned and operated by the Cajun French Music Association. Housed in a 1930s country store, visitors can see artifacts and memorabilia dedicated to preserving Acadian culture and honoring some of the greatest Cajun musicians in history. 240 S C C Duson St. / 337-457-6534 / cajunfrenchmusic.org/ halloffame.html


FOOD & DRINK

Little Big Cup ENTERTAINMENT [ ARNAUDVILLE

Liberty Theater

With a beautiful dining room and a deck overlooking Bayou Fusilier, Little Big Cup has come a long way since its days as a coffee house. The restaurant now serves traditional Cajun cuisine with an elegant presentation, and their boucherie brunch buffet on Sundays is a must-try. 149 Fuselier Road / 337-754-7147 / littlebigcup.com

[ EUNICE This historic

vaudeville house is now widely known for “Rendez-Vous Des Cajuns,” a radio and TV show recorded in front of a live audience every Saturday night. Tickets are available the morning of the event, and guests are invited to a dance floor in front of the stage. 200 Park Ave. / 337-457-6577

An order of candied, charbroiled oysters (served with a sugar cane pepper glaze and a feta and bleu cheese crumble) is just the start of a delicious meal at SHUCKS! Follow it up with an order of crawfish étouffée and fried tails, which pairs perfectly with a “Shrimply Irresistible” Bloody Mary.

FOOD & DRINK OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Acadian Village [ LAFAYETTE Sprawling

over 32 acres is Acadian history brought to life. Seven of the eleven buildings in the village are original 19th-century homes, each moved piece by piece and meticulously reassembled. Stop by for a tour, or visit in December to see the village light up for the holidays. 200 Greenleaf Drive / 337-9812364 / acadianvillage.org

SHUCKS! [ ABBEVILLE For

fresh seafood including oysters and crabmeat and wild game like alligator and duck, SHUCKS! is your one-stop shop. The restaurant’s recipes have been handed down generation to generation, ensuring the same bold, delicious flavors are delivered every time. 701 W. Port St. / 337-898-3311 / shucksrestaurant.com

ENTERTAINMENT

Lafayette Science Museum [ LAFAYETTE Part natural history museum and part

planetarium, this establishment teaches its cultural history through art exhibitions and hands-on science. Its 10,000 square feet of exhibition space includes a virtual reality lab, a crawl space designed to teach about insects and a virtual aquarium. 433 Jefferson St. / 337-291-5544 / lafayettesciencemuseum.org

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FOOD & DRINK

Blue Dog Cafe [ LAFAYETTE

OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Vermilionville Historic Village [ LAFAYETTE Preserving history from 1765 to 1890,

Vermilionville is a unique history museum where Acadian, Native American and Creole culture come to life. Local artisans are costumed and in character as they guide visitors through seven restored homes and demonstrate cooking and live music. Boat tours are also available. 300 Fisher Road / 337-233-4077 / vermilionville.org

What better way to enjoy Cajun cuisine than surrounded by a private collection of George Rodrigue’s art? Named after Rodrigue’s iconic character, Blue Dog Cafe hosts live music and even serves an award-winning brunch featuring carved prime rib, crawfish enchiladas, oyster cornbread dressing and free mimosas.1211 West Pinhook Road / 337-237-0005 / bluedogcafe.com

FOOD & DRINK

Buck & Johnny’s [ BREAUX BRIDGE

The best of Cajun and Italian flavors are combined at this unique restaurant. Live music is played Thursday and Friday nights, but be sure to consider Buck & Johnny’s famous Zydeco Breakfast on Saturday mornings, when you can enjoy music and bottomless cocktails. 100 Berard St. / 337-442-6630 / buckandjohnnys.com

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OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Champagne ’s Cajun Swamp Tours [ BREAUX BRIDGE Set up camp, board a kayak

or airboat, and journey down historic Lake Martin. With an experienced tour guide, you’ll encounter several native birds like burrowing owls, great blue herons and pileated woodpeckers. You’ll also learn about the 500-year-old cypress and tupelo trees and the secret of how Cajuns harvested and used this wood. 1151 Rookery Road / 337-230-4068 / champagnesswamptours.com

acadiana profile april/may 2018

An order of mussels at Pamplona’s Tapas Bar comes finished with a savory saffron cream. The refined dishes are inspired by a combination of international flavors from Spain, France, Italy and North Africa, and dinner is complete with a perfect glass of wine served through a precise, temperaturecontrolled pouring system.

ENTERTAINMENT

Cowboys Saloon [ SCOTT The wild west and

modern amenities come together in the Cowboy’s family. Pool tables, a jukebox and bar-top video games await patrons looking for a boot-scootin’ good time at the Saloon. The Nightclub is just a few steps away for anyone looking for live zydeco and country bands. 211 N. Ambassador Caffery Pkwy. / 337-232-6003 / cowboyslafayette.com/saloon


FOOD & DRINK ENTERTAINMENT

Randol’s Seafood Restaurant [ LAFAYETTE Make this your

next stop if you’re looking for toe-tapping entertainment in a downhome environment. Even as it nears its 40th anniversary, Randol’s maintains nightly live music and prepares signature Cajun meals and seafood cooked to perfection. 2320 Kaliste Saloom Road / 337-981-7080 / randols.com

Parish Brewing Company [ BROUSSARD In addition to its

flagship beer Canebrake, a wheat ale sweetened with cane syrup, Parish brews a wide selection of local favorites like its juice bomb IPAs, Ghost in the Machine and Envie Pale Ale. The taproom is open six days a week and tours are available on Saturdays. 229 Jared Drive / 337-330-8602 / parishbeer.com

ENTERTAINMENT

Artmosphere

FOOD & DRINK

Pamplona Tapas Bar [ LAFAYETTE The vibrant colors and eclectic decor of this bistro’s exterior are just a taste of what you’ll find inside. Enjoy lunch, dinner or a late-night meal prepared with ingredients from Artmosphere’s own garden, or show up to see displays of local art and live music six nights a week. 902 Johnston St. / 337-233-3331 / artmosphere.vpweb.com

[ LAFAYETTE Both the food and ambiance of this tapas bar are styled after Ernest

Hemingway’s favorite retreat: Pamplona, Spain, which is famous for bullfighting. All of the restaurant’s ingredients are prepared and served fresh, from their fruits and greens to their meat and seafood. A selection of Spanish wines are available to top off the meal. 631 Jefferson St. / 337-232-0070 / pamplonatapas.com

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FOOD & DRINK

The Wurst Biergarten [ LAFAYETTE The first of its kind in the Acadiana area, this

open-air market and catered park serves traditional biergarten cuisine and European and German beers. After you’ve had your fill of food and drink, hang out on the outdoor deck and listen to live music, or wander through the market area where local vendors and artists sell their treasures. 537 Jefferson St. / 337-534-4612 / wurstbiergarten.com

FOOD & DRINK

Steamboat Bill’s [ LAKE CHARLES

Need we say more than “hot and spicy crawfish”? Since the 1980s, Steamboat Bill’s has served some of the best Cajun flavors from both land and sea. Tuck into a plate of crawfish and shrimp pistolettes, jumbo butterfly shrimp, fried oysters or boudin balls. Catering is also available. 1004 N. Lakeshore Drive / 337-494-1070 / steamboatbills.com

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OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Wetlands Acadian Cultural Center [ THIBODAUX Managed

by the National Park Service, this site features an Acadian history museum, walking tours and boat tours down Bayou Lafourche. Once a week, the center also hosts a live Cajun music session and, as part of their linguistics program, a Francophone get-together to preserve the original language of the area. 314 St. Mary St. / 985-448-1375

acadiana profile april/may 2018

Laughs, drinks and food abound at The Wurst Biergarten’s patio bar, where family and friends can gather for a fun-filled night under the stars. The festive space has a huge selection of imports and domestic beers and even has wine on tap. Top it off with something to eat — we recommend trying the boudin grilled cheese.

FOOD & DRINK

Pont Breaux’s Cajun Restaurant [ BREAUX BRIDGE Listen to live Zydeco music almost

every night as you enjoy traditional Creole cuisine and seafood at this cultural cornerstone. Patrons are invited to hit the dance floor once their meal is done, and group rates are available for families and larger parties. 325 W. Mills Ave. / 337-332-4648 / pontbreauxscajunrestaurant.com


OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Evangeline Oak Park [ ST. MARTINVILLE The story of this historic site inspired the famous Henry

Wadsworth Longfellow poem, which recounts the trials of Evangeline as she awaits the return of her true love. The Evangeline Oak is said to be the spot where they finally reunited. Near the park is Evangeline’s tomb, which is adorned with a bronze statue of her likeness. 122 Evangeline St. / 337-394-2232

OUTDOORS & HISTORY

Shadows on the Teche NEW IBERIA Sitting along the Bayou Teche and surrounded by towering oaks, Shadows is an historic antebellum home originally constructed for a sugar planter in 1834. The home is now a National Historic Landmark, with original furnishings and family belongings preserved inside to showcase the lifestyle of that time. Tours are available. 317 E. Main St. / 337-369-6446 / shadowsontheteche.org

ENTERTAINMENT

La Poussiere [ BREAUX BRIDGE The good

times have been going strong at this authentic Cajun dance hall for over 60 years. Not much has changed in that time, and it still opens its doors every Saturday and Sunday for live music showcasing the culture’s traditional music, language and heritage. 1301 Grand Pointe Ave. / 337-332-1721 / lapoussiere.com

FOOD & DRINK

This Classic Revivalstyle home depicts the Southern plantation lifestyle of the 1800s and is visited by over 25,000 people each year.

Morvant ’s Bar & Grill [ YOUNGSVILLE Perhaps most well-known for the delicious

burgers they’ve been slinging for more than 30 years, Morvant’s is also a go-to for drinks, poboys, boiled crawfish and their speciality eggplant fries. Guests can enjoy the atmosphere inside or grab a table in the covered patio. 200 Lafayette St. / 337-8567469 / fb.com/morvantsbargrill

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Hop down the coast for summer fun By CherĂŠ Coen

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in Alabama, Mississippi and Florida

acadianaprofile.com 49


T

There are so many new things happening on the Gulf Coast these days it’s difficult to keep up — new hotels and attractions, restaurants, shopping and the list goes on. This year also marks the beginning of Alabama’s Bicentennial, which happens in 2019 but the state celebrates early with educational programs and community activities. Ne w H ote l s Last summer, Hotel Pass Christian opened, joining the resurgence of the Mississippi Gulf Coast town that includes the Hotel Whiskey, shops and the fun Cat Island Coffeehouse. Hotel Pass Christian overlooks the Gulf and Bacchus on the Beach restaurant, which offers room service to guests. In Ocean Springs, Mississippi, The Roost opened in an historic property that’s surrounded by ancient oaks and includes six rooms, a grab-and-go market and a comfortable communal area. Architectural Digest called the boutique hotel the most beautiful hotel in Mississippi for 2017. The Grand Hotel of Point Clear, Alabama has been an acclaimed resort for years but is currently undergoing a massive $32 million transformation, scheduled to be completed this month. At the end of 2016, the Henderson Beach Resort quietly opened in Destin, Florida. The luxury resort and spa has multiple dining and bar options, an adult pool, a lazy river and a world-class spa, and is only steps away from the beach. New attractions Do you love to get on the water to learn about nature? The Betsy Ann Riverboat offers two-hour trips in the Mississippi Sound and Back Bay of Biloxi with a

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focus on nature and local history. Visitors can watch the shrimping nets fly and learn more about the industry on the Biloxi Shrimping Trip. Ship Island Excursions travels to the Mississippi Coast barrier island with its white sandy beaches and blue Gulf waters. Be artistic The Coastal Arts Center of Orange Beach recently opened a 10,000-squarefoot gallery showcasing and selling artwork from more than 100 local artists. For those who want hands-on activities, there’s The Hot Shop, the only public-access glassblowing studio in Alabama, or the Clay Studio where visitors can try their hand at the wheel. Ocean Springs artist Walter Anderson loved his cats and used them in his artwork. The Walter Anderson Museum of Art examines his feline love with a new exhibition, “Thou Who Carriest the Sun: The Feline in Walter Anderson’s Art.” Get outside Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge outside Gulf Shores offers 7,000 acres of wildlife habitat and an opportune place to view the more than 370 species of migratory birds that visit Alabama every spring and fall. It’s also a sanctuary for nesting sea turtles and the endangered Alabama beach mouse and houses an outdoor classroom on flora

and fauna. Visitors can view this pristine spot on boardwalks and trails and this year the ADA-compliant and restored Jeff Friend Trail reopened. Visit fws.gov/bonsecour. Shopping New Orleans has had a long history of cigar manufacturing, much of which occurred with tobacco from Cuba before the embargo. The Cigar Factory re-established that history with stores in New Orleans but recently opened shop in Destin-Miramar Beach and Pensacola. While in downtown Pensacola, check out the Palafox Market, a farmer’s market that sells fresh produce and meats and arts and crafts from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Hit the beach The city of Gulf Shores has invested $15 million to enhance its Gulf Shores Public Beach and what’s new are beach access points, public sidewalks and green space, walking paths, shade structures, restrooms and more. Also getting a facelift is Gulf State Park, which will offer more trails, an enhanced golf course, campground improvements, pedestrian bridges, dune restoration and a future adventure park, to name a few. Visit alapark.com/gulfstate for more information about the park and mygulfstatepark.com to learn more about the enhancement project. Be adventurous Gulf Adventure Center at The Wharf entertainment district in Orange Beach recently added the Hummingbird Zipline to its repertoire; the course consists of eight ziplines ranging from 300 to 1,600 feet in length and towers as high as 115 feet. As visitors sail across the landscape, they’ll enjoy views of the Intracoastal Waterway and Wolf Bay. Reservations are recommended; for more information, visit zipthegulf.com. Gumbo Love Lucy Anne Buffett, sister to singer Jimmy Buffett, has been hitting the Gulf Coast promoting her latest book, “Gumbo Love: Recipes for Gulf Coast Cooking, Entertaining, and Savoring the Good Life.” She’s also busy opening new restaurants, expanding her original LuLu’s in Gulf Shores (which started as a bait shop and burger joint and is now an impressive fun spot on the Intracoastal) to include restaurants in Destin and North Myrtle Beach this summer. You can order the Cheeseburger in Paradise, named after a Jimmy Buffett song, but don’t miss the fresh seafood straight from the Gulf.


CLOCKWISE: Pensacola Beach, Florida. Orange Beach, Alabama. Sea turtle nesting at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. The Roost Hotel in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Hummingbird Zipline at The Wharf in Orange Beach.

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TOP LAWYERS 386 Lawyers in 46 Specialties METHODOLOGY Each year, Acadiana Profile publishes its Top Lawyers list, along with the stories of

compelling cases fought by three of the year’s qualifying lawyers. In determining the Top Lawyers of Acadiana we use Professional Research Services, a Detroit-based survey company. The voting for the PRS survey to determine the 2017 top attorneys for Acadiana Profile magazine was open to all licensed attorneys in the Acadiana, Louisiana market area. Each attorney was asked which attorney, other than himself or herself, he or she would recommend in the Acadiana area. Each attorney was allowed to recommend up to three colleagues in each given legal specialty. Once the online nominations were complete, each nominee was carefully evaluated on the basis of the survey results, the legitimacy of their license and their current standing with the State Bar Association of Louisiana. Attorneys who received the highest number of votes in each category are reflected in the list by legal specialty.


TOP LAWYERS Admiralty & Maritime Law Bennett B. Anderson Jr. Anderson, Dozier, Blanda & Saltzman 2010 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-242-7436 Glenn J. Armentor The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 Richard C. Broussard Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 Lucas S. Colligan Gaar Law Firm 617 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-366-0982 Larry Curtis Larry Curtis, APLC 300 Rue Beauregard Building C Lafayette 337-235-1825 Blake R. David Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 James Domengeaux Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-233-3033 Grant F. Freeman Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Robert M. Kallam Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062

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Mark A. Lowe Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2335 Jerome H. Moroux Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 P. Craig Morrow Jr. Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483 Frank X. Neuner Jr. NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 Elena A. Pecoraro Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Edwin G. Preis Jr. Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062 John L. Robert, III Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062 George H. Robinson Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2319 James Parkerson Roy Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-233-3033 Randall K. Theunissen Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000

acadiana profile april/may 2018

Douglas W. Truxillo Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Jonathan L. Woods Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062 Bob F. Wright Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-233-3033 Alternate Dispute Resolution David S. Cook David S. Cook, APLC 313 Beverly Dr. Lafayette 337-234-4155 Robert S. Dampf Stockwell, Sievert, Viccellio, Clements & Shaddock, LLP 127 W. Broad St. Floor 4 Lake Charles 337-436-9491 James M. Dill The Dill Law Firm 825 Lafayette St. Lafayette 337-261-1408 Joseph C. Giglio Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2311

Andrew D. McGlathery III Stockwell, Sievert, Viccellio, Clements & Shaddock, LLP 127 W. Broad St. Floor 4 Lake Charles 337-436-9491 Bernard H. McLaughlin Jr. McLaughlin McGlathery Mediation 713 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-310-1609 Antitrust Law Adam G. Young Young, Cotter & Meade, LLC 315 S. College Rd. Suite 163 Lafayette 337-261-8800 Appellate Practice James H. Gibson Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000 Glenn J. Armentor The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 Lawrence P. Simon Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2323

Patrick A. Juneau Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052

Paul B. Simon Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Thomas R. Juneau Sr. Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052

Melissa L. Theriot NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000

Banking and Finance Law Kyle M. Bacon Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7706 Julie S. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2307 Billy J. Domingue Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2342 Steven G. Durio Durio, McGoffin, Stagg & Ackermann, PC 220 Heymann Blvd. Lafayette 337-233-0300 Craig A. Ryan Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Bankruptcy & Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency & Reorganization Law Alternate Dispute Resolution Harold L. Domingue Jr. Harold L. Domingue, Jr. 711 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-234-6003 Joseph P. Hebert Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2348 Armistead M. Long Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Stephen C. Polito Stockwell, Sievert, Viccellio, Clements & Shaddock, LLP 127 W. Broad St. Floor 4 Lake Charles 337-436-9491 Craig A. Ryan Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Gerald H. Schiff Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 William C. Vidrine Vidrine and Vidrine 711 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-233-5195 Adam G. Young Young, Cotter & Meade, LLC 315 S. College Rd. Suite 163 Lafayette 337-261-8800 Bet-theCompany Litigations Bret C. Beyer Hill & Beyer, APLC 101 La Rue France, Suite 502 Lafayette 337-232-9733 Erin S. Beyer Hill & Beyer, APLC 101 La Rue France, Suite 502 Lafayette 337-232-9733 J. Michael Veron Veron, Bice, Palermo & Wilson, LLC 721 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-513-4436


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toughest case

Alfred Boustany II profile by Fritz Esker \ portrait by Romero & Romero

Practicing law has been a

part of Alfred Boustany II’s life for over 40 years. It’s not just a part of his professional life; it’s a part of his family life, too. At the Boustany Law Firm in Lafayette, he works in criminal, personal injury and family law with his son Alfred Boustany III. When asked about his most memorable cases, Boustany recalls a case from the early 1980s where he defended an African-American man accused of raping a white woman. Because of the nature of the crime and the time period in which it occurred, there was a highly charged, emotional atmosphere surrounding the case. But after meeting with the man, Boustany thought his client was telling the truth and he felt the evidence supported his client’s version of events. Boustany’s client was found not guilty. Ten years later, Boustany saw the man again. The man had not gotten in any trouble since the trial and was a productive member of society. He thanked Boustany for saving his life 10 years earlier. “I believed my client and I believe the jury made the right decision to this day,” Boustany said. In addition to his criminal defense work, Boustany has also worked on personal injury cases. He said that many of these have been rewarding as well. Helping people who have been seriously injured through no fault of their own get compensation for their pain and suffering is a good feeling for him. It doesn’t fully right the wrongs done to those clients, but it does help them on their journeys to recovery. “Those settlements were all really important to the people involved,” Boustany said. Born and raised in Lafayette, the 64-year-old Boustany earned his law degree from LSU. He said the endlessly evolving nature of legal work has kept things fun and interesting for him in his 40-plus-year career. “The law changes all the time,” Boustany said. “It [the profession] requires constant learning, which keeps the brain working. It keeps us sharp and involved.”

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Boustany has been married to his wife Patricia for over 40 years and has three children. He has one grandchild and another one on the way. When he’s not practicing the law and spending time with his family, he enjoys reading. Most of the books he reads are about history. Even though legal thrillers are a burgeoning sub-genre in fiction, Boustany said the only such author he reads is John Grisham.


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TOP LAWYERS Commercial Litigation H. Kent Aguillard M. Terrance Hoychick, A.P.L.C. and H. Kent Aguillard 141 S. Sixth St. Eunice 337-466-4419 Joseph C. Giglio Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2311 Emile Joseph Jr. Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000 William H.L. Kaufman Ottinger Hebert, LLC 1313 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-232-2606 Steven C. Lanza Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Douglas C. Longman Jr. Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7607 Samuel E. Masur Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 John E. McElligott Jr. Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660

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Frank X. Neuner Jr. NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 Matthew J. Randazzo III Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610 Commercial Transactions/ LLS Law Julie S. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2307 Billy J. Domingue Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2342 Jeremy A. Hebert Becker & Hebert, LLC 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-446-2407

Construction Law Richard D. Chappuis Jr. Voorhies & Labbé 700 St. John St. Floor 5 Lafayette 337-232-9700 Lamont P. Domingue Voorhies & Labbé 700 St. John St. Floor 5 Lafayette 337-232-9700 Jeremy A. Hebert Becker & Hebert, LLC 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-446-2407 Emile Joseph Jr. Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000 Michael J. Remondet Jr. Jeansonne & Remondet 200 W. Congress St. Suite 1100 Lafayette 337-237-4370 James T. Rivera Scofield & Rivera, LLC 100 E. Vermilion Suite 301 Lafayette 337-235-5353

Victoria V. Theriot NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000

Emmett C. Sole Stockwell, Sievert, Viccellio, Clements & Shaddock, LLP 127 W. Broad St. Floor 4 Lake Charles 337-436-9491

Communications Law

Corporate Law

Michael D. Hebert Becker & Hebert, LLC 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-446-2407

Kyle M. Bacon Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7706

acadiana profile april/may 2018

James J. Davidson III Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660

William P. Stubbs Jr. Stubbs Law Firm, LLC 1301 Camellia Blvd. Suite 401 Lafayette 337-233-9755

Alexander L. Reed The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405

Billy J. Domingue Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2342

Lester J. Zaunbrecher Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000

Walter M. Sanchez The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405

Steven G. Durio Durio, McGoffin, Stagg & Ackermann, PC 220 Heymann Blvd. Lafayette 337-233-0300 Joseph C. Giglio Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2311 Ryan Goudelocke Durio, McGoffin, Stagg & Ackermann, PC 220 Heymann Blvd. Lafayette 337-233-0300 Paul J. Hebert Ottinger Hebert, LLC 1313 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-232-2606 Stephen P. Jewell Jewell & Jewell 143 E. Main St., Suite 3 New Roads 225-638-3311 Brandon W. Letulier NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 Lawrence L. Lewis III Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Michael D. Skinner Skinner Law Firm, LLC 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-354-3030

Criminal Defense Non White-Collar Alfred F. Boustany II Boustany Law Firm 421 W. Vermilion St. Lafayette 337-261-0225 Tony C. Fazzio The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Thomas E. Guilbeau Guilbeau Law Office 106 Congress St. Lafayette 337-232-7240 Rebecca Jacobs Hunter The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Thomas L. Lorenzi Lorenzi & Barnatt, LLP 518 Pujo St. Lake Charles 337-513-0886 Patricia C. Manetsch The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Allyson M. Prejean Barry Sallinger 820 E. St. Mary Blvd. Lafayette 337-235-5791

J. Kevin Stockstill J. Kevin Stockstill, Attorney at Law 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-262-0203 Barry J. Sallinger Barry Sallinger 820 E. St. Mary Blvd. Lafayette 337-235-5791 Criminal Defense White Collar Todd S. Clemons Todd Clemons & Associates, APLC 1740 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-477-0000 Tony C. Fazzio The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Rebecca Jacobs Hunter The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Thomas L. Lorenzi Lorenzi & Barnatt, LLP 518 Pujo St. Lake Charles 337-513-0886 Alexander L. Reed The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405


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toughest case

Patrick C. Morrow profile by Fritz Esker \ portrait by Romero & Romero

There may not be a more

unsung profession in Louisiana than the crawfish farmer. Without them, none of those spring crawfish boils that are a staple of Louisiana life happen. Patrick C. Morrow, founder and senior partner of Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik in Opelousas, helped secure a major victory for local crawfish farmers in 2004. While Morrow has worked many rewarding cases in a distinguished 46-year career as a lawyer, he fondly remembers his work in a class action lawsuit on behalf of Louisiana crawfish farmers. The farmers were adversely affected by the use of the pesticide Icon in South Louisiana rice fields. Those fields were close to the crawfish ponds and the pesticide killed many crawfish. Morrow helped argue the case before a jury in St. Landry Parish. Before the case could reach the jury, the two sides agreed on a settlement for approximately $45 million. This helped the crawfish community recoup their losses. Deciding whether or not to accept a settlement or proceed to a jury verdict is a tricky process. Morrow likened it to a “cat and mouse game.” Each client has an individual target and each case has its individual variables. Helping people is what has made the work rewarding for Morrow. Most of his career has been spent at the firm he founded. “There are more and more regulations and red tape against the blue collar worker. Someone needs to stand up for their rights,” Morrow said.“It’s still a good feeling after all these years.” The 70-year-old Morrow, who earned his law degree from LSU, said the increasing red tape and paperwork is one way the profession has changed during his career. What could be done verbally 30 to 40 years ago now needs to be put in writing. Morrow appreciates that his firm is a family business. Morrow’s son, P. Craig Morrow, is also a partner in the firm. The father-and-son duo of Richard T. Haik Sr. and Richard T. Haik,Jr. are also partners. Partner Jeffrey Bassett practices with his son, Taylor. Partner James P. Ryan practices with his daughter, Kathleen.

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When he’s not practicing the law, Morrow enjoys hunting, spending time with his family, traveling and, of course, crawfish. He has nine grandchildren, but there’s no word yet as to whether or not any of them will join the family business. “I don’t know if any of my granddaughters want to be a lawyer,” Morrow said. “But, there’s always an opening,”


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TOP LAWYERS Walter M. Sanchez The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Michael D. Skinner Skinner Law Firm, LLC 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-354-3030 J. Kevin Stockstill J. Kevin Stockstill, Attorney at Law 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-262-0203 Donald W. Washington Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7614 Elder Law Steve M. Jankower Jankower Law Firm 110 Exchange Pl. Suite 101 Lafayette 337-289-1745 David L. Sigler Sigler & Raglin Attorneys at Law, APLLC 630 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-439-2033 Kenneth D. St. Pé Kenneth D. St. Pé 311 W. University Ave. Suite A Lafayette 337-534-4043 Eminent Domain & Condemnation Law James J. Davidson III Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660

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D’Ann R. Penner Veron, Bice, Palermo & Wilson, LLC 721 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-513-4436

Susan A. Daigle Daigle Rayburn LLC 303 W. Vermilion Suite 210 Lafayette 337-234-7000

Employee Benefits Law

Bob J. Duplantis Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Joel P. Babineaux Babineaux, Poche, Anthony & Slavich, LLC 1201 Camellia Blvd. Floor 3 Lafayette 337-984-2505 Somer G. Brown Cox Cox Filo Camel & Wilson 723 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-240-9349 Robert J. David Jr. Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052 Kevin R. Duck Duck Law Firm, LLC 5040 Ambassador Caffery Pkwy. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-660-2699 Kyle L. Gideon Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 Robert E. Rowe Rowe Law Corporation 113 Oil Center Dr. Lafayette 337-266-9626 Energy Law Robert L. Cabes Milling Benson Woodward LLP 101 La Rue France Suite 200 Lafayette 337-232-3929 Hunter A. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2354

acadiana profile april/may 2018

Gregory G. Duplantis Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 Amy Duplantis Gautreaux Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 Patrick W. Gray Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 James N. Mansfield III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2340 Samuel E. Masur Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Jennifer E. Michel Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP 100 E. Vermilion St. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-205-4739 Matthew J. Randazzo III Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Richard W. Revels Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-7424 Jamie D. Rhymes Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2360

Hunter A. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2354 Bill Goodell Jr. Goodell Law Firm 820 E. St Mary Blvd. Lafayette 337-412-2724 Patrick W. Gray Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 Paul J. Hebert Ottinger Hebert, LLC 1313 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-232-2606

George H. Robinson Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2319

Amy Allums Lee Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003

Bryan D. Scofield Scofield & Rivera, LLC 100 E. Vermilion Suite 301 Lafayette 337-235-5353

Penny Leonard Malbrew Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2364

Lawrence P. Simon Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2323

Ben L. Mayeaux NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000

Randall C. Songy Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Environmental Law

Thomas M. McNamara Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003

George Arceneaux III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2332

J. Rock Palermo III Veron, Bice, Palermo & Wilson, LLC 721 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-513-4436

Matthew J. Randazzo III Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610 Family Law James D. Bayard Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Alfred F. Boustany II Boustany Law Firm 421 W. Vermilion St. Lafayette 337-261-0225 David L. Carriere The Law Offices of David L. Carriere 322 S. Market St. Opelousas 337-948-6217 Laura L. Davenport Law Office of Laura L. Davenport 730 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-231-1397 Bradford H. Felder Veazey Felder & Renegar LLC 2 Flagg Pl. Lafayette 337-446-2709 Rachel B. Godley Rachel B. Godley, Attorney at Law, LLC 315 S. College Rd. Suite 239 Lafayette 337-456-3457 John Green Jr. Law Offices of John Green 1135 Hodges St. Lake Charles 337-656-1032


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toughest case

Elizabeth Shea profile by Fritz Esker \ portrait by Romero & Romero

Medical malpractice suits are

often highly emotional, personal cases. In such matters, it’s vital that both sides are able to present their arguments as articulately as possible. That’s what Elizabeth Shea does for her clients in her work as a medical malpractice attorney with Fraser, Wheeler, Bergstedt, and Courtney in Lake Charles. For her most memorable case, Shea cited her first jury trial where she served as lead counsel. Her client was an ER doctor who was being sued by the son of an elderly woman who died a week after a visit to the ER. The woman was a nursing home patient whose feeding tube had come out. She went to the ER to have it reinstalled. After she died a week later, the son accused the doctor of putting the tube in incorrectly and causing her death. The trial was in Jena, Louisiana. Shea had never been there. Proceedings were set for February, but an ice storm postponed the case. The delay meant the trial would take place during Mardi Gras. When Shea brought it up to the judge, he said, “Nobody celebrates Mardi Gras here.” “I was a little out of my comfort zone,” Shea said. Thankfully, the trial went better for Shea and her client than her efforts to move the case out of a Mardi Gras time slot. What she appreciated about the trial itself is what she appreciates about her medical malpractice work in general. These suits are highly personal to the doctors, whose professional judgment is being called into question. “They tried to help their patients, and it ended with a bad result, but it’s nobody’s fault,” Shea said. “I really like that I get to learn about the medicine and be an advocate for these doctors. Having a voice speak for you is just as important on the defense side as it is on the plaintiff’s side.” While she passionately believes in helping her clients, Shea has sympathy for the plaintiffs. They are usually suffering a terrible loss and are looking for an answer, but not all unexpected deaths are the fault of another human being. Shea, who earned her law degree from LSU in 2011, said she enjoys the variety in her work. Even though the subject matter may be similar, no two cases are identical and that keeps the work from becoming monotonous.

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When she is not defending her clients, the 32-year-old Shea spends time with her husband and enjoys yoga and Pilates. A Lafayette native, she grew up playing tennis and has recently rediscovered her love for the sport.


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TOP LAWYERS Rebecca Jacobs Hunter The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 John W. Jewell Jewell & Jewell 143 E. Main St. Suite 3 New Roads 225-638-3311 William A. Keaty II Keaty & Tilly, LLC 2701 Johnston St. Suite 303 Lafayette 337-347-8995 Philip C. Kobetz Philip C. Kobetz, Attorney at Law 120 Representative Row Lafayette 337-291-1990 Patricia C. Manetsch The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Richard D. Mere Richard D. Mere: Attorney at Law 701 Johnston St. Lafayette 337-269-5555 Parker Mitchell Jack Derrick Miller, APLC 415 N. Parkerson Ave. Crowley 337-788-0768 Bhyllie J. Mouton Mouton and Mouton, LLC 905 The Blvd. Rayne 337-334-7000

Alexander L. Reed The Sanchez Law Firm, LLC 1200 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-433-4405 Tom Shea Tom Shea Family Law LLC 1 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 1720 Lake Charles 337-564-4148 Diane A. Sorola Law Office of Diane Sorola 402 W. Convent St. Lafayette 337-234-2355 First Amendment Law Thomas L. Lorenzi Lorenzi & Barnatt, LLP 518 Pujo St. Lake Charles 337-513-0886 General Service Law Firm James T. Rivera Scofield & Rivera, LLC 100 E. Vermilion Suite 301 Lafayette 337-235-5353 Sean M. Stockstill Fonseca Stockstill, LLP 217 Rue Louis XIV Suite 100 Lafayette 337-456-1163 Government Relations Practice

Health Care Law Charles J. Boudreaux Jr. Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7600

Elena A. Pecoraro Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Insurance Law

Nadia de la Houssaye Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7634

Charles J. Foret Briney Foret Corry, LLP 413 Travis St. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-4070

S. Gary McGoffin Durio, McGoffin, Stagg & Ackermann, PC 220 Heymann Blvd. Lafayette 337-233-0300

Catherine M. Landry Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062

Elena A. Pecoraro Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Michael D. Skinner Skinner Law Firm, LLC 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-354-3030 Kenneth D. St. Pé Kenneth D. St. Pé 311 W. University Ave. Suite A Lafayette 337-534-4043 Immigration Law Grant F. Freeman Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453

Michael G. Lemoine Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7624 Ian A. Macdonald Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7617 John E. McElligott Jr. Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 Jennifer E. Michel Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP 100 E. Vermilion St. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-205-4739

Shane Mouton Mouton and Mouton, LLC 905 The Blvd. Rayne 337-334-7000

Stephen C. Dwight Dwight Law Firm, LLC 1400 Ryan St. Lake Charles 337-439-3138

Anna M. Grand Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453

James L. Pate NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000

Helen Popich Harris Attorney at Law 321 W. Main St. Suite 2-D Lafayette 337-291-6092

Burton P. Guidry Burton P. Guidry & Associates 111 Concord St., Suite B Abbeville 337-740-0834

Greg R. Mier Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

Richard J. Petre Jr. Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

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Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610 Intellectual Property Law Blair B. Suire Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7648 Robert L. Waddell Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7623 International Arbitration Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610 Labor & Employment Law Joel P. Babineaux Babineaux, Poche, Anthony & Slavich, LLC 1201 Camellia Blvd. Floor 3 Lafayette 337-984-2505 Robert J. David Jr. Juneau David, APLC 1018 Harding St. Suite 202 Lafayette 337-269-0052 Kevin R. Duck Duck Law Firm, LLC 5040 Ambassador Caffery Pkwy. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-660-2699

J. Michael Fussell Jr. Ottinger Hebert, LLC 1313 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-232-2606 Greg Guidry Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, PC 603 Silverstone Rd. Suite 102A Lafayette 337-769-6583 Cliff A. LaCour NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 Christopher L. Zaunbrecher Briney Foret Corry, LLP 413 Travis St. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-4070 Land Use & Zoning Law Jonathan R. Davis Turnkey Title 91 Settlers Trace Blvd. Bldg. 1 Lafayette 337-326-4830 Legal Malpractice Law James H. Gibson Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000 R. Scott Iles R. Scott Iles Personal Injury Law 1200 W. University Ave. Lafayette 337-234-8800 Steven B. Rabalais Rabalais & Hebert, LLC 701 Robley Dr. Suite 210 Lafayette 337-981-0309


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TOP LAWYERS Mass Tort Litigation/Class Actions Richard C. Broussard Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 Kevin R. Duck Duck Law Firm, LLC 5040 Ambassador Caffery Pkwy. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-660-2699 Derrick Earles Laborde Earles Law Firm 203 Energy Pkwy. Building B Lafayette 337-777-7777 Grant F. Freeman Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Jeffrey T. Gaughan Baggett, McCall, Burgess, Watson & Gaughan, LLC 3006 Country Club Rd. Lake Charles 337-478-8888 Robert M. Kallam Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062 Patrick C. Morrow Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483 Elena A. Pecoraro Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Edwin G. Preis Jr. Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062

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James Parkerson Roy Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-233-3033 James P. Ryan Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483 Medical Malpractice Law Glenn J. Armentor The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 Alan K. Breaud Breaud & Meyers, APLC 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1101 Lafayette 337-266-2200 Marc W. Judice Judice & Adley 926 Coolidge Blvd. Lafayette 337-235-2405 James P. Lambert Jim Lambert Law Firm 315 S. College Suite 146 Lafayette 337-446-2766 Sera H. Russell III The Law Office of Sera H. Russell, III 111 Mercury St. Lafayette 337-205-9786 Elizabeth Shea Attorney at Law 4350 Nelson Rd. Lake Charles 337-478-8595 Todd A. Townsley The Townsley Law Firm 3102 Enterprise Blvd. Lake Charles 337-377-0584 Scott Webre Webre & Associates 2901 Johnston St. Suite 307 Lafayette 337-237-5051

acadiana profile april/may 2018

Mergers & Acquisitions Law Kyle M. Bacon Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7706 Julie S. Chauvin Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2307 Billy J. Domingue Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2342 Samuel E. Masur Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 William P. Stubbs Jr. Stubbs Law Firm, LLC 1301 Camellia Blvd. Suite 401 Lafayette 337-233-9755 Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law Craig A. Ryan Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Municipal Law Michael P. Corry Sr. Briney Foret Corry, LLP 413 Travis St. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-4070 Michael D. Hebert Becker & Hebert, LLC 201 Rue Beauregard Lafayette 337-446-2407

James L. Pate NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 Natural Resources Law Patrick W. Gray Johnson Gray McNamara, LLC 200 W. Congress St. Suite 900 Lafayette 337-412-6003 Jeffrey D. Lieberman Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2349 James N. Mansfield III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2340 Samuel E. Masur Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132 Richard W. Revels Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-7424 Lawrence P. Simon Jr. Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2323 Non-Profit/ Charities Law Theresa A. Barnatt Lorenzi & Barnatt, LLP 518 Pujo St. Lake Charles 337-513-0886

Oil and Gas Law George Arceneaux III Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2332 Bob J. Duplantis Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Arthur D. Mouton Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 Matthew J. Randazzo III Randazzo Giglio & Bailey LLC 900 E. Saint Mary Blvd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-291-4900 Jamie D. Rhymes Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2360

Gregory G. Duplantis Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

April L. RolenOgden Liskow & Lewis 822 Harding St. Lafayette 337-267-2330

Patrick D. Gallaugher Jr. Scofield, Gerard, Pohorelsky, Gallaugher & Landry 901 Lake Shore Dr. Suite 900 Lake Charles 337-433-9436

Paul B. Simon Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Lauren L. Gardner Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Bill E. Kellner Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Samuel E. Masur Gordon, Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan, LLC 400 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 4200 Lafayette 337-237-0132

Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610

Randall C. Songy Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Personal Injury Litigation Bennett B. Anderson Jr. Anderson, Dozier, Blanda & Saltzman 2010 W. Pinhook Rd. Lafayette 337-242-7436 Glenn J. Armentor The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471


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TOP LAWYERS Bart Bernard Bart Bernard, Attorney at Law 1031 Camellia Blvd. Lafayette 337-900-9000

James S. Gates Morrow, Gates & Morrow, LLC 613 Main St. Opelousas 337-942-6529

John Wesley Tilly Keaty & Tilly, LLC 2701 Johnston St. Suite 303 Lafayette 337-347-8995

Alfred F. Boustany II Boustany Law Firm 421 W. Vermilion St. Lafayette 337-261-0225

Burton P. Guidry Burton P. Guidry & Associates 111 Concord St. Suite B Abbeville 337-740-0834

Frank M. Walker Jr. Plauché Smith & Nieset, LLC 1123 Pithon St. Lake Charles 337-436-0522

Anthony M. Fazzio Fazzio Law Firm 4906 Ambassador Caffery Pkwy. Suite 1000 Lafayette 337-366-0919

Wells T. Watson Baggett, McCall, Burgess, Watson & Gaughan, LLC 3006 Country Club Rd. Lake Charles 337-478-8888

Gary J. Russo Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7610

Richard C. Broussard Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 Brian C. Colomb Gordon McKernan Injury Attorneys 1819 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 250 Lafayette 337-999-9999 Jeffrey K. Coreil NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 Larry Curtis Larry Curtis, APLC 300 Rue Beauregard Building C Lafayette 337-235-1825 Blake R. David Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 James Domengeaux Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-233-3033 Derrick Earles Laborde Earles Law Firm 203 Energy Pkwy. Building B Lafayette 337-777-7777 Joseph F. Gaar Jr. Gaar Law Firm 617 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-366-0982

James P. Lambert Jim Lambert Law Firm 315 S. College Suite 146 Lafayette 337-446-2766 Miles A. Matt Law Offices of Matt & Allen 1026 St. John St. Lafayette 337-944-4491 Ashley E. Philen Simien & Simien, LLC 1 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 1270 Lake Charles 337-436-2121 James Parkerson Roy Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-233-3033 Eulis Simien Simien & Simien, LLC 1 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 1270 Lake Charles 337-436-2121 Jimmy Simien Simien & Simien, LLC 1 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 1270 Lake Charles 337-436-2121 Elwood C. Stevens Jr. Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-233-3033

Jason Matthew Welborn Gaar Law Firm 617 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-366-0982 Bob F. Wright Domengeaux Wright Roy & Edwards, LLC 556 Jefferson St. Suite 500 Lafayette 337-233-3033 Product Liability Litigation Glenn J. Armentor The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 Patrick J. Briney Briney Foret Corry, LLP 413 Travis St. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-4070 Richard C. Broussard Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323 John F. Colowich Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062

Blake R. David Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323

Rudie R. Soileau Jr. Lundy, Lundy, Soileau & South, LLP 501 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-439-0707 Railroad Law Harry K. Burdette The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 Kevin M. Dills Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 Grant F. Freeman Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Kyle L. Gideon Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 John E. McElligott Jr. Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660 Elena A. Pecoraro Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453

Real Estate Law Clare W. Allen Bradley Moreau Title 1318 Camellia Blvd. Lafayette 337-235-4660 Kyle M. Bacon Jones Walker LLP 600 Jefferson St. Suite 1600 Lafayette 337-593-7706 Jean-Paul Coussan Andrus Boudreaux 1301 Camellia Blvd. Suite 401 Lafayette 337-984-9480 Jonathan R. Davis Turnkey Title 91 Settlers Trace Blvd. Bldg. 1 Lafayette 337-326-4830 Elisa Devall Davis Turnkey Title 91 Settlers Trace Blvd. Bldg. 1 Lafayette 337-326-4830 Yvette Dumas Bradley Moreau Title 1318 Camellia Blvd. Lafayette 337-235-4660 Ramon J. Fonseca Jr. Fonseca Stockstill, LLP 217 Rue Louis XIV Suite 100 Lafayette 337-456-1163 John R. Pohorelsky Scofield, Gerard, Pohorelsky, Gallaugher & Landry 901 Lake Shore Dr. Suite 900 Lake Charles 337-433-9436 Wayne A. Shullaw Wayne A Shullaw, Attorney at Law 600 Jefferson St. Floor 5 Lafayette 337-266-2310 H.L. “Rye” Tuten III Tuten Title & Escrow LLC 326 Settlers Trace Suite 101A Lafayette 337-524-1703

Joan D. Wallace Turnkey Title 91 Settlers Trace Blvd. Bldg. 1 Lafayette 337-326-4830 Tax Law Roy Bergeron Jr. Simien & Simien, LLC 1 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 1270 Lake Charles 337-436-2121 Jean C. Breaux Jr. Breaux & Stelly Law Firm 413 Travis St. Suite 100 Lafayette 337-233-4447 Ted W. Hoyt Hoyt & Stanford, LLC 315 S. College Rd. Suite 165 Lafayette 337-234-1012 Lawrence L. Lewis III Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660 Robert E. Rowe Rowe Law Corporation 113 Oil Center Dr. Lafayette 337-266-9626 Russell J. Stutes Jr. Stutes & Lavergne, LLC 600 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-433-0022 James A. Watson Roddy, Watson & Everett 400 E. College St. Lake Charles 337-419-3430 Lester J. Zaunbrecher Allen & Gooch 2000 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-291-1000


Transportation Law Jeffrey M. Bassett Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett & Haik 324 W. Landry St. Opelousas 337-948-4483 Richard D. Chappuis Jr. Voorhies & Labbé 700 St. John St. Floor 5 Lafayette 337-232-9700 Larry Curtis Larry Curtis, APLC 300 Rue Beauregard Building C Lafayette 337-235-1825 James M. Dill The Dill Law Firm 825 Lafayette St. Lafayette 337-261-1408 Grant F. Freeman Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Anna M. Grand Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Elena A. Pecoraro Pecoraro Law 600 Jefferson St. Suite 810 Lafayette 337-446-2453 Bryan D. Scofield Scofield & Rivera, LLC 100 E. Vermilion Suite 301 Lafayette 337-235-5353 Trusts & Estates Theresa A. Barnatt Lorenzi & Barnatt, LLP 518 Pujo St. Lake Charles 337-513-0886

Donald A. Capretz Donald A Capretz, APLC 1011 Coolidge Blvd. Lafayette 337-237-9999

David R. Bankston David R. Bankston, Ltd. 2701 Johnston St. Suite 301 Lafayette 337-232-1444

Theodore Glenn Edwards IV Davidson Meaux 810 S. Buchanan St. Lafayette 337-237-1660

Shannon Dartez The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471

Lawrence L. Lewis III Onebane Law Firm 1200 Camellia Blvd. Suite 300 Lafayette 337-237-2660

Thomas A. Filo Cox Cox Filo Camel & Wilson 723 Broad St. Lake Charles 337-240-9349

Steven T. Ramos Andrus Boudreaux 1301 Camellia Blvd. Suite 401 Lafayette 337-984-9480 David L. Sigler Sigler & Raglin Attorneys at Law, APLLC 630 Kirby St. Lake Charles 337-439-2033 William P. Stubbs Jr. Stubbs Law Firm, LLC 1301 Camellia Blvd. Suite 401 Lafayette 337-233-9755 James A. Watson Roddy, Watson & Everett 400 E. College St. Lake Charles 337-419-3430 Workers Compensation Law Glenn J. Armentor The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 J. Derek Aswell Broussard & David 557 Jefferson St. Lafayette 337-233-2323

James D. Hollier NeunerPate 1001 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 200 Lafayette 337-237-7000 Brian J. Lindsey Preis PLC 102 Versailles Blvd. Suite 400 Lafayette 337-237-6062 Stephen M. Morrow Morrow, Gates & Morrow, LLC 613 Main St. Opelousas 337-942-6529 Donovan J. O’Pry II O’Pry Law Firm 2014 W. Pinhook Rd. Suite 507 Lafayette 337-415-0007 Dona K. Renegar Veazey Felder & Renegar LLC 2 Flagg Pl. Lafayette 337-446-2709 Mark L. Riley The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation 300 Stewart St. Lafayette 337-233-1471 Brent Steier Simien & Simien, LLC 1 Lakeshore Dr. Suite 1270 Lake Charles 337-436-2121

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culture joie de vivre

les artistes

NEVER TOO LATE TO PAINT Lue Svendson leaves her brushmark on the Acadiana art scene by Will Kalec portrait by Romero & Romero

Already an accomplished landscape architect, Lue Svendson decided at age 50 to pursue her passion and paint professionally.

A SEED OF INSPIRATION:


culture les artistes

gallery info: Svendson Studios. 424 E. Vermilion St. Lafayette. Open by Appointment or by Chance. luesvendson.com

q&a

Lue Svendson 1 Who were your earliest artistic influences? “Art has always been a part of my life, and that’s because of my grandmother and mother. My grandmother was more of a painter and my mother was more of a craftsman. If you got bored at my house, one of them would hand you a drawing tablet and a pencil. ‘Don’t tell me you’re bored, we just got you the best coloring book.’ That’s how it was growing up.”

2 Take us through the thought process of pursuing a career in landscape architecture. ”I love art. I love to create beautiful places and beautiful things. I love to be around pleasing lines and compositions, and colors. And I love being outside. LOVE being outside. So I put the two together and chose landscape architecture, and I never looked back.”

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rowing up, Lue Svendson was the kid who never wanted to come inside. It didn’t matter if the summer sun had punched the clock an hour ago, to Svendson the day didn’t have to end. It wasn’t too dark or too “buggy.” And despite the demands of her mother or grandmother, or her friends’ parents echoing the same thing, it was never too late. As many residents of Acadiana know, considering she’s one of the most in-demand professionals in her field, Svendson grew up to be a top-notch landscape architect, bringing to life literally thousands of pieces of property, she guesstimates, both here and abroad during an ongoing four-decade career. However, that never-too-late mindset from childhood never left Svendson. At a stage in life when

acadiana profile april/may 2018

most people are beginning to plan for the final chapters, Svendson went the opposite route, adding a few more pages to her story. “I’ve never regretted making that choice,” Svendson says, of becoming a landscape architect. “And let’s face it: You’re working, you’re married, you have kids — there’s not a whole lot of time to do much else. At 30 and 40, it never bothered me, but 50 you really see the end of the road. And you ask yourself, and look back, ‘What haven’t I done that I really want to do?’ And the answer was paint. So I jumped into it big time.” Make no mistake, whether planting a bush or painting with a brush, Svendson is an artist. After a brief flirtation with watercolors, Svendson has painted exclusively in oils


the past 16 years, claiming that particular paint choice “is so rich and deep. It grabbed me. There’s so much more passion.” Inside her studio — Svendson Studios — on East Vermilion, which is right on the monthly ArtWalk path, complexly layered paintings of the Bayou Teche hang above work stations containing T-squares and a mug fill of sharp pencils. Blueprints, precise to the tiniest measurement, rest near brilliant artistic adaptations of a dying sun dipping closer toward the horizon of the Cajun prairie, as Svendson’s two worlds coexist within this 100-year-old house. “It’s basically the same thing — it’s the elements of design. Think about it: line, color, form, composition…all of that is the same in a landscape plan as it is in a painting,”

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Svendson says. “Of course, I didn’t realize that until I started painting. And it dawned on me — my landscape work complements my painting work and my painting work complements my landscape work.” The parallels don’t end there, either. One of the selling points for pursuing a career in landscape architecture was it afforded Svendson the opportunity to not only create, but to construct. She enjoys the feeling of soil caked under her fingernails, the satisfying discomfort of lifting and bending (as weird as it sounds), the literal sweat labor the job demands. At the end of the project, the brain is spent and so is the body. Though it’s a little unorthodox, Svendson paints the same way — which is to say, she paints like a landscape architect. “Painting is a whole-body experience,” Svendson says. “I’m constantly up and down, up and down. Standing up. Standing back. Walking forward. You put your whole self into it. Trust me, you can wear yourself out painting.” Finding inspiration in her own surroundings, the majority of Svendson’s paintings capture the within-reach splendor of South Louisiana. The source of her content doesn’t hasn’t strayed much in her 16 years in front of a blank canvas. Her style certainly has, though. In the beginning, Svendson took a very literal approach to painting — treating it like a landscape architect, which makes sense. Dimensions were rigid. Lines were tight and pronounced. Little was left for interpretation, because that’s not the job of an architect. Slowly, Svendson let go of that, becoming, in her own words, “Less rigid… painting with more emotion, more feeling.” No longer confined to exact measures and scales, Svendson says she paints without fear now, embracing “accidents” that occur on canvas because at times it can make a painting more interesting. “I had a landscape client in Baton Rouge one time who was a painter,” Svendson says. “I did the plan, and we put

it out for bid and found a contractor. And I went out the day we were laying out all the plants, a whole backyard. And the client is sitting on the back patio watching this. And afterward she said, ‘It was like watching someone do a painting.’ “That was the neatest thing to say! It really was a compliment. From one painter to another, all I said was, ‘Well, thank you!’”n

Almost all of Svendson’s paintings feature familiar scenes for those who live in South Louisiana. With inspiration all around her, Svendson captures the landscapes, wildlife and people of Acadiana.

KEEPING IT LOCAL:

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Brothers Andre (L) aand Louis Michot are founding members of the Lost Bayou Ramblers. Not pictured are members Johnny Campos, Bryan Webre, Eric Heigle and Korey Richey

culture le musique

Golden Grace music calendar

Catch These Shows in April 1 Greetings From Levy Park April 6 Crowley

2 Holiday Lounge April 6 Mamou

3 Le Grand Hoorah April 21 Chicot State Park

4 Festival International April 25 Lafayette

5 Blue Moon Saloon April 26 Lafayette

6 Rêve Coffee Roasters April 29 Lafayette

7 Dockside Hall of Fame Tribute with the Givers at Festival International April 29 Lafayette

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The Lost Bayou Ramblers are found by the Grammys, nabbing a shiny statue on the cusp of 20 years as a band by Michael Patrick Welch portrait by Romero & Romero

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he music business has fallen apart, it is said. Some expected this death to bring forth a revolution that would level the artistic playing field. Some might argue the internet has picked more musicians’ pockets than it has filled, but there is at least one silver lining: In January, after nearly 20 years as a band,The Lost Bayou Ramblers won a Grammy award. They won without support of a major record label, without a manager and without a booking agent. “This is just us, just a homegrown Acadiana organization,” says the Ramblers’ singer and fiddle player Louis Michot. “To win a Grammy like that, it really justifies all the hard work we’ve put in.” The Grammy also justifies the Ramblers’ unique, updated Cajun sound, which blends zydeco with punk and classic rock, and sprinkles it with samples and other modern flourishes. “We did it straight-up traditional for so long,” says Louis, 39, who, along with brother Andre Michot (42, accordion and lapsteel) came up through the ranks playing in dad’s family Cajun band, Les Frères Michot. The Lost Bayou Ramblers boast many documents of their traditional chops, most notably 2007’s “Live a la Blue Moon,” which earned a nomination in the Grammys’ now-defunct Cajun and zydeco music category. Cajun, zydeco and other Louisiana genres were later lumped into the Regional Roots Album category along with Hawaiian music, Native American recordings and polka — meaning, the Ramblers won a much bigger category with 2017’s “Kalenda.” “‘Kalenda’ was a musical evolution,” says Andre, who lists off the differences between this Grammy-winning record, and the Ramblers’ other seven albums. “This newest one has samplers and drum machines, that’s different. And where the last one had acoustic bass, this one uses electric bass. On that live album that was nominated in 2007, we were playing a lot of traditional Cajun songs, while this one is mostly originals. We also have a lot of guests on ‘Kalenda,’ playing everything from pennywhistle, to cello, to different percussion, to psychedelic effects.” Andre believes the Ramblers stand out on today’s Cajun music landscape partly because none of its other members played Cajun music before joining this band. “As of a year and a half ago we have guitarist Johnny Campos from [the noise pop group] Brass Bed, and Bryan Webre on electric bass,” says Andre. “Eric Heigle [on electronics and acoustic guitar] has played with Tab Benoit, and still tours with [the rock group] Ellipsis. And we also have Eric’s cousin Korey Richey; together they engineered the Arcade Fire’s ‘Everything Now’ and ‘Reflektor’ albums, as well as our last record ‘Mammoth Waltz.’ We call those guys the ‘co-cousins’.”

acadiana profile april/may 2018

After seven years in the Ramblers, Korey Richey recently became a full-fledged member of LCD Soundsystem, limiting his involvement in his previous group. The resulting music industry connections have landed Lost Bayou Ramblers on tour and on stage with Arcade Fire and LCD Soundsystem. “We are similar to LCD in that we make dance music, and that’s what Korey likes about both bands,” says Louis. “LCD is our same speed, with similar rhythms and melodies. LCD is so simple and good. So, maybe it’s a natural thing for that South Louisiana boy to end up in a great dance band like LCD Soundsystem.” Andre though, is quick to qualify, “We are using the same Cajun instruments as always, and the same Cajun rhythms are always there.” “No matter what happens around that beat,” says Louis. “It’s basically the same rhythm that everyone’s been doing for a long time. We never vary from that. Says Louis, “At the end of the day we are still a Louisiana band singing in French. So, as much as people love our show, booking agents don’t necessarily know how to describe the experience of our show.” As such, even after the Grammy win, the Lost Bayou Ramblers still don’t have a record label, a PR firm, a manager or a booking agent. But maybe they just don’t need one. By 2012, the Ramblers had already soundtracked the runaway hit indie movie “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” In 2017, the group appeared in “The American Epic Sessions” documentary, re-recording “Allons à Lafayette” (supposedly the first Cajun song ever recorded) with Jack White and T Bone Burnett. The Ramblers have been successfully collaborating and playing wild shows with Violent Femmes singer Gordon Gano, as well as Spider Stacy of The Pogues. All this to say: prior to the Grammy, the Lost Bayou Ramblers were doing pretty well. “If you follow our calendar, we play hard, we play a lot. This Grammy will hopefully help us to take it a little easier and be a little more choosey about what we play — cause we need to,” says Louis. “You can’t do anything this hard for this long and not take a break. We do need a more reasonable pace. “ The brothers say they don’t feel any different, having won a Grammy. Perhaps this is because you can’t swing a dead nutria in Louisiana — especially in the Acadiana region — without hitting a Grammy winner. The brothers laugh while listing off all their neighbors and peers who’ve won Grammys. Andre says, “This at least means people are open to hearing traditional music in new and different ways.” n


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culture les personnes

MAKIN BACON: Chef Paul Ayo spent months playing culinary mad scientist in his kitchen, perfecting the bacon-infused menu for his new restaurant venture, Avec Bacon Café.

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Paul Ayo 1 What is a virtual restaurant? A virtual restaurant, aka a ghost restaurant, is a booming trend in the food-service industry that originally gained popularity in large metro areas such as San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City and Washington D.C. — places where commercial rent is astronomically expensive. A virtual restaurant is essentially a kitchen. There’s no dining room. There are no waiters or busboys. There’s no storefront. But there is a menu and a chef.

2 So how do I get my food? Do I go pick it up? No. Again, there’s no storefront. So the way to order from a virtual restaurant like Avec Bacon is through a third-party delivery app, in this case WAITR, or waitrapp. com. Download the app, find Avec Bacon and place your order. Within a short time, an independent delivery driver picks up your order and brings it to you.

3 What are the advantages of a virtual restaurant? Beyond making the start-up more economical for the restaurateur, virtual restaurants afford the chef a lot more flexibility and creativity. Without a hard menu to print out, the menu can be changed daily. Also, theoretically, a chef could run two virtual restaurants out of the same kitchen space.

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THE GRAND PIGS-PERIMENT Lafayette chef Paul Ayo’s new bacon-themed eatery, Avec Bacon Café, is innovative both in concept and execution by Will Kalec portrait by Romero & Romero

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f a restaurant opens in Lafayette, but there are no patrons in the dining room clanking forks against plates, no co-workers on their lunch break complaining about Rick in HR, or no first dates going on and on about how cute their Boston Terrier looks in a sweater, does it make a sound? The heck if chef Paul Ayo knows. Frankly, as the eccentric (and bearded) engine powering Lafayette’s newest arrival into a crowded and competitive food scene, he doesn’t really have time to answer such ridiculous philosophical riddles. Ayo has bacon to make. The popular chef and former face of E’s Kitchen has taken Acadiana’s passion for all things pork to the next level, opening Avec Bacon Café in the middle of March 2018. The entire menu is bacon-infused. There are the predictable BLT as well as bacon breakfast biscuits, but there’s also mad scientist creations like bacon cinnamon rolls — a seemingly simple recipe Ayo spent months perfecting. To clarify, this isn’t the bacon you pick up in a vacuum-sealed pouch. No, the bacon at Avec Bacon Café takes five days to make, according to Ayo. “The flavor of this bacon stays with you longer,” Ayo says. “Our bacon doesn’t get hidden when you put it with other things. For some people, it’s like tasting bacon for the first time.” Speaking of first times, Avec Bacon Café marks the first time a Lafayette eatery is operating as a virtual restaurant, meaning the only way to order items from Ayo’s bacon bounty is through the WAITR app. There are no tables or bar area. There’s no takeout window.You simply order online, and a third-party delivery person literally brings home the bacon. “It’s both scary and exciting at the same time,” Ayo says of this new virtual restaurant frontier. “It’s exciting to know you don’t have the 10-year lease and all the overhead you would normally have in a brick-and-mortar. But yeah, it’s scary, because no one has ever done it here. And so you wonder and hope that people are going to understand it. Doing a virtual restaurant, the food is all you are. So it has to be good.” Trying something a little bit different isn’t anything new for Ayo. Like many males growing up in South Louisiana,

acadiana profile april/may 2018

he was taught to cook at a young age. Except Ayo didn’t cut his culinary teeth on Cajun staples like rice and gravy or an etouffee. Instead, he’d plop down in front of the TV and watch “Great Chefs of the World,” mimicking their kitchen moves the same way other kids his age tried to dunk on their Nerf hoops like Michael Jordan. To encourage his budding passion, Ayo’s parents bought him an electric wok for his 10th birthday, a gift Ayo called, “the greatest thing.” As a grown-up, though, Ayo spent roughly a decade managing a motorcycle and ATV dealership before venturing into the food world by opening E’s Kitchen in Parc Lafayette in 2012. Despite the name, it wasn’t a restaurant as much as it was a kitchen supply store that featured cooking classes and demonstrations. It was at E’s Kitchen that Ayo began toying around with making his own bacon. “The first try was not great,” Ayo says. “Way, way too salty.” Thankfully, Ayo kept at it. Now, he feels the formula is perfected. The process starts with covering a pork belly with a sweet/salty/spicy rub and letting the meat cool in a refrigerator for three days. Then, Ayo thoroughly rinses the rub off the pork belly before smoking it overnight. Pull it the next morning and slice it. Initially, Ayo sold this homemade bacon at local farmers’ markets throughout Acadiana and was somewhat taken aback by how quickly it became a hit. Every slab he brought, he sold. After E’s Kitchen closed in the summer of 2017, Ayo immediately got the wheels spinning on the Avec Bacon concept. Initially, the restaurant was going to be located on Bertrand Street, but that plan fell through, opening the way to do something that hadn’t been done before (at least here) — create a virtual restaurant. “The way I try to describe it to people, is it’s like a Food Truck without wheels,” Ayo says. “But with us, you don’t have to find where we are.You just go online and order it. So that’s what we’re going to do. “When we told people we were going to do this bacon restaurant in a regular way, I got so much positive feedback that I didn’t want to let that momentum go. And if the virtual restaurant does well enough, many someday we could have an actual restaurant.” n


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culture en français, s’il vous plaît

For an English translation, visit AcadianaProfile.com

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Warren Perrin À la poursuite de la justice par David Cheramie portrait par Fusion Photography

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acadiana profile april/may 2018

l est vrai que la vérité sort de la bouche des enfants. En apprenant l’histoire du Grand Dérangement, le jeune fils d’un avocat cadien demande à son père tout innocemment si ses ancêtres acadiens n’étaient pas des criminels puisque la loi anglaise l’avait décrété ainsi en les expulsant de l’Acadie, rebaptisée Nouvelle-Écosse. Cette remarque a déclenché la transformation de Warren Perrin en militant culturel et éventuellement en troisième président du CODOFIL de 1994 à 2010, en passant par celui qui a défié la couronne anglaise. Auparavant, il était juriste à succès avec un grand cabinet à Lafayette et un petit bureau dans son village natal d’Erath dans la paroisse de Vermillon. Cette simple question posée en 1988 l’a poussé, après de longues négociations avec les représentants de la Reine Elizabeth II, à obtenir en 2003 des excuses officielles pour la déportation des Acadiens. Le mandat de Perrin était marqué par l’expansion des programmes d’immersion et la bataille contre des stéréotypes négatifs des Francophones louisianais. Selon lui, son objectif principal était de réunir et d’attirer l’attention sur les Francophones louisianais au niveau de l’état et à l’international. Un de ces premiers actes était de rassembler le temps d’un weekend plusieurs individus importants dans les mouvements culturels francophones. Se référant à une organisation acadienne d’autrefois, la Patente, il s’est mis à l’écoute des gens pour savoir dans quelle direction il devrait pousser le CODOFIL. Il a notamment mené, et mène toujours, un combat contre l’utilisation d’un terme, encore largement répandu dont l’origine même est controversée, désignant le derrière d’un chaoui comme symbole de tout un peuple. Il a servi quatre gouverneurs et était à l’origine de la création de la section francophone du barreau louisianais. Il a représenté la Louisiane à cinq Sommets de la Francophonie. Pour son premier, à Hanoï en 1997, il a voyagé dans l’avion du Président français Jacques Chirac qui, dans sa jeunesse, avait conduit un taxi à la NouvelleOrléans. Selon Perrin, le Congrès Mondial Acadien 1999 était un moment clé dans le développement d’une idée d’appartenance à une francophonie mondiale basée sur les liens de parenté et d’amitié. Plusieurs associations familiales formées à l’occasion existent encore, comme la Famille Beausoleil Broussard qui est à l’origine du Projet Nouvelle-Acadie. En tissant ces liens, Perrin a réduit l’isolation culturelle et linguistique des Louisianais francophones et a ouvert de nouveaux horizons vers l’avenir. Développer le tourisme culturel, apprendre le français aux enfants et restaurer la fierté dans notre culture francophone; voilà les grands objectifs qu’il a visés et qu’il a atteints. Il est toujours actif dans la culture avec le Projet Nouvelle-Acadie qui cherche l’endroit exacte où est enterré quelqu’un d’autre qui a défié la couronne, Beausoleil Broussard, dont il est descendant. Auteur de bientôt neufs livres sur l’histoire acadienne en Louisiane, Perrin s’est construit une autre œuvre autour de la fierté d’être cadien et francophone qu’il veut transmettre à une nouvelle génération. Tout ça, pour prouver à son fils, et à nous tous, qu’on n’est pas des criminels aux yeux de la loi. n


Acadiana Profile April/May  
Acadiana Profile April/May