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INSIDELOOK

The independent student newspaper at The Florida State University™. Established 1915.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 3-6, 2011

CLASS OF THE NATION Florida State hauls in college football’s best recruiting class SPORTS | 8

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VOLUME XX ISSUE X

BSU hosts ‘Evolution of Black’ Florida State kicks off Black History Month BRYAN VALLEJO

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Photographer The Florida State Universtity Black Student Union presented “The Evolution of Black,” the opening ceremonies for Black History Month, Tuesday, Feb. 1. The event was held at the Center for Global and Multicultural Engagement Auditorium. The ceremonies began with the African CaBryan Vallejo/FSView ribbean Dance Theatre At the BSU Black History Month opening ceremony held in the GME Auditorium, the Afriperforming “Bringing can Caribbean Dance Theatre performed “Bringing the Gifts that my Ancestors Gave” on the Gifts that my AncesTuesday, Feb. 1. tors Gave.” The group performed other native such as Martin Luther culture is like a tree with- was revealed, the emcee Caribbean music, featurwelcomed the keynote King, Jr., Malcolm X, as out roots,” Garvey said. ing dancers ranging from During the ceremony, speaker of the evening, well as a collage of the the ages of pre-teens to members of the BSU. Master Coordinator Am- Khorey Baker, who was adults. Khorey Baker Marcus Garvey was quot- ber Lodman and D’mitri met with applause, upon Following the music Brome unveiled the which one FSU student ed during the film. performance, History “A people without the newly designed Black Meets Present, a short was shown. The film prefilm put together by the sented powerful Black knowledge of their past Student Union 2011 calSEE BSU 2 Black Student Union, figures of U.S. history history, and origin and endar. Once the calendar

Science sparks chemistry at saloon Harry Kroto discusses math, science in unorthodox setting ZACHARY GOLDSTEIN Photographer

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Sir Harry Kroto, Florida State’s Francis Eppes Professor of Chemistry, takes an information sheet from a table during the Science Café held on Tuesday, Feb. 1, at Ray’s Steel City Saloon.

When most people think of a Tallahassee watering hole, they don't think often think of science. But occasionally, some educational undertakings happen outside of the classroom. That's what happened at the Science Café on Tuesday, Feb. 1, where Florida State University's Francis Eppes Professor of Chemistry Sir Harry Kroto spoke at Ray’s Steel City Saloon. The event, sponsored by the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, provided Kroto, the man who co-discovered the complex buckminsterfullerene molecule family, an opportunity to share some of his ideas on mathematics and the

way that they became the language that science speaks. Events like these, known as “Science Cafés,” are not unique to Tallahassee. “They take place globally, in fact,” Director of Educational Programs at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Pat Dixon said. “The first ones started in England in university towns, and still usually take place in a city with a major university. The idea is to be able to discuss science in a way that is accessible to many different people. You can eat food, have a drink and converse with some of the great minds in their respective fields.” For more information about science cafés, visit www.sciencecafes.org.

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BAILEY SHERTZINGER Assistant News Editor Florida State University’s ’Noles for Haiti hosted a banquet to recognize

volunteers and celebrate Haitian culture on Sunday, Jan. 30. The event, “Haiti: A Night of Remembrance and Recognition,” honored volunteers who have dedicated their time to helping Haiti recover after an earthquake devastated the country in

2010. According to a Tallahassee Democrat article, groups such as International Medical Outreach Haiti, the Tallahassee Haiti-Medical Team, Alternative Break Corps and Hope to Haiti were honored at the banquet. The article also said

that Ecclesiast Gurrier, Tony Fusco, Lawrence Gonzalez, Jesse O’Shea, Bob Rackleff and wife Esther Moring, Dr. Eric Ramcharran and Haitian Culture Club President Jean Dornevil were recognized for their work at the event. “A lot of people in

Tallahassee have given back and have been selfless, and in the spirit of altruism, these people need to be recognized,” said ’Noles for Haiti CoFounder Jesse O’Shea in a Tallahassee Democrat article. SEE HAITI 2

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NEWS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 3, 2011

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yelled out loud, “I love being black.” After the applause settled, Baker was welcomed to the stage. His speech, entitled “Fighting for our future,” touched on many different aspects relating to Black History, including the story of Priscilla Stephens, a young girl who staged a sit-in at a convenience store after her service was refused at a “white only” counter, which sent her to jail for a total of 51 days. When asked what it means to be, young, black and gifted, Baker said he thought it was “definitely a luxury.” The previous ceremonies came to an end with a vocal performance by the Musical Affirmation of Christ singing “Lift Every Voice,” and a short speech by BSU President Adrian Williams and Vice President Kiaira McCoy. Check back in later issues of the FSView & Florida Flambeau for more coverage of Black History Month events at FSU.

Bryan Vallejo/FSView

After the Black History Month opening ceremony held in the GME Auditorium concluded, the FSU audience got a chance to mingle in the lobby and eat on Tuesday, Feb. 1.

Krispy Kreme 5k challenge returns Student United Way to host 2nd annual race on Feb. 5 KATHERINE CONCEPCION Staff Writer Running on a full stomach sounds like a bad idea most of the time, but for one student organization, it’s the basis for a major fundraising event. FSU Student United Way will be hosting its 2nd annual Krispy Kreme Challenge, a four-mile race to raise money for numerous service projects on Feb. 5. The event will be held at the Westcott Fountain at 1 p.m. Last year, the group raised $4,000 and they are hoping to match or exceed that number this year. The Krispy Kreme

Challenge (KKC) originated at North Carolina State University in 2004. The race grew from 12 participants its first year to 5,500 runners in its 2009 race. “I saw the model they created; I thought it was great for FSU,” said Asimina Boutzoukas, president of FSU Student United Way. Each year, the Student United Way donates a large portion of its earnings to Registered Student Organizations that are engaging in health and human service-related projects. Last year, they gave a total of $8,500. “We work to help make their goals possible,” said Boutzoukas. “It’s a great

event, tons of fun and [the money] will all go back to FSU.” The race was designed to target individuals according to their athletic commitments and abilities instead of being a standard, one-size-fits-all marathon event. “It’s not your typical run, and there’s something in it for everyone,” said Larry Weru, vice president of Communications and webmaster for FSU Student United Way. “We have the “Challenger” for the hardcore competitors, the “Slacker “for people who want only a taste of the KKC and the “Butterfly” for those who just want to come out for a nice run.”

A Challenger eats 12 doughnuts and runs in the race for one hour, a Slacker eats at least one doughnut and can walk during the race, with no time limit and a Butterfly eats no doughnuts and runs the race for one hour. Those who prefer to stay on the sidelines can still sign up. “If you don’t want to compete, you can sign up as a Cheerleader and support the competitors or become a volunteer, and help with behindthe-scenes operations,” Weru said. Cheerleaders will receive a T-shirt at the event. Fees are $16 for Chal-

lengers and Slackers, $10 for Butterflies and Cheerleaders. The group hopes the event will become strongly established and grow in upcoming years. “It’s a very young event—this is only our second year holding this, so those who participate will help start a new tradition here at FSU,” said Weru. “People who participated last year said it’s the most fun they’ve ever had in a race and will be out there again this year.” To sign up or for more information, visit www. s t u d e n t u n i t e d w a y. org. Registration forms can also be found at the Dunlap Success Center.

FSU students rally for community river Water-bottling company Nestle Waters poses potential mining threat EMILY OSTERMEYER Contributing Writer Over 100 community members gathered in the Dorothy Cooper Spence Community Center on Thursday night for an informational meeting regarding the protection of the Wacissa River. The Friends of the Wacissa, a local group, organized the meeting in response to the potential threat of commercial water mining at the Wacissa River by the water-bottling company Nestle Waters North America. The first part of the of the meeting was informational, during which Jon Dinges, director of Water Supply and Resource Management at the Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD), gave a presentation to explain how the SRWMD issues permits for consumptive use of water to companies such as Nestle. The goal was to facilitate concerned citizens’ understanding of the factors and criteria that the SRWMD considers when evaluating permit applications. “We want the citizens to

understand how the permitting process works,” Dinges said. “We want them to understand that it’s a public process and all the information is open to them once the permit application comes in, and they can get involved by reviewing the applications to make comments to the water management district during that process.” The second part of the meeting involved an update from citizen coalition members that discussed what is currently happening with the Wacissa River in the wake of the Nestle attempt. After receiving the necessary exploratory permit in June 2010, Nestle Waters North America is currently in the process of evaluating the use of the Wacissa river as a harvesting source for their water bottling facility located in nearby Madison County, according to the “Save the Wacissa” website. If Nestle decides to pursue and gains approval for a consumptive use permit, Nestle will use the Wacissa watershed as a satellite spring source that the company would transport

by tanker truck from the spring to the Madison County facility. “We’re not really sure if they’re going to pursue it,” Georgia Ackerman of Friends of the Wacissa said. “I believe strongly that they will, but right now, they’re evaluating and testing it.” Nestle released a Frequently Asked Questions notice regarding the Wacissa Satellite Spring Source, where it addressed community concerns. According to the information, if Nestle does pursue the satellite spring, the maximum amount of water the company would harvest per day is 1.6 million gal-

lons, as permitted by the SRWMD. Additionally, the maximum amount of truckloads Nestle can run in a single day ranges between 60 and 70. “Nestle Waters works with local communities to make certain that our tankering operations are not disruptive to the lives of the residents,” the FAQ read. “We will study the Wacissa Springs’ ecosystem to ensure that, if we move forward, our water usage would be sustainable and that the local environment would remain unharmed.” Despite these assurances, locals’ concerns abound, and were voiced at Thursday’s meeting.

the event included a meal of plantains, red beans and rice, poetry readings and performances of Haitian songs. The purpose of the event was to bring togeth-

er people who care about Haiti in an atmosphere where they could collaborate. ’Noles for Haiti was created in 2010 by FSU’s Student Government Associ-

ation to organize campus efforts and initiatives to aid Haiti after the earthquake. For more information about ’Noles for Haiti, visit sga.fsu.edu/ nolesforhaiti.

If you love FSU, if you love Tallahassee, then this is the best way to get involved and use your voice, because it is a voice that people listen to. Elizabeth Swiman Director of Campus Sustainability at FSU

“The majority of Wacissa residents oppose any type of satellite spring, what’s called a bulk transfer station, in their community because there’s going to be big trucks running up and down the road,” Ackerman said. “And if you’ve ever been to Wacissa, it’s a small tiny, quiet, rural community. Having 50 to 60 trucks running up and down your roads everyday, past the bus stop where the little kids wait, it’s just going to completely upset their community. That’s one of their biggest concerns.” Community members are also concerned about the potential damage the satellite spring would pose to the aquifer. Currently, a Phase I Water Shortage Advisory was issued in December by the SRWMD in response to recent drought conditions, and is still in effect. “Clearly, pumping water from the aquifer when we have an advisory warning, drought level conditions going on, is bad for the river,” Ackerman said. “It’s bad for the ecosystem. It’s bad for the SEE RIVER 3

HAITI from 1 “One person can truly make a difference. The impact you have on the world is greater than you can ever imagine.” The Tallahassee Democrat also mentioned that

For more information about the Sunday event, visit www.tallahassee. com/article/20110131/ NEWS01/101310321/ Noles-for-Haiti-honorselfless-volunteers.


FEBRUARY 3, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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Just another ‘Manic Monday’: Cops keep busy FSUPD responds to 16 incidents around university campus on Jan. 31 JESSE DAMIANI News Editor On Jan. 31, Florida State University Police Department responded to 16 different incidents across FSU campus. Among the

different happenings, FSUPD dealt with several traffic crash criminal mischief incidents, theft, an alcohol offense and property damage. “We had vandalism, burglary, a reported seizure, a

report of a male harassing females at the bus stop by Heritage Grove, among others,” Maj. Jim Russell of the FSUPD said. Though Russell said most of the incidents were similar to those typically

called in, one stood out as an unusual case. “Most notably, we had a student arrested out of Salley Hall who was wanted on warrant in Pasco County,” said Russell. “He was arrested for solicita-

tion to commit aggravated battery.” Russell said though FSUPD received an increased number of calls, most were similar to what is normally reported. “It was a solid volume

of calls, but of the calls we received they were pretty typical types of crimes,” said Russell. Check later issues of the FSView & Florida Flambeau for further FSUPD activity coverage.

the Wacissa River, they now have the means to get involved, and that was one of our goals.” Elizabeth Swiman, director of Campus Sustainability at FSU, was present at the event. She said issues such as the protection of the Wacissa Springs are hugely important because of their direct effect on the local community. “You know, we have these beautiful spaces in our community that we want to remain beautiful and untouched and open to the public,” Swiman said. Swiman encourages students to become aware and engaged in these environmental issues. “This is the town you live in,” Swiman said. “This is where you spend four or more years of your life. This is where you work, and this is where you go to school and this is where you play and it’s also a chance for you to purport those skills of being

an engaged citizen, and this is the perfect time to practice that. If you love FSU, if you love Tallahassee, then this is the best way to get involved and use your voice, because it is a voice that people listen to.” Students are heeding the call. The Environmental Service Program (ESP) at FSU, for example, is an SGA-affiliated project that hosts events on campus and in the community to educate people on environmental issues, and is currently organizing a canoe trip on the Wacissa River to raise awareness. “We’re organizing it with FSU Outdoor Pur-

suits, so there will be really knowledgeable and experienced guides on the trip, and we’re going to give out information about the political process and the local ecology,” said Rachel Walsh, FSU senior majoring in biology and an active member of ESP. Walsh said that the canoe trip, currently scheduled for March, would help provide an opportunity for students to see the river for themselves and hopefully instill a better appreciation for it. “We talked to some local activists about how our organization could

best become involved and one of the things that they suggested was taking the people to see the river, because people are willing to protect what they have experienced and what they love,” Walsh said. “So I hope that to see the river will

help them to gain an appreciation and concern for it.” Students interested in attending the canoe trip can sign up through Outdoor Pursuits. For more information about the Wacissa River issue, visit savethewacissa.com.

RIVER from 2 springs, so that’s what’s upsetting the regional people.” The community meeting reached a capacity of standing room only, with people from four different local counties present. “There were residents from Jefferson County, Waculla County, Leon County and Gadsden County who were concerned about this across the region,” Ackerman said. “So that, for me, is extremely encouraging. A lot of people care and a lot of people don’t want water mining happening on our rivers and our springs in the area.” Ackerman said that the meeting helped disseminate awareness of the Wacissa River issue. “I think a lot of people left last night with a good understanding of how the permit process works, and as well as how they can get involved,” Ackerman said. “If this is something that they care about and want to help protect

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NEWS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 3, 2011

Global Initiative program seeks students UC-based program accepting applications for Clinton-inspired event COURTNEY ROLLE

President Clinton launched the program in 2007 with the goal of helping young leaders progress across college campuses locally and globally. The CGI U accepts students each year who aim to make the world a better place. Through the program, students have the opportunity to meet other students with similar ambitions and goals, and get help on their ideas from a selection of activists,

businesses leaders and celebrities. According to its website, the CGI U expects nearly 1,200 attendees this year. Each attendee arrives with a commitment that they would like to work on through the program. For some attendees, it’s about working on green energy initiatives; for others, it’s about working on helping third-world countries progress. For one Florida State

University graduate who hopes to gain acceptance into the CGI U—Jamal Myrick—it’s about founding his own mentoring program to foster growth in his community. Myrick said he hopes to establish a young mentorship program in his community and feels that being accepted into the CGI U will further progress his program initiatives and give him the skills he needs to be successful. “I want to start a men-

toring organization to benefit different minorities personally and professionally,” Myrick said. “I want to connect them with professionals in the career field they’re interested in and also connect them with someone who’s younger than them.” Myrick said that he is currently in the process of laying the groundwork for his organization and is trying to get it incorporated. He recently ap-

plied to the CGI U and hopes to get in. The CGI U will be accepting applications until Feb. 7, so there is still time to apply. The program offers students a chance to network with peers and learn from others’ commitments while learning about their own. To learn more about the CGI U and for directions on how to apply for the program, visit their website at www.cgiu.org.

LOCALBULLETIN

treat today at the Challenger Learning Center. Based on individual input from each member, the Commission reached consensus and established four community priorities for 2011. These include: continuing to develop and enhance the “Sense of Place” concept in the three targeted areas of Timberlane Road/ Market Street, Midtown, and South Monroe Street/ South Adams Street; examine the potential for developing and marketing both existing and new commercial spaces on Tallahassee Regional Airport property, as part of crafting an overall vision for the Airport; fo-

cus on assisting local small businesses, with particular emphasis on determining the City’s role in providing such assistance and maintaining the strong financial systems already in place to ensure City of Tallahassee utility sustainability. Along with establishing the four community priorities, the Commission also maintained its existing five target issue focus areas from 2010. This also includes placing each of the four priorities in the appropriate target issue areas, which are: Economic Development, Environmental and Energy Resources, Financial Viability of the Govern-

ment, Health and Human Services, and Long Range Community-Based Planning.

Agriculture Adam Putnam. This year, Andrew’s Capital Bar and Grill partnered with CapitalSoup.com to accept suggestions from the public for the new menu item names. Among ideas submitted by Florida voters were the “Marco Cubio” Cuban Sandwich and the Adam Putnam “Fresh from Florida” Grouper Sandwich. The unveiling of the menu takes place this week, as Florida’s leadership team will gather to enjoy the dishes named in their honor.

as well as jewelry, cars, home renovations and vacations. Bellavance, who had worked for the utility for 37 years, was placed on leave in October after two co-workers discovered evidence she might be using department checks to pay off a personal credit card bill used and took their concerns to department officials.

the suit to the museum. Fawcett wore the bathing suit for a photo shoot shortly before her debut on Charlie’s Angels in 1976. The resulting poster sold millions of copies and became the best selling poster of all time, according to Smithsonian curator Dwight Bowers. Bowers compared the poster to World War II pinups of Betty Grable and Rita Hayworth, saying it

became a symbol of the 1970s era.

Staff Writer Beginning April 1, the Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) will host its annual program at the University of California, San Diego. The program, which will run through April 3, aims to bring students together from all over the country who claim they are determined to make a difference in their communities and around the world.

Deputy Marie McClamma of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Honored as the Florida Sheriffs Association “Correctional Officer of the Year” The Florida Sheriffs Association announced Jan. 28 that Marie McClamma of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office was the recipient of this year’s Correctional Officer of the Year Award. Last week at the Florida Sheriffs Association Mid-Winter Conference in

Amelia Island, FSA President Sheriff Harrell Reid of Hamiliton County, Jefferson County Sheriff David Hobbs and Florida Gov. Rick Scott presented McClamma with her award, recognizing the distinguished deputy for her dedication and commitment to law enforcement and public safety. City Commission establishes 2011 priorities The Tallahassee City Commission held their annual goal-setting re-

NEWSBRIEFS WORLD

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Gang gunbattles, street blockades in Mexico GUADALAJARA, Mexico (AP)—Suspected drug cartel gunmen have hurled grenades, burned vehicles and blocked streets in Mexico’s second-largest city, Guadalajara. The interior secretary of Jalisco state says the attacks appear to have been coordinated, and blames them on drug gangs. Assailants burned public transport vehicles to blocks streets and hurled grenades at a police station and vehicles. Fernando Guzman Perez said Wednesday that arrests followed the Tuesday night attacks that wounded a policeman and two transport workers. Other attacks took place in the northwestern city of Zacatecas and the northern city of Monterrey, resulting in several deaths.

Town utility official embezzled $1.4 million, indictment says HARDWICK, Vt.—The former office manager of the electric department in this town of about 3,000 is facing charges that she embezzled more than $1.4 million from the utility over a 10-year period. Joyce Bellavance pleaded not guilty earlier this week to 13 counts of wire fraud in connection with the allegations during a brief court appearance and was released on her own recognizance. Each count carries a potential 20-year prison term. According to the indictment, Bellavance wrote checks to herself using sets of out-of-sequence department checks and used the money to pay credit card bills and purchase real estate—including a $399,000 Boston condominium—

Andrew’s Capital Grill and CapitalSoup.com Announce New Menu featuring Florida’s Leadership Team Andrew’s Capital Bar and Grill, Tallahassee’s best-known politico lunch spot, unveiled its new 2011 lunch menu, Thursday, Jan 27. The menu features items named for newly elected leaders including Gov. Rick Scott, Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater and Florida Commissioner of

LOCAL High-speed chase ends with crash A driver led a Florida Highway Patrol trooper on a high-speed chase on Interstate 10 Tuesday before crashing, FHP spokesman Capt. Mark Welch said. The trooper had tried to

—Compiled by Jesse Damiani

stop the female driver for speeding on I-10 near Tallahassee, Welch said, but she would not stop. The chase continued east on I-10 until the driver crashed near the Madison County line about 5:30 p.m. No one was injured and the woman was taken into custody. —Compiled by Bailey Shertzinger. Local news via the Tallahassee Democrat.

Farrah Fawcett’s red swimsuit goes to Smithsonian WASHINGTON (AP)— The red swimsuit that helped make Charlie’s Angels actress Farrah Fawcett a 1970s icon became part of the Smithsonian’s collection Wednesday on what would have been her 64th birthday. Fawcett’s longtime companion Ryan O’Neal presented the swimsuit and other items to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington. O’Neal said Fawcett, who died in 2009 after battling anal cancer for several years, always intended to give

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Yann Tiersen and S. Carey play CDU Classical and folk music soften the mood at Club Downunder

DAVID J. CROSS Staff Writer Age of X: Alpha #1 $3.99 Marvel Comic’s newest event series, Age of X, is channeling the about-15year-old fan favorite Age of Apocalypse event. In both cases, hypothetical universes are presented where established characters are shown in different lights. Marvel’s latest parallel universe cuts across a number of the X-titles, including X-Men: LEGACY and New Mutants, and explores what would have happened if the X-Men never formed. In essence, the limited series is being solicited as something of a last stand for mutants. Age of X: Alpha gets the ball rolling with what are essentially several small character profiles of key players. Here, similarities to wellestablished characters are shunted aside or adapted in interesting ways. Perhaps not essential to the overall story, this issue is a nice gateway into the new X-universe, which is to say it accomplishes its only real goal. Not good enough to buy, not bad enough to complain about, Age of X: Alpha is simply prep work for what will likely be a very dark and violent series starring everyone’s favorite mutants. Check back later this month SEE COMICS 6

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French musician Yann Tiersen will perform at Club Downunder on Monday, Feb. 7, with S. Carey.

ERIC SARRANTONIO Staff Writer This semester, Club Downunder has brought a lot of noise acts of both established credibility and up and coming promise, but on Monday, Feb.

7, there is an opportunity to relax your eardrums with minimalist classical music. Yann Tiersen, a multi-instrumentalist and composer, is traveling from France to promote his new album, Dust Lane, on an extensive

tour through the United States and Canada. Yann is best known for his soundtrack of the 2001 film Amélie, in which he reused some of his older compositions with newer ones he had been working at the time. The film was a

worldwide hit and Tiersen was an instant household name. He has since released three albums, the most recent, Dust Lanes, was released in October of last year. Opening for Tiersen is Sean Carey, who goes by

Olde Fields Clothing Company opens for business JESSICA MILITARE Staff Writer

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SEE CDU 6

New boutique comes to Gaines

COLLIN MIRANDA It’s difficult to imagine a point in my life where spending a dollar has led to so much utter frustration. Sure, a gas station burrito or something of the sort may cause a few fleeting moments of regret, but not to the extent where one would want to chuck the trashy Tex-Mex at the screen accompanied by a primal scream in the key of F@^#. As the name Aban Hawkins & the 1000 Spikes may imply, this is a game where you will die. And die again. And then get impaled, incinerated or crushed another few hundred times for good measure. For those who have ever watched those YouTube videos released in the mid2000s where somebody created impossibly difficult Super Mario Bros. stages, then recorded himself playing them while shouting expletives when he would inevitably die, you’ll have a pretty clear idea of what you’re getting into with Aban Hawkins & the 1000 Spikes. The game stars Aban (which I don’t think is actually a real name), who appears to be an archeologist with an Indiana Jones-esque adventurous streak, that finds himself in a situation where he must raid temples in order to obtain tiny gold idols, or “lost artifacts,” in this retrostyled 8-bit platformer

S. Carey for his musical project. Sean released his debut album, All We Grow, last spring and, after a brief tour with The Tallest Man On Earth, is making another round

Bryan Vallejo/FSView

Owner Josh (far left) and his business partners await the ‘Grand Opening’ of their clothing store, Olde Fields, on Friday, Feb. 4.

The name “Tallahassee” originates from a Muskogean Indian word meaning, “old fields.” Allegedly derived from the eventual Seminole Indians who migrated here from Georgia and Alabama in the late 18th and 19th centuries, they discovered sprawling areas of land previously occupied by the Apalachee tribe. Two hundred some odd years later, a group of forward-thinking individuals have set out to carry on the name in the spirit of local business. This Friday, Feb. 4, Olde Fields Clothing Company, neighborhood boutique and novelty shop, will host its grand opening. With local bands lined up, Nintendo tournaments to ensue, SEE GAINES 7

Bob Dylan Night rolls into town Six acts come together to play Dylan songs all night long GRACE NORBERG Senior Staff Writer The idea for hosting a Bob Dylan Night came to Tallahassee musician Grant Peeples at a campfire at the Riverhawk Music Festival in Brooksville, Fla., about three years ago. “Late at night, we were all just playing music and we started playing Bob Dylan, and we sat there for hours,” said

Peeples. “Everybody was playing one Bob Dylan song after another, and it just kind of struck me that it might be a fun thing to do.” Since then, Peeples has hosted 11 Bob Dylan Nights all over the state, including Miami, Gainesville, Bradenton, Panama City and two in Tallahassee each year. The goal of this night is to demonstrate all the different genres of mu-

sic that Dylan has influenced. In honor of his influence, six Tallahassee acts will take the stage in tribute to Dylan. There is no preplanned set list, which means a few bands may play the same song in completely different styles, showcasing how Dylan’s music is so widely accessible. An eccentric performance audiences can

look forward to is Aaron O’Rourke and the Free Hugs, a traditional bluegrass band, who will play all-instrumental versions of Dylan’s songs. “This is going to be the first instrumental that we’ve ever done,” said Peeples. “Whenever we think of Bob Dylan, we think of the words and the lyrics, and we really don’t appreciate what a melodic kind of guy

he is and really what a great musician he is.” Solo artist Pat Puckett is a hardcore rock ‘n’ roller who will bring out the “Like a Rolling Stone” side of Dylan’s music; Bedhead Betty is a delightful folk-pop four-piece; Charles Atkins, an instructor in the FSU Blues Lab, will provide a taste of the blues; Grant Peeples will bring SEE BOB DYLAN 6


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6

ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 3, 2011

Smith Westerns dye Club Downunder blonde Noise-pop act Smith Westerns set to visit Tallahassee on Feb. 4 ERIC SARRANTONIO Staff Writer Smith Westerns will join the list of noisy musical entertainment from this year’s Union Productions schedule on Friday, Feb. 4. After a brief tour with Girls, the press began taking notice, and now the band is popular enough to headline their own tour across Europe and North America. About a year-and-a-half since the release of their self-titled debut, the band is debuting a new sound on this tour and reaching a broader audience.

Smith Westerns recently released their second album, Dye It Blonde, revealing not only a strong work ethic, but a promising showing from such a young band. The band members are all still too young to drink at the bars they play, but that never stops them from playing a raucous set. At 19 and 20 years old, they have a wealth of time to perfect their mixture of pop and noise. Their growth is already obvious on Dye It Blonde, on which the band was inspired by the often spotless sound of britpop acts like Blur and Oasis.

However, the band takes that sound and dirties it up enough to keep their punk and lo-fi influences apparent. Upon its release, the album received the coveted Best New Music tag from Pitchfork, as well as positive reviews from Spin, Rolling Stone and All Music. Opening for Smith Westerns is the comparatively young English band Yuck. Pitchfork recently included the band on their Rising series, where they interview an up-and-coming band about their releases and venture into the music business. Smith West-

erns were also featured in the series, and have since become a favorite of Pitchfork coverage. In the interview, Yuck singer Daniel Blumberg talked about his discovery of indie music and the importance of Pavement in his collection, details almost too obvious after listening to their music. Recently, a lot of the music media including Guardian and NME have excitedly promoted Yuck as one of 2011’s most promising new acts. Yuck is preparing the release of their first full-length, which drops Feb. 15 and can be pre-ordered now

from their label site. Also opening is the local favorite Holiday Shores, who have recently received coverage from the popular music blog, Stereogum. After spending most of their touring time testing out the new songs, they plan to release their sophomore album this year. To learn more about and listen to the music of Smith Westerns, Yuck and Holiday Shores, visit them atwww.myspace. com/smithwesterns, w w w. m y s p a c e . c o m / yuckband and www. myspace.com/holidayshores, respectively.

lives to his name, which sounds ridiculous at first, but you’ll soon learn that you’ll need every last one of them. Which is still ridiculous. It’s not that I don’t enjoy or have the patience for sadistically difficult games. I’ve beaten Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, and Super Meat Boy was one of my favorite games from last year. The problem is that the developers seemed to go out of their way to make this game completely unfair, just like the aforementioned fake Mario levels, except

it stops being funny much faster. There are a few instances of decent level design, and the feeling after beating a level is incredibly triumphant, but most of the game boils down to repeatedly going through the same tedious gauntlet of traps dozens of times until, finally, you manage to twitch your way past it, with your only reward being an arrow that shoots you out of nowhere, forcing you to start over from the beginning. As if that weren’t bad enough, the game’s bugs and glitches also play a

role in one’s inescapable demise. One stage, after an extremely trying series of events, expected me to hit a target with one of my knives as I was falling so that some platforms would appear between me and a pit. When I finally managed to hit the target, the platforms still couldn’t materialize in time to catch me, and I plummeted to my death regardless, meaning the level is literally impossible to beat (fortunately, the game lets you to skip a limited number of levels, allowing me to continue). There are also

times where you’ll try to throw a knife or jump, and Aban will outright deny that request and decide to stand there and get himself killed instead, even if he is directly next to the goal. In a game where lightningfast reflexes are required at every step, this is completely unacceptable. During the tutorial sequence, the game teases you with a demonstration of a checkpoint flag, and then cheekily informs you that there will be nothing of the sort throughout the entire game. I couldn’t help but notice that the

IF YOU GO WHEN

Friday, Feb. 4, doors at 8:30 p.m. Show at 9:30 WHERE

Club Downunder LINEUP

Smith Westerns, Yuck, Holiday Shores ADMISSION

Free for FSU Students with a valid ID and $8 for the general public

DEATH from 5 from hell. The trouble lies with the jerk who “lost” these artifacts in the first place. Through the placement of hundreds of outof-nowhere death traps and some pet scorpions, he has made it abundantly clear that he wants nothing more than for those artifacts to remain lost forever. Aban, however, can’t seem to take a hint, and plunges into the temples with nothing more than two types of jumps, a bottomless sack of throwing knives, and most likely a suicide note. Oh, and he also has literally 1,000

game would have been significantly better had they actually incorporated that. Even sadistic games like BIT. TRIP RUNNER and Super Meat Boy include some sort of feature to make sure the game, despite the difficulty, remains fun rather than agonizing, such as instant respawns, replays showing all of your failed attempts at once, or even smooth, functional controls. I guess what I’m trying to say is, if I could make the choice again, I would gladly have spent my dollar on that burrito.

BOB DYLAN from 5

Photo courtesy of Grant Peeples

Event creator Grant Peeples brings Bob Dylan Night to Tally.

bobdylan.com photo

Singer Bob Dylan is honored at the American Legion Hall.

CDU from 5 through North America. Before focusing on his solo music, Sean played the drums in Bon Iver’s touring band, a gig he got after his band opened for Bon Iver’s founder Justin Vernon. Having learned all of the percussion parts to Vernon’s debut, For Emma, Forever Ago, on his own, he was befriended and recruited. I spoke to Sean about recording All We Grow as he just embarked on his touring journey. “Some of the songs came together pretty quickly but most of the songs were a lot of layering over a long period of time,” Sean said, “I just sorta pieced them together bit by bit.” This was all many months after he started writing the songs on his off-time while touring with Bon Iver. With the overall sound of All We Grow, it is apparent that Bon Iver provided more than just a touring gig for Sean. His music takes a lot of inspiration

the Americana, and the Sarah Mac Band will add some soul into Dylan’s songs. There will also be an opportunity for audience participation at the end of the show, marking this as the third Dylan Night that has this component. “There is a song Dylan has called ‘You Ain’t Going Nowhere,’” said Peeples. “Anybody can write a verse to that song, and at the end of the night, for our grand finale, anyone who wants to can get up on the stage. We’ll have a band playing, and they can come up and sing a verse of that song. People get a little bawdy, they get a little dirty and political.” Known largely as a fixture of the ’60s counterculture music scene, Dylan was only 20 years old at the time of his big breakout. College students identified with him and looked to him as an icon of political and social change. This year, Dylan will turn 70, which means he will have been in the music business for 50 years. “His music is timeless, and his songs are time-

less,” said Peeples. “The things that he sang about, his songs from the 1960s, are just as relevant today as they were back then. That’s the mark of a real artist—there’re so few artists who were playing songs back then who are still valid today.”

thankfully—interesting. That isn’t to say, however, that they aren’t stereotypes of a sort. What is striking about the cast is that they are very similar to people we all know in our lives. It’ll be hard not to picture a friend’s face on one of the five girls. As usual, Kelly deliverers beautifully detailed art, which makes the issue a must-have, regardless of the quality of the script. Kelly is a talented artist whose strength lies in the non-superhero books. He displays those skills here. Pull a mediocre title from your monthly buy list and check this out instead. Fantastic Four #587 $3.99 The media were alive last week with the story that a member of Marvel’s founding family was going to die. True to their word, one of The Fantastic Four seemingly perished in a bid to save the world.

Of course, that’s nothing new in superhero comics, where heroes fall by the sword once a month. Still, each time a “death” story appears, they are typically very well done and further round out a character’s connection to his or her friends. The Fantastic Four #587 has all the normal tropes of an issue of its nature. Surprisingly, the character’s demise is depicted in a straightforward manner—someone had to die and everyone knew it. The overall story works, but with the amount press it received, there are likely many readers out there interested in picking up this issue. Marvel does a decent job explaining what led up to the death, but the final pages of the issue will have less of an impact for unfamiliar readers. If you need to see a Marvel icon die, this is a good place to start; just try to catch up on the back issues first.

BOB DYLAN NIGHT WHEN

Friday, Feb. 4 at 7:15 p.m. WHERE

American Legion Hall on Lake Ella LINEUP

Grant Peeples, Bedhead Betty, Sarah Mac Band, Pat Puckett, Aaron O’Rourke and the Free Hugs, and Charles Atkins ADMISSION

$10 at the door. Call 322-6917 to reserve a table for eight or more.

COMICS from 5 from Vernon’s often understated sound. “Justin helped by convincing me that this project was something I should get out there,” he said, revealing how important Vernon was to the project even without providing any music to the album. Sean has not yet met Yann Tiersen, but he spoke fondly of his music commenting that while on tour with Bon Iver he saw Tiersen performing live in France. “I was a fan of his soundtracks,” Sean said, “and it just seemed like something that would work.” He is still obviously excited to be embarking on a tour, however short, with Tiersen. “For the show next week, it’s just going to be me and Nick,” he said of his recording partner, “so we’re just a duo, strippeddown thing for the Yann dates.” This stripped-down show should highlight the importance of under-

statement in Sean’s music and provide a more intimate environment. To learn more about or listen to the music of Yann Tiersen and S. Carey, visit their Myspace pages at w w w. m y s p a c e . c o m / yanntierseninprogress and www.myspace. com/scareymusic.

IF YOU GO WHEN

Monday, Feb. 7, Doors at 8:30, show at 9:30 p.m. WHERE

Club Downunder LINEUP

Yann Tiersen, S. Carey ADMISSION

Free for FSU students with the new Gold Card ID and $12 for the general public, 18 years and up

when the first two issues of the series are released for a better assessment. Until then, if you’re feeling nostalgic, re-read Age of Apocalypse. The New York Five $2.99 Writer Brian Wood and artist Ryan Kelly’s latest offering is a humorous, melodramatic follow-up to their previous collaboration, The New York Four. The first part of the series follows four New York University students during their first semester at the school. The New York Five follows the same footsteps as the four female roommates have come back from winter break with some problems to work out. It’s not surprising that Wood’s script is excellent and enough in-text clues have been laid out that new readers won’t need to pick up the previous series. The characters are well rounded, quirky and—


ARTS&LIFE

FEBRUARY 3, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

PAGE

7

Helpful hints for a bikini body ‘Balance, variety and moderation’ are key for healthy weight loss success REBEKAH SUWAK Staff Writer With Spring Break on the brain, many students can be seen hitting the gym in pursuit of that beach-worthy body. Moderation, however, is necessary for overall success in this pursuit. When seeking a change in appearance, including a realistic set of guidelines and balance of strain and nourishment is key. “Balance, variety and moderation are essential tools for having a healthy relationship with exercise,� FSU’s Health Promotion Director, Professor and Nutri-

receiving instruction and guidance regarding a personal fitness plan. Some simple changes might include incorporating physical activity into regular endeavors. The Leach Center offers personal trainers and a fitness staff to help start the journey to a healthy body, including free one-on-one sessions with a fitness instructor. Thagard also offers appointments with registered dieticians, as well as an extensive website with information regarding health and wellness at http://www. tshc.fsu.edu.

tionist Amy Magnuson said. “Balance the amount of exercise to a safe and healthy cut of—10 hours a week [non-athletes]; find an activity you enjoy while replenishing and nourishing your body and find healthier varieties for fast food or keep it in moderation.� Heeding these guidelines can prove to be an essential first step when starting or rekindling a relationship with exercise. Workout goals and personal experience can inspire motivation and create a healthy relationship with physical activity. “Although college proves

a difficult time for maintaining a healthy lifestyle, working out with a buddy or for at least 30 minutes a day can make the biggest difference,� senior Dietetics major Georgeanne Little said. “Simple things like parking further from class can really add up.� Expanding one’s perception about working out can, in turn, lead to many new and enjoyable exercise venues. “Think outside of the gym, find a comfortable environment to exercise, even if its one or two daily walks with a dog,� Magnuson said. “Your perception and par-

ticipation with exercise can also reduce stress levels.� Stress, the ugly monster that can deteriorate students’ mental and physical health, can be deterred with one adjustment: adopting a balanced diet, including reducing alcohol intake to avoid weight gain. This, in turn, can also prove helpful to achieving a weight goal. “For dieting, extreme and fast usually don’t last while five-to-10 daily servings of fruits and vegetables make for an excellent starting point,� Little said. “If you go out drinking a lot, be conscious that alcohol’s calories add up fast.�

EDNOS (Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified) can result from extreme dieting and exercise, and possess some characteristics of known disorders such as bulimia or anorexia. “Half of students struggle with harmful behavior, diet pills, excessive exercise and restrictive eating,� Magnuson said. “It can lead to other eating disorders and affects both your social life and school; this explains the necessity for a balance of safe and healthy ways to stay fit.� These unhealthy habits can be avoided by establishing realistic boundaries and

Apparel with an alternative vibe and attitude, the store’s combination of the styles is unique. “Everything we have spans new men’s and women’s clothing, covering the tastes and needs of any wardrobe. We have a lot of boutique style dresses, custom-printed shirts and denim that combines our own designs and incoming designer’s inventory as well,� said co-owner Mike Hurley. For the knick-knacks collector, the store houses goodies like Audrey Hepburn and Where The Wild Things Are bobbleheads to lifesize cut-outs of Star Wars characters, and even a used

records section. The integration of different artistic areas sets Olde Fields apart from the average boutique. Artists are welcome to submit their art for display, not only for community exposure, but to brighten up the space with local creativity. “From everyone we know in the surrounding shops, they have been very supportive of having us come into the area, because it’s going to bring in more revenue toward their businesses as well as ours,� said Hurley. With the ongoing construction on Gaines Street proposed to be completed by March, the new roads and additions to the street will

be a warm welcome for the shop. “We want Gaines Street to be more of a destination spot for shopping and eating, so we hope our store can add to that,� said Co-owner Jeremy Matlow. Built and managed with the community in mind, Olde Fields Clothing Company is open for business. “We want our grand opening party to let people know who we are. The doors will be open, and with First Friday going on, we’re hoping a lot of people will come through,� said Mike Hurley. Visit Olde Fields on Facebook and at oldefieldsclothing.com.

Olde Fields Clothing Store, located on 519 West Gaines Street is awaiting the ‘Grand Opening’ on Friday, Feb. 4.

GAINES from 5 hors d’oeuvres, contests and giveaways, the celebration of a new addition to Gaines Street is certainly promised. “We want our clothing store to incorporate local artists, musicians, and designers to create a one-stop shop that is very communitybased,� said Co-owner Josh Williams. Including amenities such as custom screen printing, artist showcases, and an essential living room equipped with couches and an oldfashioned television console with a beloved Nintendo gaming system, the store seems to have it all. Although it is similar to Urban Outfitters and American

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TANGO WITH TAR HEELS F l o r i da S t a t e ’s m e n’s ba ske t ba l l t e a m t rave l s t o C ha pe l H i l l t o t a ke o n UN C o n S unda y PAGE 10 FSView & Florida Flambeau

FEBRUARY 3, 2011

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 8

Signed, sealed and delivered Joseph La Belle/FSView

Jimbo Fisher hauled in an impressive class on National Signing Day.

Fisher, Seminoles usher in top-tier recruiting class on National Signing Day

BRETT JULA Sports Editor Jimbo Fisher made a name for himself over the years as one of the nation’s premier recruiters

during assistant coaching stints at Auburn, LSU and Florida State. His job title may have changed to head coach, but Fisher’s ability to lure some of the best high school talent in the nation hasn’t changed one bit. Fisher and the Florida State football program made a huge splash on National Signing Day this past Wednesday, as many

of the nation’s top high school seniors pledged their allegiance to FSU by signing a National Letter of Intent for the Seminoles. The Seminoles’ 2011 class was impressive enough to be ranked the No. 1 class in the nation by ESPN and the No. 3-ranked class by Rivals.com. “I think we got the guys we went after and were the guys we needed for this team and this organization to move forward,” Fisher said. “I’m very excited that we not only hit our needs as far as athletically and [signing] a lot of big playmakers and big-

body guys, but we went across the board. Every position was filled and we have some guys I think can come in and make an immediate impact.” In all, 29 players make up the recruiting class, with 20 of those officially committing on Signing Day. The other eight signees all enrolled early at Florida State and are on campus taking classes. The Seminoles didn’t have to go far to bring in a near-consensus No. 1 class, as 22 of the 28 signees reside in Florida. More specifically, Florida State hit the south Florida

region very hard, signing 12 prospects from Palm Beach, Broward or Dade County. South Florida has always been known as a terrific breeding ground for talent, and Fisher and his staff, using that knowledge and their many years of experience recruiting the area, cashed in on it. “Within a 100-mile radius of Ft. Lauderdale, going into [Wednesday] there were 77 players going to BCS schools,” Fisher said. “It’s a very competitive area with great coaching and great players, and we’re going to concentrate

where the players are.” Some notable players from south Florida who will venture to Tallahassee are Nick O’Leary, the nation’s top-ranked tight end, of West Palm Beach and four-star wide receiver Rashad Greene of the Ft. Lauderdale powerhouse St. Thomas Aquinas. Greene is one of three Aquinas players who are part of the 2011 class. Despite receiving the majority of their class from south Florida, the Seminoles’ most prized recruits come from elseSEE DELIVERED 10

Seminoles blow past Demon Deacons Five players score in double figures to fuel rout of Wake Forest MATT RITTER Staff Writer It has been a season to forget for Wake Forest and first-year head coach Jeff Bzdelik. Florida State made sure that didn’t change on Tuesday night. Five players scored in double figures for the Seminoles (16-6, 6-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) en route to an 85-61 pasting of the visiting Demon Deacons at the Donald L. Tucker Center. The ’Noles

twice held leads of 32 points, which is the largest lead Florida State has held over an ACC opponent this season. Guard Devidas Dulkys led the charge with 16 points and finished 4-of8 from 3-point range. Bernard James and Michael Snaer added 13 and 11 points, respectively, to help the ’Noles rebound from a disappointing performance at Clemson this past Saturday afternoon. “I thought our players executed a lot better to-

night offensively and defensively,” FSU head coach Leonard Hamilton said. “We have a lot of room for improvement and I think we can become a lot better.” The Seminoles ended the first half on a 17-5 run to open up a 31-19 halftime lead, despite shooting just 31 percent in the first 20 minutes. The game was tied at 14 until the Seminoles went on a 12-0 run led by Dulkys. Dulkys started the run

with a breakaway dunk to give the Seminoles a 16-14 lead. He later added to the run with an uncontested lay-up to push the lead to 21-14. Guard Ian Miller ultimately capped the run with a 3-pointer. Miller finished with 11 points in just his second game back since early December. Florida State’s shooting picked up drastically in the second half. The ’Noles shot 51 percent and scored 54 points in the second half to blow a reasonably close

game wide open. In addition to the hot second-half shooting, the Seminole defense continued to stifle its opponents. FSU forced 24 Wake Forest turnovers, and for the 89th time in the last 90 games, held an opponent to less than 50 percent shooting from the field. “It wasn’t so much what they did, but rather what we didn’t do,” Bzdelik said. “The 24 turnovers led to 27 free points.” Okaro White made his

first career start in place of injured forward Terrence Shannon, who was out of action with a bruised bone in his knee. Hamilton said the timetable for Shannon’s return is unknown. White filled in nicely for Shannon, finishing with eight points and six rebounds in 23 minutes of action. Despite the many bright spots on Tuesday night, the lone blemish may be the continued shooting SEE WAKE 10

FSU guard provides optimism, rediscovers touch Dulkys busts out of slump, finds shooter’s stroke in defeat of Wake Forest SCOTT CRUMBLY Staff Writer In Florida State’s six losses prior to Tuesday night’s game against Atlantic Coast Conference rival Wake Forest, the Seminoles were shooting an average of 35.4 percent from the floor. In each of those losses, FSU’s Achilles heel was their inability to knock down jump shots against the zone defenses that opponents were throwing at them. While the ’Noles can always count on their No.1-ranked field goal percentage defense to keep them in games, it goes to waste when you can’t convert shots to put points on the board. It came as no surprise,

then, that when sharpshooting guard Deividas Dulkys broke out of the shooting slump that had plagued him for much of the season against the Demon Deacons Tuesday night, the Seminoles ran away with an easy 85-61 victory. With the game tied in the first half, Dulkys keyed a 12-0 scoring run with a pair of steals that resulted in two fast-break buckets and gave FSU a 26-14 lead to swing momentum in favor of the Seminoles. The rout was on from there. Dulkys went on to hit four 3-pointers en route to a season-high 16 points on 54 percent shooting. The junior led all scorers on the evening, and added three

key first-half steals to the stat sheet. Prior to Tuesday’s 6-for-11 shooting performance, including 4-of-8 from long distance, Dulkys was shooting a pedestrian 33-percent from beyond the 3-point arc. “It’s been a while since I hit that many [shots],” Dulkys said following the win. “But I’ve just got to thank my teammates for looking for me when I get hot and I think that it was overall a really good game for us.” Dulkys has always had the ability to beat teams with his 3-point marksmanship, and FSU head coach Leonard Hamilton knew that his shooting guard would find his stroke eventually. “We haven’t necessarily

made a big deal out of the fact that his shots haven’t been falling because we know it’s just a matter of time [until] they would start falling,” Hamilton said. “Hopefully this is the start of him getting on a roll, because we’ve been missing those 3-point shots that he’s [usually] making.” Dulkys’ return to form is a great sign for Florida State moving forward, as his ability to stroke from the outside provides a huge offensive boost for a team that has struggled to score consistently all season long. “[My] coaches and teammates, they all trust in me,” Dulkys added. “We only have eight games left in the SEE OPTIMISM 10

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Deividas Dulkys was a catalyst for the Seminoles’ 24-point victory over Wake Forest.


SPORTS

FEBRUARY 3, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

The stakes get higher Seminoles clash with Tar Heels Sunday in pivotal ACC matchup

NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports Editor The roller coaster ride continues for the Florida State Seminoles. After suffering an awfully frustrating loss to Clemson last Saturday, the ’Noles rebounded against a reeling Wake Forest team at home, registering their highest point total in league play at 85 on Tuesday. But the matchup on Sunday should prove to be an entirely different beast. North Carolina is a member of college basketball’s elite, one of the blue bloods along with the likes of Duke, Kentucky and Kansas. Second on the all-time wins list, the Tar Heels have 41 NCAA tournament berths, 18 Final Four appearances and five national championships, most recently in 2009, when they defeated Michigan State in front of a largely pro-Spartan crowd in Detroit. Chapel Hill was home to Bob McAdoo, James Worthy and, of course, his Airness, Michael Jordan. Although the program has been on a bit of a decline in the short time since that championship,

North Carolina is finding their footing as of late. Excluding a hiccup against sliding Georgia Tech, the Tar Heels are undefeated in league play, and should prove to be a tough matchup for FSU. The strength of UNC’s game is rebounding, as they are first in the conference and second in the nation, averaging 42.4 rebounds per game, setting up a battle on the boards in Sunday’s contest. For the ’Noles to compete in Chapel Hill, they’re going to have to battle the likes of junior forward Tyler Zeller and freshman sensation Harrison Barnes. The duo is one-two on the team in scoring, with the more experienced Zeller averaging 14.0 points a game and Barnes averages 13.1 a game. Whereas the sevenfoot Zeller is more of a banger down low, Barnes is a scorer. Barnes has totaled 51 points in his last two games, and while his 3-point shooting percentage is not the highest on the team, he can hit from outside and is 50 percent from beyond the arc in his last two games. The problem of whether to clog the lane for Zeller or step out on Barnes or the Tar Heels’ other shooters will be a conundrum for FSU. They’re going to have to continue their SEE TAR HEELS 10

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Roundtable: Which recruit will shine the earliest? This past Wednesday’s National Signing Day marked the culmination of Jimbo Fisher’s second recruiting class as head coach at Florida State, and if the hype surrounding the future of Seminole football is any indication, the class of 2011 may be one fans won’t soon forget. Fisher’s coaching philosophies and the direction of the program clearly caught the eyes of the nation’s top prep talent, as many scouting services rated the Seminoles’ recruiting class among the best in the country. The next step for Fisher and his coaching staff is, naturally, to develop this bevy of talent into a championship-caliber program that will bring FSU back to the winning standard it set in the ’80s and ’90s. But which of the many potential stars from this class will be the first to help Fisher and the Seminoles make that long-awaited return back to college football’s elite? Some members of the FSView & Florida Flambeau sports staff weigh in with their predictions. BRETT JULA Sports Editor With so much talent coming into the Florida State program this offseason, it’s awfully difficult to pick one player who will stand out above the rest in their rookie seasons. Throw in what the Seminoles have coming back from 2010’s 10-4 team, and it makes it that much harder. FSU will return 38 players from their two-deep roster, including 16 starters, for the 2011 season, which should make it very tough for these newcomers—talented as they may be—to see significant snaps this fall. If I had to pick one, though, I’d have to go with five-star defensive back Karlos Williams. It’s still uncertain what position Williams, the No.2-ranked defensive back in the nation and

eighth-ranked overall prospect, will wind up playing. His size and athleticism makes him a great fit at safety—his high school position—or even wide receiver, as many scouts have been impressed with his catching ability. His physicality and sure tackling also make him a candidate to join what’s already a very deep and talented linebacker corps. I expect Williams to play safety, if anything because that’s the one position where the Seminoles aren’t all that deep. With the losses of safeties Ochuko Jenije to graduation and JaJuan Harley to transfer, the door is open for Williams to step in and play backup to either Nick Moody or Terrence Parks and possibly see action in the Seminoles’ nickel and dime packages. Regardless of how much playing time the Davenport native re-

ceives on either side of the ball, expect Williams to be a big contributor on special teams—that’s where many standout Seminoles of the past and present made their initial marks before moving on to decorated careers.

NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports Editor Karlos Williams, a top-notch, blazingly fast, hard-hitting defensive back is sure to make a quick impact for the Florida State defense. The eighth-best player in the country according to Rivals.com, Williams had the shifty kind of speed necessary to run offensive sets with his high school team, but also the closing velocity requisite of all great defensive players. If you need any proof of Williams’ merit, just look to the Under Armour

High School All-America game, where Williams absolutely leveled Florida commitment (he’s got the right idea already) A.C. Leonard and returned an interception for a touchdown. Consistently in good position, Williams is somewhat of a mercenary from the safety position, and the tape indicates that his game is built around being in the right place at the right time. Williams has great speed, running a 4.5 40yard dash, and has the physical skills to play linebacker, but would have to beef up a little bit to do so, as his weight is currently listed at 210 pounds. Considering what defensive coordinator Mark Stoops has done with the likes of Xavier Rhodes (freshman All-American) and Greg Reid, who drasSEE ROUNDTABLE 10


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SPORTS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 3, 2011

DELIVERED from 8 both run hard between the tackles and be effective as a receiver either split out wide or out of the backfield. But what excites Fisher most about the top-ranked athlete in the nation is his 6-foot-2, 219-pound frame. “You go watch that guy run the ball and pound

where in the sunshine state. James Wilder, Jr. and Karlos Williams come from the greater Tampa and Orlando areas, respectively, and are FSU’s lone five-star prospects. Wilder, Jr., is a versatile running back who brings the rare ability to

that football up in there, there weren’t many guys in that [U.S. Army All-American] game that wanted to tackle him,” Fisher said of Wilder, Jr. “He’ll be a tremendous blocker [too] and you can flex him out and he can catch a football.” Williams, who is the

Top Commits

younger brother of current Seminole linebacker Vince Williams, is the No. 8-ranked overall prospect and has the potential to be a very special player from what most likely will be the safety position. “I think Karlos is one of those unique guys that comes around about evKarlos Williams Height: 6’2’’ Weight: 210 lbs Hometown: Davenport Highschool: Ridge Position: DB

Timmy Jernigan Height: 6’2’’ Weight: 275 lbs Hometown: Lake City High School: Columbia Position: DT

sbnation.com

Williams is a hard-hitting, ball-hawking safety who has a pension for punishing receivers and quarterbacks alike. Willams’ size and speed should be a welcome addition to the defense.

Bleacherreport.com

Jernigan was rated the No. 2 defensive tackle in 2011.

ery 10 or 15 years,” Fisher said. “He has great top-end speed and tremendous ball skills. “He plays the ball in the deep part of the field, which a lot of those guys that are big safeties can’t do. […] I’m very excited about him.” With such a highly tout-

ed recruiting class coming in on the heels of the program’s first 10-win season since 2003, Fisher believes now could be the time for Florida State to step back in the national spotlight. “Right now is the time to make that stretch,” Fisher said. “There’s never better than right now.” James Wilder, Jr. Height: 6’2’’ Weight: 219 lbs Hometown: Tampa High School: Plant Position: RB Elitescoutingservices.com

Wilder Jr. has all the tools to make him a potential star both at Florida State and in the NFL.

ROUNDTABLE from 9 tically improved his play under the new scheme, a summer under Stoops should put Williams in a position to make some big plays in the fall.

SCOTT CRUMBLY Staff Writer With Jimbo Fisher and the Seminoles’ coaching staff set to haul in one of the top recruiting classes in the country for the second-straight year, there are a few prospects that jump out as players who

could make an immediate impact in Tallahassee. Five-star safety Karlos Williams is certainly one of them, and his playmaking ability was on full display in the Under Armour All-America Game on Jan. 5. Given that the ’Noles have both safeties retuning next season in Terrance Parks and Nick Moody, I believe that the recruit with the best chance to make a fast impact for FSU is tight end Nick O’Leary. O’Leary, who is from Dwyer High School in

West Palm Beach, is the second-ranked tight end in the country according to ESPN, and the 20thranked prospect overall. At 6’4’’ and 230 pounds, O’Leary has ideal size for the tight end position, but what really makes the AllAmerican such a dangerous weapon is his athleticism. He presents the speed to stretch the field along with the size to aid in run blocking, and has proven his ability to reel in tough catches. On the surface, O’Leary’s

versatility reminds me a lot of the Indianapolis Colts’ tight end Dallas Clark, which will allow Fisher to use him in many ways. Like Clark, O’Leary has the ability to line up at the tight end and H-back positions, while also being able to line up in the slot and create mismatches in coverage. That kind of versatility is rare in a tight end, and O’Leary will bring the ’Noles a playmaker at the position that Fisher has not really had in his time at Florida State.

double-figure scoring, including freshman Ian Miller with 11 points and Deividas Dulkys, who recorded a game-high 16 points and shot 50 percent (4-of-8) from beyond the arc. But steamrolling the worst team in the conference and going into the Dean Smith Center are two different things, and

the big key for FSU Saturday will be if they can get All-American candidate Chris Singleton going. Singleton has not scored more than 15 points in a game since the Seminoles defeated Duke on Jan. 12, and over his last four games, Singleton is averaging a mere 6.3 points per game. To secure a win and

remain in the chase for a regular-season ACC title, a win on Saturday is critical. FSU will have to maintain their solid defense and Singleton absolutely has to get going for FSU to pull off the win against one of college basketball’s greatest programs.

poor shooting effort. The Seminoles know they cannot focus on this win for too long, as a road battle with North Carolina looms ahead on Sunday afternoon. Dulkys knows that the matchup with the Tar Heels on Super Bowl Sunday is an important game to win.

“It’s one of the few games we’re going to play on the road against a ranked team,” said Dulkys. “We need a road win to have for Selection Sunday.” Florida State will play its next two games on the road against UNC and Georgia Tech before returning home to face Virginia on Feb. 12.

TAR HEELS from 9 disciplined, tenacious defense. More of a worry for Florida State than their defense is their offense, which has been streaky as of late, and some games it seems the ’Noles couldn’t throw a rock into the ocean. Tuesday night was a good night for FSU, as it saw five Seminoles in

WAKE from 8 struggles of Chris Singleton. The potential NBA draft pick finished with just five points on 2-of-11 shooting. Singleton is now averaging just 6.3 points in his last four games and is shooting 21 percent over that same span. He managed to finish with eight rebounds and did add three steals to salvage another

OPTIMISM from 8 regular season and hopefully I can keep it up and keep that confidence going.” Throughout his cold streak, which spanned over most of the last month-and-a-half, Dulkys’ confidence never faltered. “He’s a shooter,” teammate Okaro White said. “He’s had his slumps this year and one thing about him, he’s always going to keep shooting and he always has his confidence up. It showed tonight.” Hamilton echoed those sentiments in the postgame press conference. “Deividas is an extremely confident person,” he said. “The only thing different that I saw tonight [was] that his shots were falling.” While his confidence certainly helped him persevere through the slump, Tuesday’s performance was no fluke. Asked where he had been confidencewise during his shooting struggles, Dulkys gave a simple answer. “In the gym. getting extra shots,” Dulkys said. “That’s pretty much what I was doing every single game, every single day— just trying to come in and get more shots.” The extra practice has finally paid off for Dulkys, and the Seminoles hope that it will continue to pay off as they get closer to postseason play.

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Revolutions across the pond Retracing Our Steps ERIK EMBREY Staff Writer The events that have been occurring across the Atlantic the last few weeks have been nothing short of extraordinary. Two countries, Egypt and Tunisia, have found themselves in a state of emergency due to the populace protesting and holding demonstrations against the government. The protests started in Tunisia in late December, with the population becoming increasingly distressed because of corrupt government and poor living conditions. President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali soon re-

linquished his position and fled the country. In late January, citizens of Egypt were inspired enough by what was occurring in Tunisia to begin similar protests for comparable reasons. As of Feb. 1, President Hosni Mubarak has announced that he will hand over power in September to an elected successor. From a human rights standpoint, it’s respectable and even laudable that the citizens are overthrowing an oppressive government, and hopefully in the aftermath they can establish a government administration that properly protects their freedoms. It could lead to the region becoming more stable over the long run, or even lead to other countries with totalitarian regimes in the region to have

similar upheavals in a sort of domino effect. The people of these countries are taking an extremely risky, yet potentially rewarding, step in attempting to come more into step with western democratic nations. The U.S. itself has a large stake in the outcome of these revolutions, specifically with regards to Egypt. The U.S. government has provided quite a large sum of foreign aid to the country; Egypt has been the second largest recipient of aid after Israel within the last few decades. The U.S. government definitely has had a vested interest in keeping relations with the country, as Egypt’s administration has acted as a mediator for Israel-Palestine relations quite effectively over the years, and really has acted

CAMERON GAUTHIER Staff Writer During every election, whether it is at the city, state or national level, voters get to hear all of the politicians from every party talk about how concerned they are for the people who are voting for them. And, while I believe that, sometimes, elected officials may truly be concerned, especially in lower positions that leave them nothing substantial to gain, it seems pretty obvious that that’s frequently not a candidate’s true concern. A good indication of this is the amount of money some candidates pour into winning. For example, Meg Whitman spent $160 million of her own money in a failed attempt to be elected as governor of California. To put into perspective how much money this is, consider this: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2009 the median income for a family household was around $60 thousand and for nonfamily households it was $30 thousand. This means that, not considering taxes and assuming their income didn’t change, it would take 2,667 years for the average family household and twice that for the average non-family household to make as much money as Whitman spent on one campaign. Rick Scott spent $73 million of his own money to scrape by with a win in the Florida gubernatorial race. This type of spending undermines any message of true concern for the people they aim to “govern” as well as indicating some other things. Primarily—and I’m not suggesting that this isn’t already obvious—the main goal of most people seeking an elected political position is power. They want to be able to control something that is impor-

tant or something that seems important to them. They want to be above everyone else (as if having $100 million to spend on a campaign doesn’t already place them in an advantageous position). Most importantly, they want to get laws passed that will ensure the continued wealth of themselves and their business interests and the continued lack of wealth in their constituents. It’s kind of sad when one really thinks about it; a large part of the Republican Party’s base is composed of the people who suffer the most as a result of republican policies, but who are convinced otherwise by the people who “represent” them. There are uninsured Americans who would lose everything they have if someone in their family were to have a serious health issue, yet they continue to speak out against health care reform because the leaders of the party they support have convinced them to. Pundits and politicians lied to them without blinking an eye. They warned them of death panels, and never-ending waits at hospitals and doctors’ offices, and told them that the Congressional Budget Office was lying because the Democrats told them to. These pundits and politicians can get away with saying anything and they very well know it. The question we really need to ask, though, is whether the person who is truly the best candidate would really need to spend so much money to effectively buy the voters trust. How good is someone who has no more to offer than money? It seems that a majority of Americans no longer question the words of politicians and pundits. Effectively, this has made it such that the people no longer elect politicians based on who is truly aligned with their interests, but rather, who they are told to elect by other high profile politicians and TV personalities. The only fix to this situation will be an influx of candidates who are actually more concerned with the issues than with personal power and that, unfortunately, will be a long time coming.

administration, and possibly even worse. The region is certainly populated with groups that could seize the governmental vacuum and cause an even poorer state of affairs. Citizens of Egypt are also not satisfied with the timeline that President Mubarak has put forward with the resignation of his position. September is still months away, and many of the protesters want him out of power immediately. They have also noted that his promise not to run in the next election has not extended to his son not running. It may not be a foreign group that seizes power that causes future problems, but rather, the possibility of President Mubarak stepping out of the limelight and ruling

through a figurehead. Of a practical observation, the U.S. government staying silent for the first days of this revolution was not totally unexpected. It really was an unusual place our government was put in, because of the fact that President Mubarak was supported for so long and played such a key role in diplomacy in the region. Agreeing to support the formation of a new administration was a fairly bold move, because the U.S. does risk losing the diplomatic ties and “ins” to the region that it has held for years. However, President Obama did the right thing calling for change. With any luck, the citizens of Egypt and Tunisia will find the freedom they are struggling for.

Look at it This Way by Daniel Ackerman

Politics: money talks Hope Will Never Be Silent

as the go-between for many of the countries in the area for the U.S. The U.S. seems willing to back a more democratic Egypt, which is great. President Obama was recently quoted as saying that Egypt’s transition “must begin now,” following the announcement of President Mubarak’s future September resignation. Nevertheless, all this is not without serious risk; there’s a definite downside in that there is now a great amount of political destabilization in the region. There are now two countries without proper leadership, and it’s feasible to see others experience upheaval. The power that comes in to fill any voids that are created could theoretically be just as corrupt as the previous

Time to deliver, Mr. Obama Rocky Mountain Collegian Editorial Board, Colorado State U. via UWIRE President Barack Obama talks a big game, but in the end, he simply doesn’t deliver, making him the New York Jets of politics. In Tuesday night’s State of the Union address, he laid out mighty plans for reducing excess government spending once and

for all, creating a utopian society of electric cars and 100 percent employment, and ending subsidies for oil companies––a move sure to outrage FOX News pundits. It sounds great on paper, but Obama seems to have forgotten some rather minor details: that he has a very uncooperative Republican-dominated House to deal with, and that it will be very difficult

to reduce spending if he’s implementing all sorts of– –how shall we say––awesome new programs. Nobody can possibly envy the mighty tasks Obama has in front of him, what with a massive deficit, a struggling economy and two large-scale wars overseas. But Obama was elected because of his promises of change and– –as he often reiterated in his address––his desire to

invest in our future. America’s problems are mighty, and for Obama to succeed in creating the change that he has so often promised he needs to stop relying on rhetoric and rely on change we can believe in––and change that he can deliver. It’s time for President Obama to stop being the New York Jets, and instead start being the Green Bay Packers.

How was your day? CHAD SQUITIERI Staff Writer There was a recent commercial made by the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) that outlined a police officer’s typical day. The commercial started with a domestic abuse case where the officer arrived on scene to find a black-and-blue female and angry male fighting, with their two elementary-aged children watching from a distance. The scene later changes to the officer on a traffic stop gone bad, where the suspect steps out of his car taking firing at the officer, and finally switches to a scene of the officer coming home to his daughter, who asks how his day was. The tagline of the commercial read, “How was your day?” which, as the commercial was intended to, got me thinking about how even one of my bad days do not include the type of things a

sound

byte police officer deals with daily. With the recent loss of K-9 Officer Yaslowitz and Sgt. Baitinger of the St. Petersburg Police Department last week, the meaning of the FOP commercial really struck home. This year, already five Police Officers have been lost their lives in the line of duty in Florida alone, bringing the national toll up to 17. Those numbers are staggering, and the type of being it takes to murder someone who has dedicated their life to protecting others is beyond comprehension. Thousands of police officers from multiple agencies came to show their respect at the funeral of the two slain St. Pete officers last week-

end. The death of a police officer obviously affects the entire community, but as I found out, it affects fellow officers in a different way than the rest of us. To understand this connection and the type of person it takes to work in such an environment, I turned to my father. Christopher Squitieri is a current sergeant for the Clearwater Police Department and is a 21year veteran. “Officers around the country, even though we don’t know each other, share a bond,” Squitieri said. “We know the type of work we do and are aware that every day when we walk out of the house we may not return, but it’s not something you dwell on. “When an officer dies, it reminds you of that reality and takes time until your work can return to normal.” In response to being

asked how an officer balances things they encounter on the job with normal life, Sgt. Squitieri gave a straightforward response. “You never stop being a cop,” he said. “A normal citizen is able to go about their life not constantly being aware of everything going on around them, but the things we deal with daily on the job don’t afford us that luxury. “Our job is 0-60—one second you can be sitting at a stoplight, and the next you’re going to an armed robbery in progress.” Perhaps Sgt. Squitieri summed up the difference between a police officer and average citizen best with five simple words: “No day is the same.” So today, as your night winds to an end, despite whether it was good or bad, think of those fallen officers and ask yourself: how was your day?


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Study Break FEBRUARY 3, 2011

PAG E 1 3

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

Horoscopes

Crossword Puzzle

’Nole Trivia

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Today is an 8 -- Today (and for the next three weeks) communication comes easily. Take advantage of this to bring other people into your projects. Thank them.

MORI

This week’s prize is a gift certificate Japanese Steak House from

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

& Sushi Bar

Today is a 9 -- The days ahead look promising. Your ambition and desire for perfection can take you far. Write down career goals and take action to realize them.

What is the name of the FSU student who wa snamed to USA Today’s All-USA College Academic First Team in 2010?

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

(850) 561-1605

Today is a 9 -- If you dream of moving to another continent, now it’s the right time to do it. It will take courage, patience and thoroughness, but you can do it.

Just be the first caller between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. tonight and leave a voicemail with your name, number and answer.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Sudoku

Today is a 7 -Change keeps showing up today. Although you feel more conservative, you jump into action. Invest in your own ideas, and you’ll be pleased.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Today is an 8 -- It’s a perfect day to recreate partnerships. Banish old wounds and invent something new with a business or sentimental partner. Why waste precious time? Play together.

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All Right Reserved.

Today in History

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Today is a 7 -- Focus your energy on completing projects, especially those that require focused skill. You’re on fire and you want to get things done. Take your time.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Today is a 7 -- Continue your trip into self-discovery. Don’t be afraid to be childlike. Paint with your fingers, maybe. Don’t miss a chance to play in the snow.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Today is a 6 -- Learn from the challenges earlier in the day. Find your way home, eventually, to a comfortable chair for some serious lounging, complete with favorite treats.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Today is a 6 -- Not everybody likes what you say, and that’s okay. You can be respectful and still speak out. Don’t be afraid to go public for what you care about.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Today is an 8 -- Put your energy to work generating money. Rethink financial options, and be open to new income possibilities. Go for what you want, but don’t step on anyone to get it.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Today is a 9 -- You have everything going for you today. Don’t fall asleep on your laurels and keep exploring creatively. Reward yourself by watching a good film.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Today is a 6 -- Find a quiet place to sit and write down your thoughts. Concentrate intently. Enjoy the quiet time before the full speed coming ahead. Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services

Word Search: Hip Hop Artists I

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Mos Def Public Enemy Queen Latifah Souls of Mischief Talib Kweli The Fugees

The Roots Wu-Tang Clan

On this date: In 1811, American newspaper editor Horace Greeley was born in Amherst, N.H. In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln and Confederate Vice President Alexander H. Stephens held a shipboard peace conference off the Virginia coast; the talks deadlocked over the issue of Southern autonomy. In 1913, the 16th Amendment to the Constitution, providing for a federal income tax, was ratified. In 1924, the 28th president of the United States, Woodrow Wilson, died in Washington, D.C., at age 67. In 1930, the chief justice of the United States, William Howard Taft, resigned for health reasons. (He died just over a month later.) In 1943, during World War II, the U.S. transport ship Dorchester, which was carrying troops to Greenland, sank after being hit by a German torpedo; of the more than 900 men aboard, only some 230 survived. In 1959, An American Airlines Lockheed Electra crashed into New York’s East River, killing 65 of the 73 people on board. In 1966, the Soviet probe Luna 9 became the first manmade object to make a soft landing on the moon. In 1971, New York City police officer Frank Serpico, who had charged there was widespread corruption in the NYPD, was shot and seriously wounded

during a drug bust in Brooklyn. In 1991, the rate for a firstclass postage stamp rose to 29 cents. Ten years ago: Terry McAuliffe was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee. The XFL, a football league founded by the World Wrestling Federation and jointly owned by NBC, held its first two games, in which the Las Vegas Outlaws beat the New York/New Jersey Hitmen 190, and the Orlando Rage beat the Chicago Enforcers 33-29. (However, the XFL folded after just one season.) Five years ago: An Egyptian passenger ferry sank in the Red Sea during bad weather, killing more than 1,000 passengers. Twenty-three al-Qaida prisoners escaped from a Yemeni prison, including one convicted of the 2000 attack on the destroyer USS Cole. Actor Al Lewis (“The Munsters”) died in New York (he was probably 82, although he’d claimed to have been born in 1910, which would have made him 95). One year ago: A suicide bomber killed seven people in northwestern Pakistan, including three U.S. soldiers. Motivational speaker James Arthur Ray was arrested on manslaughter charges after three people died following a northern Arizona sweat lodge ceremony he’d led in Oct. 2009. Actress Frances Reid, 95, died in Los Angeles.

Today’s Birthdays Comedian Shelley Berman is 85. Former Sen. Paul Sarbanes (D-Md.) is 78. Football Hallof-Famer Fran Tarkenton is 71. Actress Bridget Hanley is 70. Actress Blythe Danner is 68. Singer Dennis Edwards is 68. Football Hall-of-Famer Bob Griese is 66. Singer-guitarist Dave Davies (The Kinks) is 64. Singer Melanie is 64. Actress Morgan Fairchild is 61. Actor Nathan Lane is 55. Rock musi-

cian Lee Ranaldo (Sonic Youth) is 55. Actor Thomas Calabro is 52. Actor-director Keith Gordon is 50. Actress Michele Greene is 49. Country singer Matraca (muh-TRAY’-suh) Berg is 47. Actress Maura Tierney is 46. Actor Warwick Davis is 41. Reggaeton singer Daddy Yankee is 35. Musician Grant Barry is 34. Singer-songwriter Jessica Harp is 29. Rapper Sean Kingston is 21.

Thought for Today “Fame is a vapor, popularity an accident, and riches take wings. Only one thing endures and that is character.” —Horace Greeley (1811-1872)

— The Associated Press


PAGE

14

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBURARY 3, 2011

UNOFFICIAL BALLOT STUDENT GOVERNMENT SPRING 2011 ELECTIONS STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT/VICE PRESIDENT (All students may vote for this office. Vote for one) Avi Assidon

President

Dayne Hutchinson

Vice President

Kyle Dunnington

President

Nikki Allen

Ignite

Vice President

Rachel Liniger

State

Dayron Silverio

Ignite

SENIOR CLASS COUNCIL (All juniors and seniors may vote for these offices) President

Alissa Simon

Ignite State

Brian Cosgrove

Vice President Ignite

Sam Nebel

State

Anibal (Papo) Hernandez Treasurer Jasmine Styles Ignite Melissa Bucks

Secretary

Alyssa Smathers

State

State

Seat 4 Kalin Dingess Joshua Hill

State Ignite

State Ignite

Seat 6 Adrienne Dawson Tura Magley

Ignite State

Seat 8 Abria Harris Matt Schnitzlein

Ignite State

BUSINESS (Juniors and seniors or those that have been formally accepted in this division may vote for these seats) Seat 4 Jesid Acosta Stephen Biondy Seat 6 Pauly Bunn Lauren Williams

Ignite State

State Ignite

COMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION (Juniors and seniors or those that have been formally accepted in this division may vote for this seat) Seat 2 Andres Bascumbe

State

CRIMINOLOGY (Juniors and seniors or those that have been formally accepted in this division may vote for thise seats) Seat 2 Marco Blanco Travis Brant

Ignite

Seat 18 Amy Berry Kai E.S Daniels

State Ignite

Seat 20 Jesus Hernandez Kambria Sims

Ignite State

GRADUATE STUIDES (All graduate students can vote for these seats Including Professional Programs)

Seat 22 Randy J. Alves Carl Sharpe

State Ignite

Seat 2 Aaron Feuer

State

Seat 24 Molly Goldberg Alan Tegroen

Ignite State

Seat 4 Julie Shaffer

State

Seat 2 Winsome Jackson Nikki Jacobs

Ignite State

Seat 6 Andrew W. Smith

State

Seat 10 Raul Guillermo Perez

Ignite

Seat 16 Galen Wood

HUMAN SCIENCES (Junior and seniors or those that have been formally accepted in this division may vote for this seat) Seat 2 Javario Bates

Ignite

Ignite State

SOCIAL SCIENCES (Junior and seniors or those that have been formally accepted in this division may vote for these seats) Seat 2 Harrison R. DuBosar Signe Thomas

Ignite State

Seat 4 Maddie Burich Rosalia Contreras

State Ignite

Seat 6 Rueben Stokes Graham Woodard

Ignite State

UNDERGRADUATE STUIDES (All freshman and sophomores may vote for these seats) Seat 2 Jerry Howze Joanna Johns

UNION BOARD (Twelve (12) seats will be selected from the following candidates. Vote up to twelve (12) times) David Agatstein

Ignite

Kayla Barnett

Ignite

Vanessa Botero

Ignite

Saisha Delevoe

Ignite

Bernard F. Dorcin

Ignite

Lizzie Eads

State

Ashley Fagan

Ignite

Jephery G. Francis

Ignite

Kayla Hilkert

Ignite

Nicole Laster

State

Sara Saxner

Ignite

Sebastian Sovero

Independent

Shannon Thompson

Ignite

Milly Vasquez

Ignite

Hailey Verano

State

Terrence S. Williams

Ignite

Ignite

Ignite

ARTS AND SCIENCES (Juniors and seniors or those that have been formally accepted in this division may vote for these seats) Seat 2 Stu Gravenmier Gabi Zonfrelli

Brandon Eisaman

State

STUDENT BODY TREASURER (All students may vote for this office)

Kimmy Siddle

ENGINEERING (Juniors and seniors or those that have been formally accepted in this division may vote for this seat)

State Ignite

Seat 4 Robert Burie State Paige Felice Rosenthal Ignite Seat 6 Robin Bailey Taylor Gilbert

Ignite State

Seat 8 Ky’Eisha Penn Devian Wilcox

Ignite State

Seat 10 Lauren Ashley Hemstreet State Mitchell Rosenberg Ignite Seat 12 Jamie Bardwell Andy Labrecque Itai Raz

State Independent Ignite

Seat 14 Zack Ernst J.P. Ross

State Ignite

Seat 16 Frank Brown Cannon II State

REFERENDUM QUESTION Do you support the implementation of a 50 cent per credit-hour “Green Fee” that will be used to subsidize the Student Green Energy Fund, creating renewable and sustainable energy projects on campus and investing in energy efficiency projects that will enable Florida State University to become a more green campus? Yes

No


02.03.11  

E-Edition for our February 3, 2011 issue.

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