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ees with a project idea to bring their ideas to life. If they don’t have a project in mind, they’ll be paired up with someone to learn how to use the tools and help with a project already in progress. The scene on any Wednesday night might include an energetic 8-year-old building a wooden scooter, a grandmother finishing up a bedside table or a teenage skater working on new vinyl stickers for his board. Tiny WPA does not offer classes or memberships, but anyone is allowed to come as often as they’d like to Stop By + Build. Hive76 (1821 E. Hagert St., Ste. 100C), a Kensington makerspace, also hosts a weekly open house on Wednesdays from 8 to 11 p.m., and they welcome anyone who is interested in beginning their maker journey. Their space boasts a small wood shop, a soldering and electronics bench, a 3D printer, a laser cutter and a vinyl cutter. If you have a project and supplies, you can show up to the open house and get guidance from Hive76’s members, but you must be a member to use their tools. To serve people who are just getting started, they offer a “lite” membership at $15/month. “We wanted to start a place that people who wanted to learn a new skill could do it without a huge expense,” says Chris Terrell, Hive76’s president. Treasurer Daniel Provenzano adds, “Keeping the barriers to entry low is a big part of the ethos here.” That “lite” membership also makes a great gift for your apartment-dwelling friend who doesn’t have space to set up their own wood shop or digital fabrication studio. For a full-service outfit that offers memberships at varying levels and a wide array of professional-grade digital fabrication (3D printing, laser cutting, vinyl cutting), electronics, woodworking, metalworking, jewelry-making and textile equipment, there’s NextFab, a makerspace network with three locations in the Philadelphia region (2025 Washington Ave., and 1227 N. 4th St., both in Philadelphia; and 503 N. Tatnall St. in Wilmington, Del.). NextFab welcomes all skill levels and offers access to tools, classes, events and entrepreneur services. “Our culture is built 32

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towards learning, networking and teaching for all skill sets,” says Rebecca Ledbetter, digital marketing coordinator at NextFab. “We offer free Getting Started [opportunities] at NextFab consultations for new members, where a NextFab consultant will work with you to develop a personalized plan to help you achieve the goals you’ve set.” New members are required to go through orientation and safety training before they are allowed to use tools. “Our classes and workshops are meant to certify a maker on a skill or machine, and then have them start building for themselves,” Ledbetter adds.

Memberships start at $55/month for access to NextFab’s equipment, but you can become a member for $25/month to access NextFab’s members-only classes. NextFab also offers gift cards that can be used for any service they offer, including classes and memberships. If you dream of producing your own stationery, creating jewelry or making one-of-a-kind pottery, Fleisher Art Memorial (719 Catharine St.) offers a wide range of printmaking, screenprinting, ceramics and jewelry-making classes perfect for beginners. Their JumpstART series of classes

Profile for Red Flag Media

Grid Magazine December 2019 [#127]  

You Can Do It! Remake your holiday with DIY gifts and classes • A homeless man's wisdom: "Be compassionate," p. 10 • The majestic hawks liv...

Grid Magazine December 2019 [#127]  

You Can Do It! Remake your holiday with DIY gifts and classes • A homeless man's wisdom: "Be compassionate," p. 10 • The majestic hawks liv...