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RED APPLE READING OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2016 MAGAZINE

WWW.REDAPPLEREADING.COM

DO’s AND DON’Ts FOR CHILDREN AND TECHNOLOGY

READING SPECIFICS:

CHOOSING BOOKS FOR BEGINNING READERS SPOTLIGHT ON...

GOOSEBUMPS

EASY READER:

PUMPKIN PATCH PALS BOOK REVIEWS:

FALL FAMILY

7 WAYS FAVORITES FOR KIDS SOUP AND A BOOK: TO SHOW HOW COULD THANKFULNESS YOUR PUMPKIN GROW?

BIG


CONTENTS 04 DOS AND DON’TS FOR CHILDREN AND TECHNOLOGY

How to keep it safe when your child uses technology.

06 SOUP AND A BOOK Cuddle up with How Big Could Your Pumpkin Grow? by Wendell Minor.

08 READING SPECIFICS: Choosing the best books for beginning readers.

10 BOOK REVIEWS 8 fall family favorites we hope your family will love too!

12 TIPS 7 ways for kids to show thankfulness.

13 STORY TIME! Enjoy a fall adventure with Pumpkin Patch Pals.

14 LEVEL A - PUMPKIN PATCH PALS Best for reading out loud to pre-readers or for fluent reader practice – followed by an activity page.

26 LEVEL B - PUMPKIN PATCH PALS Simplified story text for emerging readers – plus an activity page.

38 LEVEL C - PUMPKIN PATCH PALS Early reader version of the story – followed by an activity page.

50 COMPREHENSION SKILLS

Check in with these story questions after reading Pumpkin Patch Pals.

51 ACTIVITY PAGES

More fun fall activity pages for young readers.

54 LITERACY TIME

Engaging fall activities that promote literacy.

56 LITERACY LINEUP

Birthdays and special days for the months of October and November.

58 SPOTLIGHT ON...

…R.L. STINE’S GOOSEBUMPS Review from a young and mysterious book critic.

59 BEST OF THE WEB

Editor picks of exceptional online resources for families.

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©2016 Red Apple Reading. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and any reproduction or redistribution of part or all of this material without express and written permission is strictly prohibited. For questions or inquiries please email support@redapplereading.com.


Connect with us!

Letter from the Editor Our favorite season is here once again! We are enjoying the temperature change, as well as the anticipation for our favorite family holidays to come. For many years our family visited the local pumpkin patch each October, and we have sought to recreate the experience in this issue’s leveled reader: Pumpkin Patch Pals. From picking a favorite pumpkin to getting lost in the corn maze, then heading home to carve pumpkins and roast pumpkin seeds, we hope you enjoy the story and maybe get your family out to a pumpkin patch too this season! In these pages you will also find articles about keeping your children safe when using technology, and how to choose the best books for beginning readers (it can be tricky). We’ve also included a list of picture books that are fall

family favorites, a review of R.L. Stine’s famous Goosebumps series, ways that children can show thankfulness to others, and other fun activities to help promote literacy at home. Enjoy the pace of fall before the winter holidays bustle in! Sincerely,

Tammy Bennecke EDITOR IN CHIEF tammybennecke@redapplereading.com

“I am a part of everything that I have read.” -Theodore Roosevelt

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DO’S AND DON’TS FOR CHILDREN AND TECHNOLOGY DO SET LIMITS ON SCREEN TIME

Technology can be both fun and useful, and it’s becoming a bigger part of our lives every day. However, even a good thing can be harmful if overused or abused. Here are some things

Setting limits on how much time your kiddos spend on the computer or other devices helps keep them from neglecting other responsibilities and activities. It’s fine to make exceptions for school-related or educational use of technology, but be clear what the extra time should be used for.

DON’T ALLOW UNLIMITED INTERNET USE IN PRIVATE AREAS

you can do to make your child’s use of technology safer.

DO USE PARENTAL CONTROLS Almost all devices offer highlycustomizable parental control options. Take advantage of these tools! Even the best-behaved child can accidentally stumble across inappropriate content unless it’s restricted.

DON’T RELY COMPLETELY ON A FILTER The filters you set with your nifty parental controls or other resources are incredibly helpful, but they might not catch everything. Periodically check what websites, apps, and games your kiddos are using to make sure nothing has slipped through.

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Many parents disagree on exactly how much internet freedom should be given to children using devices where they can’t be monitored. Whether you completely forbid the use of internet in your kiddo’s room or prefer to give them more liberty, it’s definitely a good idea to place at least some limitations on what your child can access while you can’t see them.

DO REMEMBER TO COMMUNICATE Be willing to have conversations with your child about what they are and are not allowed to access. Allow your child to ask why certain things are blocked, and be open to unblocking things if your child works with you to show why the content is not inappropriate - especially with your older children. Just like filters may miss bad websites, they may also catch good websites.


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DON’T COMPLETELY FORBID THE USE OF PASSWORDS Parents are often against the idea of their children having a password on their phones and laptops. This is not without good reason, but it’s important to remember that most kids are more concerned about their less well-meaning peers getting into personal information than you. Compromise by having them give you their password or let you put your fingerprint in their device so that you can open it.

With a little forethought and effort, you can help your kids enjoy the benefits of technology safely! Take time today to make sure you have appropriate boundaries in place for your children.

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SOUP AND A BOOK We love autumn! We also love the yummy comfort foods that go along with the season. If you feel the same way, we think you will like this issue’s selections for dinner and book! Autumn is a great time to cuddle up on the couch and enjoy a fun book with the kiddos. We think this particular title will be one that the parents enjoy just as much as the kids!

How Big Could Your Pumpkin Grow? Author and illustrator Wendell Minor imagines what some of our favorite American landmarks would be like if they were decorated with enormous pumpkins. The Grand Canyon and Mt. Rushmore would be quite different with huge jack-o-lanterns looming over them! One of the best parts about this book is the two-page guide at the end with informative details about the different places pictured throughout the story.

Pumpkin Soup from MyRecipes How do you follow up a good book about pumpkins? With a delicious pumpkin soup, of course! This simple meal is perfect for chilly fall nights. The recipe is easy to throw together and is ready in just 20 minutes. Kids can help stir in the ingredients (under close adult supervision – it’s hot!) and set a festive fall table.

Crock Pot Pumpkin Spice White Hot Chocolate from A Night Owl After dinner, the family can enjoy a steaming cup of this delicious pumpkin spiced hot chocolate. With only four ingredients, this yummy fall beverage is simple to throw in the crockpot and is ready in 2-3 hours!

There’s just no better way to spend a fall evening than gathered around the table with family! Autumn can be a hectic season. Be sure to slow down for at least one evening this month to enjoy food, each other’s company, and a good book!

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SERIOUS LEARNING THAT’S SERIOUSY FUN!

www.RedAppleReading.com Help your child become a better reader with videos and games that make it fun to learn.

FALL IS HERE!

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READING SPECIFICS CHOOSING THE BEST BOOKS FOR BEGINNING READERS Parents often have difficulty deciding which books

Finding books that a child reads on his own as an

to give their children for extra reading practice

emerging or beginning reader can be much more

at home. There are several variables to consider,

difficult. Parents often push their children to

including the child’s age, current reading skills,

read more challenging books than what the child

possible learning delays, personal preferences, and

may currently be interested in or capable of. In

teacher recommendations.

addition, many schools now have programs that give each child a reading level and/or a set amount

It is important that children view reading as an

of reading to do each night or week. Remember,

enjoyable activity, not a chore or task that must be

the message at this stage should be that “reading

completed. When children have positive reading

is fun!” Books cannot be so difficult that children

experiences, they are more likely to read for

struggle with words or fail to understand what

enjoyment as they get older, which will provide

they are reading.

the continued practice needed to become a fluent reader. Books for reading out loud to your child are fairly simple to select: look for variety (fiction and nonfiction) and avoid overly complicated language. Feel free to read books with slightly advanced vocabulary, as long as you take the time to explain confusing terms and your child is interested in the content.

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HERE ARE SOME RECOMMENDATIONS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN WHEN THEY ARE JUST BEGINNING TO READ: ALPHABET BOOKS Simple alphabet books identify letters and sounds and often have pictures that match the beginning sound of the letter.

BASIC WORD AND PICTURE BOOKS These usually have one word and one picture per page (e.g. the word “ball” with a picture of a ball). They are great for learning new vocabulary and can have varying content (shapes, colors, etc.). Words and images help to visually associate a picture with a written word.

EASY RHYMING BOOKS Rhymes help to build an understanding of sounds in relation to letters.

WORD FAMILY AND “FLIP” BOOKS These are often teacher- or home-made and focus on reading words with specific word endings (e.g. cat, sat, bat, rat).

As children get older and become fluent readers, it usually gets much easier to find books that engage them and help to build vocabulary and fluency. Here are three general guidelines for older readers: find books they like, books that challenge them (but not too much!), and books that teach and inspire. Other options to consider: digital books on a tablet or e-reader, comic books and magazines. Subscriptions to kid’s magazines can be great resources for favorite subject matter or finding new interests. If it makes reading more entertaining, take advantage of every opportunity to get your child to enjoy reading books. All children and families are different, and no expert can tell you what’s best for your child. As long as you are exposing your beginning reader to books and literacy on a daily basis, you are providing the advantage needed to become a successful, lifelong reader.

PHONICS READERS Phonics books focus on a particular letter sound or combination, like the short U sound or the digraph SH, and are excellent practice as follow-up to learning a particular skill in the classroom. Teachers often send little stapled books home with kindergarteners and first graders, but this type of book can also be found in boxed sets and at bookstores and retail outlets.

EASY READERS These books have simple language and/or repetition to help new readers feel confident as they begin to read. The vocabulary is usually controlled (i.e. limited) and they are often leveled or labeled for certain ages or grades. There are a lot of these types of books available now, with topics from superheroes to princesses to creepy crawlies!

THE RED APPLE READING PROGRAM INCLUDES PLENTY OF ALPHABET LETTER-SOUND ACTIVITIES AND PRACTICE, A WORD AND PICTURE SIDESHOW FOR VOCABULARY ACQUISITION, RHYMING AND WORD FAMILY LESSONS AND GAMES, AND STORIES WITH CONTROLLED VOCABULARY TO PRACTICE NEW SKILLS LEARNED. ADDITIONAL OFFLINE CONTENT INCLUDES PRINTABLE FLASH CARDS, FLIP BOOKS, PHONICS READERS AND EASY READERS.

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FALL FAMILY FAVORITES CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS by Judi Barrett Kiddos can discover the town of Chewandswallow, a land where breakfast, lunch, and dinner come from the weather! What will happen when too much food falls from the sky? Ages 4 to 8

WHO TOOK THE COOKIES FROM THE COOKIE JAR? by Bonnie Lass Help the small critters find out who took the cookies. Was it Raven? Snake? Frog? Follow the cookie crumbs to solve the mystery and be delighted with the happy ending. Ages 4 to 7

BENEATH THE GHOST MOON by Jane Yolen The mice have prepared for their Ghost Dance Ball, but some creepy-crawlies destroy their work. Help the mice fight back and celebrate in the Halloween moon with a clever and catchy rhyme scheme. Ages 5 and up

WHERE’S MY TEDDY? by Jez Alborough Eddie finds his teddy in the woods, only to discover the teddy has grown. A real bear comes along with Eddie’s real-sized teddy, and they both get spooked. Ages 3 to 7

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TRICK OR TREAT, SMELL MY FEET by Diane de Groat Gilbert is in for a surprise when he accidentally takes his sister’s Halloween costume to school and not his. This story will teach the good and the bad about being different. Ages 4 to 8

THE HOUSE THAT DRAC BUILT by Judy Sierra Trick-or-treaters on Halloween resolve the chaotic events going on in the house that Drac built. Not for the faint of heart. Ages 4 to 7

MUSTARD by Jessel Miller Witness Mustard blossom into a happy, kind, and insightful woman. Thanks to her parents and angels, she grows up with soft love and strong values. Children will be drawn to the vivid and detailed illustrations. All ages

THE 13 DAYS OF HALLOWEEN by Carol Greene In this spooky spin-off of The 12 Days of Christmas, a ghoul proves his love to another with haunting gifts like hissing cats and flying brooms. Read to discover what frightening present he receives in return! Ages 4 to 8 11


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7 WAYS TO SHOW THANKFULNESS

1. MAKE A CARD

3. MAKE IT A HABIT

Send a friend or family member a homemade thank you card. This is a good activity for kids of all ages, even if your younger child needs a little extra help.

4. TAKE TURNS EXPRESSING

2. DO SOMETHING HELPFUL Encourage and help your child to do something nice for someone who’s done something nice for them. While more complicated tasks should be reserved for older children, even your younger kiddos can bring in groceries or other simple jobs

Get your little ones to make thankfulness a habit by reminding them to say “thank you” often.

GRATITUDE

Have each person in your family say one thing that they are thankful for. This is a great dinnertime activity, but it can also be used in other settings, such as car rides.

5. THANKFULNESS CRAFTS There are a wide variety of gratitude-themed craft ideas for kids. Pick a few that fit your children’s interests and ages. Check out this cool one from Teach Kids Art!

6. GRATITUDE JOURNAL Leave a journal in a high-traffic area of the house, such as the living room or kitchen. Both you and your children can periodically write down things you are thankful for and read the entries together later.

7. PLAY A GAME Stand in a circle and pass a ball between people in the circle. When someone throws the ball to another player, the thrower has to say one thing they are thankful for about the catcher.

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STORY TIME

PUMPKIN PATCH PALS 3 DIFFERENT VERSIONS OF THE SAME STORY! CHOOSE THE VERSION THAT’S BEST FOR YOUR YOUNG READER, THEN CLICK A LINK BELOW AND PRINT THE PAGES FOR REPEATED READING AND PRACTICE.

LEVEL A - STORY AND ACTIVITIES

PAGES 14 - 24

BEST FOR READING ALOUD TO PRE-READERS

LEVEL B - STORY AND ACTIVITIES

PAGES 26 - 36

EASY TEXT FOR EMERGING READERS

LEVEL C - STORY AND ACTIVITIES

PAGES 38 - 48

MORE COMPLEXITY FOR EARLY READERS

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

PAGE 50

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PUMPKIN PATCH PALS Level A


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Dot, Finn, Russ, and Tess dressed in warm clothing so they wouldn’t get cold while they visited the pumpkin patch. When they arrived there was so much to do! “What shall we do first?” Tess asked.

p. 1


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Russ replied, “Let’s see who can go through the corn maze the fastest! Boys on one team and girls on the other.” The friends agreed and ran into the corn maze. “Girls win!” exclaimed Dot when they finished.

p. 2


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Then the four friends found the tall haystack pyramid and began to climb it. Finn made it all the way to the top first and waved his hands in triumph!

p. 3


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From the top of the haystack, Finn could see a large pumpkin patch with countless pumpkins nearby. “Let’s each pick out a pumpkin now to take home and carve,” he said.

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“How do we know which ones are ripe?” Russ asked. “The ripe pumpkins have hard skin. You can use your nail to see if the skin is hard,” said Tess. Russ found a large pumpkin, Dot spotted a small one she liked, and Finn and Tess picked medium-sized pumpkins.

p. 5


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“Let’s get those pumpkins home now so you can carve them. I will collect the seeds from the inside of the pumpkins and roast them for a tasty snack,” said Finn’s mom. She drove the four friends back to Finn’s house.

p. 6


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“First I will cut the tops off, then you can pull out the insides of the pumpkins, like this.” Finn’s mom demonstrated. “Eww!” they all replied. The four pals pulled out the slimy insides of their pumpkins. They separated the orange slime from the seeds.

p. 7


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Once they removed the seeds and all of the slimy insides, the friends carefully carved unique designs into their pumpkins. Finn’s mom rinsed the pumpkin seeds in a colander, spread them out on a baking sheet, and cooked them in the oven.

p. 8


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“These roasted pumpkin seeds are delicious,” said Tess. “I agree. I love fall,” said Dot, gobbling up a handful of seeds. “Let’s take your pumpkins outside and see how they look with lights in them,” said Finn’s mom.

p. 9


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Russ, Tess, Finn and Dot gathered outside on the porch as Finn’s mom put lights inside of the pumpkins. The pumpkins looked so cool - they glowed! “Fall is definitely my favorite time of year,” Finn said. “I hope we can do this again next autumn!”

p. 10


PUMPKIN FUN

RED APPLE READING

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PUMPKIN PATCH PALS Level B


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Dot, Finn, Russ, and Tess dressed warmly and went to the pumpkin patch. There was so much to do! “What shall we do first?� Tess asked.

p. 1


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Russ said, “Let’s see who can finish the corn maze first! Boys on one team and girls on the other.” They all ran into the maze. “Girls win!” said Dot at the end.

p. 2


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Next, the four pals began to climb up the tall haystack. Finn made it up to the top first and waved his hands!

p. 3


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From the top, Finn could see the pumpkin patch with a lot of pumpkins in it. “Let’s each pick a pumpkin to take home,” he said.

p. 4


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“The pumpkins have hard skin when they are ripe. You can use your nail to check,� said Tess. Russ got a big pumpkin, Dot picked a small one, and Finn and Tess picked mid-size pumpkins.

p. 5


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“Let’s get the pumpkins home so you can carve them. I will get the seeds from inside the pumpkins and roast them for a snack,” said Finn’s mom. She drove the four pals home.

p. 6


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“I will cut the tops off, then you can pull out the seeds like this.” Finn’s mom showed them how. “Eww!” they all said. The four pals pulled out the seeds and slime from the pumpkins.

p. 7


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Once they took out the seeds and the slime, the friends carved their pumpkins. Finn’s mom rinsed the pumpkin seeds and cooked them in the oven.

p. 8


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“These pumpkin seeds are yummy,” said Tess. “I love fall,” said Dot, eating a bunch of seeds. “Let’s take your pumpkins out and see how they look with lights,” said Finn’s mom.

p. 9


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Russ, Tess, Finn and Dot went out on the porch as Finn’s mom put lights in the pumpkins. They looked so cool - they glowed! “Fall is the best time of year,” Finn said. “I hope we can do this next fall!”

p. 10


CORN MAZE CAPERS

RED APPLE READING

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PUMPKIN PATCH PALS Level C


W W W. R E D A P P L E R E A D I N G . C O M

Dot, Finn, Russ, and Tess dressed in warm clothes so they wouldn’t get cold at the pumpkin patch. When they arrived there was so much to do! “What will we do first?” Tess asked.

p. 1


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Russ said, “Let’s see who can go through the corn maze the fastest! Boys on one team and girls on the other.” They all ran into the maze. “Girls win!” exclaimed Dot when they finished.

p. 2


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Then the four friends found the tall haystack and began to climb it. Finn made it all the way to the top first and waved his hands as the winner!

p. 3


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From the top of the haystack, Finn could see a large pumpkin patch with pumpkins nearby. “Let’s each pick out a pumpkin to take home and carve,” he said.

p. 4


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“How do we know if they are ripe?” Russ asked. “The ripe ones have hard skin. You can use your nail to check,” said Tess. Russ found a large pumpkin, Dot spotted a small one, and Finn and Tess picked medium-sized pumpkins.

p. 5


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“Let’s get your pumpkins home so you can carve them. I will collect the seeds from the inside of the pumpkins and roast them for a snack,” said Finn’s mom. She drove the four friends back to Finn’s house.

p. 6


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“First I will cut the tops off, then you can pull out the insides of the pumpkins, like this.” Finn’s mom showed them how. “Eww!” they all replied. They pulled out the slimy insides of their pumpkins and separated the seeds.

p. 7


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Once they took out the seeds and the slime, the friends carved designs into their pumpkins. Finn’s mom rinsed the seeds, put them on a baking sheet, and cooked them in the oven.

p. 8


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“These roasted pumpkin seeds are delicious,” said Tess. “I agree. I love fall,” said Dot, eating a handful of seeds. “Let’s take your pumpkins outside and see how they look with lights,” said Finn’s mom.

p. 9


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Russ, Tess, Finn and Dot went outside on the porch as Finn’s mom put lights in the pumpkins. The pumpkins looked so cool - they glowed! “Fall is my favorite time of year,” Finn said. “I hope we can do this again next fall!”

p. 10


CONTRACTIONS

RED APPLE READING

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COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:

PUMPKIN PAT C H PA L S

50

1

What 3 things did the friends do at the pumpkin patch?

2

What did the pals do with the pumpkins after taking them home?

3

What happened to the seeds inside of the pumpkins?

4

How do you think the friends feel about their day?

5

What month do you think this story takes place in?


NUMBER WORDS

RED APPLE READING

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AUTUMN FAVORITES

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RED APPLE READING


FALL JOKES

RED APPLE READING

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LITERACY TIME! A H - C HO O B O O!

SP OOK Y S I G H T W OR D S Take bowling to a whole new scary level! Clean out six tin cans (e.g. soup cans). Remove the wrapping and paint the tin (or print and tape on) with your favorite Halloween characters, like a ghost, jacko-lantern, mummy, black cat, zombie or even Frankenstein! Write sight words that your child needs to learn on each can with a marker. Have your child read the sight words out loud while they stack the tins like a pyramid. Use a tennis ball to throw or roll at the cans. Have your child read the word on each can that is knocked over. After playing several times, have your child practice writing and spelling the sight words.

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RED APPLE READING

Make your own frightening (or friendly!) monster out of a used rectangular tissue box. Paint the empty tissue box any color you want your monster to be: red, purple, orange, and green are good colors! Then use another color to add a design to your monster like polka-dots, fur drawings, or zig-zags. Next, take white foam paper and cut out some sharp monster teeth in a triangular pattern. Use an egg carton as eyes for each eye you want your monster to have. Then an adult can hot glue the teeth to the opening of the tissue box, and the egg carton eyes above the teeth. Attach googly eyes to the egg cartons or decorate in any other way you’d like. Afterwards, have your child write out sentences that describe their new monster friend on slips of paper. Lastly, read the sentences and feed your monster each slip of paper.


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Help your child fall in love with reading. FA L L L E T T E R L E AV E S

W OR D S OF A F E AT H E R

Create a sensory bin for your toddler. Use a small plastic bin and fill with dry beans, pine cones, acorns, and any other fall goods. Then take fake fall colored leaves and write different letters of the alphabet on each leaf with a thick permanent marker. Bury the leaves in the sensory bin. Have your child roam through the bin and feel for a leaf. After selecting a leaf, have your child say what letter it is, its letter sound, and a word that starts with that letter.

Practice building words with this fun Thanksgiving activity. Have your child color a paper plate brown. Add googly eyes, an orange triangle for a nose, and a red wattle. Then cut out feather shapes on brown, orange, and red construction paper. Write the letters of the alphabet on each feather. Have your child spell out spelling or sight words using the feathers and inserting them behind the paper plate to make a turkey!

RED APPLE READING

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Birthdays, holidays and other fun days to celebrate!

OCTOBER 2016 Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

JULIE ANDREWS

2

3

JOAN SWEENEY

9

4

JOHN HIMMELMAN

10

JOHANNA HURWITZ

16

ELIZABETH CODY KIMMEL

26

FRED MARCELLINO

14

ENGLISH LANGUAGE DAY

DAN GUTMAN

ERIC ROHMANN

HALLOWEEN

RED APPLE READING

R.L. STEIN

15

LOIS LENSKI

BARRY MOSER

22

21

CROCKETT JOHNSON

27

8

ALICE DALGLISH

BETSY HEARNE

20

19

25

MEILO SO

BARBARA ROBINSON

COLIN THOMPSON

7

13

31

HENRY WINKLER

56

18

24

30

RUSSELL FREEDMAN

JUDITH CASELEY

OSCAR WILDE

DAVID SHANNON

12

11

17

23

DONALD J. SOBOL

JAMES MARSHALL

6

5

SMART IS COOL DAY

JANET AHLBERG

29

28

LEONARD KESSLER

VALERIE WORTH


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NOVEMBER 2016 Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

2

1

FAMILY LITERACY DAY

6

7

SNEED B. COLLARD III

SHEILA SOLOMON KLASS

13

8

14

ASTRID LINDGREN

JEZ ALBOROUGH

20

MARION DANE BAUER

27

KEVIN HENKES

ED YOUNG

STEPHANIE SPINNER

JAMIE LEE CURTIS

GLORIA WHELAN

THANKSGIVING

LARRY DANE BRIMNER

DENISE BRENNANNELSON

12

VETERAN’S DAY

18

CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI

24

23

29

28

17

Saturday

5

11

NEIL GAIMAN

LOIS EHLERT

JESSICA SCOTT KERRIN

ELIZABETH GEORGE SPEARE

JANELL CANNON

10

16

Friday

4

ALYSSA SATIN CAPUCILLI

NAT’L YOUNG READER’S DAY

22

21

3

9

15

Thursday

MARJORIE W. SHARMAT

19

PEGGY GIFFORD

ANN HERBERT SCOTT

26

25

MARC BROWN

CHARLES SCHULZ

30

C.S. LEWIS

MARK TWAIN

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SPOTLIGHT ON…

Written by Carley Bennecke, In-house book critic

During the spooky month of October we celebrate a mysterious author’s birthday: R.L. Stine. Stine is best known for his spine-chilling children’s book series: Goosebumps. I can recall in sixth grade when I read Stine’s eleventh book in the series: The Haunted Mask. In this thriller, an 11-year-old girl with my own name, Carly, battles bullying and decides to stand up to her tormenters. She buys a frightening Halloween mask to scare them on Halloween night, but there’s something wrong: the mask won’t 58

come off and is stuck to her own face! Carly grows more and more aggressive that night and must do what she can to get the mask off. This ghostly tale is the perfect read for youngsters ages 8 to 12 who enjoy a little scare to get in the mood for Halloween. Your child might also enjoy one of over one hundred other Goosebumps stories in the series.

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W W W. R E D A P P L E R E A D I N G . C O M

BEST OF THE WEB FOOD BLOG: Chef Grace Not sure what to cook for dinner? Look to kid chef Grace! She creates yummy recipes with her helpful dad and posts them on her blog.

GAMING: Fun Brain Play fun and educational games on Fun Brain. Our personal favorites are Mighty Guy and Bumble Numbers.

READING: Poetry 4 Kids Read and write poems on this resourceful poetry website. Be sure to check out the rhyming dictionary, a helpful tool to find rhymes!

HISTORY:

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.” — George RR Martin

History for Kids This website contains all of history, from ancient Greece to early American history. It contains fun games, helpful worksheets, practice quizzes, and entertaining articles about each historical period. RED APPLE READING

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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2016

RED APPLE READING Serious Learning that’s Seriously Fun.

WWW. REDAPPLEREADING.COM


Red Apple Reading - October/November 2016