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Two Dance Dawgs are bringing their pompoms to the big leagues. Page 5

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 117, No. 151 | Athens, Georgia

Code of Conduct revised for drugs and drinking By MICHAEL PROCHASKA THE RED & BLACK

alcohol- or drug-related charges were to be placed on a six- to 12-month probation, but a second offense during that probation period would result in an automatic suspension from the University, regardless of the charge. University Judiciary had little to no discretion on each individu-

As soon as Maymester begins, students will see more flexibility in the University’s Code of Conduct regarding alcohol and drug violations. The previous policy ruled that students who were arrested on

NCAA names chief, Adams to continue University position By CHELSEA COOK THE RED & BLACK Tuesday at 6 p.m., the National Collegiate Athletic Association announced its new president — and he’s not ours. The NCAA named University of Washington president Mark Emmert to become the fifth CEO of the organization. Following NCAA president Myles Brand’s death in September of pancreatic cancer, University President Michael Adams — who served last year as the NCAA’s executive committee chairman — entered the spotlight as a potential candidate for the position. Headlines from the likes of Boston Globe columnist Bob Ryan became critical of Adams as a candidate, citing several controversies published in Richard Whitt’s book,

al case, but under the new system, hearing panels from the Office of Judicial Programs will have more authority to regulate punishments suitable for specific cases. “The modifications will allow more discretion to student conduct officers, to University Judiciary members and to other hearing panels to more fully con-

sider all of the circumstances of a case before making a determination about sanctions,” said Vice President for Student Affairs Rodney Bennett at Tuesday’s monthly cabinet meeting. “The proposed policy will allow us to change student culture as we See CODE, Page 3

Rodney Bennett says new changes will streamline the conduct system.

DECODING

THE DREAM

University President Michael Adams has held the spot for 13 years.

“Behind the Hedges.” Amidst the speculations, Adams continually told reporters he wished to stay at the University. Interviews were conducted in Indianapolis Tuesday with the three finalists — Emmert, Lt. Gen. Franklin “Buster” Hagenbeck, superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., and Beth Brooke, global vice chairman of Ernst & Young. Adams spent Tuesday in Athens attending the See ADAMS, Page 5

Texting bans pass state House, Senate

American ideal transforms By MAGGIE SUMMERS FOR THE RED & BLACK

By JACOB DEMMITT THE RED & BLACK With the steering wheel between their knees, an iPod in one hand and a juicy text message from their BFF in the other, University students love to multitask. Following some new pieces of legislation, however, Georgia residents may be forced to put down the cell phone and concentrate on the road. As of Tuesday, the Georgia House and Senate have both passed bills that would outlaw text messaging while driving. Senate Bill 360 prohibits drivers on Georgia roads from writing, sending or reading “any text based communication, including but not limited to a text message, instant message, electronic mail, or Internet data.” The bill goes on to say this rule would not apply to See TEXT, Page 2

HARPER BRIDGERS | The Red & Black

Wes Russo (top) and Lindsey Reynolds have differing views of the American Dream due to their diverse backgrounds.

It’s a feeble crowd. Only three workers made it to this Thursday session. They are scattered on picnic tables under a tent in the parking lot of Home Depot on Epps Bridge Road. One is eating a Chick-fil-a sandwich a volunteer brought. Another is drinking red Gatorade. They all look a little bored and apathetic. Volunteers from Somos America come here every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday to give English lessons to mostly Spanishspeaking day laborers. Somos America is a worker’s rights movement under the Economic

Justice Coalition dedicated to helping improve the working conditions of Spanish-speaking immigrant workers. Moy lives on Lexington Road. He is 23 and an illegal immigrant. He smiles when he hears the phrase “Sueño Americano.” Historian James Truslow Adams coined the phrase “American Dream” in 1931. It is a difficult expression to define because its meaning is derived mostly by the individual. The United States has always had a fascination with individualism and the selfmade man. Montgomery Wolf, a lecturer of history at the University, says the Founding See DREAM, Page 7

Diamond Dogs fail to finish off Georgia Tech in loss Pitcher hits skid in eighth inning By DREW KANN THE RED & BLACK The rivalry between the Diamond Dogs and the Yellow Jackets in 2010 was hardly the hotly-contested onfield feud fans have become accustomed to seeing in recent years. Georgia Tech staked a firm claim to the state’s baseball bragging rights with their 6-4 defeat of the Diamond Dogs Tuesday night in Atlanta at Turner Field. Georgia failed to preserve an eighth inning 2-0 lead, as the Yellow Jacket bats battled back against the Georgia bullpen with a six-run

BASEBALL Georgia Tech 6, Georgia 4 eighth inning surge to earn the victory. With the win in the annual meeting between the two squads in the Spring Baseball Classic for Kids, Georgia Tech earned a sweep of the season series between the two squads, after the Yellow Jackets were victorious in two previous oncampus meetings in Athens and Atlanta. Despite the loss to its bitter instate rivals, Georgia still holds a 6-2 advantage all-time in meetings between the two squads at Turner Field. Unlike in the last meeting

TOONS

between the two squads — in which the Yellow Jackets hammered the Bulldog pitching staff for 25 runs on 25 hits at Foley Field — the 16,194 fans in attendance at Tuesday’s game were treated to a pitcher’s duel early. Georgia Tech starter Mark Pope was unhittable in his first five innings of work, as the right-hander had a no-hitter going through the fifth inning, registering nine strikeouts in his seven innings on the mound. The Bulldogs’ starter, freshman Blake Dieterich, was stellar as well, surrendering just one hit in five innings of work, a first inning double to Tech’s Tony Plagman. Georgia finally broke the deadlock in the bottom sixth after See LOSS, Page 10

Index

S Second baseman Levi Hyams went 2-for-5 from behind the plate with one RBI Tuesday night.

VEG(AN) OUT

Muhammad came to ‘South Park,’ but some people aren’t happy about it. What do students think? Page 2

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WES BLANKENSHIP | The Red & Black

TARGET PRACTICE

Compassionate cookies, cruelty-free cupcakes and barnyard-friendly brownies take over Tate today. Page 5 News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 6

Variety ..................... 5 Sports ...................... 9

Alumni and students hit the bull’s-eye in turning a traditional bar game into competitive sport. Page 8 Crossword ............... 2 Sudoku .................... 9


NEWS

2 | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | The Red & Black

MAN ON THE STREET:

BRITTANY BAKER Senior Latin and classical culture major from Athens

‘South Park’ and Muhammad What started as a juvenile and crude cartoon about aliens and anal probes has blossomed into a scathing social satire — but with great humor comes great responsibility. The past two Wednesday nights have proved to be turning points in the history of “South Park.” You thought Matt Stone and Trey Parker had written everything under the sun considered off-limits, but for their 200th episode, these writers went for the ultimate taboo in the profession of cartoon art — a depiction of Muhammad. Some cartoonists have been murdered

for drawing Muhammad in a comical light, but these examples of Islamic militarism didn’t stop Stone and Parker from poking fun at the divine. In response, Comedy Central censored the show, and the group Revolution Muslim published a death threat, citing the death of Dutch filmmaker Theo van Gogh to prove how far they will go to defend their religion. We spoke with University students about their feelings concerning the controversy. — Michael Prochaska

TEXT: Some compare bill to seat belt laws ¢From Page 1 public safety first responders or individuals who are lawfully parked, making emergency phone calls or reporting crimes. Those caught in violation of this new bill would receive a fine “not less than $50 nor more than $100.” Offenders would also receive one point against their license. A similar bill has also been passed in the Georgia House. Before any laws are changed, however, the minor differences between the House and Senate versions must be worked out in committee by the end of the legislative session Thursday. Skeptics of the bill argue it will be difficult to enforce. However, Rep. Allen Peake (R-Macon) told Georgia Public Broadcasting this does not concern him. “This bill will change behavior,” he said. “Members have said that it’s difficult to enforce. Well, let me tell you something: the seat belt law, the

16-year-old restriction driving laws, DUI laws — they all changed behavior.” Peake is not the only person drawing comparisons between the texting legislation and the seat belt laws. “People already know its dangerous,” said Shannon Philipps, an exercise and sports science major from Peachtree City. “This bill will just give more incentive to be safer. It’s kind of like wearing a seat belt.” Other University students seem to share the same sentiment. “I think its a good thing,” said Ben Vernon, an economics major from Atlanta. “A lot of people text and drive. Now that there’s a law, cops can start cracking down and saving lives.” Tuesday, the House also passed Senate Bill 458, which says passengers in the front seat of pickup trucks must wear a seat belt. Previously, the language of the seat belt law exempted pickup truck passengers. It only required passengers in cars, vans and SUVs to buckle up.

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

Pizza problems lead to police involvement Adam Christopher Moler, 20, and University employee, David Aaron

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“I definitely think that the threats were uncalled for. I think it was just a bit out of line considering it was ‘South Park.’”

“It’s a free speech issue. If anybody gets offended by the content, you don’t have to watch it.”

ONLINE

Police Documents Romine, 23, were arrested and charged with simple battery at 12:23 p.m. on April 27. According to an Athens-Clarke County Police report, an officer responded to a domestic disturbance report at Abbey West Apartments. Romine, who is an information technology security analyst for Enterprise Information Technology Services, reportedly told the officer he was having problems with his roommate, Moler. Romine told the officer he and Moler were having an argument. Romine reportedly then began to yell off the balcony intimate details about Moler and his girlfriend. When the officer spoke with Moler, Moler explained that two pieces of pizza were missing from his refrigerator. When Moler confronted Romine about it, Romine reportedly denied eating it, and Romine pushed Moler’s forehead with his forehead. The two reportedly “grabbed at each other’s arms,” and Moler later showed the police officer a small scratch on his arm. According to the report, Moler’s girlfriend, a witness, said she believes Romine “has some mental health issues, and he also owns a firearm.” Romine confirmed that he has a .22 rifle, which he keeps in his car. —Compiled by Polina Marinova

CORRECTIONS In Tuesday, April 27’s compilation of University community members who have died in the past year, it was reported that University student William McVay died on Dec. 13. McVay died on Dec. 11. Additionally, in Tuesday, April 27’s “Bear Hollow adopts new cubs,” Zoo Coordinator Berkeley Boone’s name was not spelled correctly. The Red & Black regrets these errors. The Red & Black is committed to journalistic excellence and providing the most accurate news possible. Contact us if you discover an error, and we will do our best to correct it. Editor-in-Chief: Chelsea Cook (706) 433-3027 editor@randb.com Managing Editor: Daniel Burnett (706) 433-3026 me@randb.com

Discover the new UGA Mail

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23 Cleaning cloths 25 Morsels 26 Use an ax 27 Back part 28 Very interested in 29 Claw 32 Theater employee 34 Facts and figures 35 Word of

“Whether or not it was in good taste was irrelevant. It was in bad taste, but people can make jokes; it’s your right to make a joke.”

STEPHAN PASTIS

TRANSMETROPOLITAN

Previous puzzle’s solution ACROSS 1 Worn out 6 Shine 10 Actor James __ 14 Saying 15 __ land; fantasy world 16 Mixture 17 Make obscure 18 Prayer 66 Part of a 41 Boy or closing wood joint man 19 Dieted successfully 42 Arrogant 67 Periods of history 20 Lampoon 44 Old Testament 68 __ 22 Item of little Skywalker; prophet value “Star Wars” 24 Withered 46 IRS colleccharacter tion 25 Bragged 47 Bestowed 69 Build 26 Auto49 Shocked nomous DOWN Ukrainian 51 Walk walk unsteadily 1 Keep __ peninsula 8 Bullring on; watch 29 Slight col- 54 Soft cheer carefully cheese oring 9 Promis2 Thought 55 Hug 30 Rooster’s cuous 56 Totally sep- 3 Simple mate 10 Sports stafloat arate 31 Crouch dium 4 Pomp60 Gorillas 33 African 11 In the air ousness 61 Puncture nation 5 Collegians’ 12 Theater 37 Barn din- 63 Blazing walkway goals 64 Gave temner 6 Cinnamon 13 Famous porarily 39 Tiny piece roll topping 21 Mosul resiof land in 65 James __ 7 Unable to dent Jones the sea

Junior social studies education major from Woodstock

“With something like that, that’s a key pillar to a religion. It’s better just to leave it alone.”

CRIME NOTEBOOK Indecent exposure reported University Police have launched an investigation into an indecent exposure incident after a female graduate teaching assistant reported a “suspicious” male walking on Lumpkin Street at 9:44 a.m. on April 26. The man reportedly waved to the girl to get her attention, and as she turned around, “she saw his exposed genitalia and saw that he was fondling himself.” The complainant said she wasn’t sure if the man said anything to her because she was wearing headphones, according to the report. She described the suspect wearing a maroon shirt and a camouflage-print backpack. Later the same day, at 11:39 a.m., a police officer saw a male walking on Thomas Street who matched the description of the complainant’s report. The officer talked to the suspect and the man reportedly told police he had spoken to several girls, but said he did not do anything inappropriate. He also told the officer he was on probation for an aggravated assault incident, which occurred in 2002. The officer was unable to contact the probation officer to verify the claim. When the officer contacted the complainant, she identified the man “as the man who exposed himself earlier in the day,” according to the report.

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sorrow 36 Bank teller’s word 38 Implies 40 Rips 43 Uses a shovel 45 Stir up 48 Container 50 Young cow 51 Weight revealer 52 Candle

53 Game site 54 Holy book 56 Gloomy 57 Square root of eighty-one 58 Swamp reptile, for short 59 Camper’s shelter 62 Fraternity letter


NEWS

The Red & Black | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | 3

CODE: Three-strike system deals with substance arrests ¢From Page 1 resolve referrals more informally. The proposed policy will allow us to address violations more efficiently with regard to the date of the incident.” Bennett said the changes will ease and reduce the number of minor incidents that clog the system under the old rules, and it will allow officials to focus more effectively on the more serious alcohol and drug violations. Former Student Government Association president Katie Barlow made the minimum sanctions policy a key component of her administration. “It’s certainly a long time coming,” Barlow said. “We’ve been working on it a while.” She emphasized the benefits of the changes. “The purpose fundamentally is to allow for a more equitable judicial policy and to give University Judiciary — which is primarily students — more discretion in cases and to provide a more philosoph- JACKSON ically educational component,” Barlow said. University president Michael Adams said the new policy was designed to differentiate between a student caught with a beer in a dorm refrigerator and a DUIrelated offense. “We deal more forthrightly with the more serious cases. Anyone who believes that this is a free pass on alcohol violations needs to return to base zero because that’s not what this is designed to be,” he said. “They might be wise to interpret the greater flexibility on major cases as a likelihood of even more significant penalties … I don’t think it’s just the head football coach who’s wary of the reputation of the University being impacted by egregious behavior.” When asked if the University was moving from a two-strike suspension rule to a three-strike policy, Adams said the new system will not make a blanket statement for how many charges one must accumulate before receiving punishment. Instead, penalties will range in severity based on a more prioritized system of hearing cases. “I would characterize the new policy as on the second strike there’s a higher level of judgment applied to the set of circumstances, so I don’t think we’re going to move to any three-strike situation,” Adams said. Minimum probation periods will remain the same for the first offense, and any violation thereafter will be heard by the University Judiciary. Students can expect a two-year trial period before the system will permanently be implemented, but the new rules will be in effect as soon as the start of this year’s Maymester term. Some students, however, will receive the short end of the stick, as the policy does not overturn previous suspensions or expulsions. Former student Michael Houck is one of the unlucky few. At last summer’s freshmen orientation, Houck was charged with underage consumption of alcohol and placed on probation for the academic year. Houck was subsequently cited on alcohol-related misconduct earlier this semester. “There were some people in my room drinking, and because I was in the room while they were in there drinking, I was condoning it, and the RA that wrote our

IT’S OFFICIAL

ONLINE

Coverage of the afternoon’s University Council meeting

room up wrote me up, too, and I ended up getting suspended for it,” he said. Houck plans to return to the University in January 2011, when he will be allowed to transfer his credits from a community college. Had the new system been in place, Houck may still have been suspended, but his case would have been a lower priority for Judiciary members to hear, and he might have gotten a lesser punishment. “I feel like that’s a more forgiving system,” Houck said. “People have been talking to me, asking if I’m upset that I wasn’t grandfathered into that, and it’s unfortunate that it’s right after I’m getting suspended, but I would rather see them change it than have other people fall into the same situation as I did.” Houck also said he believes more can be done to amend the University’s suspension policy. “I was booted from the meal plan because my student account was shut off, so any time that I would come up there and visit, I wouldn’t be able to eat at the dining halls,” Houck said. Houck said he was surprised University Food Services refused to reimburse him for the meal plan he had already paid for. So as not to receive failing grades in the classes he couldn’t finish, Houck also had to use up all four withdrawals students are allowed before being forced to take a failing grade. “For the rest of college I’m not allowed to withdraw from a class without it being an F on my GPA,” he said. Jerrod Lukacs, a senior from Lawrenceville and executive director of University Judiciary, said withdrawal issues are not being disregarded. He said Associate Dean of Student Affairs Kimberly Ellis is looking into reviewing the withdrawal policy in reference to suspensions. Lukacs helped formulate the new policy and said committee members’ main focus was more on implementing a more priority-based system than on the details of suspension regulations. The reformed Code of Conduct regulations moved swiftly through the judicial process so upcoming freshmen will be subject to its rules for orientation. “We wanted to do that so that it would be uniform for all the students coming in during the summer,” Lukacs said. Tom Jackson, vice president for public affairs, said students with a history of arrests and misconduct will be subject to the new rules the same as anyone else. University Judiciary will also continue to obtain police reports from the University and Athens-Clarke County police, he said. When Houck returns to the University, he will not forget his experience with sanctions. Houck said he plans to teach others what he’s learned in hopes that they will not make the same mistakes or be subject to the same difficulties. “When I come back, I’m going to make sure that any incoming freshmen or anyone that’s younger than I am knows what happened to me,” he said. “I think awareness is probably the best part of preventing anything from happening.”

PAIGE VARNER | The Red & Black

S Katie Barlow passed the baton to Josh Delaney Tuesday night as he and his Student Government Association administration took oaths of office. Delaney’s first item of business is working out the kinks in his proposal to include at-large Senate seats for campus organizations.

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4 | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | The Red & Black

NEWS

Georgia Council for the Arts funding uncertain By JULIA CARPENTER THE RED & BLACK

LILY PRICE | The Red & Black

S Candles placed on the Chapel steps Tuesday memorialize those lost in the past school year.

Vigil for deceased honors lives lost By PATRICK HOOPER THE RED & BLACK More than 200 people rose as one when the ROTC presented the state and national colors in “Georgia Remembers... a Candlelight Memorial,” hosted at the Chapel Tuesday evening. SGA President Josh Delaney read aloud the names of the past year’s deceased alongside Stuart Ivy and Jeffrey Dorfman.

The names represented the students, faculty and staff lost. The tradition of holding the service began at the end of spring semester 2000. “It’s a young tradition we hope to nurture and support,” said Alan Campbell, senior associate dean for student support. This year, strong winds forced the event inside the Chapel after a large branch fell across the venue.

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On April 21, the Georgia Senate agreed to restore $900,000 in the fiscal year 2011 state budget to serve as funding for the arts, but the University’s arts community still isn’t completely sure how this funding will affect them — or even if this funding is as much of a bonus as the state paints it to be. Jenny Williams, public relations coordinator for the Georgia Museum of Art, remains skeptical of the legislators’ sudden change of heart. “It might not be an increase,” she said. “It’s actually looking like a decrease.” Williams said the state Legislature originally cut the Georgia Council for the Arts budget from $2.5 million to $800,000. The Georgia Council for the Arts is a state agency that awards grants to encourage arts programming, and organizations such as the Georgia Museum of Art apply for these grants every year. With the newly-passed $900,000 restoration calcu-

lated into its budget, the GCA still only has $1.7 million to spend — $800,000 less than in past years. However, the Senate voted Tuesday to allow for another means of funding local arts programs. The bill would allow local governments to put a penny sales tax option on the ballot to help fund the arts, the Atlanta JournalConstitution reported. All budget decisions and state legislation will have to be finalized by the end of the legislative session on Thursday. Still, Williams said, the museum won’t be killed by the proposed cuts — it just makes getting money all the more difficult. “In years past, due to our great proposals, we’ve been awarded different amounts of money for different projects,” she said. “With our decreased state budget, we’re going to need more things like the Georgia Council for the Arts, more of these alternative funding options. They will be more of a necessity for us to operate at the same level of excellence as we always have.” William Eiland, director

of the Georgia Museum of Art, said about 47 percent of the museum’s funding comes from the state. The majority of the museum’s budget, the other 53 percent, relies on private funding. “We raise the money,” he said. “Just a small part of it has been supported by the Georgia Council for the Arts in the past.” Eiland said there have also been times when the museum relied more heavily on funding from the council. “We have used those funds for general operating when we have, for example, needed it at the end of the year,” he said. “With the budget cuts, we needed stamps, telephone, insurance for the collection.” Dale Monson, director of the Hugh Hodgson School of Music, expressed similar doubt over how much help this $900,000 restoration would provide his college. “It would have a marginal effect,” he said. “I mean, it doesn’t pay the light bills. That historically won’t have much impact on our academic pro-

grams.” Monson said the newlypassed funding could help develop a stronger art program at the University as it attracts more applicants in coming years. “It certainly helps our students in work they may be doing,” he said. “These grants are often given for musicians to perform in public schools, and that would definitely have an impact in the long run. More children will be impacted by that and may want to be performers and come to us.” Beset with economic problems, the GCA recently changed its online mission statement from “providing access to the arts for all Georgians” to “access to the arts for all Georgians with the primary responsibility to the state’s nonprofit arts industry.” “The Council’s mission has traditionally been — and I’m not using the language, I’m not even paraphrasing — but their mission has been to support the arts community in Georgia,” Eiland said. “I hope that continues to be their mission.”

Adams requests more student involvement in arts By ADINA SOLOMON THE RED & BLACK University President Michael Adams has a job for you. At Tuesday’s Cabinet meeting, Adams said he wants more students to attend performances at the University’s Performing Arts Center. Adams, who has attended performing arts functions in the past, noted a lack of student attendance. But George Foreman, director of the PAC since Jan. 1, said the University boasts a high student participation rate in performing arts events, though he said he will “work toward increased student attendance.” “The Performing Arts Center actually has a pretty good student attendance compared to the rest of the world. On average, 10 to 11 percent of the audience is made up of students,” Foreman said. “This is actually above the national average, but increasing student participation will be a serious ongoing effort.” He said in order to encourage

students to go to theater productions, there will be new student prices, online ticketing and the ability to use Bulldog Bucks to pay for tickets. The University’s center includes two world-class concert halls. Both of the halls host shows featuring jazz, classical music, ballet and folk dance. The center will house more than 125 performances next year. “The Performing Arts Center is in the business of presenting performances,” Foreman said at the Cabinet meeting Tuesday. As the center moves forward, Foreman said he wants to make the schedule more varied. “I was interested in including as many recognizable names as possible in next year’s schedule,” he said. But Foreman said he also plans to have lesser-known performers at the PAC, as they could prove to be just as talented as famous ones. “The greatest cello player in the world may be someone we’ve never heard of,” he said. “All the artists on

next year’s schedule are all artists of the highest caliber.” Foreman also said the Classic Center and the Performing Arts Center will join together to host performances. “I expect there will be an announcement in the next two or three weeks. When that comes, I guarantee you there will be names you’ll know and performances you’ll want to attend,” he said. Changes closer to campus are also coming. Foreman described the ticket system for productions at the Fine Arts building as antiquated. “If you’ve ever bought a ticket to a theater department production, you know their box office system should be in a museum,” Foreman said. “Everything is done by hand, even handwritten tickets.” Foreman said next year, the PAC box office will handle the ticketing for performances at the Fine Arts building, improving the process. —Michael Prochaska contributed to this story


NEWS & VARIETY

The Red & Black | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | 5

Pair of Dance Dawgs goes pro

ADAMS: ‘Happy at UGA’ ¢From Page 1 University Council meeting. “I have known Dr. Emmert to be a very effective and very capable president and he will perform likewise in his new role as president,â€? Adams said in a statement to the media. “I congratulate him and wish him well.â€? Adams was named president of the University in June 1997. He is often recognized for the amount of funding he has brought in — with external funding for research, public service and instruction totals hitting approximately $200 million annually. He also established the Arch Foundation, a private gifts and donations corporation, in 2005, and exceeded his $500 million Archway to Excellence Campaign goal by bringing in an additional $154 million in gifts and pledges. “I’m happy at UGA,â€? Adams has said in several formal settings to reporters. “I will stay as long as the Board of Regents will have me.â€?

By NATHAN SORENSEN THE RED & BLACK Two of the Dance Dawgs will not be dancing for the University basketball games next semester. Reneau Kadis and Bristen Mann became the two newest members of the Atlanta Falcons cheerleading squad after auditioning for four days in Atlanta. Both dancers said the try-outs were a rigorous experience. “It was definitely nerveracking, but exciting at the same time,� Mann said. Kadis, a senior and captain of the Dance Dawgs, said her four years on the squad helped her with the move to the Falcons. “It’s definitely prepared me for the next level,� she said. “I have seen so much progress in the four years I’ve been in the spirit program.� The Atlanta Falcons’ five-day audition hosted more than 250 girls who performed in front of 15 judges, said Ashley Clark,

UGA Courtesy photo

S Bristen Mann and Reneau Kadis, two University Dance Dawgs, have been selected to serve as new Atlanta Falcons football cheerleaders. dance coordinator for the Dance Dawgs. “That week is really kind of hectic for anybody,� said Clark of the audition week. “You know you can dance and you know you have a good body, but you never know what the judges are looking for.� With eight out of the 32 total cheerleaders on the

Falcons squad coming from the University, the Dance Dawgs have a “rich tradition� of sending members to the Atlanta Falcons, Clark said. “We’ve had at least 10 to 15 Dance Dawgs make the Atlanta Falcons,� she said. Kadis, who has danced and cheered since an early age, said she was more.

than nervous to move onto the Falcons. “It’s kind of scaring me to go to the next level,� she said, “but it’s a really exciting opportunity.� Mann said she agreed making the Atlanta Falcons was a thrill. “I’m finally going to get paid to do what I love,� she said.

Vegan bake sale offers animal-friendly treats By CRISSINDA PONDER THE RED & BLACK Today’s treats are udderly recommended and chick approved. Although baking usually involves the use of butter, milk and eggs, the sweets on sale today at Tate Plaza are not made with any of the three. The Worldwide Vegan Bake Sale — sponsored by the University’s animal advocacy group, Speak Out for Species — will feature animal-friendly desserts. “This is the second annual Worldwide Vegan Bake Sale, but it’s the first year that S.O.S. is participating in it,� said Jenny Aszman, S.O.S. co-president. Voted the 2009 “Veg Event of the Year� by VegNews Magazine, the

VEGAN BAKE SALE When: Today 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Where: Tate Plaza Price: $1 to $2

bake sale features baked goods such as brownies, cookies and cupcakes. Chocolate chip cookies will also be provided by Earth Fare, an organic supermarket. “We want to make people aware of the fact that vegan baked goods can be just as tasty as ‘traditional’ baked goods,� said Claire Rice, S.O.S. social coordinator. “You’ll never miss the eggs, milk and butter!�

Most of the sweets for sale will come from S.O.S. members who have baked them at home. “We want to let people know that they can make baked goods without using animal products,� Aszman said. The items are expected to sell for $1 to $2, with all proceeds benefitting Athens Canine Rescue — a volunteer network of foster homes for animals. “Athens Canine Rescue is such an awesome organization, and I would love to see students get involved through fostering and participating in adoption days,� Rice said. “But for those students who don’t have the time to do those things, donating a small amount of money is an equally important way to contribute.�

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6 | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | The Red & Black

Chelsea Cook | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Daniel Burnett | Managing Editor me@randb.com Yasmin Yonis | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

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Our Take

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

Hooray for Adams The University can rest easy knowing its beloved leader is sticking around Uncross your fingers, guys. After months of speculation that University President Michael Adams would be chosen as the president of the NCAA, the good news finally came. University of Washington President Mark Emmert got the job. That means Michael Adams is here to stay. Though the job would have been an amazing opportunity for Adams, the University is lucky he was passed over. Without Adams, who would The Red & Black’s cartoonist lambaste on a weekly basis? Without Adams, who would bravely face fundraising parties full of potential donors in a mansion yet to undergo extensive, expensive and arguably unnecessary renovations? Without Adams, who would the campus blame for everything from budget cuts to an unexpected snowstorm? Adams is often the scapegoat for the University’s woes. It is easy to focus on his shortcomings. However, with the NCAA’s choice made, the speculation period is over, leaving Adams free to continue focusing on the myriad of issues facing the University. Lucky us. — Paige Bowman for the editorial board

A sobering reality Policy changes for Judiciary programs now allow for more fair punishments Congratulations, UGA. You’ve finally realized there’s a difference between getting caught sober in a dorm room where other students are drinking and getting pulled over on Broad Street after $1 Yuengling night. Under the old minimum sanctions rules, it was two strikes and you’re out when it comes to alcohol and drug offenses — regardless of the situation. But thanks largely to the efforts of our Student Government Association, starting in May, second offenses will no longer lead to an automatic suspension. The Office of Judiciary Programs will have some leeway before deciding whether to give a student the boot from the University. Unfortunately, this distinction came a little too late for one student. Former University freshman Michael Houck was caught in a dorm room where other students were drinking, and because this was his second offense — the first being an alcohol-related mishap during freshmen orientation — he won’t be able to return to the University until January. Should the University differentiate between a student found with a bottle of Mr. Boston vodka tucked away in a dorm room and the guy careening drunkenly through downtown with no headlights and no regard for the lives of others? Absolutely. The editorial board commends former SGA president Katie Barlow’s administration and the University for making this long-awaited change a reality. But there’s more to be done. A suspension forces students to withdraw from their classes, possibly exhausting their four opportunities to withdraw without automatically failing. Associate Dean of Student Affairs Kimberly Ellis said the office is looking into amending the withdrawal policy for students who have been suspended. We support this action. Suspension from the University is already sobering enough without having to fail all your classes. — Daniel Burnett for the editorial board

Charge passengers based on weight M

y favorite discount airline broke my heart when they announced the implementation of the $45 carry-on fee. I’ve traveled to see my sister in Florida using Spirit Air for the past three years, packing only the essentials in a tiny carry-on to save money. Sorry, sis — looks like that option is no longer the cheapest. I understand times are tough and the price of fuel is only rising while more and more planes are parked on the tarmac. I understand the need to increase prices — but carry-on fees? Why, Spirit? There’s a better solution out there, one most people are using to exemplify the absurdity of this new fee — but I don’t support the backlash. In fact, I’m behind the ludicrous suggestion 100 percent. Why not charge people by the pound? Now before you start huffing and puffing, making claims I’m just another insensitive person trying to single out the heavier members of the population — let me explain. I don’t believe in discriminating against people based on their size. That being said, I strongly believe in paying for what you use. And the more weight you carry — bags or otherwise — the heavier the plane becomes and the more fuel used to reach your destination. No one has an ethical problem with Delta charging a steep fee

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when your checked bag weighs over 50 pounds. No one has an ethical problem with Kroger charging more for two pounds of filet mignon than one. In fact, it’s pretty standard to pay for what you use, no judgment attached. Georgia Power doesn’t judge you when you use 1,000 kilowatts more than your neighbor. You suck it up and pay the bill. It’s called being responsible. This business model, which I believe is far more effective than a standard carry-on fee, fits the American motto of getting what you pay for. How many of you are complaining about my stance on this issue? OK. How many of you complain about welfare recipients who get money for not working? That’s what I thought. Apply a weight limit that accompanies every ticket — let’s say it’s 100 pounds. Each additional pound costs an additional dollar. Simple. When you enter the airport, you get weighed — bags, shoes, the whole kit and kaboodle. Anything you’re taking on the plane adds to the amount of the fuel needed, and therefore your ticket price.

— Samantha Shelton is a senior from Auburn majoring in newspapers and women’s studies

Mailbox

E-mail and letters from our readers

Graduate school better after job experience Marcie, Marcie, Marcie. I think — no, I know — you have this all wrong. In your April 27 editorial, “Put job search on hold for education,” you encourage jobless and graduating students to simply stay in school and wait out the hunt for employment. Opting to extend your education to graduate school simply because you don’t have a job prospect upon graduation is not a solution to your problem. It is, instead, a terrible idea. For some. I know how difficult the job market is to navigate right now. I know how scary it can seem to take the leap of graduating with the idea of (gasp!) having to live at home for a few months while things pan out. But I also know how difficult it is to deal with graduate student classmates who just don’t want to be there, especially for grad students like myself, who gave up a career to pursue the calling of higher education. Graduate school is a big decision, and not one that should be taken lightly. It works best after a few years of in-the-field practice, after you’ve sharpened your undergraduate talents and know how to apply the skill set you learned in college the first go round. For some majors, taking a straight shot from undergrad to graduate school is a good idea; in fact, it may be the only idea. But for most of us, graduate school isn’t a mandatory stepping stone.

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

SAMANTHA SHELTON

“But Samantha, what about privacy?” I’m not suggesting a carnival scale, lined with lights and a clown on stilts passing out balloons. The weight would pop up on a computer screen, only to be seen by the airline worker, who will then automatically charge the credit card you used to book the flight for the difference. I’m all for privacy rights — your weight is your private, personal business. It’s not like you share it every time you buy a six-pack from Tall Boy. It’s not like we have eyes that can ballpark the weight of an item by looking at it. It’s not like anyone really cares. Honestly, I understand and respect that certain conditions can cause weight gain outside the realm of someone’s control, and charging by the pound is unfair. But I have to spend $60 every two months on contacts because I inherited my father’s astigmatism. Life isn’t fair — but capitalism should be. And charging a standard fee for a carry-on, citing increased fuel use for reasoning while overlooking the bodybuilder sitting next to me whose left arm is heavier than my suitcase — that’s not just unfair, it’s illogical.

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I am never one to discourage people from seeking out education. By all means, if you want to go to graduate school, I urge you to do so. Look at me: I did. But I truly want to be here, earning my additional educational stripes. Picking graduate school just because you don’t have any other immediate options not only is the easy way out, it also cheapens the experience for those who honestly want to be back in the classroom. ANNA FERGUSON Graduate student, St. Simons Journalism

Courage needed during ‘draining’ job search Ms. Opraseuth, please don’t tell me you think that because you are going to graduate school that you are “better off than those who decide to enter the workforce.” That single statement puts you against many of our qualified colleagues who are accepting jobs or are still searching. As an out-of-state student who hasn’t had the luxury of HOPE these past four years and has been paying nearly $10,000 a semester, graduate school isn’t exactly a feasible option right now. Although I know more education could only

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benefit me down the road, I’ve got a long stream of student loan payments staring me in the face. Yes, the economy stinks right now, but I’m simply asking you to support those who are still sending out résumé after résumé and are not giving up. The job search is a grueling process. Those of us who have gone through it know how difficult and draining it can be, and the last thing we need is someone telling us it’s all for nothing. For some people, graduate school is the path to take. For others — like myself — a job right out of school is a more appropriate fit. There are those like yourself who need more education to round out their degrees, and there are those of us who can be successful simply with our bachelor’s degree, or as you said, “the equivalent to a high school degree.” Understand that your personal brand is more than your grades and GPA; it’s your background, your personality and the confidence to work with what you’ve got. If you’d like to “play it safe” and go to graduate school for a couple of years, that’s fine. But please don’t go around discrediting those of us who are brave enough to take a risk. KELSEY ANDRICH Senior, Birmingham, Ala. Management information systems

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VARIETY

The Red & Black | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | 7

Local artists earn money selling on Etsy By SOPHIE LOGHMAN THE RED & BLACK It can be compared to eBay, but with a little more vintage flare to it. Great for those too lazy to head to thrift shops and flea markets, Etsy is a place to buy and sell all things handmade, such as art, clothing, photography, jewelry and toys. Launched in 2005, Etsy requires all users to sell unique, individual goodies. There’s no room for designer items — nothing can be in bulk or produced by a machine. Etsy’s vision is to build a new economy that bases itself on buying, selling, and living handmade. Lauren Harrell, who graduated from the University in 2001, worked as a fulltime kitchen and bath designer until she decided to take a risk and work full-time as a freelance artist. This change led her to launch her own Etsy shop in 2009. “I only sell a few pieces a month on Etsy,” Harrell said. “But I’ve never regretted opening my shop. It was an affordable way for me to have an Internet presence before I created a website.” Now Harrell’s website, artworkandinteriors.com, hosts the widest scope of her work. Harrell’s pieces, which can be described as both whimsical and heartfelt, are made up of watercolor and acrylic paint. “Nature inspires me daily and provides an endless source for inspiration,” she said. “I also have to give credit to my mom. She sends me poems on a regular basis that usually gets the creative juices flowing.” Harrell says nursery art is her favorite category to draw. “The customers take pictures of the nursery, send fabric swatches, tell me about colors they’re using, and my piece becomes a main part of the room’s décor,” she said. “It’s pretty rewarding.”

*** For Stephanie Blair, a third year MFA student studying fabric design, finding time to sell items is no problem for her workload. In 2008, Blair made a bold move and decided to create her own Etsy Shop after hearing about it from a couple of her friends. “I was surprised there was a market for my items,” said Blair, who designs kooky, vintage eyewear. Etsy isn’t just a place to sell artwork, but also a place to buy unique vintage pieces and support other thriving artists. An avid eyewear collector herself, Blair’s rooms started to get overcrowded with too many glasses, so she decided to sell her goodies. “I try to support makers of all kinds since I will be hoping to get income from the industry very soon,” Blair said. “I think it’s important to strike a balance between buying local and buying from skilled artisans you find on the Internet.” She plans to expand her Etsy store as time allows. “Right now I only sell glasses,” Blair said. “But I’m hoping to eventually branch out into vintage clothing, then start hand-making fiber art-related items, since that is my degree focus.” However, not all Etsy experiences are positive. Taylor Wilkins, a sophomore photography major, has not had as much luck with Etsy compared to others. “My experience hasn’t been all that favorable, although I don’t update as often as I should,” Wilkins said. Wilkins began selling items on Etsy during her senior year of high school, and has only made 18 sales to date. “I’ve sold a fair amount of note card sets and a few smaller prints, but nothing major,” she said. “I mostly just use it as a means of getting exposure and for networking.” As a photography major, Wilkins is very much consumed by the workload of

WES BLANKENSHIP | The Red & Black

S University sophomore Taylor Wilkins earns extra pocket change selling her photos on Etsy, a website for handmade arts and crafts. her classes. However, when time allows, she tries to go outside and snap a few pictures for her Etsy page. For inspiration, Wilkins likes to drive and explore places that she’s not familiar with. “It’s very hard to juggle selling and schoolwork, which is why I’m so behind,” she said. Even though her site hasn’t gotten as many hits as she would like, Wilkins still

DREAM: Ideals different for every American ¢From Page 1 Fathers based the U.S. government on a meritocracy, a government in which responsibility is assigned and officials are elected according to their merits. Adams called it “a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position.” For many, the dream remains a promise that each individual has an equal opportunity to succeed. *** Moy came to the U.S. three years ago. He hasn’t been back to visit since he got to Georgia, not because it’s too hard to get back home, but because it’s too hard to get back in the U.S.. Moy says he likes it here because he has work. He didn’t want to come here and be forced to leave his family and friends, but he is paying for his sister to go to university in Mexico. Before he came to America, he was studying to be an electrician. He smiles sadly when he says he would settle for being a resident of the United States, not even a full citizen. The process of obtaining citizenship is too difficult. Moy’s American Dream is to own his own business and his own house where he and his family can live. His initial plan was to come to America to make money and then go back, but the plan may be changing. Things are going well. He likes it here. More often than not, the phrase “American Dream” conjures up images of pretty little houses, 2.5 kids, minivans and Little League baseball games — it overwhelmingly provokes an image of the suburbs. In the late 1940s and 1950s, “owning a suburban house was the marker of being a good American,” said Melissa Estes Blair, lecturer of history at UGA. Owning the same house and same car as your neighbor was encouraged. Conformity was essential to being a good American. It was frowned upon for anyone to be different. “It’s about being the same as everybody else so we all could band together and work against the Communists,” Blair said. The G.I. Bill and other government policy also helped to advance suburban development. Sameness was the goal of 1950s America. And suburbia achieved it. The suburban version of American Dream is exactly

what Lindsey Reynolds is looking to avoid. She wants nothing to do with it, and she makes that quite clear. “I don’t think that if you were born in America you can have an American Dream because you’ve been strangled by it your whole life,” Reynolds said. After a few moments she added, “That was dramatic.” But her words speak a familiar truth. A fourth-year painting major, Reynolds grew up in a four-bedroom, two-and-ahalf bathroom house in Marietta. Her father is a lawyer, her mother a trained pharmacist and stay-at-home mom. She has two sisters and two dogs. She is the first person to say that her parents are some of the nicest people she knows and that they are happy with their life in the suburbs — statements that prove to be a sharp juxtaposition with her opinion. “I’d rather be homeless than live in the suburbs,” she said. “I don’t think you can grow up here and have a concept of America because your America is your city, your town and your high school. That’s not all of America … ‘let me jam this college application down your throat’ doesn’t count as wanting some-

“I don’t think that if you were born in America you can have an American Dream because you’ve been strangled by it your whole life.” LINDSEY REYNOLDS

SENIOR PAINTING MAJOR

thing. It’s just following the conveyor belt.” *** Wes Russo’s path to achieving a quintessential part of the American Dream was unexpected and most definitely unplanned. He began his journey as a history major at the College of Charleston with the intention of going to law school. Instead, he transferred to the University and opened a small business — a very successful restaurant in downtown Athens on Clayton Street called Transmetropolitan. Transmet, specializing in pizza and pasta, opened Sept. 1, 2001, and has been serving up food and drinks for more than nine years. Russo is humble when asked about the success of his restaurant.

When he says he never did it for financial success, it’s easy to believe him. “I don’t feel like because the restaurant is successful I’ve ‘made it’ in the traditional sense, because I think the most enjoyment I get out of it are the things that don’t involve the financial aspect of it,” he said. Russo is conscious of the good and bad aspects of owning a small business. Sometimes it’s overwhelming but he has no regrets. He likes working for himself. “Waking up and putting on a suit and tie — or a costume, as I like to call it — I don’t know if I could have ever done that,” he said. Opening a successful small business at the age of 24 qualifies Russo as having achieved a certain façade of the American Dream. Certainly, he evokes envy in the hearts of those who have tried and failed, and stirs encouragement in those looking to do the same. Owning a successful small business can easily be seen as the epitome of success in America. However, Russo is modest when asked whether he believes he has achieved the American Dream. “Well, if it means the pursuit of happiness, then yes,” he said.

enjoys shopping on Etsy. “There is an abundance of unique jewelry that you won’t see anyone else wearing, which is always nice,” Wilkins said. In Wilkins’ opinion, thrift shopping in Athens still beats out buying online. “I don’t necessarily think [Etsy] could replace local thrift stores and vintage shopping,” Wilkins said. “First of all, there’s something special about finding a gem in a thrift store — something that seems special to you.”


VARIETY

8 | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | The Red & Black

Dart league lacks membership

Athens’ poverty stars in film

By EVA VASQUEZ THE RED & BLACK

By ADAM CARLSON THE RED & BLACK In Athens-Clarke County, the poor are only getting poorer. This is what “Chop from the Top: A Case for a Living Wage” hopes to communicate. Produced and directed by a trio of University students — Avery White, Kristin Andrews and Lindsey Hudson — the documentary is a look into the lives of those struggling against a shrinking budget as well as what it means on a personal level when budgets are cut. “We decided, OK, let’s do a documentary on something that’s pressing and buzzing in Athens, and that buzzword right now is ‘budget cuts,’” White said. The work, which began as a senior thesis project, features interviews with a variety of people on issues connected to the working-poor. When dealing with how best to portray the issue of poverty in Athens, the filmmakers faced a dilemma in putting “a different face” on the problem, Hudson said. “It was something we felt was really important to do,” Andrews said. “We didn’t just want to put one face on the poor.” They found their solution in the first-hand accounts from workers on and around campus. One example high-

Courtesy Avery White

S ‘Chop from the Top,’ a new senior thesis documentary, puts a ‘different face’ on the issue of living wage and its effect on Athens.

CHOP FROM THE TOP When: Tonight at 6:30 Where: MLC 248 Price: Free lighted by the trio is the story of a University alumnus who graduated three years ago. After majoring in English, he entered into a job climate unlike what he expected and eventually — after previously commuting one hour to a job paying $8.50 an hour — found a job back at the University as a library assistant. The position, to his surprise, paid as much as that of a janitor. However, not all subjects were willing to talk. Often they ran up against the workers’ hesitation toward appearing on tape to complain about their jobs. The film “shows these people really don’t have a voice,” White said. With “Chop from the Top,” White, Andrews and Hudson aim to change that. More importantly, they want to compile data that already exists into one location in

order to re-focus the conversation on major issues affecting the local community. Citing the arguments for a living wage such as decreased dependence on government programs including welfare and food stamps, White said the documentary portrays more than just the standard arguments for aiding those below the poverty line. “No one can go out from this film without understanding that poverty affects us all,” Andrews said. Further, “Chop from the Top” emphasizes the necessity of a living wage for those currently without it, showing the daily struggles of employees working — and failing — to make ends meet. In making the documentary, the trio found the issues and problems to be complex, involving social, cultural and economic factors. But the reason for presenting and discussing them was simple. The living wage “is our idea of humanity,” Hudson said. “This is our idea of survival.”

Throwing one pointed dart and hitting the bull’s-eye: the great equalizer. Athens Dart Association brings together dart fanatics from all walks of life with one common goal — the bull’s-eye. “It’s a very different mix of people — we have Ph.D.s, nurses, teachers, students, repairmen and some people that don’t work at all,” said ADA treasurer Jen Gibbs. Jen is married to Mark Gibbs, the vice president of the Athens Dart Association, and they have been dueling it out dartsstyle since the first time they met. “We drew each other in a blind draw tournament,” Jen Gibbs said. Jen and Mark Gibbs do not mess around when it comes to darts. Jen was once in the top-10 in the nation, and Mark was president of ADA for 10 years. They know everything possible about the league, but who is the reigning champion of the household is up for debate. Mark abdicated the ADA presidency to Todd Lawrence, with whom he joined the league along with current secretary Nathan Freeman when the three were all University students. However, student participation is not what it used to be. It is a goal of all the officers to get more students involved. “About 25 percent of the league is involved with the University in some way, and the other 75 percent are Athens locals or townies,” Lawrence said. The league has two seasons — one in the fall and one in spring. “We purposefully schedule things to run along with the University schedule,” Lawrence said. At first glance, the Athens Dart Association is simply an organization of teams playing bar games, but in reality, darts is quite a competitive sport — it just happens to usually take place at bars. There is strategy to the game, and there have even been cases where teams try to steal players from rival teams. “It can get pretty heated,” Mark Gibbs said. Part of that probably has to do with the inclusion of alcohol, but not all meets occur at bars. Local restaurants can be venues for meets as well. “We have teams throwing out of Locos,” Lawrence said. There are currently four divisions — A through D — in the Athens Dart Association, which is much fewer than the league had in its glory years. “When I first joined in the mid-’90s there was more of a scene for it,” Lawrence said. “We had divisions A through G.”

TO JOIN A TEAM Website: www.athensdarts.net President: Todd Lawrence lawrence190@charter.net Vice President: Mark Gibbs markgibbs68@gmail.com Treasurer: Jen Gibbs - jenngibbs72@gmail.com Secretary: Nathan Freeman - nathanf@uga.edu

When a team is first created, it starts off in the lowest division which is currently division D. At the end of the season, the top two teams move up to the next division. For example, Freeman’s team — the “Church Street Chuckers” — started out in the C division and eventually made its way up to A, where the team has stayed ever since. “I like to think of us as a rising power,” Freeman said. Mark and Jen Gibbs both play for the reigning ADA city champions, the “Orphans,” and they consider themselves the team to beat. “Mark and I have been throwing in A since before ’93,” Jen Gibbs said. “I am the only female in the A division.” Each team has a “home bar,” and most bars will pay their team’s dues because it is a great way to bring in business. Not only does ADA bring business to bars — the league also makes an effort to give to charities. “We donate $500 to Toys for Tots each year, and we donated $400 to Northeast Georgia Food Bank this year,” Jen Gibbs said. It is too late in the season to create a new team, but for those interested, there is still room on a few teams for players. To join the league, contact the secretary, Freeman, or any of the other officers for more information. ADA also has a website with details and a full schedule of their season.


SPORTS

The Red & Black | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | 9

Dogs’ QB depth could dwindle to two By NICK PARKER THE RED & BLACK A scary depth chart possibility looms at quarterback for the Georgia Bulldogs. In the two weeks since the three-way quarterback battle of spring practice ended, Zach Mettenberger has been dismissed from the squad and the projected No. 2 in Logan Gray is weighing his options of playing for other programs. With Gray tossing around the idea of transferring, the Bulldogs could be left with an inexperienced true freshman behind postspring No. 1 Aaron Murray. That leaves the question of injuries looming for Georgia. “If we don’t get hurt, I feel fine. If you have injuries, it could be tough, it could be very tough,” head coach Mark Richt said of how he feels about the quarterback depth. And those were Richt’s words before Gray started to reconsider his future. With Mettenberger’s dismissal, and the possible loss of Gray, the burden falls on freshman Hutson Mason of Lassiter High School in Marietta to provide adequate depth as the third-string, or possibly backup, quarterback as a true freshman. “There’s no question there will be a greater sense of urgency in

the quarterback room to get him prepared,” Richt said Thursday. “Any time one guy gets one step closer on the depth chart, it’s going to change the amount of reps he would have gotten, and that’s going to prepare him more quickly than it would have with another quarterback in the mix.” Mason is talented. His state record-setting 4,560 passing yards last season are GRAY undeniable, but the idea of any freshman going up against a Southeastern Conference defense is one defensive coordinators salivate over. “I’m not saying anything bad about Hutson, but we know how difficult MASON it is for a true freshman to be able to function and not make a mistakes [in the SEC],” Richt said. “[Matthew] Stafford was the first pick of the draft, and he had rough times as a true freshman. What you saw Stafford go through is the natural progression of a quarterback. I don’t think any true freshman has the ability to come in there and

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1 M/F SHARE suite in 3BR 3BA luxury condo at The Woodlands. Near UGA, town. Beautiful clubhouse/ sports plex. Pets fine. $450. 706-714-7600 FEMALE ROOMMATE: PRIVATE Room & Bath in 3BR Woodlands of Athens Condo, $450/mo. includes all utilites, cable, internet. Call Courtney 972-841-7631 FEMALE ROOMMATE: TO share 2BR 2BA Woodlands of Athens Condo, $450/mo. + 1/2 utilities; $400 deposit. Avail 8/1/2010. Call 912659-8650 or 912-659-8651. ROOMMATE WANTED. PRICING starts at $315. No deposit required. Call for more information 1-877430-3615 THE WOODLANDS 2 Female Roommates needed for a 3BR 3BA cottage for the August 2010-August 2011 school year. Living room and kitchen come fully furnished; in a gated community with clubhouse, workout room, pools, etc. near campus. Please contact: ashleycleary@gmail.com WOODLANDS-FEMALE ROOMMATE 3BR 3BA Swimming, tennis, clubhouse! Available now. Lease $425/mo + 400 dep 1/3 utilities. No pets. Becky 770-823-7353 Between 10am-9pm.

$1075/ MO S. Milledge, walk to campus, bus out front, walk to 5Pts, 1 car garage, near Henry and S. Milledge. 2 to 3BR 3BA. Very large (1500 sqft.) No pets. Call Dillard Realty 706-202-2762 $1200 3BR 3BA house in Bridgewater Community near DT. W/D included. Prelease now for 8/1 move in. Call 706-296-5587 or billycrozier@aol.com $1280 4BR 4BA house on S. Milledge. Alarm systems, W/D, no pets. 706552-3500 hancockpropertiesinc.com

$1400 - HUGE 4 or 5BR 4BA Apt. walking distance to campus & downtown. 1 month free rent. 2 large LRs. Large utility rm. huge deck, W/D, DW. That’s only $280 per person. Approx 2500 sqft. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500 $1650 - 4 or 5BR Windsor Place Condo 1 LEFT COMPLETELY REMODELED) (5pts. area). That’s only $330 per person. All new flooring. cabinets, granite countertops, plumb & elect fixtures, appliances & HVAC. Looks brand new. 4 HUGE BRs, 3BA 2 LRs. lg. utility room. huge deck and pool. Downstairs LR can be an additional BR. Approx.2500 Sqft. MUST SEE! Prelease for fall 2010. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 $350 MONTH FOR 1/2 house - furnished! Private Bedroom, Office, Bath. Share Kitchen, LR, DR, Laundry with male tenant. 7 miles/15 minutes from UGA. 404-217-8266 $500 BACK TO Tenant at move-in or 1 Month Free Rent - Lg 3BR 2BA hse apt w/ big yard. 435 Clover St. $875/mo. 706-546-0600 $500/ MO. 1BR 1BA apartments in Cobb Hill close to UGA busline and DT. Lg BR w/ walk in closet, LG LR and open kitchen. Central to everything. See @ parkerandassociates.com 706-546-0600 $675/MO. 2BR 2BA Condo- Prince Ave. Lg Kit, LR/DR w/ patio/balcony & bedrooms. Pool, laundry, & plenty of parking. Parkerandassociates.com or 706-546-0600

play flawlessly.” As for a redshirt freshman’s capacity to lead the Georgia offense? “Well, I think he’s very equipped,” Richt said. “He has had the benefit of playing at Tampa Plant. He played on a state championship team. He played on a team that knew how to win and what it takes as far as camaraderie and unity. “I think if our team will respond to him regardless of his age, I think it will go very well, because he knows what it looks like, he knows what it feels like, and he’s very eager to do that, along with Logan’s leadership.” But Richt praised Gray, too, after the spring, and said he wasn’t prepared to name anyone the clear-cut starter for the season opener. “The main thing is [Logan] is much more comfortable, in my opinion, about knowing what to do and how to do it,” Richt said when releasing the depth chart. “The more you understand about quarterback and the more you can throw a ball on time to the right guy, the more accurate you become, no matter what your arm strength is or your footwork is or whatever.” As Gray irons out a decision, a once deep and talented quarterback pool could be left with only one big fish in two short weeks.

FILE | The Red & Black

S Redshirt freshman Aaron Murray leads a group of quarterbacks into unfamiliar territory on the field.

Classifieds

1BR 1BA LYNNROCK Apts. $490 with DW, water included. Block from campus off Baxter St. Text “lynnrock” to 41513 Joiner Management 706-353-6868 www.joinermanagement.com

1BR APTS W/ 1 MONTH FREE & NO PET FEE! Close to Campus & Downtown from $380-$425 NO SD w/ acceptable credit. That’s only $350-$390 w/ special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com. 706549-2500 2 AND 3BR Condos available Fall. Woodlands 3BR/3BA $1275 and Brookewood Mill 2BR/2.5BA End unit $900. Call Dillard Realty 706-3532333 owner/agent, mickey@dillardrealty.com 2BR 1BA APARTMENT in 5Pts. Great for Grad Students. Close to campus. W/D, DW, CHAC, Pets OK. Avail. 8/1 $700/mo. 706-369-2908. 2BR 1BA HOUSE 1/2 mile to campus. Bonus room, hdwd floors, W/D, DW, CHAC, fenced backyard. Pets ok. Available 8/1. $850/mo. 706-3692908. 2BR 2.5BA condo for rent. Appleby Mews Phase 1, Very close to downtown and campus. All appliances included, W/D connections inside condo. 1244 sq ft. Great storage, Pool in center of complex. $675 per month Contact Elizabeth 478-714-5702 2BR 2.5BA WOODLANDS, Gated. Large room/closet. W/D, all appliances. Hardwood/carpet, pool, tennis, fitness center. UGA busline, close to campus, available July 15th. $880/mo. 678-427-4977 2BR 2BA CONDO at the Summit of Athens. $950/mo. 3 miles from campus, less than 10 minute drive. Popular area for students 910-876-1030 michael.leinwand@gmail.com 2BR 2BA CONDO for rent. $100 bonus! Off S. Lumpkin, 1 mile from campus. Carpet and tile one year old, new paint, fireplace, storage area, W/D. Pets welcome. $725/mo. Owner/agent Michele 404-281-6273 sc10211975@gmail.com 2BR 2BA DUPLEX $650. w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $600 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, DW, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500 2BR 2BA LUXURY Flat at BROOKEWOOD MILL. Sophisticated, private, beautiful pool, woodland creek. Near UGA/ town, on busline. Pets fine. $900. 706-714-7600 2BR 2BA ON College Station. Huge apartment, FP, deck, lots of closets, DW, W/D, CHAC. Avail. now. Pets OK. $575/mo. 706-369-2908.

$900/ MO 2BR 2BA at The Summit. Resort style, gated Community w/ amazing amenities! Steps from bus, pool, clubhouse! W/D, appliances, & trash included. Ask for this special! 706552-0552 jennifer@parkerandassociates.com

2BR 2BA PARTIALLY furnished condo (BR unfurnished); W/D; already leased to one graduate student; located in Milledge Place; $400/mo; contact George Granade @ granadeg@bellsouth.net

$99.00 MOVES YOU in for all summer and fall preleasers! 1, 2, and 3 BR apartments available! Restrictions apply. Pet friendly, on busline. Call us today! 706 549 6254

4BR 4BA HOUSE 3 Brick houses side by side w/ front porches. Huge yards, W/D included, security system, pets welcome! Eastside, Beaverdam Rd $1060/mo. 706-552-3500.

2BR APTS $550- $650 w/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ good credit! Blocks to campus & downtown. W/D included. Only $505-$596 w/ current special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706549-2500

3BR 2BA APTS $600$650 W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ good credit! Blocks to campus & downtown. W/D included. Only $550-$596 w/ current special. www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 706-549-2500 3BR 2BA DUPLEX $750 W/ 1 MONTH FREE! NO PET FEE! NO SD w/ acceptable credit! Under $700 w/ current special. 2 miles from downtown. Unit comes with W/D, dw, microwave. Includes sec sys monitoring, lawn maintenance, & pest control. SD of $450 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 www.ambroseproperties.postlets.com 3BR 3BA LUXURY Townhouse at The Woodlands. Near UGA and downtown. 8/1 Prelease. Student mecca. Beautiful Clubhouse and Sportsplex. Pets Fine. $1350. 706-7147600 3BR 3BA WOODLANDS cottage $1185/mo. Fall ‘10 and/or Spring ‘11. Gated, Wood floors, kitchen, bar, W/D. 1.5 miles downtown. Abbey 678-524-9234 abbey.vandewiele@gmail.com 3BR FLAT CONDO in gated community. The Woodlands of Athens. Very large rooms. 3BA, W/D, all appliances, patio with grass yard. $445/ BR. Call Jimmy 404-8862687. jp@masterpiecearms.com AMAZING 5BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. from campus. 2 LRs, 2 kitchens, big BRs, huge deck, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1900/mo. 706369-2908. AMAZING RENOVATED 5BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. from campus. 2 LRs, 2 kitchens, big BRs, huge deck, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1900/mo. 706-369-2908. BARNETT RIDGE FLATSEastside $625. Lots of room for the price. W/D, DW included. Text “Barnett” to 41513. www.joinermanagement.com Joiner Management 706-353-6868 BOULEVARD AND ARMC area! 1, 2, & 3BR available. Great locations, off street parking. Pet friendly, hardwood floors. Call Sean: 706425-9626

FIRST MONTH FREE! 2BR 2BA apt $850/mo. On Baxter street. Hardwoods, All appliances included, Pool, privately owned. Call Nicole 770-713-0601 or dawgs0385@yahoo.com GREAT 4BR 4BA house. 1/2 mi. from campus. Front porch, back deck, nice yd., DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. Special! $1500/mo. 706-369-2908.

LUXURY COTTAGE 3BR 3BA $1500 mo, Close to campus. Includes free wifi and 32” Flatscreen tv installed in cottage. Amazing amenities! Hurry, won’t last! 706-552-0552 NOW PRE-LEASING for Fall! 1 to 4 bedroom houses. $350-$1,500. Close to downtown and Pet Friendly. These lease up fast! www.deklerealty.com 706-548-0580 PRE-LEASING FOR FALL All 1BR APTS 5 Pts. Minutes to Campus, On UGA & City bus lines. NO pets. Call Today! 706-548-1132 ROYAL OAKS TOWNHOMES 2BR 2BA $685. Pool and volleyball. Joiner Management 706-3536868 www.joinermanagement.com Text “Royal” to 41513

SOUTH MILLEDGE HUNTER’S RUN

FALL PRELEASES. BEST rentals in Athens! 1-5BR houses, apts, condos, In the heart of UGA/Dwntn/5pts. Avail Aug! Call 706-369-2908 for more info. FIRST MONTH FREE 3BR 2.5BA townhouse on Milledge. Now preleasing for Fall. Great location, pool, sand volleyball, basketball. Incl. W/D, on bus line. Call Paul 678-4620824.

2BR 5pts. July. UTILcam-

THE SUMMIT 3BR Condos/Cottages. Amazing specials! Lots of options! Fabulous Amenities! $450-$500/BR Call Summit 706-552-0552 THE SUMMIT- 3BR Condo Amazing special! Only $400/BR Flat/TH Unbeatable location next to Volleyball/ Tennis Courts, Clubhouse, & Pool. Call Summit 706-552-0552 WALK TO CAMPUS 3BR 2.5BA Townhouse Condo. All appliances. Great location on UGA bus line. $875/mo. 1775 S. Milledge Avenue. Call Kathy at 404-310-0951.

3 GIRLS NEED 1-2 more roommates to sublease in our 5BR house this summer. 5 minutes from UGA campus. DW, W/D, AC, Cable, Internet. Lovely house, wood floors. $375 per month, plus utilities. 540551-0800 FIRST MONTH RENT FREE. Sublease fees paid. The EXCHANGE apts at Athens. $514/mo 2BR 2BA fully furnished. ALL utilities included except electric. For more details: pcovington@fmglaw.com 678-612-5014 ROOM AVAILABLE FOR Sublease in 3BR unit at The Exchange of Athens. $444/mo, fully furnished, covered parking, includes utilities. E-mail: kmccarthy89@gmail.com

SUBLEASE 1BR, FULLY Furnished with full bath and walk-in closet. $300/mo June-July 2010. The Exhange on Atlanta hwy. 404-317-5329 SUBLEASE FULLY FURNISHED room (one share in 4BR 2BA) for Males from May 8th to July 31st 2010. Contact 678-464-0507. Bus service to UGA.

NINTENDO WII SYSTEM $100. Like new condition. Games, accessories available. Contact Alex. 404-512-0559

! BARTENDERS WANTED! Up to $250/day. No experience necessary. Training provided. 1-800965-6520 ext 106.

HERTZ IS SEEKING a college student for a part time position of customer service representative at our Athens Airport location. Must be aggressive, energetic, and willing to work weekends. For immediate consideration, please call 706-543-5984.

ANIMAL CARETAKERS NEEDED caring for Dogs & Cats. Weekends now and seasonal full time over the busy summer season. Contact us by email: winding_creek@yahoo.com

LIFEGUARDS WANTED. WORK at Legion Pool on the UGA campus. Late May through mid August. Competitive pay. Applications available at Tate Information Desk. Call Jamie 706542-8512

ATTENTION STUDENTS: $15 base appt, FT/PT cust svc/sales, no exp nec, all ages 17+, cond apply. Call now! 706-543-9292 BARTENDERS NEEDED Earn up to $250/day FT/PT. No Experience Required. Will Train. Call NOW 404-665-3506 x103 CAMP COUNSELORS, MALE and female, needed for great overnight camps in the mountains of PA. Have a fun summer while working with children in the outdoors. Teach/assist with water sports, ropes course, media, archery, gymnastics, environmental ed, and much more. Office, nanny & kitchen positions also available. Apply online at www.pineforestcamp.com DENTAL OFFICE, MON -Fri year round. PT. Min. GPA 3.5, $10/hr. Pre-Dental student preferred. Fax resume to 706-546-1715. EARN $40! UGA researchers are looking for persons to participate in a one visit research study on eating disorders. Contact bnstudy@uga.edu. FUELING AIRPLANES Line service technician Ben Epps Airport. Aircraft service to include parking, fueling, towing. No experience necessary, will train. Visit athensclarkecounty.com and click on Human Resources for employment application information. Deadline for application is Friday 4/30/10. GRANDMOTHER SEEKS PT teacher/mentor/friend for 3 YR old in Comer 4 days a week. Flexible schedule T-F; 2pm-7pm or 3pm- 8pm. Contact Dyonne at ga_mingo@yahoo.com or Mandy at ladydawgsouth@yahoo.com RETAIL SALES POSITION Uniforms Unlimited PT and FT contact jjwilson@uniformsunlimited.com

PART TIME ACCOUNTS manager. Duties include calling delinquent accounts, filing, and assisting potential customers with sales. Apply at The Point, 768 W Broad St. 706-546-4145. PART TIME FRONT desk receptionist needed Athens Flight Center at the Athens Ben Epps Airport. Friendly personality a must. Experience in cash register operation, telephones and computers a plus. Flexible scheduling with hours available Monday-Friday 3pm9pm and Saturday & Sunday 9am-3pm/ 3pm-9pm $7.99/hour. Must be avaliable for both weeknight and weekend shifts. Please visit athensclarkecounty.com Human Resources website to download an application and for further information. Deadline for applications is Fri April 30. STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM PAID Survey Takers Needed In Athens. 100% FREE To Join. Click On Surveys. THE GEORGIA CLUB is seeking 1 FT & 1 Seasonal Cook. Salary based on experience. Candidate must possess strong initiative, attention to detail, with flexible schedule. No phone calls accepted. Drug-free workplace. Email resumes to crountree@thegeorgiaclub.com or apply in person at 1050 Chancellors Dr., Statham, GA UGA EQUESTRIAN TEAM is hiring barn staff. Horse experience a must. rgarrison@sports.uga.edu

ADOPTION - LOVING, creative home awaits your baby through adoption. All NYC has to offer. Expenses paid. Call or email Ellen toll free: 888-8688778, www.eeadoption.com ellen@eeadoption.com

C’s Get Degrees

CEDAR BLUFFS EASTSIDE location. 2BR 2.5BA and 2BR 2BA flats $670. W/D, DW included. Text “Cedar” to 41513. Joiner Management 706-3536868 www.joinermanagement.com CONDO FOR RENT: 2/3BR 2BA Pope St. all appliances. W/D. Near campus. Available Aug 1st. $780/mo. 478-6091303

2BR APARTMENT, ONE lockable room for sublease with full bath & walkin closet. The Exchange of Athens. Full Kitchen, furnished, W/D. 770-6523100. Sublease expires 07/31/10.

SUBLEASE 1BR 1BA Master in 3BR 2.5BA Eastside townhome. $300/mo + util. Available until July 31. Peaceful and remodeled. 229-220-5552

2, 3 & 4 BR, W/D, alarm system, large yards. 24 hr. maint. response * SPECIAL $800 3BR/2BA * 706-552-3500 hancockpropertiesinc.com SUMMER RENTAL 2.5BA townhouse in Avail June and $900/mo INCLUDING ITIES. 5 min walk to pus. 706-202-4572

2BR 1BA IN 5BR 3BA Duplex. Only $250/mo. + utilities. June and July 2010. Barnett Shoals Drive. Bus stop next to driveway. Call 678-438-5213

$400 FOR ONE week of work in early June available for students living in or near the following areas: Columbus, Warner Robins, Moultrie, LaGrange, and Waycross. Seatbelt observation. Contact David at 706-5429084.

256 E. Clayton St 706-549-0166 Mon-Sat Noon-2AM

Previous puzzle’s solution 6

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The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

6 5

9 6

2 4

7 8

5 9

3 2

8 7

1

4 3

7 2

8 3

4 7

1

9 5

6

2 4

3 8

5 9

3 8

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4

8 3

2 7

6

7 2

9 5

8 3

1 8

6 2

9

4 6

5 1

7 5

2 4

3 7

2 6

3 1

9 5

8 3

6 7

7 4

5 8

4 9

1 2

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7

5 9

2 5

3 2

1 8

9 1

6 3

8 6

5 1

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7 3

3 6

1 4

9 5

4 9

8 7

6 8

9 7

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3 6

6 2

7 8

8 9

1 3

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1 9

6 5

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2 1

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3 2

9 6

7 4


SPORTS

10 | Wednesday, April 28, 2010 | The Red & Black

Player’s explanations make matters worse Y

LOSS: Relief pitching blows lead

ou can just imagine the dirt showering over Mark Richt’s shoulders right

¢From Page 1 freshman third baseman Todd Hankins reached first on a wellplaced leadoff bunt to spark the Bulldog rally. After left fielder Johnathan Taylor singled to left and right fielder Peter Verdin reached on another bunt, Levi Hyams’ bases-loaded single scored Hankins from third to give Georgia the 1-0 lead. With two outs, designated hitter Robert Shipman smacked a grounder that ricocheted off of Pope’s shin, scoring Taylor to put Georgia in front 2-0. After closing out the seventh inning unscathed, Georgia reliever Justin Earls ran into trouble in the eighth. With one out and two runners on, Plagman brought home outfielder Jeff Rowland on a sacrifice fly that made it a 2-1 ball game and brought an end to

WES BLANKENSHIP | The Red & Black

SSenior Justin Earls was tagged with two runs on four hits in Tuesday’s loss to Georgia Tech at Turner Field. Earls’ night. Earls was replaced by senior Jeff Walters, who struggled to get out of the jam, giving up four runs and four hits and two walks. Tech took a 3-2 lead on a triple to left center by Matt Skole before Chase Burnette’s twoout double stretched the lead to 4-2. Walters loaded the bases with two outs on two consecutive

walks and was unable to stop the bleeding before Tech’s Evan Martin made it 6-2 with a tworun double. Bulldog freshman Brett DeLoach made things interesting when he delivered a pinchhit, two-run double in the bottom of the eighth to make the score 6-4, but Georgia was unable to add to their tally in the ninth.

THE 3-MINUTE INTERVIEW:

DRAKE BERNSTEIN

Junior Drake Bernstein joined the Georgia men’s tennis team in the fall of 2007. The following spring, the Bulldogs brought home their secondstraight national championship. Now as an upperclassmen, Bernstein has taken on a new role with the Bulldogs. What’s one of your favorite memories with the tennis team? Winning it all in 2008 — it went by so fast ... You can’t beat winning in a NCAA championship. Hopefully, we can repeat that in a couple of weeks here. What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

too good the next day. I go to bed anywhere between 8:30 and 10 most of the time. What would you never leave the house without? My phone. That’s something, especially Javi [Javier Garrapiz] will tell you, that I can’t go anywhere without. I have to check my phone every 30 seconds. Usually, there’s nobody talking to me, but every now and then, I like to feel like I have friends. If I’m not checking my own phone, I’m checking Will Oliver’s phone, because he’s got plenty of friends for me to talk to. Will you be hitting up Six Flags over the summer?

Maybe a basketball goal. When I was younger, that was something I could do every day and I’d use it after school. It kept me from playing video games all day. Instead, I could go out and play basketball.

I hate roller coasters. I hate heights. I can’t handle anything above four stories. I freak out. I got on one and I’ll never get on a roller coaster again. [It was] when I was 10 or 11 at Six Flags, and it just wasn’t a good experience. I’m really terrified of heights, so there’s no chance I’m ever skydiving.

Would you rather have a night in or a night out?

What is your biggest pet peeve?

Depends on what time of the year it is and it depends on who I’d be going with. A night in is always good. I go to bed pretty early, as a lot of people know, so I’d have to say a night in, so I don’t feel too bad the next day. I’m pretty weird — if I go to sleep much later than 10, I don’t feel

I can’t stand being late anywhere, even if it’s being like 30 seconds late to class. That will drive me up the wall. I hate being late myself and I can’t stand when other people are late, too.

BERNSTEIN

— Lisa Glaser

now. This time around, it was junior tight end Aron White who decided to pick up the shovel — or a pen — and pull his weight for the program by digging deeper into the hole that Georgia football program already finds itself in. In a letter written to The Red & Black published Tuesday, White responded to a previous column by claiming Bulldog fans need to put the incidents of arrested football players “into perspective.” He also said fans need to understand that if “any other student organizations were watched as closely as our student-athletes are then perhaps they would have more arrests and incidents too.” Come on, No. 81, are you really going to play that card? While Georgia fans should be proud to have such players as yourself who are making the most out of their college experience, other students are not going to feel sorry for a program who can not stay out of trouble — regardless of whether players are in a highly-scrutinized situation or not. See, Aron, you are missing the point. This was the part of an argument with your parents where it is better to just stay silent and accept the reprimands for previous actions. You know, the same part where the police explain that anything you say can and will be used against you — surely your ex-teammates can explain that drill. Instead, excuses were inconceivably made, warranting yet another response coming down on a team that has been an embarrassment to the University of Georgia and, surely, its head football coach. Whether the reasoning is fair or not, being part of a team means that well-behaved athletes such as yourself are going to receive portions of blame when multiple teammates fall from grace. Outside opinions will undoubtedly perceive the lawless actions of a few as a reflection of the entire program. This is why the voices of leaders, such as yourself, are so vital in a world of college athlet-

ZACH DILLARD

ics where there are so many potential pitfalls. So try voicing that strong opinion toward a troubled locker room — not to the media and fans. And yes, Zach Mettenberger is just a (redshirt) freshman, so perhaps he does deserve a pass for the one mistake he made in his Bulldog career. But Josh Parrish was just a redshirt freshman when he was arrested on April 11. Montez Robinson was just a rising sophomore during all three of his run-ins with the Athens-Clarke County Police. Trent Dittmer is just a senior. Two is company, three’s a crowd — and four warrants a few degrading columns from the media about the Georgia football program, one that seems to receive more ink in the Crime Notebook than in the Sports pages. The fact of the matter is that upon signing their letters of intent to Georgia, football players have bound themselves to different standards. As far as media attention and legal issues are concerned, these standards are higher. In other instances, though, far less is requested of studentathletes than their collegiate peers. Feel free to keep petitioning on how the football program should be looked upon no differently than “any other student organization” — then try to explain why football players’ average SAT scores were allowed to be 334 points lower than the average male student when your class was admitted back in 2007. So by all means, Mr. White, keep making insubstantial excuses as to why four Georgia players have been arrested in the past two months, and how the subsequent media attention is unjustified. Here’s your shovel back. Keep digging — you are bound to hit rock bottom eventually. — Zach Dillard is a sportswriter for The Red & Black

“Furlough on the Fairways” April 30th, Reading Day!!

FRIDAY APRIL 30TH is reading day, a furlough day at the University, and a great day to spend at the UGA Golf Course for the PGA tournament! When you visit an event sponsor below you will have a chance to earn a free ticket to use on any day during the tournament week April 26th - May 2nd

35 FREE Tickets

to the first 35 people that come in and order a full rack of ribs!

Featured Events: Student/Junior Clinic Monday - Open to the public! General Public Golf Club Demo Day Saturday! Yamaha ‘Putt for a Golf Car’ Sunday! Featured Concerts: Thurs: Songwriters in the Round Fri: The Splitz (Motown, Soul) Saturday: Sons of Sailors (Jimmy Buffet Tribute Act)

Two Days Only!

Tuesday April 27th & Wednesday April 28th Give us two minutes of your time for a presentation on our Hearts On Fire diamonds and we will give you the opportunity to putt your way to winning a ticket for Furlough on the Fairways. And a chance to win $100 toward the purchase of any Hearts On Fire merchandise!

Putt for Your Chance to Win!

...gives back! Supporting Athens’ Charities


April 28, 2010 Issue