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ISSUE ONE SPRING / SUMMER TWENTY TEN

THE MODERNIST. HARMONY KORINE. COLE MOHR. THE DEATH OF MENSWEAR. SIMON FOXTON. CHARLOTTE GAINSBOURG. ‘A SINGLE MAN’. FUN BOY 3. CHRISTOPHER SHANNON. ROBIN HOOD. SNIPERS. GIRLS GIRLS GIRLS.


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CONTRIBUTORS ISSUE ONE

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OPENER

LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

WWW.RE-BEL1.BLOGSPOT.COM Editors In Chief & Creative Directors Rasharn Agyemang & Jaiden Jeremy James Artistic Direction Rob Meyers For RBPMstudio www.rbpmstudio.co.uk Editorial Director Jaiden Jeremy James Fashion Director Rasharn Agyemang Senior Contributing Fashion Editor Simon Foxton Contributing Fashion Editors Anna Trevelyan Steve Morriss Photographers Bella Howard Ben Rayner Christian Oita Daniel Sannwald Fabien Kruszelnicki Kira Bunse Kim Jakobsen Pierre Debusschere Simon Hariss Assistant To Fashion Director Richard Coward Advertising Director Stephen White stephen@stephenwhitepublishing.com For advertising and enquires please contact: jaiden_rva_james@yahoo.co.uk

There was no specific theme behind this issue i guess it was just working with people we’ve always wished to but never knew how until the idea for Re-bel came to us. All in all we worked with a role call of talented individuals and of course we have to thank them for actually putting their trust into a project that was nothing more then a name. The list of contributors is diverse and these pages became like a galleries wall showcasing the work of young talented artists we had some shoots shot at Showstudio’s Fashion Revolution in their live studio allowing not only the visitors of the exhibition to view the shoot but also those online as they were streamed live for all to see. Exploring one of the oldest forms of media and one of the newest is something that we are keen to continue doing with Re-bel. We aim not only to simply reflect the times but to help shape them. To be a voice for so many who are voiceless and promote new talent whilst respecting and acknowledging the contributions that the established visionaries have brought to the world and how they have helped change, inspire and add to the wealth of global culture. Every season via our label we send out a message whether it be last seasons youth by youth and us commenting on our age and the fragile moment that one endures, a period of such transition and change and as soon as it began as soon as it will be over or the upcoming season about our worries for a world with people who care only for the present greedily burning up and destroying all around them, we both felt that communicating by these means only reaches a select few within a certain world so we wanted to create a place, a home for our further thoughts ones we can deliver via imagery and text and embrace other worlds and other forms of art as well as championing and encouraging a new wave of artists.

Jaiden Jeremy James & Rasharn Agyemang Editors-In-Chief & Creative Directors

Covers: Photography Simon Harris, Styling Steve Morriss, Creative Direction Rob Meyers. Dan Felton wears beige sleeveless vest and Wide-neck t-shirt both by Acne, skull ring by Silver Service and cross earring stylist’s own.

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ISSUE ONE SPRING/SUMMER TWENTY TEN ISSUE ONE SPRING / SUMMER TWENTY TEN

FRONT TO BACK - Front Fashion Theory . The Demise Of Modern Menswear . Fashion Fact . We Heart Modernism Harmony Korine . And His House Of Beautiful Wierdos - Talk Nine Daughters + A Stereo . Quickfire Q+A’s With The Boys . Harry Llyod . Thieves From The Rich To Feed To The Poor Christopher Shannon . Loves A Well Lubed PVC . Fabien Kruzelnicki . Is Quite The ‘Fast Shooter’ Apparently!? Anna Trevelyan . We Literally Couldn’t Shut Anna And + Jaiden Up - List Cover Story . How We Found This Seasons Perfect Re-bel . Demins . A Small Gaggle Of Cute Brit Boys Ich Bin Hot . A Small Gaggle Of Cute German Boys . For Him + For Her . The Future Of Fragrance Machine Washable . This Seasons T’s Worn By A Few More Cute Brit Boys - Review Music Review . Charlotte Gainsbourg . Film Review . Tom Ford’s ‘A Single Man’ Book Review . David Benjamin Sherry . DVD Review . ‘Boys On Film’ - Fashion Future Perfect . By Pierre Debusschere + Rasharn Agyemang Splash Out . ByChristian Oita + Rasharn Agyemang Fun Boy 3! . By Christian Oita + Simon Foxton Girls Girls Girls . By Bella Howard + Rasharn Agyemang Sniper . By Christian Oita + Rasharn Agyemang Lets Draw A New World . By Daniel Sannwald, Tabassom Charaf + Kez Glozier Velvet Underground . By Kim Jakobsen To + Anna Trevelyan - Curate Daniel Sannwald . The First Of Our Artists Invited To ‘Curate’

Above Images left To Right: Cover, Photography Simon Harris, Styling Steve Morriss, Creative Direction Rob Meyers ‘Fun Boy 3’ Photography Christian Oita, Styling Simon Foxton ‘Sniper’ Photography Christian Oita, Styling Rasharn Agyemang

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FRONT

CONTENTS

THE MODERNIST. HARMONY KORINE. COLE MOHR. THE DEATH OF MENSWEAR. SIMON FOXTON. CHARLOTTE GAINSBOURG. ‘A SINGLE MAN’. FUN BOY 3. CHRISTOPHER SHANNON. ROBIN HOOD. SNIPERS. GIRLS GIRLS GIRLS.

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Fashion Theory . The Demise Of Modern Menswear Fashion Fact . We Heart Modernism Harmony Korine . And His House Of Beautiful Wierdo’s


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FASHION THEORY

FASHION FACT

THE DEMISE OF MODERN MENSWEAR

WE HEART MODERNISM

Words Jaiden Jeremy James Photography Rob Meyers

30th January 2007, Hedi Slimane took a bow, high on euphoria of seeing the maestro at work but blackened by rumours that it maybe his last and indeed the rumours were true. For 7 years Hedi reigned supreme over the menswear realm his influence was unrivalled, the slim, sleek, rock chic aesthetic that changed the way men looked at their bodies and signalled a move away from the overtly buff and baggy, loose and layered look that dominated the 90’s. So in sync with the contemporary world around him, that Dior Homme not only evoked the zeitgeist but was a significant part of it. In many respects he offered to men what Christian Dior offered to women in 1947, a new look. This wasn’t the first nor the last wound menswear would receive but it was one of it’s worst. Helmut Lang & Jil Sander two brands whose understated minimalism both had dominating voices and helped to define an era, seems was destined to share the same fate, from the acquisition by Prada, the fall out and the departure from the house that they created and which bore their names. Although Jil Sander has been revived by the genius of Raf Simons a major player in modern men’s fashion, who has challenged conventions and pushed boundaries for what he is now rewarded. His own label no longer bears the spirit of youth, but one of a wayward adolescent that has now grown up found his briefcase and is ready to compete in the competitive world of luxury fashion made by a man for another man. Helmut Lang (the label) on the other hand has withdrawn itself from the glossy catwalks of New York or Paris and no longer does clothes for men. Miu Miu is a prime example of how luxury brands neglect their men’s division, whilst womenswear went from strength to strength and continues to do so by distancing itself from Prada and creating it’s own distinctive voice. The men’s on other hand eventually fizzled into none existence from the lack of advertising to the change of catwalks to presentations, shocking the fashion world that S/S 08 a collection which had received rave weeks a few weeks prior would be it’s last. Although gone are the days of Slimane, Lang & Sander new names have popped up and presenting unique and powerful visions of modern clothes worn by modern men from New York’s

Thom Browne, Tim Hamilton, Patrick Ervell and Adam Kimmel London’s MAN exports from the luxury sportswear by Cassette Playa, Chris Shannon and New Power Studio to the classic Brit look updated for the 21st centaury by Carolyn Massey, JW Anderson, Carola Euler and Lou Dalton and the forward thinkers and experimentalists Aitor Throup, Katie Eary, James Long and Jaiden rVa James and Paris‘s Romain Kremer and Juun J . As well as new places to champion them in recent years GQ Style, Another Man, V Man, Man About Town, Fantastic Man, Vogue Homme Japan. Proving the power and importance of modern menswear and with the predominately menswear stylists from the longstanding Simon Foxton to Panos Yiapanis and Nicola Formichetti having more opportunities and places to showcase their art. The latter creating and setting trends via his ground breaking work, sky rocketing the careers of models & designers he champions and Panos who is vital part to the rejuvenation of luxury menswear with his pioneering work with Tisci at Givenchy. Kim Jones is also key to the importance of menswear rising at time when British menswear in particular didn’t even get a look in at London Fashion Week it’s because of this MAN was born which has successful nurtured and discovered a role call of diverse talent adding a much needed depth to universal menswear the next season will be the 3rd London Fashion Week menswear day and the official birth of NEW GEN Men further support from Topman which is much needed. Kim’s struggle has also payed off from working with Umbro and other brands to finance and forward his own brand he now sits at the helm of the sleeping giant Dunhill. As one door closes another opens and with many luxury brands slowly awakening to the power and money to be made in menswear with Chanel & Balenciaga in recent years incorporating their menswear into their women’s shows and Ricardo Tisci helping to mould a new male with his high and very fashion forward Givenchy as well as Lanvin who’s high end mix of casual wear, tailoring and sportswear have won places in many males wardrobe. But it is Tisc’s work that holds the most interest through his daring and provocative designs. Like in the early nineties when the high end brands was stuck in the doldrums, it was to Britain they looked for revitalization, the Brits played a vital part as they do today with Richard Nicoll at Cerruti, Marios Schwab at Halston, Christopher Kane at Versus and Jonathan Saunders at Pollini. What is needed now is for the bright young wunderkinds of British menswear to be embraced not just at home but more importantly abroad in order for them to continue and to be able to grow their own brands major investment is needed the fashion forward thinkers produce menswear that is on the edge , in the process like Tisci helping to create a new man a modernist not scared of fashion but open and willing to embrace it, championing a new way for men to see clothes and helping ushering a new decade where men are more explorative to and experimental in their choice of garments and how they look, offering a stop shop and a place to go for men who want to exceed the limit confined by the masses of mundane clothing.

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Words Jaiden Jeremy James

It is Tom Ford’s A Single Man which led to the theme of this specific section, in a lovingly warm flashback scene where George and Jim have a discussion in which Jim declares he has never slept with a woman George replies ‘How Modern’. If being a Homosexual in the 60’s and not sleeping with a woman was perceived as modern then it led me to wonder what would equate being considered modern by today’s standards. In reality how can one be modern in an ever changing world as the one we inhabit today where as soon as something is brought it’s dated, or the ever changing pace of the internet which allows for us to consume what we so desire within the timeframe we desire to do so. With the division of the sexes getting smaller and smaller and the option for one sex to become another, in a world where there is a phrase to define almost everything from pansexual, poly sexual, metro sexual, bisexual and transsexual. Where money is an object desired by all and a title is no longer able to hold down those many people who are factotums. Where good jobs are hard to find and cities are so crowded that we are reduced to inhabit box like homes or where Clothes cut for a woman fall effortlessly on a man and vice a versa. The 21st centaury is a time of sexual freedom epitomised by Lady GaGa who like Madonna in the 80’s has liberated women further from their repression awakening sexual desires and the liberty to express them through clothes and their looks. Sadly there is yet a man to rise from the ashes of Boy George or furthermore David Bowie these men who pushed and pulled the boundaries of normality in the process opening doors and pulling down barriers by simply being. The modern man isn’t a man at all they are a person, a person of all trades a person or even better an object with no labels. A modernist.

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HARMONY KORINE

AND HIS HOUSE OF BEAUTIFUL WIERDOS Words Jaiden Jeremy James Stills Rob Meyers

Harmony Korine is a name well known and highly regarded in under ground and independent cinema. He has been known and respected since his break out writing debut at just 19, he wrote Kids (directed by Larry Clark) in the mid nineties in which he portrayed and captured his generation faultlessly. He went on to work with Clark one more time on Ken Park and to date has written, directed, produced not only movies but also books, created art which has been widely exhibited and acted in his own films and those of others such as Gus Van Sant‘s Last Days. His own movies are highly explorative and avant-garde blurring the line and confusing the viewer as to what is documentary or what is just film with his first movie Gummo and even more so with his second film Julien Donkey Boy filmed under the Dogme 95 manifesto and with low cost recording equipment adding to the documentary feel. After a long pause Harmony returned not only to screen but to top form with Mister Lonely his most conventional of outings yet , his latest work is Trash Humpers filmed in a way that the viewer is tricked to believe they are watching a home video more specifically a VHS that has been recorded over jumping in to what was recorded before and out to what is after. His work deals with solitude in it’s many forms from his preoccupation with nuns the holy untouched women of God in both Mister Lonely and also in Donkey Boy where it briefly cuts to a nun violently pleasuring herself. In Ken Park the loneliness stems from the teens going through the transitional period and pains of youth to adult finding solace in the arms and beds of one another as their parents fail to understand them and fail to even try. In Mister Lonely all are at unease and unrest with their own self to such an extent and extreme that they impersonate or more specifically mimic others, their idols who ironically don’t or didn’t even have comfort themselves . These individuals find a place within a community and a family that they create. Julien in Donkey Boy can never be at ease as his schizophrenia means there will always be a constant battle and a conflict from within. All of Harmony’s films seem to feature dysfunctional families in some form or another. Key examples of this, are in Gummo & Julien Donkey Boy cut off from mainstream society in Gummo where the small town is disconnected from wider America and in

the process has created its own cultural identity one where evidently attitudes towards race & difference hasn’t moved forward nor changed at all.r In Donkey Boy the family is withdrawn into themselves incestuous and abusive the rules of society fall hard on the ears of the head of the family the unstable father. Korine also has a fixation with disabled people and outsiders from the legless man in Kids singing ‘I have no legs’ on the subway to the albino who is stating her stats to what seems to be dating video and also the black gay dwarf in Gummo, the armless drummer, Chrissy Julien’s girlfriend and the albino who sings ‘I am a black albino straight from Alabama’ in Donkey boy, by including people who are not usually included he adds to the different viewing experience that you are subjected to when watching a Harmony Korine film and also at the same time champions the injustice of the few that are rarely seen on screen, rebelling against the plain and pretty starlets in every mainstream movie. Within most if not all of Korine’s films there is a multitude of stories woven together some with relations to one another such as Gummo telling the tales of different citizens in the same town or Ken Park with the multiple broken families also within the same area or he has two stories with one over riding the other but have no relation, such as in Mister Lonely with the miracle performing flying nuns. Also in many of his films he features scenes that are very close or similar or could be considered closely related to others in his different films. Take for example in Kids and Gummo with the disabled dwarf singing I have no legs and the albino rapping about Alabama both declaring there disabilities to the world or the scene in Ken Park where the girls father makes her dress as her mother in her mothers clothes and in Donkey Boy the father ask his son to put on his mothers dress offering him money to do so. Korine has proved with his structured screenplays for Kids and Ken Park and with Mister Lonely his most conventional film that he is full capable of creating work that could be considered normal and with mainstream appeal its just he simply chooses not to. His Films are tragically funny like Gummo in which he reveals what is hidden by the glossiness of the American Dream exported via Hollywood , a place that is nothing short of third world in a first world country.

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NINE DAUGHTERS + A STEREO QUICKFIRE Q+A’S WITH THE BOYS Interviews Jaiden Jeremy James Photography Kira Bunce

Nine Daughters + A Stereo . Quickfire Q+A’s With The Boys Harry Llyod . Thieves From The Rich To Feed To The Poor Christopher Shannon . Loves A Well Lubed PVC Fabien Kruzelnicki . Is Quite The ‘Fast Shooter’ Apparently!? Anna Trevelyan . We Literally Couldn’t Shut Anna And + Jaiden Up / Yes, They’re Still Going . . .

Name: Assan Alvin N’Jai What does a normal day in your life consist of? Practice mainly; I practice basketball everyday and of course spending time with my girlfriend and university. How would you describe yourself? I’d say stubborn, sometimes a bit lazy but defiantly ambitious. How would you describe your personal style? Individual, smart casual I guess....I love G-shock. What do you prefer Boys or Girls. Girls Other than modeling what do you do? I go to university (economics) and play basketball. What’s it like to grow up in Germany? To my mind it is not that spectacular, it’s eve boring. I’d prefer to live I the U.S.A. Do you feel the country has become more open and accepting whilst you’ve been growing up? Difficult question. Sometimes I feel like it has not. What are your dreams and hopes for your country? That people over here get more relaxed. Things are too smug and tense. What kind of music do you like? R&B, Hip-Hop What films have inspired you? A film called Glory Road. Do you have a favorite Director? I’d say Spike Lee and Clint Eastwood Do you have any favorite books? ‘Only the strong survive’ – that’s an autobiography of Allen Iverson. What magazines do you read? I don’t read any magazines. Are there any contemporary artists whose work you like? There are a lot of great artists out there whose work I like at the moment. What has been your best experience to date from modeling? A trip to London What has been your worst? A late night flight and getting up at six o’clock in the morning. What are your future ambitions after modeling? Just getting a lot of dough no matter how.

Name: Max P What does a normal day in your life consist of? Stand up, breakfast, wash myself, watch TV, meet friends. How would you describe yourself? Thin & funny. How would you describe your personal style? British oversized. What do you prefer Boys or Girls? Boys. Other than modeling what do you do? Work at Parties. Do you feel the country has become more open and accepting whilst you’ve been growing up? Yes I think so. What are your dreams and hopes for your country? Everybody feels free. What kind of music do you like? Indie, electro, metal, 80’s. Do you have a favorite Director? No. Do you have any favorite books? No. What magazines do you read? Indie, Intro. Are there any contemporary artists whose work you like? The fashion of Kilian Kerner How did you get into modeling? A friend took me to his agency and the booker asked me to model What has been your worst experience to date from modeling? Travel to a place and I pass the train. What are your future ambitions after modeling? Have a good job, anywhere.

Name: Marc What does a normal day in your life consist of? Spending time with friends How would you describe yourself? Fun and energetic How would you describe your personal style? Relaxed What do you prefer Boys or Girls? Girls Other than modelling what do you do? Live What’s it like to grow up in Germany? It’s all I’ve known Do you feel the country has become more open and accepting whilst you’ve been growing up? It’s remained the same What kind of music do you like? A bit of everything What films have inspired you? I watch alot Do you have any favourite books? No What magazines do you read? I don’t read many but I like some with cool images What designers work do you admire? I don’t know yet Are there any contemporary artists who’s work you like? Not really How did you get into modelling? I was spotted What has been your best experience to date from modelling? Its just beginning What has been your worst? None yet What are your future ambitions after modelling? To see where the road goes


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Name: Lukas B What does a normal day in your life consist of? Going to school, Work and teach children in math and sport. How would you describe yourself? A little crazy, creative and very chilled. How would you describe your personal style? I wear what I want and often it’s chilled. What do you prefer Boys or Girls? Girls of course ;) Other than modeling what do you do? I support children in school (math) and I train hand ball. What’s it like to grow up in Germany? It’s an easy life when I look to Africa and so. Do you feel the country has become more open and accepting whilst you’ve been growing up? Yes, I think people become more accepting to other groups of humans. I think they start to see beyond the colored skin. What are your dreams and hopes for your country? I hope we can improve the social structure. My dream is a free country where everybody can do what they want to. What kind of music do you like? Reggae, Ska, Metal and Drum n Bass. What films have inspired you? There were so many I cant remember. Do you have a favorite director? No. Do you have any favorite books? I’ve read some but there wasn’t any that interested me. What magazines do you read? At the moment none. Are there any contemporary artists whose work you like? No, I think artists from the past are often better. How did you get into modeling? They saw me on the street and asked me. What has been your best experience to date from modeling? A trip to Paris What has been your worst? I don’t know. What are your future ambitions after modeling. I’m very interested in and want to study Biology.

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HARRY LLOYD

Name: Ousainou N’Jai What does a normal day in your life consist of? Being in the gym, training my basketball skills. How would you describe yourself? Eased and ambitious How would you describe your personal style? Switch my style everyday, but its always balanced mixture of hip-hop and some of that new hip-hop style with a tendency to that typical R&B style. What do you prefer Boys or Girls? Girls, definitely. Other than modeling what do you do? Like already mentioned I’m a basketball player, also study economics. What’s it like to grow up in Germany? Being focused on what you do, not where you’re living at, cause otherwise you can get very bored over here ha-ha. Do you feel the country has become more open and accepting whilst you’ve been growing up? O not yet, unfortunately. What are your dreams and hopes for your country? Being a country with no spiritual borders, open minded and liberal. What kind of music do you like? Hip-hop, R&B, soul. Some live Trey Songz. What films have inspired you? Glory Road. Do you have a favorite Director? Spike Lee and Clint Eastwood. Do you have any favorite books? ‘Only the Strong survives’ by Allen Iverson. What magazines do you read? Slam Are there any contemporary artists whose work you like? Trey Songz, Lil Wayne, Fabolous, Pharell , All Star How did you get into modeling? I was attending with my twin to the agency and fortunately got the chance to be involved too. What has been your best experience to date from modeling? The Hyatt hotel at a billionaire boys club shooting in London and the Adidas shooting of course. What has been your worst? Getting up at 5:30 for the Adidas shoot for 4 mornings. What are your future ambitions after modeling? Get a safe job, make money.

Name: Julian P What does a normal day in your life consist of? Work & Sleep. How would you describe yourself? Amazing of course =). How would you describe your personal style? Also amazing. What do you prefer Boys or Girls? Girls. Other than modeling what do you do? Graffiti, party and fuck =). What’s it like to grow up in Germany? Because you could live in Cologne. Do you feel the country has become more open and accepting whilst you’ve been growing up? It doesn’t matter to me. What are your dreams and hopes for your country? In Germany you can’t have hopes =) What kind of music do you like? Drum n Bass, Hip-Hop What films have inspired you? No films, just life inspires me. Do you have a favorite director? No. Do you have any favorite books? I don’t like to read What magazines do you read? Playboy. What designers work do you admire? Stephan Schneider very much. Are there any contemporary artists whose work you like? Unknown graffiti artists. How did you get into modeling? Somebody speck with me in the city. What has been your best experience to date from modeling? Different cites. What has been your worst? There is none. What are your future ambitions after modeling? Get a great job.

THIEVES FROM THE RICH TO FEED THE POOR Interview and Styling Steve Morriss Photography Ben Rayner SM: Did you do any research for the role?

Name: Bojan What does a normal day in your life consist of? Work and a lot of coffee How would you describe yourself? I am,…er… a nice guy How would you describe your personal style? functional What do you prefer Boys or Girls? Girls Other than modelling what do you do? Office jobs What’s it like to grow up in Germany? Awesome Do you feel the country has become more open and accepting whilst you’ve been growing up? Definitely What are your dreams and hopes for your country? Should I have any? What kind of music do you like? Little of this and that What films have inspired you? none Do you have a favourite director? No Do you have any favourite books? Angela’s Ashes What magazines do you read? None What designers work do you admire? Coco Chanel How did you get into modelling? I was out shopping and I got scouted What has been your best experience to date from modelling? Going to Tokyo for a month! What has been your worst? All the waiting What are your future ambitions after modelling? To be happy

in the BBC TV series. What was it like filming that? HL: The best part was all the stunt work and when they choreographed a big fight scene – all us boys lobbied to do as much fighting ourselves as possible. I mean if you’re making Robin Hood and you’re not interested in doing any swordplay, you’re in the wrong job. SM: Was it filmed in the UK?

At just 26 years old and with no formal training, actor Harry Lloyd is making quite a name for himself on both stage and screen alike. Educated at Eton and Oxford, and the great-great-great grandson of Charles Dickens, Lloyd has so far made his biggest impact on the viewing public in the BBC’s Robin Hood. Currently starring on the West End stage with ex Bond girl Gemma Arterton, and having recently filmed a TV pilot for HBO with Sean Bean, he’s getting used to working with some of Britain’s hottest Hollywood exports. The irony of starring in a play about the darker underside of the movie business whilst standing on the verge of breaking into the US himself is not lost on him, and he’s happy to take things at a slow and steady pace. Whether the industry will allow him to remains to be seen, but he seemed to be taking it all in his stride when we caught up with him on his way to rehearsals. SM: You’re perhaps best known for playing Will Scarlett, one of Robin Hood’s merry men

HL: No it was filmed in Hungary. We lived in Budapest for 6 or 7 months for each series. It was strange living away from home for that long, on my own in a foreign city. But it was a beautiful place and it helped me to learn a skill which I guess you need as an actor, that you can live anywhere after a while, you get quite good at picking up and putting down quite quickly, and actually all you need is a room and a suitcase. SM: You’re currently starring in the West End in The Little Dog Laughed alongside Gemma Arterton, Rupert Friend and Tamsin Greig. Can you tell me a little bit about your character in the play? HL: I play Alex who’s a Manhattan rent boy who considers himself to be straight and has a girlfriend, but has sex with men for a living. He’s had a tricky life but he’s the kind of guy who laughs through it, he doesn’t really let people close enough to see the truth. Then comes the night when he meets one of his clients who’s an up-and-coming movie star, played by Rupert Friend, but he doesn’t recognize him and they end up falling in love. It’s about their inner struggles as neither of them has officially come out to themselves but they allow themselves to fall in love. My character has got a girlfriend

played by Gemma Arterton, that’s his tie, and Rupert’s character has this agent, played by Tamsin Greig, who doesn’t want him to be gay so he can carry on being a successful movie star. It’s a very interesting relationship, and the play is shot through with Manhattan wit with everyone keeping each other at bay with this really sharp humour, when actually they’re quite lost people who need love more than they’re prepared to admit. It’s bang on the money about Hollywood and how it doesn’t necessarily allow people to be themselves in order to be successful. The writer of the play, Douglas Carter Beane, has also written screenplays for Hollywood, so he knows inside out the bullshit that goes on. He would tell us stories during rehearsals about the lengths to which people go to cover things up. It’s an industry that sells the idea of happiness as a product, but in order to market that there are some nasty things that go on that no-one’s prepared to look into because we so want to believe in the dream ourselves, but actually a lot of hearts are broken in real life. The hardest thing when you are deeply miserable is to keep smiling through it for someone else’s benefit.

HL: Yes, I went to New York and got in touch with a few rent boys through rentboy.com just to find out a bit more about it. I texted this guy saying ‘I’m researching a play, do you want to meet for coffee?’. It was all very straightforward. Some of these guys make $100,000 a year with 12 or 13 regular clients, and everyone understands the deal. Its $300 an hour or $1000 to stay overnight, and he was lovely and open about it. In fact he emailed me because he’s in London this week so he’s going to come and see the play. It was great to see how normal and regular his life was. He hadn’t had some dark, seedy past, it was his choice to get into it, and it’s better than working in Starbucks. I was also struggling to understand this character that has sex with men for a living but doesn’t consider himself gay. How can you do that without feeling that you’re lying to yourself? How can sex for some people just be this thing that you can get money for, how can you disassociate it with love and personal experience? Talking to these guys helped me to see their perspective, which was very useful. SM: You’ve also recently filmed a pilot for a new fantasy series with Sean Bean for HBO. HL: Yes, and although its fantasy it’s very grown-up, its got a big complicated ensemble cast like The Wire. Its like a political thriller set in a ‘middle earth’ type world, but less magic and dwarves, more incest and kids getting killed, backstabbing and blackmail, lots of nasty power-hungry people doing horrible things to each other. I play the son of the previous king who was deposed by people like Sean Bean’s character. My character’s in exile and he’s trying to plan his invasion to reclaim the throne that’s rightfully his.


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SM: Once you get involved with a big American production like that do you feel you’ll have the call of Hollywood coming soon, and are you ready for that? HL: I don’t know, doing this play about the dark side of Hollywood makes you very cynical about the whole thing. America is more at my door than it has been and the next step would be to get representation out there but I don’t have some benchmark that I’m trying to reach, I don’t feel like I’m on a ladder, I’m just following my nose and seeing what comes along. It’s been very interesting working in America for the first time and getting very excited about it, and then at the same time being in a play that basically portrays Hollywood as a big pile of shit. It’s a confusing time and I’ll be cautious.

SM: The Little Dog Laughed runs until early April, what are your plans after that, hopefully the HBO show will get picked up?

SM: You were in a couple of episodes of Doctor Who where you played a young army cadet possessed by an alien. Were you a fan of the show before filming that?

Top: Grey pinstripe and beige canvas paneled jacket by Kasper Harup-Hansen for Lens at Topman and Grey polo shirt by Fred Perry Bottom: Grey Prince of Wales check suit jacket and trousers by Dior Homme, Grey fine striped shirt by Fred Perry and Houndstooth patterned tie by Topman Stylist’s assistant - Susan Doyle Grooming - Christopher Sweeney at DWM using Dermalogica Skincare and Shu Uemura Art of Hair Product

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HL: I’d never really got into it, but then having got the part I watched a fair few episodes and really enjoyed it. There was nothing really like it on telly that had the same breadth of storylines and imagination. I really enjoyed playing that character and having so much freedom. When you play an alien you can kind of do what you want. Often when you’re playing a role the one secret rule is that you have to be believable as a human being, which is sometimes trickier than you might think. But when you’re an alien you can go to town, and the character was pure evil, it was great. It was originally a smaller role, so when I went in to the audition I thought I’d just have some fun with it. I came up with this idea that they really enjoyed and they ended up making him into the lead baddie.

HL: Yeah, we find out in March whether its been green lit, and if so we’ll be filming all summer. Then I’ll probably go out to the US and have some meetings, have a sniff around. It’s exciting times. I’m only just learning about photo shoots and magazine interviews and it’s very interesting, especially doing it while being in a play all about fame, its quite appropriate. See Harry in The Little Dog Laughed at the Garrick Theatre in London until 10th April, and coming soon as Prince Viserys Targaryen in HBO’s Game of Thronesaut lore vercipisit volupta

SM: How did you start acting in the first place? HL: I didn’t study acting but I did school plays. A casting director came to see one of them and I got a TV job and in a roundabout way ended up getting an agent while I was still at school. I still wanted to go to university because I thought if I could get a place at Oxford then I should go, I didn’t want to turn that part of my brain off just yet. I did lots of plays there and still had an agent when I finished studying so I just started doing things like an episode of The Bill and Holby City. Then I got a series called Vital Signs - a six-part drama for ITV with Tamzin Outhwaite - which was made by Tiger Aspect who were making Robin Hood, so as soon as one finished they put me up for the other. It didn’t feel like an overnight thing, it was a very nice progression, then since Robin Hood the biggest parts I’ve had, apart from the HBO show, have been in theatre. I’ve loved it, especially having not been to drama school and having been out in the open for a year filming Robin Hood, I really wanted to get onstage just to prove to myself that I can hack it. SM: Have you ever felt the need to prove yourself to other people as well, having not been to drama school? HL: I think I’ve been my own fiercest critic, I’ve never felt that pressure from anyone else. I really want to do both things, I miss theatre if I don’t do it, but then if I do theatre straight for a year I’ll probably miss screen work. I’m proud of the different types of characters I’ve been able to play in both theatre and TV. I’ve been in 3 plays in the last year in which I’ve played a flamboyant Sicilian immigrant in 1950’s New York, a painter from Norway

in the 1880’s, and now I’m here playing a Manhattan rent boy, its really exciting. SM: You’ve already worked with some great people in both TV and theatre, many of whom have a Hollywood background. Is there anyone that you would particularly like to work with that you haven’t had the opportunity to yet? HL: I’d love to work with some of the British directors who are working in America, people who started in theatre like Stephen Daldry and Sam Mendes, but I don’t really have any specific boxes that I want to tick. Hopefully great things will come along and I’ll get to meet loads of great people I’ve never heard of and they’ll inspire me. I’m really enjoying working with these guys in the play at the moment, they’re all so brilliant and so different, and really interesting to work with. Because there are only four of us its quite intimate, it’s a really nice project.


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CHRISTOPHER SHANNON LOVES A WELL LUBED PVC Interview Jaiden Jeremy James a lot of similar stuff we disagree loads which I really like, I need to work with people who I can have loads of interaction with. There’s something really depressing about stylist/ designer relationships that seem fake and without a genuine connection. I would never work with a stylist for the sake of just having one or trying to work with someone for the name, there has to be something there. One of the interesting features of your work is your use of colour, which is quite astounding, is there anything that led you to understand and use colour the way you do?

iphones are really handy for taking sly snaps of things. I suppose there are fabrics I will never be drawn to and elements of design I am not really into, it’s shaped by more what I don’t like, in the start anyway. What was the Atmosphere like being around Kylie?

You grew up in Liverpool, how do you believe this has influenced the way you design? I think where you grow up and who with really affects your tastes, I had a pretty eclectic upbringing. My family had a real mix of friends from creative industries and I think that against the backdrop of a northern city with a very particular history is a large percentage of what I’ am about. Liverpool has a strong music and football history and along with those things come particular dress codes, it’s also the home of the original ‘casual’ look. How do you start your design process and are there any main sources of inspiration that recur every season? I always start with fabric and colour, trying to use things I haven’t before or things I don’t really like so it’s a bit more of a challenge. There’s always piles of inspiration around that comes from loads of different sources, books and films plus just people I see around,

Tense and educational. Pop styling was something I fell into when I was doing a lot of freelance print for people. It was a very sink or swim period, Id left the BA course at St Martins and didn’t really have many skills, I threw myself in the deep end with everything until I knew what I was doing. Kylie was never really my scene but I’m really glad I did it, It made me realise what I didn’t want to be. I loved the travel and working on the videos, also it was very pressured which is a good way to learn how to get things done quickly. Your work with the stylist John Colver seems to be the perfect partnership how did it come about? We met a few years ago when we were both assisting, we both had a bit of a goal but that didn’t seem in sync with the things around us. For a while I think we just liked what the other one was trying to do, then on the MA he would come to St Martins and we would just talk about the work and we just grew from there. On my second MAN show it just seemed a bit odd that John wasn’t styling it with me but still coming in all the time, in the end I forced him into it because I knew there wasn’t going to be another combination like us, he didn’t think he was ready but you only learn by doing stuff you cant do. We fight all the time but I couldn’t work with anyone else, even though we like

I think I was just really interested in it, and when I was first studying there was so little colour in menswear. I never really understood menswear designers fear of it, all the endless dreadful shades of brown and blacks. I’m really interested in product and also seeing things in a new way and colour is really intrinsic to that. I couldn’t really work in another way, like designing some big story first then finding the fabrics and colours that’s too story book for me, only when I have samples in my hand, I start to figure out how I want to make them work. You’ve collaborated with a diverse portfolio of well regarded and respected names and individuals most recently Reebok and Eastpak, how has the support of these companies helped you? Loads of ways really, Working with Eastpak is really interesting in regards to working within their massive corporation but still achieving what I want. They are really generous with fabrics and also they want the best product too, they aren’t the sort of company to just

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throw themselves into something that isn’t right and I really like that about them. I love treating the bags as a separate range but then the challenge of making them fit within the show, its nice to have something that’s produced in a different way to the way we work, I think it makes the whole collection have more interesting sensitivities. You’ve shown at MAN for three seasons and now are graduating onto NEW GEN Men, how has MAN helped your profile and do you feel that London Menswear can finally start to progress with the new opportunities opening up? I really really hope so. If we can get some buyers over to London too that I think we will have cracked it, it doesn’t have to be loads just some really good ones that are willing to take a chance. When I started doing MAN I didn’t really think ahead but the business has really dragged me along with it. The Eastpak collab really helped seed the brand into big stores like Liberty and Selfridges and now stores of a similar stature are really interested in taking the mainline too. The shows and all the press are one thing but really getting your production right I think is what separates designers from wannabees and I really hope we can move that forward this season and get more product into the stores that are asking for it. MAN is great for profile and press but unless you have a head for business it can all end up just being froth and self indulgence and a bit of a wasted opportunity. Topman is extremely supportive to young talent and I know they’ve been so to you also, obviously in collaboration with Lulu & Fashion East with MAN and including you in their projects such as the White T in which you

we had more time to do it. The street cast lads are really funny on the day of the show, beforehand they are all nervous and timid then after one go on the catwalk they want to go again and again. Do you see your work as unisex? I don’t intentionally make it so, but it seems it is, much more in the sense of a girl wearing boys clothes than I’ve made women’s clothes and presented them on men. I think the simplicity and the colour ways make some pieces accessible to women but it’s never something I think about when I am designing. You’ve recently ventured into light tailoring with your use of shirts; do you plan to continue mixing the two? created a T-shirt applying your signature logo mania to it which promptly sold out proving that you are able to tap into a main stream market, I also know you’ve created some denim shorts for them again using your logos, How has it been working with Topman and how did it feel to be received so warmly by their audience? The Topman team are really easy to work with, I think they understand what it is I do and want to achieve. My Christopher Shannon for Topman collection goes into their stores worldwide in February and looks really good, its really different from the other LENS collections but I think we did a good job. I really love that there are easier more affordable pieces available worldwide. Your mainline is also stocked in Topman’s new floor, I know your stockists are limited, I also know several friends who truly appreciate what you do, where other are you stocked? We are growing with stockists all the time, S/ S 10 will be available at Oki ni which is great for people to grab some pieces online, it will also be available in stores in Japan, Korea and Sweden. The Topman collection is available in London, New York, Tokyo and Singapore. The Eastpak collection available in something ridiculous like 500 stores worldwide including Liberty and Selfridges. Your use of models in your shows is interesting and I understand that most of the boys you cast are not specifically models, is there a specific reason for doing so? I’m so bored by agency boys plus anyone can get them, I love street casting I just wish

Every collection I’ve done since my BA has been quite shirt heavy, sometimes they are hidden by the outerwear pieces. I’ve always just really enjoyed doing them and plus it’s really hard to get interesting shirts that aren’t over designed or too officey. I really think what Martine Rose is doing is great, just focussing on the one thing; I think her stuff always looks really fresh. In answer to the question I think I will always include shirts and sweatshirts in the collections, people look hot in them and they are nice to work on. I am not a big fan of the whole celebrity endorsement thing that engulfed and effected the whole last decade but is there any specific person that you would most like to see wear your garments as I know Chris Brown is a fan? No not really, its doesn’t enter my head, I’m

much more interested in seeing someone in the street wearing it, its really nice when someone has a piece on and it totally fits with their look and doesn’t dictate it too much. The idea of trying to get someone to wear it or celeb freebies make me want to throw up. Finally what can we expect from the upcoming season? At this point I have no idea, this is the 5th season in a row we will have presented on catwalk at Fashion Week so I hope I’m finally taking it in my stride and it will come together. I wanted a bit more texture this season and to take a few more risks, that said I would never ditch a piece I thought was nice for a more attentiony piece just for the sake of it. I hope we just keep moving it forward and keeping it fresh.


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FABIEN KRUSZELNICKI

IS QUITE THE ‘FAST SHOOTER’APPARENTLY!? Interview Jaiden Jeremy James Your work usually features boys playfully although sexy definitely not sexual, you seem to capture a certain innocence from your subjects, its also quite natural in many senses from the use of natural light to the way the boys are captured registering the emotive states that they go through whilst in the process of being shot. Opposed to say a traditional fashion shoot where the clothes are the most important and the models just the hanger, in your photography you definitely collaborate with all parties present usually allowing a part of the models personality to come through, Could you tell me what or whose work inspires or inspired you in the beginning of your career that led you to want to pick up a camera? You have a really interesting name, could you tell me a little bit about your background and where you are from. Thanks! Well my surname comes from my mother’s side, my grandfather was Polish and came over after WWII so that’s where that comes from but I’ve got a general mix in me from Scottish to Spanish. I grew up far out East London where it becomes Essex; you could say where London turns into suburbia, just a general kid growing up around London I guess. I really enjoyed working with you, you’re very easy to work with, quite relaxed and a fast shooter, you also know exactly what you want from an image especially for someone so young, how old are you exactly? Just turned 26, but I was 25 when we did the shoot for Re-bel. You’re also a bit of an interview veteran, having the opportunity to interview the world’s most dazzling young men, how does it feel to be the interviewee for once? It’s kind of nice, it’s refreshing to have someone else ask the questions for once and although I can be fairly quiet in person, I can come alive a bit more when I write. But it’s always interesting to have questions about you; it makes you keep thinking about what you’re doing and where you’re going. I know from a prior conversation you cited that you studied art, what led you to pursue photography? Well I’d say I’ve always been fascinated by

imagery since I was very young. There’s just something about it, it’s almost like a memory you’re creating. I find it such a dominant force in everything around us. Imagery can instigate almost any emotion and be so contrasting and broad in its use. It can make you want to do things, buy things, go to places. I think I just fell in love with imagery as a child and wanted to be a part of it, trying to create great photos that will be trapped in time and never die. Do you see what you’re doing now as a form of art? Well I guess it depends on what it is exactly I’m doing. It’s probably not art in the fine art sense but there is an element of art in my work whether it’s the way I capture a portrait of someone or construct an image to produce some reaction or feeling. It all depends on your definition of art and that can be a very long conversation over a brandy... How long have you been working as a photographer now? Properly working not that long, probably just a bit over a year now, but taking photos intentionally, more like 7 years. That sounds wanky doesn’t it! Is there any shoot you’ve done that stands out more then the others for any particular reason? Yeah, there is a shoot that I did with two models last year at my home which was quite relaxed and natural which keeps getting mentioned to me. I think it had that youthful romantic quality to it that people love, but apart from that no, I love my photos for like a day then get bored of them and have to move on.

There are so many photographers and artists work I love for many different reasons which have inspired me over the years. Most notably Bruce Weber, Larry Clark, Mert and Marcus, David Armstrong, Sam Taylor-Wood, Ryan McGinley, Collier Schorr, Jack Pierson, Luke Smalley, Mario Testino, Willy Vanderperre, David Sims, Craig McDean, Matthias Vriens, Steven Klien, Karl Lagerfeld... the list can just go on and on. They all seem to be able to capture the personality of the subject in on a personal level whatever the picture looks like, and it always makes you think ‘wow, that’s beautiful’.

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Weber’s work with Ralph Lauren and his various personal projects probably play a strong part in that. Also film-wise it really can be anything. There are so many great ones out there which even the smallest detail can be inspiring, not just because of who or what the films about but also the mood. Films like 2046, Risky Business (although I’ve only seen it once), Goodbye Lenin, Interview with the Vampire, there really are so many more and I can never remember them all. You’ve captured some of the most beautiful male models from the likes of Daniel Evans, Jamie Kendrick, River Viiperi and Robbie Wadge. Amongst all the boys that you have used is there any who you’ve used multiple times and could go as far to call them a muse?

I’ve always been in love with magazines; it’s that image thing again. And to be part of a new one which was fun, wholesome and also put attention onto the models seemed like a great idea. Originally Hero was supposed to just be a small side project but when it got going and came out peopled really loved it, the fact that it was a little different and fun people found refreshing.

Ha-ha, yes there are some guys I’ve shot more than once and others who I’d like to shoot more often but I don’t think I’ve got a muse just yet. But everyone can be so different and brilliant in their own way from the way they pose, or they’re just confident in themselves or have a great general personality which makes you fall in love with shooting them.

Is there an ethos for Hero? We just want it to be fresh and wholesome and optimistic. Something that people can enjoy reading and look forward to. Somewhere to showcase the faces of tomorrow’s fashion as well as the fashion itself. We’ve got some bigger plans for it soon for the next issue out in June but that would be giving it away! How do you go about pairing photographers with stylists for the magazines?

I do really admire the fact that your very grounded, working with big stylists such as Andrew Davis & also finding time to work with younger talent – not just myself but the young menswear designer Asger Juel Larssen, whose look book you shot. Do you know what exactly it is you look for in a collaborator?

Are there any films, photographic imagery or artwork that has left a strong impression on you?

I don’t think I really look for anything specific in a collaborator, as long as I like what they do and they like my work then that’s all you need. And it’s always fun to work with new people because you get such different view points and have a chance to do something you haven’t before. I guess someone who’s open minded definitely makes all the difference, and as long as there’s a mutal appreciation I can’t see how things can go wrong.

There’s a lot of imagery from the late 80s and 90s I’m currently very attracted to. It’s got a beautiful wholesome sense of happiness. However my work might look, I always have a romantic optimism when creating it. Bruce

Your also not fazed about working for online publications, which I find refreshing, your photo’s have been featured on Fashion 156 and I Love Fake, Do you see the future of fashion photography online? I really can’t tell. Not at the moment though, I think there is definitely more scope for people to show stuff online and it immediately reaches so many viewers but there’s just something about seeing a photo in a magazine or book or up on a wall in a store that you just can’t match. There’s no doubt online will be a big factor in some way or another but it’s still early days and it needs to find it’s voice, but I don’t think it will be the only media for fashion. Along with being a photographer you work on the fashion magazine Hero, which you co-founded and publish, what led you to want to start your own magazine?

We usually work quite closely with photographers whilst still giving them the freedom to explore and push what they do. We find that pretty much all the photographers we ask to be involved already have a great relationship with some stylists so we’re happy to work with who they’re comfortable with, which has given us the chance to work with some great people like fashion editors from NumÈro Homme and Slurp to younger stylists. I find it great that you can also respect and admire the work of your peers and support them with showcasing their work in Hero. You’ve worked with a diverse range of talent from Kira Bunse, Jeremy Kost, Greg Vaughan and Joe Lally – is there a certain quality you look for that leads you to want to feature these peoples’ work? To an extent, we look to work with people that can create that effortless natural feeling in their images and really bring out the personalities of the models. People who are still defining their style but still eager to push forward and define a new generation.

Are there any photographers whose work you would like to see grace the pages of Hero? There are loads of people who we’d love to shoot for us. Obviously Bruce Weber would be a dream but also Karim Sadli, Josh Olins, Benjamin Alexander Husby, and Doug Inglish... Which Publications do you find interesting at present? As my magazine collection is too enormous there are loads of publications I love, but some of my favourites are L’Official Homme, Arena Homme +, Another Man, Vogue Homme/ Japan, Interview, V, Vman and 10men. Is there anybody you really want to shoot? I would love to shoot Sean O’Pry and Kristen Stewart. Could you name three of your favourite models? That is quite a tough question but Sean O’Pry, Garrett Neff, and I’ve always liked Will Chalker. Finally where do wish to see yourself in the future? Is this one of those questions where you’re supposed to say looking out of my penthouse overlooking Times Square after just getting back from a holiday in Florida? Because that’s where I’d like to be, but also I’d like to have shot for every great Magazine out there with a few campaigns in between, and maybe an exhibition at the Bowery. Aim high!


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ANNA TREVELYAN

WE LITERALLY COULDN’T SHUT ANNA + JAIDEN UP Interview Jaiden Jeremy James Photography Ellis Scott

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really boring but I did an art course and I was ahhh, I already know what I wanted to do, all I really liked to do at that point was make clothes dress up and stuff, then I found out that you could do fashion styling as a job so I applied for a course at London College of Fashion. Jaiden- The same course that you met Ella & Justine Anna- Yeah I met a lot of my really really close friends, but during that time probably more important then studying, I went out a lot and met some really interesting, talented and amazing people, that was really inspirational, I was lucky enough to be going out with a certain amount of people at this time in London when everything was really quite amazing, there was a lot going on.

Jaiden- Really good pictures and really strong Anna- Thanks, the worst thing is my mum reads my blog and I had to put that warning up and I am like look at this and it’s inspirational and it will be like some hardcore porn or something, it’s embarrassing

Jaiden- Like Boombox days

I know there is so much talent that remain unseen, I think it’s unfair because the majority have no money and they have to just fight and fight and fight to be able to show their designs so in that respect it’s a bit bad. But we do have some truly exciting things happening at the moment. Jaiden-We truly met at A/W 09 London Fashion Week, after the Ashish show where VV Brown performed although we had seen each other around Shoreditch and at other places and parties. It’s after this that Sam Voltage, Rasharn, you & I hanged out for that entire fashion week and got to know each other. Do you remember the first time we actually spoke

three seasons now I think his work is inspiring, who else, I think you guys (Jaiden rVa James) I really do, I think its amazing what you do as it’s so controversial and really unexpected and people would never think that you guy’s would do what you do if they look at you and then you come out with something that’s completely out of this world that’s amazing, who else that’s 3 right you need five.

Anna- Yeah I remember the first time we properly spoke on the Fashion week bus the season before, going to the MAN show, you guys were talking about the Gareth Pugh Dazed cover shot by Nick Knight and I was like yeah that is amazing.

Jaiden-(laughs) Yeah

Jaiden- You’ve been a huge supporter of not only our work but young British talent in general, could you give us five names of individuals who’s work you admire and why? Anna- Ok I would say (pause) Keko Hainswheeler, he’s a friend of both of ours and I think he is really creative and original in his work and also truly dedicated and passionate about his craft. Also Craig Lawrence who used to do the knitwear for Gareth Pugh and recently has been doing his own collections for two to

Anna- There is this girl who’s work I really like her name is Petra Storr she works quite a lot with paper and she does sets that are really interesting, as well as clothing and these crazy little models, it’s kind of cool that someone’s making stuff out of kind of different material, like it is to use editorially but it’s more of an art kind of thing then a commercial piece of clothing. Who else? Um ok definitely I am going to go with Gemma Slack that girl is cool with her robot machine girl’s, I love them. Ok that’s five. Jaiden- How do you feel about London Fashion Week

Jaiden- I understand fully obviously as it’s something we are fighting for at the moment and coming from a place with no money and personally having no money, I can say is a killer and again as our collections and highly conceptual, explorative and experimental not everyone can understand our vision and because of people like Kim Jones who fought for menswear when there wasn’t even a single platform or option open to men’s designers, things are moving on with the emergence of New Gen men and the Fashion East Men’s installations now there is a chance for designers to start at the installations which we have done for the past two seasons, progress on to MAN catwalk which we hope to do next and grow as business finding the right manufacturers, factories etc to deal with our collection so when we consider producing things more commercial and more mass marketed they have the highest craftsmanship possible. Then move onto New Gen Men. Anna- |I can understand that, but another thing is you have to walk to far to all the places at LFW and it’s painful

Both laugh

Jaiden- It’s getting better now its located at Somerset House, but yeah I can imagine especially as your always in killer heels

Anna- How do I feel about it?

Laughs

Jaiden-Yeah opposed to the other fashion weeks as all the others are more polished and obviously each one has their own aesthetic reflecting the cities inhabitants and culture

Jaiden-I’ve always been interested in you as a person as you are one of the most open and sincere individuals I’ve met, could you care to tell me a little more about you such as your background and how you happened to assist one of fashion’s most talented image makers

Anna- I think London has some great designers but saying that not all of them get the opportunity to show, primarily because of funding, places and time like LFW is too short to show everyone, which is a shame because

Anna-Well I grew up in a few places in England, but I mainly grew up in a place called Lichfield in like the Midlands really,

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Anna- Even before Boombox really. Like Antisocial, Family, All You Can Eat and that inspired me quite a lot

Laughs Jaiden- There is nothing embarrassing about sexuality though, I love work like that from people who remind you subtly like Ryan McGinley or mildly like Steven Klein sometimes although he can be explicit but not as full on as Larry Clark, I truly don’t understand what’s to be ashamed of about sex we all like it, love it or want it.

Jaiden- That sounds really cool as I know London like goes through these cycles where it renews itself artistically and when that happens London is truly an amazing place to live, work and simply just be, like with New- Rave and Boombox and the New wave of British talent in fashion especially like Christopher Kane, Richard Nicoll, Marios Schwabs, Carri Mundane, Gareth Pugh.

Anna- Yeah it’s what inspires me a lot Jaiden- So would you say your more of a menswear stylist

Anna- Yeah that’s true, but then I assisted another stylist and then I met Nicola when I modelled for the Uniqlo Campaign and he was like will you work for me and I was like o my god ahhh amazing. Jaiden- It’s amazing as I was also featured within that specific campaign (SS08 Uniqlo UT Campaign shot by Matt Irwin Styled by Nicola) and it’s the first time I met both Sam and Nicola, the campaign also featured amongst others Keko Hainswheeler, Gary Card, Brett Lloyd, Kez (Anna’s boyfriend) and yourself, to me it showcased how alive and vibrant London was and is in talent especially now as we are all breaking through with Keko working with you guys and Gaga and getting his work featured on V magazine’s cover, Gary Card still making amazing artwork and again working with you guys, Brett who now shoots for Vogue Homme Japan and GQ Style. Anna-Yeah it was really interesting and even more that it was Nicola who did the casting and he is really great at picking up on peoples talent and supporting that. There was so many people like fifty who are now like all our friends and its great to see that now everyone is doing really well for themselves. Jaiden- Yeah even Matt Irwin, who at the time was a budding photographer has had solo exhibitions and shot Vogue covers Anna-Yeah I know, that was a fun shoot Jaiden- It really was, did you do the video also

Anna- Nope I didn’t sadly I was working that day but that was a really great video Jaiden- yeah I did it and it was really funny they made us do like stuff like those Calvin Klein banned Ad’s and act all boyish and playful with one another in room full of boys but I wasn’t complaining Laughs You run a blog, http://annatrevelyan. blogspot.com posting up your inspirations, one of my favourite shoots of yours personally is the one you did for October 09 Dazed with Saga. Prior to that you posted up your inspirations such as vintage Larry Clark & Nan Goldin, Where usually do you source inspiration from? Anna- um anywhere really, I mean I have a huge folder on my laptop of truly amazing images that I just come across here, there and everywhere and that I love, I really love people like Nan Goldin and Larry Clark and Ellen Von Unwerth, pictures that manage to trap such strong sexuality and passion. That’s something that really speaks to me and their work was something that really spoke to me whilst I was at university, I just posted that up and it wasn’t really intentional but I did that shoot a couple weeks later.

Anna- No, I actually really enjoy doing both , obviously women swear should be natural to me being a woman but having worked with Nicola focused more on men’s but with my own work I am trying to do both Jaiden- I am glad though because Menswear. I mean before Nicola came along menswear was quite drab I mean putting boys in a Giorgio Armani suit and men’s was actually quite boring I mean of course there was Simon Foxton and Buffalo and Arena Homme etc, but there wasn’t much more I mean he has come and in the process his work has been so influential that he has been able to create mini male supermodels like Luke and Ash and all the other boys he has promoted helping to kick start careers.


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Jaiden- Oh yeah Rankin, amazing, talking about magazines you’ve also appeared on the pages of Another, Indie, Elle, Teen something Japan what was it

ANNA TREVELYAN

YES, THEY’RE STILL GOING... Interview Jaiden Jeremy James

Anna- Teen Nylon something or another Laughs Jaiden-That’s it Teen Elle Korea Anna- Yeah Jaiden- And Elle don’t know if you’ve seen it British Elle it was you with slashed jeans and ironically it was the Lily Allen cover which people say you look like

Jaiden- Favourite Designer? Anna- Alexander Mcqueen (RIP) Jaiden- Favourite Model of all time?

Anna- Yeah, I know I never saw it but people did tell me about it

Jaiden-Your personal Style unlike a lot of stylists who actually dress down in jeans and a t-shirt, is very avant garde as is the style you create in your work, how do you separate the two

Jaiden-Yeah along those lines it’s about the Mayan calendar predicting the world will end then

Anna- Yeah I agree Jaiden- Where would like to see yourself in five years Anna- I would like, I mean I would like to be really good at what I do and doing shoots I am really proud of, like hopefully working and consulting for brands and people I’ve always wanted to work with. Jaiden- Well yeah your already heading down the right path Anna- Yeah but then I also believe the world might change in 2012, like we could become these spiritual, evolutionized beings, floating around the galaxy more open and more loving with one another. Jaiden- Have you seen 2012 Anna-No not yet, isn’t it about the end of the world

Anna- I don’t really know, I am just kind of being able to produce shoots the way I want to, and get the pages needed to do so and work with people, I really want to work with and I am still experimenting both in the way I look and in the way I work, I am not consciously separating the two but I don’t really think about it I just create what I create.

Anna- Yeah but the general idea is not that it’s going to be the end of the world, it’s more like an awakening people becoming more conscious, it’s quite complicated and there is loads of theories and I still haven’t read enough yet and I don’t want to bore you with it.

Jaiden- It’s just when I see you from a mile away I know its you as is the same when I see your work and the thing is you always look different and so does your work but saying that you always have a signature about you that is identifiably you.

Jaiden- Not at all, I love hearing different ideologies and opinions as it helps for me to create my own. But where do you stand on politics ?, Brown or Cameron ?

Anna-That’s good I like people to be able to know its my work but I definitely don’t want to just put people in what I would wear, I want to be able to create images and imagery that has been touched by me but that is not me.

Anna- I don’t know enough to form an opinion on either side, I kind of think that they won’t make that much of a difference to our everyday lives, If I do vote it will probably be for the Green party. There’s no point of making an uninformed vote.

Jaiden-Yeah definitely, Your personal style has basically got you shot by some of the world’s most re known , talented and truly inspirational photographers Hedi Slimane, Ellen Von Unwerth, Matt Irwin who else?, you’ve also done a MAC cosmetic campaign

Jaiden- That’s true but I believe it’s the governments fault as their schools don’t teach enough about the history of politics or to be honest anything about it, it’s like that whole snobbish, medieval way of saying voting is for the ruling classes but I don’t want to bore you with that. How does it feel to be working at one of the most important magazines like Dazed, which is one of my favourite publications as it reflects global culture promoting new talent and is truly inspirational .

Anna- Rankin for Another

Anna- It’s really cool as I am surrounded by really talented people and it’s not just fashion so you learn a lot about other things such as culture, art and music which is really good for me as I am like stuck in this fashion bubble. It’s a great place to be.

Anna- Felix the little Buffalo boy

Jaiden- How does it feel to be celebrated in that way

Jaiden- Photographer?

Anna- It’s actually kind of fun, I like it, it’s cool to have my picture taken by such important people, I am not camera shy I like having my picture taken and I love getting dressed up

Anna- Ellen Von Unwerth

Jaiden- How did Indie come about

Anna- Vogue Paris

Anna- That was through the photographer Nick who is a friend of my boyfriend Kez and he asked us to be in it, it was funny we was all quite drunk

Jaiden- Movie Director?

Jaiden- do you believe as I believe that fashion is an art form.

Jaiden- Magazine? (excluding Dazed as you work on it)

Anna- Yeah it depends on how you approach it but even if you do something simple even being able to make something boring look interesting is being creative Jaiden- I guess like us which is the opposite as there is always a message behind our collections instead of just doing a grey marl sweat shirt or playing up to stereotypes bagging track pants although we have done collections that are more reserved such as our first three and will eventually have two lines the conceptual art and the ready to wear wearable line. Anna- Yeah but again that’s why you guys are so interesting, I mean last season which was bout Ophelia I loved that. Jaiden- Yeah it was and this season was a Ryan McGinley picture of I think Dash Snow ( RIP) in a knitted mask that covered his face obviously as well as Slipknot and the messages behind Larry Clark’s work with the teenager outsiders which is why they are in uniform that is the same but different in colour so therefore unique to one another and Youth by Youth because I am only 19 but feel like I am losing or lost my youth. Anna- Yeah it’s also amazing that you guys are so young Jaiden- I don’t think age has anything to do with it really, I mean I’ve seen and been through a lot and I sure don’t feel my age, but anyway lets play quick fire I ask you questions and you give me your fastest most honest response. Anna- Ok

Anna-At the moment George Lucas Jaiden- really, o yeah you posted Anakin up yesterday on face book Anna- (laughs) yeah I am going through a Stars Wars phase I am a bit of a sci-fi geek Jaiden- I don’t blame you with Hayden Christensen in the newest ones although he can’t act amazingly well he is still hot Jaiden-Musician? Anna- Lady Gaga Jaiden- Book? Phillip Pullman- His dark Materials, you would love it, it’s a really amazing book and I have read it like a hundred times, it’s so good. Jaiden- And he is you favourite author as well? Anna- I have a lot of favourite Authors, but that is definitely my favourite book although I was in Paris and I found this Dutch book really old from the 70’s its like A3 on this paper and it’s like some pornographic story about a man who becomes a woman for a day by magic, its really a beautiful book called The Virgin Sperm Dancers.

Jaiden- Have you seen Destricted, I love it, it’s like several different artists take on sex and I loved it because some of it was explicit and hardcore but then beautiful at the same time because it took sex from the porno’s that we usually see such hardcore sex in and presented it to us in a different context like Sam Taylor Wood and Larry Clark did a piece it’s really good. Anna- Sounds good but no I haven’t seen it, o yeah shortbus is really good about some sex club in New York and Distinct Nine was amazing that’s probably 18 if you count all the trilogies. Jaiden- The more the merrier, ok two people you truly admire ? Anna- My Boss ( Nicola Formichetti) and my boyfriend Jaiden- Artist? Anna-Kenneth Anger, you would love him Jaiden- I’ve never seen his films as I am scared of watching them as I read how they are satanic and I know the power of art and film can be overwhelming and change and taint your views so in that perspective I am truly careful in what I watch but I will check him out as his work is available online.

Jaiden- Five Movies?

Jaiden-Boys or girls?

Anna- Ok Stars Wars the sexology, Rome & Juliet by Baz Luhrmann, I’ve been watching a trilogy of Nightwatch and Daywatch some Russian horror trilogy, my films change all the time that I like. I kind of like things with good and evil, what else X-men trilogy.

Anna-(laughs)both, no question mark, do not understand the question Jaiden- Thank You Anna- No thank you Jaiden


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LIST

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COVER STORY

HOW WE FOUND THIS SEASONS PERFECT RE-BEL Photography Simon Harris Styling Steve Morriss Creative Direction Rob Meyers

Cover Story . How We Found This Seasons Perfect Re-bel Demins . A Small Gaggle Of Cute Brit Boys Ich Bin Hot . A Small Gaggle Of Cute German Boys For Him + For Her . The Future Of Fragrance Machine Washable . This Seasons T’s Worn By A Few More Cute Brit Boys

Wide-neck t-shirt by Acne, cross earring stylist’s own


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Beige sleeveless vest by Acne, knitted grey Jumper by Cos, black patterned trousers by Topman Design, studded bracelet and chain necklace both by Eddie Borgo, sheer jumper by Topman Design, striped trousers by Lanvin, leather belts by Topman, chain bracelet model’s own, skull ring by Silver Service, cross earring stylist’s own


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Black one-button jacket by Acne, black patterned trousers by Topman Design, skull ring by Silver Service. Wide-neck t-shirt by Acne, spiked bracelet by Eddie Borgo, chain bracelet model’s own, skull ring by Silver Service, cross earring stylist’s own

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Grooming - Barrie Griffith at my-management using Shu Uemura Artist Hair Photograhpy Assistant - Robert Mcnichol-Ouch Retouching - Ben Charles Edwards Model - Dan Felton at D1 Models

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Sleeveless denim jacket and black jeans by Topman, spiked ring by Eddie Borgo, chain bracelet model’s own, cross earring stylist’s own. Wide-neck t-shirt by Acne. Black ripped jeans by Komakino, black leather boots by Dr Martens, studded leather wrap bracelet by Moutoncollet, chain bracelet models own, vintage black asymmetric Helmut Lang vest top stylist’s own, skull ring by Silver Service.


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SPRING SUMMER Denim, clockwise from top: Raf byRaf (Group shot L-R) Marc by Marc Jacobs, Raf By Raf, Boxfresh and Diesel Firetrap Franklin Marshall H&M True Religion

DENIMS

A SMALL GAGGLE OF CUTE BRIT BOYS Photography Fabien Kruszelnicki Styling Jaiden Jeremy James

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ICH BIN HOT

A SMALL GAGGLE OF CUTE GERMAN BOYS Photography Kira Bunse Styling Rasharn Agyeman

This Page: Grey t-shirt and plain gray shorts by Freddy. Opposite Page, Clockwise: Patterned dressing gown by Topman Baseball Cap by Stone Island and Grey and purple Rebook trainers. Inside out gray t-shirt with blue logo by Franklin Marshall, Black vest by Hugo Boss and vintage denim Jeans by Levis. Light to dark grey t-shirt and sweat pants by Nike

Styling assistant - Richard Coward. Photographers assistant - Roman S

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FOR HIM + FOR HER THE FUTURE OF FRAGRANCE Photography Kira Bunse Casting Rasharn Agyemang He Wears Burberry Beat + She Wears Burberry Sport


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MACHINE WASHABLE

THIS SEASONS T’S WORN BY A FEW MORE CUTE BRIT BOYS Photography Fabien Kruszelnicki Styling Jaiden Jeremy James

Grooming: Yuka Hirata. Assistant: Jai Phoenix Harris

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T-Shirts, clockwise from top: United Colours of Benetton Raf Simons x Fred Perry Raf Simons K by Karl Lagerfeld Franklin Marshall Marc By Marc Jacobs JCDC American Apparel

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REVIEW

MUSIC REVIEW

CHARLOTTE GAINSBOURG Words Jaiden Jeremy James

Charlotte Gainsbourg, it’s simply where to start she is a woman of many talents? Although she is primarily known as an award actress (Antichrist, I am Not There, Science of Sleep,) she also serves as a muse to Balenciaga designer Nicolas Ghesquiere starring in his ad’s and with the designer himself claiming Charlotte to be in his mind whilst creating his complex, daring and fashion forward pieces. She is also known for her artistic lineage (mother Jane Birkin & Father Serge Gainsbourg), and is a prime example that talent is sometimes inherited being able to summon both her parents skills at will.

Music Review . Charlotte Gainsbourg Film Review . Tom Ford’s ‘A Single Man’ Book Review . David Benjamin Sherry Dvd Review . ‘Boys On Film’

Her third album IRM is one of if not her best, her seductive, relaxing whispery vocals are juxtaposed brilliantly by the Beck produced record featuring beats with more depth, heavier then her previous out puts that blend perfectly well with Gainsbourg Coo‘s. The soft sounds that Charlotte’s voice is known for becomes ghostly, eerily strange when matched with the lyrics of such hard hitting topics. From the likes of the MRI scans that she endured a few years back after an accident that almost killed her. Even the whitewashed pale Nick Knight, album cover exudes a haunting quality. With lyrics like ‘Heaven can wait and hells to far to go’ she is clearly contemplating her existence. Stepping from the shadows of a father as Iconic as Serge most have been a hard task but with this album it seems that Charlotte is simply able to carve a career as a recording artist that has the right amount of distance yet not too much to disfranchise her from her late fathers sound as proved in Le Chat Du Café Des Artistes which is the most reminiscent. Personal Favourites include: The heavy yet more commercial sounds of Heaven Can Wait in which Beck features and raises Charlottes voice to a slightly higher decibel, IRM ‘Take a picture what‘s inside, ghost image in my mind…register all my fears, tell me where the trauma lies’ with its sounds lifted from those that a MRI machine produces, is a harrowing yet sombre experience for one to be able to take something like the machines noise and place it onto a track and turn it into, music, a song that must be liberating, therapeutic and at the same time scary, Greenwich Mean Time where the kitten purrs are switched for more fast paced vocals that could be considered more akin with M.I.A, the track is the most uplifting ‘were all fine, were all fine we fit together like nickels on a dime’


FILM REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

TOM FORD’S ‘A SINGLE MAN‘

DAVID BENJAMIN SHERRY

Words Jaiden Jeremy James

Words Jaiden Jeremy James

Tom Ford proves that one can successfully leap from one artistic endeavour to another, embarking on a different route from the one he is so famously known, yet he is still able to conjure, create and provoke to the delight of his many fans. A Single Man features a very British cast from the British playing British (Colin Firth) to those playing American (Matthew Goode & Nicholas Hoult). Following Firth as George a high school professor living in 1962. After tragic circumstances he is left as is the title ‘A Single Man’ and the film focuses on how George copes within a 24 hour time frame, In which he evaluates his existence and contemplates suicide. George’s day is full of encounters some of not much regard and some more important to him than others, from Kenny (Hoult) who sees something in George that he sees within himself and pursues his teacher, Carlos (Kortajarena) the sexy James Dean esque hustler who enchants George momentarily and Charley ( Julianne Moore) the drunken best friend bitter by how life has treated her and throwing herself at George to no avail. It seems that the most of the encounters of note are sexually charged in some form or another. The cinematography is truly the most captivating, Ford clearly went through a lot of effort to painstakingly transport the viewer back to the early sixties, the clothes are immaculate but the colour even more so, by amplifying and diluting the tonal effects Ford is able to not only demonstrate how George is feeling but also using this to change the viewers mood as well. Adding Hitchcock’s Psycho on a billboard peering down in one scene adds authenticity as well as suggesting Ford’s love of cinema. Ford’s use of the technique of sharpening and dulling of tones and hues in which the lighter scenes are in George’s happier moments and distortion and paler shades for the unhappier times as well as beautiful stark Black & White shots for the greying and fading memories, the ones that George maybe trying so hard to hold on to and the place where Jim (Goode), Solely resides. Key examples of where Ford’s technique is put into play is the scene when Kenny (Hoult) turns up at the bar where George is sat drinking and obviously lost in not to kind a thought but as soon as he sees Kenny the scene is thrown

into colour. Another memorable scene is one of the most beautiful within the movie in which Ford uses his muse Jon Kortajarena, it’s almost pale or pastel until a moment is shared between George and Carlos (Kortajarena) slowly pouring in the colour as the smoke billows from Carlo’s lips. The Two segments swamped with glowing hues are those where George is no longer alone, when in the company of others particularly the two boys who momentarily pull George from mourning. Another Scene that sticks to mind is the fleeting moment where everything in George’s life changes, the world he knows or knew is shattered and as soon as the phone is placed upon it’s receiver the harsh reality will consume him even deeper, when ones life that seemed a dream has so cruelly been turned into a nightmare. Ford is able to capture beautifully in just a few flashbacks what is rarely captured in film a loving couple, who live in harmony , it is just that they both happen to be men. This relationship is not explored too deeply nor focused on for too long but is an integral part of the story, within the brief shots, one is allowed as a voyeur into a loving home, just by the arrangements of their bodies you are ale to understand that what these men share is deep rooted. This particular scene couldn’t be emulated by the greatest director of whom has no experience of the experience of a man loving another man, which is why this project or film must have been one that was highly personal to Ford. A Film like this is needed to widen the vocabulary of contemporary Gay output . One where no excuses, apologies or violence is needed where sexuality isn’t subjected to questioning these characters are simply who they are.

David Benjamin Sherry is one of those rare photographic talents who is able to manipulate the medium he works in crossing it’s many genres yet doing so successfully, and being able to conjure images that are truly captivating. From his covers and editorials in the likes of mainstream magazines such as Dazed, O32C, Art Review, V Man, Vogue Homme Japan, GQ Style and Purple to his personal art which varies in its self from surrealistic, documentary, portrait, and landscape amongst others. His own art work most particularly his landscapes seem to manipulate or enhance the beauty of the natural world which we see through his lens and in it’s psychedelic colours. In his latest work he seems to be merging, becoming one with great mother nature camouflaged to match the scenery, protecting him from the harshness of the world concealing him from others, wrapped in natures bosom. What is also magnificent about Sherry’s work is his use of colour from his monotone images, to his hazy romantic imagery which fades subtly to a degree of different tones. To bursts of colour with the subject photographed against a colourful backdrop reminiscent of Walter Pfeiffer. ‘It’s Time’ The book is a like a trip each page giving you a natural high mimicking and fulfilling a journey that you need not take or if you wish to take without the risks and come down. You open the pages of Sherry’s ’It’s Time’. Which results in the kind of experience one has after necking a load of acid and is sat listening to MGMT lost only to be found in a magical world where landscapes are the colours of candy floss , forest are so soaked with sunlight they turn a shade of magnificent yellow, people become blurred, distorted, faint, fading into the distance unable to be touched. It’s within this world that Sherry so clearly resides he seems comfortable in showing it to us allowing us to tour but not remain, giving us a history his history one he clearly has not only of his artistic medium but evidently those of others. Published by Damiani


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‘BOYS ON FILM‘ Words Jaiden Jeremy James

Series one entitled Hard Love deals with issues of love and life that Gay men have to deal with from falling in love with your straight best friend to the more obscene such as falling in love with a recently out of the closet Zombie, Hard love’s mixture of heart warming, heart felt, reality based and with the more abstract comically camp shorts, gives the series a diverse mixture and something for one and all. The best shorts include Summer, funded by Hackney Film Fund and quintessentially British set in Hampstead Heath, The film captures youthfulness well and the confusion of falling for one of your close friends, seeing them in a way they sadly don‘t see you. Gay Zombie is one of the most comical, Cowboy Forever is definitely the short with the most stunning visuals and at 26 minutes also the longest of this series and deals with sexual awakening on a ranch, a place where being a macho male is a part of the atmosphere. Scarred is the thriller of the bunch with an unexpected end, Le Weekend shot on super 8 film gives Hard love different texture and viewing experience. Boys on Film Two is named In Too Deep, the overall theme is more loose on this one, the mixture again is wide ranging the ones that strike the highest chord are The Island which mixes animation with film, Cowboy which has a strong sexual undercurrent from the get go with the lonesome shirtless, jeans but no boxer/brief wearing youth. Performing hard labour where every flex of the muscle is viewable and the spectacle wearing estate agent who’s prying eyes fall not only on the land he at first was interested in, the ending enjoys an unexpected twist with the inclusion of horror. Kali Ma & Love Bite are the resident funny films the former with a mum extracting humour filled revenge on her sons homophobic bully and the latter featuring two school boys chilling smoking weed with the camera panning over one of the boys we are led to believe that one is about to come out of the closet but that is not what comes out in the end. Lucky Blue shows how one can toy with others feelings switching on and off causing confusion and torment., Bramadero is one of the most erotic with two men

acting like animals teasing each other by flashing, stripping and crawling to one another, the sex scenes are strong and detailed but at the same time poetic, allowing you to think of how thin the divide between violence and sex is and that sex can sometimes be an act of violence and is an ancient animal instinct, it also allows the mind to ponder on when is sex on screen allowed to become porn as porn is created to exploit those on screen and excite those off, whilst these scenes are vivid yet also beautiful and romantic. Boys on Film 3 is called American Boy and the films feature just that, the overall theme that interlinks all together is America. Highlights include Bugcrush featuring Donald Cumming from The Virgins, quite abstract a gay quiet kid is invited to hang out by the new cool kid only for things to turn quite sinister. The Young & Evil about a black youth so determined to get HIV that he tracks down and seduces a advocate infected by the virus, Dish a viewpoint not explored too often about a 15 year old gay virgin who feels pressured into losing his virginity in order to fit in with his friends with impeccable writing adding a more than true to life element to this 15 minute tale and Dare about a loner who offers the high school jock to help him learn his lines in a play and after a few drinks roles are blurred and the scene is plunged into a sexual game. A large portion of Gay indie movies are usually really cheesy, corny, overly camp, extremely bad acting or all the following in one as well as films that’s primary focus is on sex thus becoming soft porn. Then in recent years you have ‘Hollywood’ Gay movies Brokeback Mountain, Milk and Talented Mr Ripley where the main character and films focus is homosexual orientated but approached too softly and subtly. So then there is always a gap between the two which the Boys on Film Series fills brilliantly. The Majority of the shorts in the three series are short but not too short, well written and not overdone the sex scenes where featured are fine balanced performance not too subtly and yet not too vivid helping the viewer to remain focused and absorb the overall story

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FASHION

DVD REVIEW

The Boys on film series has overall been insightful and refreshing championing Gay filmmakers and short films with Gay themes in them. Each series is usually bound together with an overall theme and compromises of films ranging from 6 to 36 minutes.

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Future Perfect . By Pierre Debusschere + Rasharn Agyemang Splash Out . ByChristian Oita + Rasharn Agyemang Fun Boy 3! . By Christian Oita + Simon Foxton Girls Girls Girls . By Bella Howard + Rasharn Agyemang Sniper . By Christian Oita + Rasharn Agyemang Lets Draw A New World . By Daniel Sannwald, Tabassom Charaf + Kez Glozier Velvet Underground . By Kim Jakobsen To + Anna Trevelyan


FUT UR E PERFECT

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OPENING PAGE: BLUE AND WHITE STARS SKIN BY PETROU/MAN OPPOSITE PAGE: RED JOGGER BOTTOMS BY FUJIWARA THIS PAGE: LIGHT GREY BLAZER AND LIGHT GREY PLAIN T-SHIRT BY FUJIWARA


PREVIOUS DOUBLE SPREAD: ORANGE/BLACK SWIMING TRUNKS AND BRIGHT YELLOW SPORTS TRAINERS BY Y3 THIS AND OPPOSITE PAGE: FULL LOOKS BY FUJIWARA MAKE UP ARTIST - SIGRID VOLDERS. STYLISTS ASSISTANT - RICHARD COWARD


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FULL LOOK CHRISTOPHER SHANNON WITH RUCKSACK EASTPAK BY CHRISOPHER SHANNON

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PHOTOGRAPHY C H R I S T I A N O I TA STYLING SIMON FOXTON

BLACK AND WHITE T SHIRT AND SHORTS BY KTZ MULTI COLOURED LEGGINGS, BLUE AND ORANGE HAT AND CORSET STYLIST OWN.


LONG SLEEVE TOP AND LEGGINGS VIVIENNE WESTWOOD, DENIM TRAINERS BY NIKE.

BACKPACK BY EASPAK X CHRISTOPHER SHANNON, VINTAGE MTV T SHIRT, DENIM SHORTS AND LEGGINGS STYLIST OWN.


CARDIGAN BY THOM BROWNE, LEGGINGS BY AMERICAN APPAREL, WHITE TRAINERS BY REEBOK.

LONG SLEEVE TOP VIVIENNE WESTWOOD.


CREAM WITH COLOURED STRIPED HOT PANTS AND PALE BLUE BANDEAU BOTH BY PAUL SMITH. DENIM JUMPSUIT BY DIESEL.

PHOTOGRAPHY B E L L A H O WA R D STYLING R ASHARN AGYEMANG

RED LOGO TOP BY JCDC AND TRUE RELIGION – BLACK JEANS. DEEP BLUE JEANS BY WRANGLER, PALE BLUE BANDEAU BY PAUL SMITH AND WATCH BY G-SHOCK.

GIRLS GIRLS GIRLS


BOTH SPREADS WHITE VEST AND NEWSPRINT JEANS BY JCDC. MAKE-UP ABIGAIL JOHNSON USING YVES SAINT LAURENT. HAIR HIROSHI MATSUSHITA USING BUMBLE & BUMBLE. STYLISTS ASSISTANT - RICHARD COWARD.


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OPPOSITE: SUIT BY DIOR HOMME HARNESS BY JAIDEN RVA JAMES


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LONG SLEEVE LEATHER T SHIRT AND TROUSERS BY JAMES LONG BLACK LEATHER BRACELET BY J W ANDERSON

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BLACK JACKET AND TROUSERS BY JUUN.J BLACK AND WHITE SHIRT TRUSSARDI BLACK LEATHER BELT BY COS

KARL LAGERFIELD BLACK JACKET AND TROUSERS BELTED LEATHER ACCESSORY BY JUUN.J


LEFT: FULL LOOK J W ANDERSON RIGHT: BLACK TROUSERS BY TOPMAN DESIGN. BELT BY COS HAIR: HIROSHI MATSUSHITA USING BUMBLE & BUMBLE. MAKE-UP: ABIGAIL JOHNSON USING YVES SAINT LAURENT


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LETS DRAW A NEW WORLD PHOTOGRAPHY D A N I E L S A N N WA L D STYLING TA B A S S O M C H A R A F I L L U S T R AT I O N KEZ GLOZIER

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VELVET UNDE R GROUND PHOTOGRAPHY KIM JAKOBSEN TO STYLING A N N A T R E V E LYA N


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TROUSERS BY ALEXANDER MCQUEEN, CORSET BY GARETH PUGH CAPE BY PAM HOGG MAKE UP: THOMAS DE KLUYVER. HAIR: TOMIHIRO KONO. MODEL: CAILIN AT NEXT

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CURATE

Daniel Sannwald . The First Of Our Artists Invited To ‘Curate’


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I am an avid follower of your blog in which I remember you posting that you’re a fan of Screen on the Green and Rio Cinema’s which incidentally also happen to be my two favourites as well especially the former in which I watched September Issue followed by RJ. Cutler conducting a Q&A session, I am assuming you’re a film enthusiast?

DANIEL SANNWALD

THE FIRST OF OUR ARTISTS INVITED TO ‘CURATE’ Interview Jaiden Jeremy James Photography Daniel Sannwald

Do you remember the first image that you saw that left a mark on you ?

If I asked you to define your work how would you do so?

That must have been at my uncles flat when I was a child. He had this “penthouse magazine” playgirl fold-out poster in his working room. It was a lady with really curly hair laying on the floor wearing nothing more then a men’s shirt. It had this softness and blurriness of a David Hamilton. I remember that I was secretly trying to look at it– so I would pretend to go in the bathroom but secretly observe the image.

I am very busy experimenting with photography and showing errors and mistakes in a society that is busy in creating the perfect image. In other words I like the possibility of losing control over the structures that are so prevalent in our present society.

At what point came the decision to become a photographer? It came late to me but I somehow always knew it. Can you recall the first picture you ever took? I was very young when my father committed suicide. After his death my mother and I lived a vagabondish life. We didn‘t’ really have a place I would have called our home. We had all our possessions in her car and we would go around all her friends to stay over, sometimes for a night, sometimes for month or longer. At a certain point my mother took me on a trip to Turkey in this car for some vacation. I can’t remember it so well anymore but I remember it was the first vacation I was allowed to take pictures with her camera. One of the first photos I ever took was when my mother was sleeping in the car. She looked so perfect to me… I remember at that moment she symbolised every idealist feeling I had about a woman.

To me your more of an artist working within the field of fashion photography although your work transcends just merely reflecting the seasons mood or trends, your art is usually more deep rooted, what led you to apply yourself to fashion photography? I am very interested in the social meaning of fashion like conformity and individualism, expression, exhibitionism, membership and classification, camouflage and so on... For this specific issue we’ve featured Germany quite a lot for instance we asked some young models what it was like growing up in Germany and the changes that they’ve felt the country has been through both negative and positive could you tell me through your eyes what changes you believe the country has been through and what effects you believe the changes has had on the art scene and on artists like yourself ? I left Germany almost 10 years ago so my awareness of “what is going on” in Germany is not so strong anymore. I do miss the pretzel’s! Has moving to London had any profound effects on the way you conduct or look at your work? The first few months I felt very exhausted in London. It was very difficult for me to cope with this vibe of survival, which seems to be marked in all the faces you see on the streets. Instead of inspiring me London made me very tired. It took me around 4 months to find how to use the city. On my search I found many nice things and great spots and I discovered that cooking and going to the markets in

London is really relaxing and inspiring to me. You have also moved beyond the still image and worked with film, this seems to be a route that many young photographers are now taking what inspired you to do so?. 14 years ago I studied art with main focus on “video art” in Germany. That was before I even considered doing photography. I had lessons by a German Video Artists who did a lot of visuals back then for the Acid and Rave club scene in Munich. Under his supervision I did a few visuals back then for two or three nights in a club called Ultraschall. Back then already I used a lot of dramatic and elongated shadows and my photography builds up on what I had done then. Now it’s going back to where I started and it feels like drawing a kind of a circle. It excites me very much to connect everything now with one another. Do you believe that moving image is the future of fashion photography in general? I do believe that moving image has become a new subgenre within fashion photography but I think that one will never replace the other. Photography deals with a unique moment in time while moving image concerns a period and I think that both remain as equally important. You also explore and experiment with film on your blog using graphics and lo-fi camera work and footage as well as your hilarious video diaries which are so simple but yet so effective, is there a reason for these pieces? I really enjoy doing them. Sometimes I wake up in the morning with an idea in my head for a video and I have to laugh already, then mostly I eat my breakfast; porridge really fast so I can quickly record the video. I know that a lot of artists seem to decide to make feature films either mid or later on in their career such as Sam Taylor Wood with Nowhere Boy and Sean Ellis with Cash back

I do prefer cinemas such as Screen on the Green and Rio because they provide a certain intimacy and romance that I don’t find anymore in the large cinema complexes. In Munich, Germany I used to go to a cinema, which was in a cellar and was really small with awful seats, you could just buy beer or cola for drinks. I am very enthusiastic about these kind of places. What directors and actors work do you admire and follow? I like the films from people such as Norman Mclaren, Fischli and Weiss, Miyazaki, the Maysels Brothers, Fritz Lang, Kenneth Anger and Steven Spielberg. I am not so into to actors but I have to admit that I love Meryl Streep. Could you tell me about your trip to Indonesia and what you learned whilst there?

now with a book about to be published and a successful career to boot would you ever consider a feature film and if so what do you believe it would be about? I would love to do a film about the mystery of the nothingness. In the beginning there was nothing. I like the idea that the nothingness collapsed in itself and all what we know came out of it. Maybe I should start with a film about everything. About your book what led you to the decide the time was right and could you tell me a bit more about it and how the project started? A year ago the publisher Heroes asked me to collaborate on a project together and since that day we worked very closely, on the project and it’s been a very exciting journey. Honestly I am really really happy about the book. So far everything I have produced has been for magazines so it is nice to create something, which has a longer time span. But of course I am questioning whether or not it is really the time to produce a book! I didn’t want it to be a book that feels like a big statement. We have edited out many images and left it more open. I don’t think there is ever really a time when you are really ready to bring out a publication.

I did an artist in residency for almost 4 month in a political active underground photographers community called RUANG MES 56. They had a space in Yogyakarta in south central Java. Yogyakarta is the only province in Indonesia that is still governed by that area’s pre-colonial monarchy. For me it was a very confronting time and very challenging. It was hard for me to work just amongst men and in a very male oriented art scene. I was sent by the Belgium government with the task to build a cultural bridge between Belgium and Indonesia. Apart from working on my exhibition in Indonesia, I organized an art group for a small group of street kids. With whom I set up an imaginary boy band and we applied for the Indonesian version of X FACTOR. It was a very funny time with a lot of laughing for the kids and me. It was great. What I love about your work is its range you are successfully able to take beautiful fashion photography that blends art in subtly and I believe the 40-page shoot you did with Cole Mohr caught the essence of your work moving from collages, to illustrations, to x-rays, is there a preferred style of work that your most comfortable with or are you simply happy exploring and experimenting? The legendary unpublished Cole Mohr shoot! (Now ublished in this premier issue of Re-bel) Hahahaha. Honestly I didn’t do so much experimenting on that one as Kez Glozier did the amazing illustration on it. I shot the images in one day and one night in Berlin for a magazine, which sadly closed before that issue hit the newsstands. It was called LIEBLING (which means “favourite or Darling ”) and was one of my favourite German magazines amongst Qvest and 032c. I remember that I was really sad that day and that it was difficult for me to get into the shoot. Cole was very sweet and he enjoyed hanging with us in Berlin, so much that he cancelled his flight for the castings in Milan for the fashion week to hang a bit more with us. It was a very special night and the shoot remains a very nice memory. In some of your work you reference other artists such as Millais Ophelia and Dali’s skull picture, which shows you have a certain respect for these artists and a knowledge of the past, which artists do you admire past and

Do You have a favourite Author?

and me. This communication often led to a playful exchange of items like photographs, poems, song texts and drawings. By sending and receiving personal information, which was sometimes honest and sometimes false, it soon developed into a natural and unplanned game based on each other’s reactions. Two years ago I won the Royal Academy Prize with this work and a nomination as emerging artists at the photo museum winterthur in switzerland.

I really like children books like stories by Michael Ende, Roald Dahl (with Quentin Blake’s illustrations) and Charles Lutwidge Dodgson’s Alice in Wonderland. Honestly, I just read children books and poetry books.

You once stated that you would love to work with Miuccia Prada and Jamie Bell do you still wish to do so and what brings you to want to work with Jamie Bell as I can understand and see you and Prada together easily.

How did it feel to be a part of Terry Gilliam’s latest venture?, The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus, in which your work was briefly featured and Gilliam’s vision perfectly complemented your own.

I believe that Prada and I have a lot of crossover points in the ways of thinking. I love the brand and how it is so radical in everything they do. I am sure a collaboration would lead to something amazing.

I was super happy when I got the e-mail from the assistant of Terry Gilliam. She told me that Gilliam really likes my work and that in his next movie he would like to have Heath Ledger flipping trough a magazine showcasing some of my images. My father and my mother used to watch BRAZIL time and time again together; Gilliam my fathers favourite film director. It was so amazing to be part of “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus”.

And Jamie Bell?

present and which work has had a profound effect on your outlook on life? Most inspiring are my friends and the people who surround me rather then artists and works I know from galleries and magazines. I do like to sometimes use clear references to the past, as my images are utopian dreams of a time that has went by..

Do you have a favourite project that stands out more then all the other you’ve done to date? I feel really strong about the project “Prison is a place”. Four years ago I found a webpage called “Friends behind the Wall” that offers data of American prisoners looking for contact with the outside world by mail. I started to correspond with 34 Afro-American prisoners from different prisons in the United States. Since then I’ve collected over 300 letters, drawings and photo’s, turning it into an archive of intense emotions. These letters are documents of the communication between the prisoners

Jamie Bell carries a really nice mood with him and I would love to collaborate with him on a video work. (maybe in “The Film of Everything”) The work you did for Little Boots is amazing, how did that come about and is there any other celebrity you have a desire to capture? Little Boots once posted on her twitter that I am her favourite photographer, which is really sweet of her. BAT FOR LASHES and BASEMENT JAXX put an option on collaboration last year, which sadly didn’t worked out. I would have enjoyed working with both of them. I am very open for anything and it would thrill me to work with people such as THESE NEW PURITANS or pop stars like BEYONCE. Your work is quite mystical, surreal, poetic are you a spiritual person? Yes.


Styling: Rasharn Agyemang. Set Design: David White Grooming: Valeria Ferreira. Model: Ross Bowling at Premier Fashion Assistant: Richard Coward. Retouching: Osewa Adojutelegan All looks by Romain Kremer


All rights reserved. Re-bel was produced exclusively for Jaiden RVA James by RBPMstudio Nothing within this paper may be reproduced in whole or part without the prior written permission of the publisher

And To All The Contributors, As This Would Have Been Impossible Without Your Help

Nicolaformichetti Lady Gaga Sarita D Martinez Jai-phoenix Harris Marc King Ryan Cooper Brown Katie Curran John Sandiford

Nine Daughters And A Stereo Amck Models - Special Thank You To Simon Worgan Oxygen Model Management Select Models Models 1 Premier Models

SHOWstudio.com Nick Knight Alex Flury Laura Bradley

Fashion East/MAN Lulu Kennedy Charlie Porter

Thank You

RE-BEL

ISSUE ONE SPRING / SUMMER TWENTY TEN

THE MODERNISNT COLE MOHR THE DEATH OF MENSWEAR CHARLOTTE GAINSBOURG ‘A SINGLE MAN’ SIMON FOXTON HARMONY KORINE CHRISTOPHER SHANNON ROBIN HOOD SNIPERS GIRLS GIRLS GIRLS


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