Page 1

W W W . FULSHEAR . COM


Cross creek rancH

The life you want. Right now.

ADVENTURE

ISLAND WATERPARK

OVER 15 Miles of

TRAILS

ON-SITE ELEMENTARY

SCHOOL

With sparkling lakes, gorgeous natural splendor and incredible amenities, including playgrounds, an on-site elementary school, a fitness center, dog park and Italian café, there’s no question everything you want out of life is right here, right now. Discover the life you’re looking for today in Cross Creek Ranch.

CrossCreekTexas.com • Katy ISD & Lamar CISD • Homes from the $280s to Millions

In FULSHEAR at FM1463 and FM1093


ENJOY THE

breath-taking beauty

& THE

country lifestyle

OF THE BRAZOS RIVER

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos. The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine piece of the rural Texas countryside without having to sacrifice the amenities of city living. Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, is easily accessible from Westpark Tollway and FM 1093. Laprada Landing offers tracts ranging from Âą60 - 105 acres, each with its own unhindered view of the Brazos River. With varying tree coverage, each tract has its own features that set it apart from the others with no two being exactly alike. There is ample opportunity to build and create your own sense of place.


N

HWY 99

Interstate 10

Westpark Tollway

FM 1093

FM 723

Stratman Rd

Laprada Trace

(Formerly Montgomery Rd)

r ive

sR zo

Bra

359 HWY

Bois D’Arc Ln

Winner Foster Rd

Secluded in one of the scenic bends of the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers an escape from the rigors of the city. Located 40 miles west of downtown Houston, Laprada Landing feels worlds away with dense stands of mature trees and sweeping vistas overlooking the Brazos.

Beadle Ln

The unspoiled, natural beauty of the tracts offers a pristine F othe r mrural o r e Texas infor m at i o n cwithout o n tachaving t piece of countryside to BILLamenities BLYTHE of at city (713)living. 829-3465 or sacrifice the Laprada Landing, located just south of Fulshear, easily accessible from D. LEIGH MARTIN atis(713) 835-9839 Westpark Tollway and FM 1093.

Martha Turner

Sotheby’s International Realty


To our Readers,

06 LETTER FROM TH E PUBLISH ER

THIS IS AN

amazing

TIME FOR OUR AREA.

While we navigate our area’s long-needed area mobility improvements, we continue to watch as land owners make way for area development. It seems that the best word to describe this season is “change” – and Fulshear has become the very definition of it. Today, we have the opportunity to witness and to participate in something grand – the reinvention of a community. On behalf of my publishing partner, Mr. George Lane, as well as our dedicated Fulshear Magazine staff, writers, and photographers, allow me to say “thank you” for receiving and reading this issue. It is an honor to be able to bring it to you. I can say that for each member of the team, our efforts represent a labor of love and commitment for the community we serve. We hope you are pleased with the result.

FULSHEAR A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Adding to the significance of our area, writer Susan Strickland brings us an insightful article featuring the Fulshear Farmer’s Market. Then, being a “child of the 60s,” Susan has uncovered information about Simonton’s own music legend, Dobie Gray. Susan also highlights some of our area’s more colorful past through articles that include an old-west-style gunfight in downtown Fulshear, area bootleggers and the moonshine they made near Simonton. You won’t want to miss her article about our area’s historic “Dinky” that served as our area’s public transportation for many years. Before you turn to the next page, we want you to know that our advertisers are amazing. It is their commitment that makes this publication possible. Please patronize their businesses – and when you do, please let them know that you appreciate their support for Fulshear Magazine. We couldn’t be here without them. So, now you can flip the page and begin to read this issue of Fulshear Magazine. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we have enjoyed producing it.

SEE YOU IN THE SPRING! Respectfully,

Daniel McJunkin

PUBLISHER - FULSHEAR MAGAZINE

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

LETTER FROM THE

Publisher

M

In this issue, you’ll find some amazing articles, each covering some pretty interesting subjects. As a celebration of over fifty years of American space exploration, writer Jaclyn Ritter brings us an incredible interview and article covering one of NASA’s most influential aerospace pioneers, Astronaut, Colonel Walter Cunningham. Jaclyn also graces our publication with an insightful introduction to Fort Bend County’s first family in her article featuring Fort Bend County Judge, Bob Hebert and his lovely wife Pat. Jaclyn follows up with a terrific article about House Concerts in Weston Lakes, some amazing young entrepreneurs in Cross Creek Ranch, and more.

Photo by rhonda renee Photography


FULSHEAR M

On the Cover

A

G

A

Z

I

N

FC

Photo by Katie Mecham

Letter from the Publisher

06

MAGAZINE STAFF

The Right Stuff

12

DANIEL M c JUNKIN

20

KATIE MECHAM

Growing a Champion Chamber Putting the Community First

Carousin’, Rabble Rousin’, and Deadly Shootin’ Footprints on Fulshear

Art Director

JENNI M c JUNKIN

28

Media Director

JACLYN RITTER Associate Editor

31

DHK Development’s Distinctive Touch

SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND Associate Editor

DON M c COY

Yen Teppanyaki Sushi Steakhouse

38

Fresh & Local

40

A Town and it’s Market

LaPrada Landing

Publisher

Chamber Consultant

PRODUCTION STAFF SHAY TIDWELL

44

A New Style of Country Living

Production Manager

BONNIE M c FERREN Bookkeeping

It’s All in the Cards

48

All Aboard

50

TRACY MILLER Accounting

JOSEPH SONNIER IT Consultant

A Brief History of the DInky

The Man Behind the Title

53

Revenuers, Bootleggers, & Moonshiners

58

Prohibition in Fulshear & Simonton

Small Concerts, Big Talent

63

Give Me the Beat, Boys

68

From Small Town Country Life to Big City Lights

Chicken with Carmelized Apples & Bacon Recipe

73

Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce Directory

75

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JACLYN RITTER SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF HEGER KATIE MECHAM RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY JACLYN RITTER

FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC GEORGE LANE & DANIEL M c JUNKIN Principals

WWW.FULSHEAR.COM

FULSHEAR MAGAZINE 281-973-0633

4017 Penn Lane, Fulshear, TX 77441

© Copyright 2016 - Fulshear Media Partners, LLC All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Photo by Jaclyn Ritter

E


12

The Right

Stuff Apollo 7 Astronaut, Walter Cunningham, Earned His Place in American History Books

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER


On

October 11, 1968, families all across America were glued to their television sets. The big names in politics, music, and film were gathered together at the Cape in Florida, on crowded bleachers, with their eyes to the skies. There, on launch pad 34, sat Walter Cunningham, Walter Schirra Jr., and Don Eisele, strapped in to a one million, three-hundred-thousand pound rocket. Following the devastating accident of Apollo 1 that took place only months prior, these men aboard Apollo 7 were carrying the nation’s hopes and dreams of one day reaching the moon. Born in Creston, Iowa during the height of the great depression, Walter Cunningham did not have it easy. Times were hard, and his family worked tirelessly just to get by. How did he pull through and find his way into such an elite and selective group of our country’s history? It was no coincidence. There was no luck. Walter grew up with the firm belief that, with hard work and dedication, he could achieve the high goals he had set for himself. With this mentality, he was able to join what the writer Tom Wolfe once described as “The Brotherhood of the Right Stuff.” To be chosen by NASA, during this early generation of the space program, was next to impossible. These selected individuals were hand chosen out of the best of the best. These men had to have the “right stuff.” Walter was no exception. He earned his place in history because he had drive, he had brains, he had passion, and most of all, he had confidence he could handle whatever he faced.

The depression took a toll on his family. Walter’s father traveled to California in search of a better life. In 1939, seven-year-old Walter, his brother, and mother made the move to Venice, California to reunite as a family. As young as ten years old, Walter was known to pick up odd jobs to help the family. His first job was assisting his father to clean under houses and build foundations. Walter also worked with his brother and cousin making cement blocks for construction. For almost four years, Walter had a paper route, delivering the Santa Monica Evening Outlook. “I didn’t have a bicycle, but our area’s distributor for the newspaper had a spare and sold it to me for $5,” smiles Walter. “I was able to pay it off in a couple of months’ time. It may sound like I am talking about how poor we were during that time, but it really was great. It was all I knew. I simply enjoyed looking for opportunities to get ahead.” When asked who instilled this positive outlook and drive, Walter replies, “I think it just reflects the time.” There were no strongly driven life lessons, or a particular “aha” moment. Walter simply had an innate desire to better himself – a strong drive to succeed. “I don’t remember ever regretting or resenting any of what I had to do to move up in life.” To this day, Walter stresses the importance of this kind of attitude. Little did that young boy know that, on October 22, 1968, his picture would be on the front page of the very newspaper he delivered years before.

Academic

Pure

Excellence

From small town Iowa to flying amongst the stars, Walter was not one to sit around and wait for his destiny. He had a drive that was so profound it actually propelled him toward his dreams.

From a young age, Walter knew that determination could only get you so far. A strong education is a fundamental key to success. Luckily for him, school often came easy. Due to being placed on the advanced track at an early age, Walter graduated high school as the top boy in his class.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Determination

13

Left: Walter Cunningham inside the Command/Service Module in 1968. Above: The Florida launch of Apollo 7 on October 11, 1968.


TH E RIGH T STUFF

14

Walter enlisted in the Navy out of school; he did not want to be drafted by the army. Two years of college were required in order to get in to Navy flight school. To his surprise, Walter managed to pass a two-year college equivalency test, allowing him an early acceptance into flight training in Pensacola. Six months before earning his wings, Walter learned that the only way to be guaranteed fighter planes was to join the Marine Corps. He did not give it a second thought; he made the transition. Walter graduated from flight training as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. While overseas in Korea, Walter witnessed many circumstances where a college education helped individuals move quicker through the ranks. “I came to realize that I better go to college,” remembers Walter. “A year after returning home, I transferred to a reserve squadron and went to the University of California at Los Angeles at the age of 24. At one point, Walter was juggling five jobs along with his studies. His education was number one, but he knew he still had to earn a living. Walter was selected as an Astronaut by NASA while in the final year of his doctorate work in physics at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences. Opportunity was at the door, and it was knocking loud and hard. Walter trained as the backup crew for Apollo 1, prepared for and flew his Apollo 7 mission, and later took the position of Chief of the Skylab Astronauts. After his retirement from NASA in 1971, Walter did not take a break; he set his sights on the next goal. Walter attended Harvard Graduate School of Business through their Advanced Management Program. Walter is quick to note that without his extensive education and desire to learn, he would not have been given a second look by NASA. The ability to think quickly, reason, and make educated decisions is exactly what it means to have the “right stuff.”

Confidence and

Passion F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Walter took an early interest in planes. With WWII in full swing during his childhood, airplanes were flying in and out of Southern California factories on a regular basis. Walter, at nine years of age, developed the impressive ability to identify the specific plane flying overhead by the sound alone. This early interest had young Walter sneaking into Douglas Airport to watch the planes take off and land. “When I was about 12 or 13, Douglas Airport had a weekend where for a penny a pound they would fly you in a circle around the airport.” Walter lights up as he recalls the childhood memory. “Weighing roughly 130 pounds, I lied and said I was 115 because that is all the money I had!” Walter experienced a rush during those fast flying minutes in the air. Surprisingly, this was his only time in a plane prior to flight training!

Hurricaine Gladys off the Gulf of Mexico as seen from space on the Apollo 7 mission - photo taken by Walter Cunningham.

Walter entered flight training at the early age of 19. Most of his colleagues had college degrees, and Walter wondered if he would be able to fit in considering his age and lack of experience. Not only did Walter fit in, but he excelled. He was a natural who stood out from the pack, finishing top of his class. Flying became his passion. “While I’ve flown other planes that may be considered “better,” the T-38 was like a toy to me,” reminisces Walter. “I just strapped it on my shoulders and went.” Like walking or breathing, flying was second nature. “From the beginning, I lived, grew, belonged in an airplane. Mechanical skills are only a small part of what makes an aviator. It’s what’s in the head and heart that makes a great pilot. I viewed flying as a joyous liberating experience. I came to know that the magic for me was in the control or mastery one has over one’s destiny when flying an airplane.” “We lost a lot of good people in plane accidents.” Walter continues by saying, “There were 30 in our first three groups selected by NASA, and by the time I flew my mission, there were only 25 left.” Walter stresses the importance of confidence. “I’ve always considered myself a fine aviator, and one of the best. Most good fighter pilots consider themselves one of the best; in fact, they kind of need to. I had the self confidence that it takes to do these sorts of jobs.” Having a love and passion for flying was not enough -- these men had to have confidence in themselves and their abilities.

Sharing the Ticket to

Success Walter Cunningham overcame hurdles, both big and small, to earn himself a coveted space in American history books. Through determination, his studies, a passion for flying, and confidence in himself, Walter earned his place in the “Brotherhood of the Right Stuff.”


15

“How quickly we take for granted what so long ago seemed impossible” WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

- Walter Cunningham -

Photo by: rhonda renee Photography


TH E RIGH T STUFF

16

APOLLO 7 Quick Facts: OCTOBER 11, 1968 - OCTOBER 22, 1968 ALTITUDE: 141.65 miles INCLINATION: 31.608 degree ORBITS: 163 revolutions DURATION: 10 days, 20 hours, 9 minutes, 3 seconds DISTANCE: 4,546,918.3 miles Apollo 7 accomplished what it set out to do – qualifying the command and service module and clearing the way for the proposed lunar-orbit mission to follow. Apollo 7 remains the LONGEST, most AMBITIOUS and most SUCCESSFUL first test flight of any new flying machine! Walter and his crew earned an Emmy for the first live TV downlink from space - INFORMATION FROM NASA.GOV -

Apollo 7

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Mission Photos

S-IVB over Kennedy Space Center.

The Apollo 7 crew: Walter Schirra Jr., Don Eisele, and Walter Cunningham.


the vehicle was the airplane,” notes Walter. That ambition is what landed him in that rocket, on pad 34, on display for all to see, carrying the dreams of America.

17

Today, Walter is a successful business man who enjoys his morning newspaper and cup of coffee at the local McDonald’s. His time with NASA are now happy memories that can be seen sprawled out across his office in the forms of awards, plaques, medals, and photos. He and his wife proudly look out through their big picture windows over the city of Houston, the city they love – the city where Walter’s dreams came true.

Mr. Cunningham in his home, reflecting on the incredible experiences of his time with NASA.

An astronaut is a symbol of man’s desire to explore the unknown. It is a job that few want, few qualify for, and few earn. Dr. Robert Voas, a psychologist and the training director for the Mercury astronauts, described the unique blend of characteristics these men possessed as: “intelligence without genius, knowledge without inflexibility, a high degree of skill without over-training, fear but not cowardice, bravery without foolhardiness, self-confidence without egotism, physical fitness without being muscle-bound, a preference for participatory over spectator sports, frankness without blabber mouthing, enjoyment of life without excel, humor without disproportion and fast reflexes without panic in a crisis.” Everyone has these traits; however, very few have them in that particular balance. Walter grew up at a time when there were no handouts. He worked for every dollar he earned and every step he took up the ladder. “My ticket to upward mobility was ambition;

When Walter speaks to students, he shares stories and answers questions about his time in space, but he also hopes to pass on a very important message. “Stop depending on other people for your success – you need to make it yourself. You have got to be willing to stick your neck out. Even the little challenges, when you take them on and tackle them yourself and succeed, that increases your confidence and your outlook the next go around. And most importantly, quit depending on the rest of the world to take care of you; make sure you can take care of yourself.” Walter was there at the beginning. He and his colleagues had an integral part in landing America on the moon. This did not come without sacrifice, sacrifice on them and their families. However, these men chose each and every day to risk their lives for science. Their hunger to explore the unknown and push science to its limits far outweighed these sacrifices. Walter proved he has the “right stuff” and joined the brotherhood of American explorers. It is now up to the younger generations to prove that the “right stuff” isn’t going out of style. d

Photo by: rhonda renee Photography

Just a few important books on Mr. Cunningham’s shelf, including his book “The All-American Boys.”

Writer’s note As a longtime lover of the space program and a kid who attended space camp, a childhood dream became reality the day I sat down and interviewed Mr. Walter Cunningham for the Fulshear Magazine. While I was not alive to see the Apollo missions first hand, the appreciation and understanding is still very much there. I bought and read Walter’s book, The All-American Boys, in preparation for our interview. In it, he discusses the application process for NASA, the journey to the first 30 selected, the significance and lessons learned from Apollo 1, astropolitics, and of course, what it was like to fly into space. The book was inspiring, and an interesting look into the inner workings of the space program. The problem was, how do I narrow it down to a small article? Truth is, I couldn’t! This only scratches the surface. I could have written about Apollo 7 and Walter’s role during the mission, but I chose to instead highlight the road that led him to that big day in 1968. However, I highly recommend you grab his book to continue the story. What an honor it was. Thank you Mr. Cunningham for making a girl’s dream come true!

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Photo by: rhonda renee Photography


GROWING A CH AMPION CH AMBER

20

growing a

ChampionChamber Putting the Community First WRITTEN BY THE FULSHEAR AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

W F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

ith creative prowess, the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce combines the talents of many with technological acumen to create a functional multi-network of components that benefit the chamber members and the overall community in many ways.

The Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce is a strong organization and emphasizes their strength in their Mission Statement, “The Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce is dedicated to serving the Business Community in the Fulshear Area. In our pursuit of excellence and goodness we strive to be the best possible partner to our members. We consider facilitating positive energy the very heart of our chamber and the key to our success. We want to continue to build a community of goodwill, satisfying our own needs for connection and for finding larger meaning in our work, while helping generate success for our members.�


HUMBLE

21

BEGINNINGS Early Chamber Meeting

It was just a few short years ago, in October of 2013, that the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce was conceived by the former City of Fulshear Economic Development Director, Cheryl Stalinsky, along with local businessmen Randy Stacy of Fulshear Insurance Group, Michael Martin of Martin Mortgage, and Mark Ball of Pro Image Promotional Products. The group first met at Yong’s Asian Fusion Restaurant. Seated around a table, they made plans to launch the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce. From the groups’ creation on January 1, 2014 to now, less than 3 years later, the Fulshear Area Chamber has exceeded all expectations.

KEEPING PACE WITH GROWTH

St Patrick’s Day Celebration

The Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce has become one of the fastest growing chambers in the Houston area today. The Fulshear Area Chamber membership has grown so quickly that they have outgrown their meeting spaces twice. The group is now meeting at their third venue, the gymnasium of Parkway Fellowship, which is located at the southeast corner of FM 1093 and FM 359. Meetings are held the second Wednesday of every month from 7:309:00am. Arriving early not only guarantees a good seat, but a chance to network with others and catch up on the latest area business trends.

FROM STARTUP TO

STANDOUT

It is interesting to consider that the oldest chamber in the Houston area making the list is the Galveston Chamber of Commerce that was formed in 1845. Besides that, six of the chambers of commerce on the list were formed in the 1970’s and five more were formed in the 1960’s. The Fort Bend Chamber, organized in 1973, came in at number four on the list with 1,300 members and an annual budget of $1.5 million. To be considered in such company in such a short period of time is remarkable, and recognition of such an accomplishment is certainly well deserved by the Fulshear Area Chamber. Festival of Lights Parade

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Rope Cutting for Texana Center

In June 2014, The Houston Business Journal listed the top 24 “Most Funded Houston-Area Chambers of Commerce.” Membership and annual budget were considered when ranking the list. If the Houston Business Journal’s list was published today, and assuming the numbers would remain the same as in 2014, the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce, with 425 members and two full-time staff, would rank approximately number 20 on the list.


GROWING A CH AMPION CH AMBER

22

MEANINGFUL

MEETINGS Throughout 2016, monthly attendance averaged 110 members and guests. The meetings feature one and a half hours of a jam-packed agenda, full of information that updates the group regarding the latest events, volunteer opportunities, available sponsorships, special guests, and motivational speakers. Attendees are rewarded with chances to win door prizes throughout the sessions. The meetings are popular with elected officials as well. For instance, it’s not uncommon to have an opportunity to visit with State Senator Lois Kolkhorst, Texas House of Representative Dr. John Zerwas, local mayors, city councilmembers and even law enforcement leaders. What makes the chamber’s meetings so special that over 100 people attend and participate month after month? City of Fulshear Councilwoman Tricia Krenek answered that question the best by saying, “The members of the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce are what make the organization so great! Attend just one of the monthly meetings and you will be welcomed with a smile and feel the dynamic synergy abound. The membership is eager to support one another and the entire Fulshear community, which gives me much hope and excitement for Fulshear’s economic future.”

Chamber Meeting

A NEW

STANDARD Many consider a chamber of commerce to be a bunch of stodgy old men in business suits with bad toupees. That may have been true back in the 1950’s, but the Fulshear Area Chamber is setting a new standard for chambers operating in the 21st century.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Chambers of commerce are most notable as networking groups for businesses. Many of these businesses are found to have common goals and interests, and they find it beneficial to work together to achieve these goals; but the Fulshear Area Chamber has gone a step further and has garnered excitement in the community that is second to none.

The Fulshear Area Chamber is not just any chamber of commerce. In 2014, the Fulshear Area Chamber embraced the heritage of Churchill Fulshear by incorporating the design of a horse head as its logo, making it a logo that is recognized by many outside of the Fulshear community. To date, the group has held numerous “rope cuttings” – as opposed to ribbon cuttings - to celebrate businesses openings. Beyond that, the

Downtown Fulshear during the Freedom Fest


Andi Wallis, Community Relations Manager of Texana Center, had this to say about the Fulshear Festivals, “My favorite event is the St. Patrick’s Festival. It’s a unique, family-friendly event, and the only one of its kind in the area. My family has been attending the event for several years, and it’s one of the things that helped me convince my husband to move to the area.”

23

Andi also enjoys a unique perspective of the Fulshear Area Chamber as Texana Center is a member of nine different chambers. She says, “Attending the chamber meetings is refreshing. There is always someone new to meet and everyone is so eager to network with each other.” She goes on to say, “Everyone has welcomed Texana Center with open arms, especially when it was announced that we would eventually have a campus in Fulshear!”

LEGISLATIVE

PREVIEW

Executive Director Don McCoy

group has organized “wranglers” to serve as chamber ambassadors and have built so much excitement in the business community that even businesses in other areas are taking note of what’s happening in Fulshear.

HOSTING

AREA EVENTS

The 85th session of the Texas Legislature begins on January 10, 2017. On December 2, 2016, the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce will host the 85th Legislative Preview underwritten by New First National Bank. The breakfast will feature a preview of the upcoming legislative session with presentations by State Senator Lois Kolkhorst and Representative Dr. John Zerwas. Organizers of this event include board members, Rebecca Hafner and Tricia Wright. The day this event was unveiled, the phones started ringing and tables sold out fast.

Upon their founding in 2014, the Fulshear Area Chamber immediately took over planning and operating annual major events within the city. These events included St. Patrick’s Day, the “Freedom Festival 4th of July Celebration,” the “Festival of Lights Christmas Celebration,” as well as Fulshear’s respected “State of the City” presentation.

In addition to the festivals, the Fulshear Area Chamber offers educational opportunities, including “How-to-Win Wednesdays.” The group also organizes other events for networking and community support, which include “Broken Boot Casino Night,” and the “Stampede of Golf” tournament, which is held in October of each year. The community has benefited from the creativity and organizational skills that Don brought with him. Each event has exceeded the one before in terms of attendance, revenues, and good old-fashion fun. Now people from all over the county anticipate the marvelous annual events and festivals in Fulshear.

Senator Lois Kolkhorst

Representative Dr. John Zerwas

PRESERVING

SMALL TOWN CHARM Senator Lois Kolkhorst also shared her sentiments, “Fulshear stands as a beacon of the new frontier, preserving the essence of small town charm amongst the vast expansion and growth of Fort Bend County. The community involvement is paralleled to none and the citizens of Fulshear take great pride in the fabric of their hometown. It is always exciting to be a part of the many events throughout the year that the Fulshear Chamber puts on. Because of their strong leadership and creativity, the Chamber knows how to truly bring

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

The city events are nothing short of a small production, which is right up Don McCoy’s alley. Don is the charismatic Executive Director of the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce. He was hired in December 2013 just in time for the launch of the chamber on January 1, 2014. Having worked in the theater prior to assuming the leadership position with Fulshear Area Chamber, Don’s talents have served him well in his position.


out the character of Fulshear and enrich the draw for those looking for a place to call home.”

LOCAL BUSINESS

SHOWCASE Rope Cutting Ceremony for Clarity Eye Care

Representative Dr. John Zerwas had this to say about the Fulshear Area Chamber, “Since its inception, less than three years ago, membership in the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce has exploded, gaining over 400 members, rising quickly to be one of the top chambers in Texas. It has showcased our local businesses and reinforced the pride we all feel in our community. I am honored to have been a dedicated member since the beginning. Kudos to Executive Director Don McCoy and the Board of Directors for their outstanding work.”

COMMUNITY

SPIRIT

Stampede of Golf Tournament

The sense of community spirit is prevalent within the Fulshear Area Chamber. Ask any of the 425+ members and you will hear a common theme, “community.” Christie Power of Stewart Title in Fulshear said, “Being a member of the Fulshear Area Chamber and attending the monthly meeting means getting vital information about our community in a very energetic atmosphere.”

FINDING

CUSTOMERS Terri Oliver of WaterCrestCruiseTravel.com says, “When a new business owner starts out from scratch, one of the main things they need to do is to find customers quickly and find the best ways to market and to manage their time. For me, one of the very first things I did was to see if Fulshear had a Chamber of Commerce.”

BUILDING

Freedom Festival Parade

A STRONG COMMUNITY Bruce Granger, Franchise Owner, NaturaLawn of America, says, “The Fulshear Area Chamber has been an awesome addition to our community. As an area resident of Fulshear since 2006 we have seen the transition from small community to small town to what will soon be small city. The businesses are vital to this type of growth and transition and a strong chamber can help shape a strong community.”

BRINGING BUSINESSES

TOGETHER

Rope Cutting Ceremony for IronTribe Fitness

Anne Frye of 1st Texas Home Health says their business opened in Fulshear eight years ago. “Fulshear Area


VOLUNTEER

OPPORTUNITIES Linda Wooten moved to Fulshear about 10 years ago. She works with the local seniors at the Senior Center and is an active member of the Fulshear Simonton Lions Club. She says, “I first became involved as a volunteer for the city events long before the Fulshear Area Chamber was created. Back then, it was a small group of people representing local businesses, churches, civic organizations, clubs, and individuals from the community that helped plan and do the work for each event.” Linda continues, “I really enjoyed volunteering for these projects. They gave me the opportunity to meet and work with many wonderful people that live in the Fulshear area. I am pleased that the Fulshear Area Chamber has carried on the tradition and has also made the festivals bigger and better while still retaining that “small town” feel.”

DEDICATED LEADERSHIP

The Fulshear Area Chamber is led by a Board of Directors that includes Chairman, Randy Stacy, Fulshear Insurance Group, Inc.; Vice-Chairman, Rebecca Hafner, Independence Title; Treasurer, Terry Crockett, New First National Bank; Secretary, Tricia Wright, Touchstone Crystal by Swarovski; Mary Meier, First Choice Emergency Room; Hugh Durlam, All-Terra Engineering, Inc.; and Rachel Durham, Keller Williams Realty. Former board members include Michael Martin, Martin Mortgage; Mark Ball, Pro Image Promotional Products; and Nancy Garcia, Keller Williams Realty. Serving as paid staff are Executive Director Don McCoy and Assistant Executive Director, Amy Norvell. They do an exemplary job of organizing and supporting the backbone of the chamber - its members.

The members, their enthusiasm and commitment to the chamber and community is what makes the Fulshear Area Chamber stand out from all the other chambers. Don and Amy do a great job of helping new members figure out their talents and interests and assist them with getting plugged in to the chamber. Rope cuttings are a great way to meet some of the newcomers, but if taking

a break from their business in the middle of the day is a hardship, there are other opportunities for business owners to become involved.

25

WORKING

RELATIONSHIPS As with any organization, it is always good to have open communication and a good working relationship with local emergency service agencies. This becomes particularly important in the organization of festivals. Police Chief Kenny Seymour says, “During the short time the chamber has existed it has far exceeded anyone’s expectations. I don’t believe you will find a more diverse organization anywhere in the Fort Bend area. The “can do” attitude and synergy of the chamber is infectious and is inviting to our local area businesses.” He continues, saying, “The Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce has been, and continues to be, a huge supporter of the Fulshear Police Department. It is a privilege to work with Don McCoy and Amy Norvell on projects. They portray the “make it happen” attitude I embrace and look for. Moreover, I am proud of the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce as it exemplifies the image that we, as a city, want to present to the community.”

THE POWER OF

SYNERGY The Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives says on their website, “The whole of a chamber of commerce is greater than the sum of its parts, programs, people, and participants.” It is interesting to note the definition of synergy, which has been mentioned by several people when referring to the Fulshear Area Chamber:

Synergy is defined as the interaction or cooperation of two or more organizations, substances, or other agents to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate effects. Synergy is the driving force behind the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce. Individually, chamber members are outstanding. However, collectively, they make even more outstanding things happen. The chamber’s success is all about their attitude. It’s not, “What can my community do for me?” but rather, “What can I do for my community?” d

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Chamber is just what this community needed to bring businesses together under one umbrella. After 1st Texas Home Health opened in Fulshear, I immediately got involved serving the community. Now that we have the Chamber, there is something happening every month. I’ve enjoyed serving as a “Wrangler” and being involved in all of the events. The chamber is helping shape Fulshear into the city it is today.”


28

CAROUSIN’, RABBLE ROUSIN’, AND DEADLY SHOOTIN ’ Whoopin’ it up on Friday Nights in Old Fulshear WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

T

ales of the Old West always include a good gunfight. It’s just…well, it’s just tradition. A Wild West town simply would not make sense if it didn’t have a gunfight to tout in its historical and anecdotal archives.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Fulshear, Texas is no exception to that tradition. In a Houston Chronicle article dated May 5, 1996, a reporter described “a Wild Tale…of a Texas saloon and a no-good drunkard of a man egged into a gunfight with a young lawman trying to keep the peace in a town where everyone carried a six-shooter.”

This WILD TALE, folks, happened right here in Fulshear, Texas. Photo: ©iStock.com/fergregory


THE BAD GUY

This particular gunfight happened February 17, 1893. Joseph R. Wade, known by all in this small town as “Jody,” was a 35-year-old bachelor, bully, and drinker. In the annals of Wade family lore, Jody was also known to be “quite the scrapper.”

Jody was the son of Pennington Tucker Wade and Lucretia Collatinus Foster (daughter of “Old 300” Randolph Foster). Jody was the brother of Lucy Wade Briscoe, half brother to Johnny Mayes, and great uncle to Carl Bentley, longtime resident and Justice of the Peace in Fulshear.

Apparently, to those who recalled the shootout, Jody was not too popular with the rest of the local drinking crowd, because he was in the habit of beating the hell out of most of them. Jody’s half brother, Johnny Mayes, owned the saloon in downtown Fulshear.

JOSEPH R. “JODY” WADE’S TOMBSTONE

As Jody liquored up, his buddies taunted him about how the deputy was coming to arrest him. In a fit of drunken bravado, Jody boasted, “No Dutchman named Hoffman’s going to arrest me.” Others in the saloon crowd made it their official function of the night to notify Hoffman that Jody needed to be arrested. Out of drunken crowd mentality, a perfect storm aligned.

While there were many drinking establishments in Fulshear in 1893, the scene of this particular crime took place in Johnny Mayes’ saloon on Main Street.

The deputy strutted in to make the arrest. Jody pulled his gun. The two men shot each other. Right there in downtown Fulshear. Right there in Johnny Mayes’ saloon.

THE GOOD GUY In a duel or gunfight of any note, the bad guy must have a worthy opponent. On the opposite side of Jody Wade’s combative nature stood law-abiding H.W. Hoffman, a Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Deputy, known in these parts as the local law enforcer. While not particularly near and dear to the drinking gang, Hoffman was a man well-versed in arresting local drunks as they staggered out of the many drinking establishments in town.

On February 17, 1893, the boys at Johnny Mayes’ bar cooked up a plan. They would get Jody rip-roarin’ drunk and then get the deputy to come to the bar to arrest him. In an apparent conclusion of group-think, the saloon patrons resolved to get rid of both Jody and the deputy. The reasons why they needed to rid themselves of the unpopular twosome is lost to time and brought back to life only in the imagination.

AN ILL-FATED

ENDING

H.W. HOFFMAN’S TOMBSTONE

(Photo courtesy of Salem Lutheran Cemetery in Tomball, Texas)

Lucy Wade Briscoe passed this story and its fanciful details on to her grandson, Carl Bentley, whose recollections — narrated to me in a 2005 interview — contributed mightily to this raucous story.

Jody managed to stagger three blocks to where his sister Lucy lived. He collapsed on her gate and called out, “Sis, come help me! I’ve been shot!” Joseph R. “Jody” Wade died right there on that gate and is buried in the Wade family plot in Fulshear Cemetery. Deputy H. W. Hoffman died two days later, leaving a widow and two sons. He is buried at Salem Lutheran Cemetery in Tomball. His headstone has a German inscription that, when translated, reads, “Died an honorable death in the performance of his official duty as a Deputy Sheriff in Fulshear, Fort Bend County.” d

Old Town Fulshear

29


F O O T P R I N T S

O N

FULSHEAR

31

DHK DEVELOPMENT’S

DISTINCTIVE TOUCH

F

From the early age of four, Doug Konopka could envision endless possibilities as he considered the landscape around his first Lionel model train set. “After opening that gift from my grandmother,” he recalls, “I spent countless hours over the next 14 years building neighborhoods, parks and downtowns around that track on a sheet of plywood in my basement in Erie, Pennsylvania. And throughout my childhood I was constantly rearranging my family’s village under the Christmas tree – and if you ask my wife, April, and two sons, Trevor and Cole, I still do to this day! Looking back, I suppose this was conceptually the start of my career as a developer.”

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Some folks are likely grateful for that train set and Doug’s visionary modifications to his Christmas village – because it ultimately led him to create DHK Development, Inc., in 1991 – which led him to bring a visionary touch to the Fulshear area that is alive and well many years later.


FOOTPRINTS ON FULSH EAR

32

DOUG KONOPKA Resident Carole McCann appreciates the impact Doug and DHK Development have had in Fulshear – personally and professionally. “My husband Michael and I met Doug when he started the beautiful Fulbrook development,” she shares. “I was most impressed with his unique style and amazing vision. He has not disappointed me in any of his projects, including his design for an old-style downtown environment of Fulshear Town Center.” Adds Carol, “Doug is a kind, caring man with boundless energy, and he was one of the first to sponsor my family’s Bike for Mike which contributes to Fulshear and area charities in honor of my late husband.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

DHK Development, Inc. is a boutique firm that manages undeveloped properties owned by a few select Houston families, provides real estate consulting services and develops both residential communities and mixed-use projects. DHK’s concept of large waterfront and wooded home sites amidst an abundance of natural, open spaces has been one of the most popular footprints making a long lasting impression in Fulshear. City council member Ramona Ridge credits Doug with the vision to enhance as well as preserve Fulshear’s uniqueness. “Doug’s innovational thinking in our formative years as a growing city has led the way for high quality development in Fulshear,” she says. “DHK understands the desires of many that want to live surrounded by nature and wildlife, rather than concrete and asphalt.” Adds Ramona, “Doug

was one of the first developers to support our Dark Skies Ordinance, created to ensure that residents and future generations of Fulshear can enjoy the stars at night. Additionally, his foresight and generosity helped to create the Fulshear Farmers’ Market, one of the most popular destinations in Fulshear. He serves as a Board Member of the 501(c) 3 Forever Fulshear. Besides all of his developmental cleverness, Doug is an all-around nice guy and a pleasure to work with.”

A BEHIND-THE-SCENES LOOK AT THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS Doug was initially drawn to the Fulshear area by a 600-acre land management agreement in Simonton. “During that time I met many wonderful people, like Frances Smart, Jo Douglass, Carole McCann and Synda Frost, and was impressed by the natural beauty and the desire of residents to maintain the identity of the area and not get swallowed up by West Houston,” he shares. Under Mayors Mike Dinges, Jamie Roberts and Tommy Kuykendall, he served on the Fulshear Planning Commission, encouraging local leaders to plan for the area’s growth. “We sponsored two town hall meetings at which residents were invited to express their desires for Fulshear’s future and they overwhelmingly voiced support to create a pedestrian style town center, protect open space and prepare a comprehensive plan to guide future growth.”

Bountiful Living


Planning for growth is one of his beloved pastimes. Once prospective DHK properties are located, Doug meets with local elected officials and city management seeking guidance prior to the preparation of land plans, construction cost estimates and financial models. “After we receive approvals for our land and engineering plans,” he explains, “the construction process begins. It often takes about two years from the time we find a property to the time we sell the first lots.”

must consist of capable, creative consultants, strong financial partners and enthusiastic residents. DHK seeks honest, creative and dedicated team members and encourages them to go wild with ideas.

Hands down, Doug’s favorite aspect of being a developer is “creating high quality, lifestyle communities that people find unique, sustainable and surprising.” DHK trademark footprints within Fulshear include breezefriendly three rail fences, roundabouts, birdhouse villages, natural open meadows, tree protection policies and attention-grabbing home designs.

Every property has its own unique character.

DHK’s first project in Fulshear was Fulbrook. Several years later, DHK helped establish another community on Fulshear Creek featuring unique community space amenities including a lodge, bocce court and a lakeside stage for outdoor concerts. During the summer of 2011, Fulshear Creek Crossing residents became the first in the Houston region to harvest about 1000 pounds of grapes from their two-acre neighborhood vineyard and make their own label of Blanc de Bois wine. “DHK Development creates these types of unique opportunities to build small-town charm into the culture of the community,” resident Simona McKey shared in an online recap of the local news.

City leaders, potential buyers and longtime residents see DHK’s basic development policies playing out on a daily basis: DHK does not develop subdivisions, implying entry landscaping and houses are the important ingredients, but rather “communities” which implies the residents are the most important.

Successful communities are alive with simple but memorable events such as outdoor concerts, harvest feasts and fishing tournaments.

Preserve its natural environment and pay homage to its history by recognizing the property’s previous owners with named streets and places.

Area resident Sue Gruber is quick to tout DHK’s footprints throughout Fulshear. “When my husband Greg, and I moved to Fulbrook 10 years ago, one of the main reasons we were convinced to do so was because of Doug and the vision he had not only for Fulbrook, but Fulshear as well,” says Sue. “We loved the idea of living in the country in a community that was concerned with the environment -- and dedicated to maintaining natural surroundings while being close to Houston and all that a big city has to offer. We also loved the small town feel of Fulshear and all of its rich history. We liked the thought of living somewhere that was embracing growth and progress while being sensitive to issues like maintaining our prairies, ensuring the livelihood of Texas native plants, reducing light pollution, and the like.” She adds, “Doug is a visionary with a big heart.” DHK’s footprints in Fulshear extend beyond property development to include cultural development. In his early years in Fulshear, Doug was instrumental in forming what originally was called the Fulshear Arts Council, now Arts Fulshear, a non-profit arts organization. “When Doug hosted music, art and culinary events in the area that were immensely popular,” says Arts Fulshear Executive Director Marcia Simmons, “I suggested starting a community arts organization and he agreed and pledged his support.” Since that beginning five

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

A community will be successful because of a unified team effort. In addition to the developer, the team

33

LAKE WITHIN THE NEW COMMUNITY FULSHEAR RUN


FOOTPRINTS ON FULSH EAR

34

years ago, she says DHK has been one of Arts Fulshear’s largest corporate sponsors. “Doug recently joined our Board of Directors and was elected President. The idea for a visual and performing arts center began with Doug, and may culminate with DHK Development if we can raise the funds.”

INTRODUCING…

FULSHEAR RUN

FULSHEAR RUN ENTRANCE

Councilman Stephen Gill has known Doug for seven years. “When I think of Doug, I think of his vision, integrity, unique perspective, community oriented mindset and his passion for creating communities that provide a wonderful environment in which to live and play. I think Fulshear Run will be his most unique development yet and will add to the uniqueness of Fulshear.”

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Promoting “Bountiful Living,” Fulshear Run (fulshearrun.com), is a sophisticated singlefamily residential development located south of the intersection of FM 1093 and Bois D’Arc Lane that offers half-acre and 1+acre home sites flanked by creeks, ponds, woods, prairies and pastures. It offers hiking trails amidst vineyards, olive orchards, a small performance stage and fishing pier -- and is the only master planned acreage community offering city utility services. “It is a very unique community because of its tree cover and 30’ topographic changes,” adds Doug, “and it is a link between town and country.” The instant popularity of this new community is visible through the construction activities of Fairmont Custom Homes and Trendmaker Homes. Adds Doug, “After our children, the greatest investment we typically make is in our home. We design our communities so that they not only protect home values, but hopefully enhance them over time. The value protection process begins with a creative land plan, features strong architectural guidelines and deed restrictions, and culminates with active community involvement.” Also part of the Fulshear Run Planned Unit Development zoning designation is a 25+ acre mixed-used commercial district. Doug has stated that he prefers that this district, while uniquely linked to Fulshear Run by trails, not carry the same name.

FULSHEAR RUN SECTIONS 1 & 2 ILLUSTRATIVE PLAN

TRENDMAKER MODEL HOME IN FULSHEAR RUN


“I WANT ALL OF FULSHEAR, AND THE ENTIRE REGION IN FACT, TO FEEL THAT THIS DISTRICT BELONGS TO THEM, AND NOT JUST TO ONE OF MY COMMUNITIES. THIS WILL BE A TOWN CENTER WHERE PEOPLE CAN SHOP, DINE, LIVE, WORK, ENJOY THE ARTS AND PARTICIPATE IN SPORTING AND COMMUNITY EVENTS.”

35

In an effort to engage all residents, last year he hosted a community forum, attended by nearly 100 citizens, to present and listen to ideas.

THE SONGBIRD PARK

Former mayor Tommy Kuykendall believes Fulshear has been blessed by the quality of development attracting residents here today. “At a time when Fulshear was struggling to institute responsible and sustainable design standards, Doug worked closely with the City serving as an advisory member of the Planning Commission,” he says. “Doug listens to the vision of Fulshear residents making him a great partner with Fulshear and our community. One thing I have learned through our association is that DHK’s development projects will be well planned, unique and embody Fulshear’s vision.”

“DHK’S DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS WILL BE WELL PLANNED, UNIQUE AND EMBODY FULSHEAR’S VISION.”

THE FULSHEAR FARMERS’ MARKET

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

- TOMMY KUYKENDALL -


FOOTPRINTS ON FULSH EAR

36

2016 POP-UP SUPPER EVENT

SIGNATURE TOUCHES

BENEFIT

LOCAL NONPROFITS On October 8, Fulshear Run became the picturesque backdrop for DHK Development’s inaugural Farm & Vineyard Faire. From 2-5pm, over 450 foodies and nature lovers spent an afternoon enjoying entertainment, gourmet bites from top chefs, fine wines and locally produced craft beers under a canopy of oaks. The one-of-a-kind Pop-Up Supper under the stars that evening featured Bravo’s Top Chef Monica Pope and friends – complete with live music and a meal showcasing the freshest organic ingredients and fine wines. “DHK has created the Fulshear Run Community Services Foundation into which we will donate funds from the sale of home sites to be used for beneficiaries including Arts Fulshear and the Fulshear Farmer’s Market through Forever Fulshear,” Doug adds. In the meantime, funds raised during the Farm and Vineyard Faire will be earmarked to both organizations.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

“Without a doubt, the highlight of my Fulshear career is the spectrum of relationships I have developed.” Adds Doug, “I can name so many residents, community leaders and business owners whom I admire and respect, and want to work with to develop a unique Fulshear. The city will continue to grow. I hope we can all work together to ensure that Fulshear reaches its great potential.” d

W W W. F U L S H E A R R U N . C O M 2016 INAUGURAL FARM & VINEYARD FAIRE


YEN

38

TEPPANYAKI SUSHI STEAKHOUSE

New restaurant brings unique dining to Fulshear WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

F

ulshear residents tend to be very loyal to their local restaurants and coffee houses. While there may not be an abundance of options, the available establishments have been embraced and supported from the beginning. While neighboring towns have a plethora of options, it sure is nice to ditch the drive and stay close. Yen Teppanyaki Sushi Steakhouse is one of the new kids on the block, and, in a short time, has already proven to be a staple amongst Fulshear residents.

Why Fulshear?

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Yen may be a new restaurant, but the gentlemen behind it have been in the game for a long time. The owners, Jason Wang, Tony Wang, and Leo Dong opened Sushi Hana, a very successful restaurant in the Shops of Bella Terra along the Grand Parkway, in 2007. With Fulshear’s consistent growth, the three jumped at the opportunity to share their craft with its residents. Yen Teppanyaki Sushi Steakhouse opened on March 7th, 2016 along FM1463. Tony Pham, manager at Sushi Hana, was eager to get to work on the new restaurant. During college, Tony worked at a local Florida restaurant to help fund his degree in electrical engineering. Twentyfive years later Tony Pham is still in the food industry and he would not change a thing. “If you do not love what it is you are doing, you can never truly do it right,” smiles Tony. “I love what I do and am glad I chose the path I did.”

A New Style of Dining Tony, along with owners, Jason, Tony, and Leo, opted for a more contemporary interior for Yen Teppanyaki, instead of a traditional Japanese decor. While the menu at Sushi Hana was more fusion,


offering a variety of Asian cuisines, Yen is more focused on traditional Japanese sushi and hibachi. Their seafood dishes tend to be the most popular, however they have chicken, three different cuts of steak, and vegetable entrees to please a broader palette. Tony’s favorite – the filet mignon lobster. When it comes to dining, guests have four different options: the sushi bar, traditional table dining, hibachi grill dining, and the VIP room, which is available to reserve for parties and corporate events. To experience the real deal, opt for the hibachi grill! Hibachi is a style of Japanese teppanyaki cooking that integrates gas heated hotplates into tables that seat multiple people. This more family oriented style of dining is not only about the food, but also about the experience. The chef puts on a show, all while preparing a mouthwatering meal. Hibachi chefs are specially trained. There is no wall separating the dining room from the kitchen. Their work is on display for all to see. They must be aware of any food allergies amongst the group, know how everyone likes their meat cooked, masterfully cut and dice to perfection, all while putting on a show. This is multitasking at its best! Diners are witnessing true performance artistry. One minute, ingredients are being tossed around the grill with flair and precision, and then the next, the whole grill is set aflame. Yen’s lead chef, Bobby Wang, is proud to say that every chef is experienced. They know that the key to delicious food is in the details. Steak needs to cook on a hot grill and be transferred to a hot plate. The inexperienced chefs will stand out because they cook their steaks on the side of the grill, for fear of overcooking it. An experienced and confident chef

places it right in the center and knows the precise moment to remove it from the grill to achieve that tender, juicy, and flavorful piece of meat that cuts like butter. This is true attention to detail.

Consistency is Key The key to Yen’s early success is consistency consistency in both service and quality of food. Tony knows that if customers are confident that they will get the same great experience each and every time they dine at Yen’s, that they will spread the word and likely return. Yen Teppanyaki Sushi Steakhouse is proud to call Fulshear home. They have not even been open a year and they are already members of the Fulshear Area Chamber of Commerce. In the years to come, they hope to become even more active with area schools, churches, and local events. The love the owners, manager, and chefs have for the restaurant is apparent - from the moment you walk into the restaurant, all the way until your last bite. There is a sense of pride in what they do, and they do it well. d

What is Teppanyaki?

Teppanyaki translates to “grilling on a hot plate.” Introduced to the United States following WWII, “Japanese Steakhouses” became more and more popular. Teppanyaki encompases all Japanese food cooked on an iron grill, or hibachi grill. Dishes usually consist of thinly sliced meat, rice, vegetables, and soy sauce.

TEPPANYAKI SUSHI STEAKHOUSE 6630 FM 1463, Fulshear, TX 77441 (281) 665-3917 www.yenhibachi.com Email: info@yenhibachi.com

LUNCH Thurs-Fri • 11-2pm DINNER Mon-Thurs • 5-10pm, Fri • 4:30-10pm Sat •11:30-10pm, Sun • 11:30-9:30pm

39


A TOWN & ITS MARKET WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY

“Most of my neighbors had vegetable gardens. We lived on acreage. We grew all these

beautiful vegetables

and could only eat so much. What were we to do with the rest?” Thus began Ramona Ridge’s quest to share with the community around her the bountiful harvest from her garden and from that of her neighbors. Ramona, the owner and manager of the Fulshear Farmers Market, explained the impetus for her idea to me while we sat in her office during the Saturday morning market. There were frequent interruptions as different people knocked on the door and asked about requirements for being a vendor. Could they sell baked goods? Could the market use another vendor to sell fresh eggs? What was required to obtain a Food Handler Certificate? Ramona had the answers. The Fulshear Farmers Market is a huge draw for the community, and people want in on the action.


contacted Ramona and offered to come out to Fulshear on Valentines Day. “A perfect day,” Ramona recalls. “Seventy-five degrees…perfect day…perfect weather.” Three thousand people showed up that day. The farmers market closed at 1pm, but hungry patrons were still lined up for Cousins Maine Lobster at three in the afternoon. It was obvious that the food truck business was going to be a viable commodity for the local farmers market and, in fact, the Fulshear Farmers Market was the first venue to host a food truck event in Fort Bend County.

41

With fresh, local, and fascinating in mind, Ramona introduced me to three vendors who offer a unique perspective on our local farmers market experience —

Back in 2014, Ramona knew that Doug Konopka owned the property at FM 1093 and Bois d’Arc. When she approached him about the idea of putting a farmers market on that spot, he immediately thought it was a great idea. “When Ramona approached me about creating a farmer’s market in Fulshear,” Doug says, “I was ecstatic because of my own intention of developing an indoor/outdoor public market. Also, I felt that the farmer’s market could become a prominent gathering place for all of Fulshear. Ramona has created something that Fulshear can be proud of.” From that moment forward, a non-profit known as Forever Fulshear became the brains and brawn behind the farmers market in downtown Fulshear, a market that is frequented by hundreds of local residents every weekend, as well as those from neighboring communities. The market has even been featured on two Houston television stations — Fox and WB 39. “With a lick and a promise, we crossed our fingers and started the market,” Ramona says. And, that is how it all began. Fulshear Farmers Market was in business. The hardest part of the process was finding farmers with enough vegetables to sell for four hours every Saturday. Today, that is still a problem. Seasonal produce is just that. Tomatoes only grow for a couple of months a year, as do grapefruit, peaches, and pears. Ramona tries to limit the vendor marketing pool to a 200-mile radius from Fulshear to keep the produce local and fresh. But she has added artisans and craftsmen and those with unique food products to sell, as well. The other big draw to the Saturday market is the array of food trucks on the grounds. The food truck business has boomed over the past few years, and the Fulshear Farmers Market’s inclusion of those purveyors of good eats has taken advantage of the growing trend. From the very beginning, Ramona saw the need for food vendors. “The first day the market was open, we were surrounded by farm vendors selling fresh food, but there was nothing for customers to eat. There was no readymade food.” She had recently heard that Cousins Maine Lobster had just won top prize on ABC’s Shark Tank. Through a Fulshear Farmers Market fan who mentioned that the market was looking for food trucks, Cousins actually

Soni Holladay THE SCIENCE OF FARMING

From Horticulturist to Cut Flower Grower

If you’ve been to the Fulshear market this summer, you might have noticed a young woman standing behind sprays of colorful cut flower bouquets. That woman is Soni Holladay of Local Flora, a business enterprise she has recently started from ten or more years as a museum horticulturist, bringing her extensive knowledge of the science of growing beautiful plants to the passion of a cut-flower business.

LIVING WITH NATURE

Soni and her husband, Boone — our Fort Bend County Extension Agent — live in an 1870s house that was moved to Fulshear from Houston about 20 years ago.

Cut flower vendor Soni Holladay.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Doug Konopka and Ramona Ridge.


FRESH & LOCAL

42

THE SCIENTIST IN THE FARMER

A graduate of Horticulture from Texas A&M, Soni has been the Operations Director of the Cockrell Butterfly Center at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. She spent 8 years with the Cockrell, working on the rain forest exhibit and managing the greenhouses. She now brings her accumulated knowledge of science and passion to our community, where she will work in the garden section of the new Ace Hardware and will sell cut flowers at the Fulshear Farmers Market. Soni also spent a year and a half at Baylor College of Medicine, analyzing plants for their vitamin and mineral content. The passion and dedication she has brought to science and to her work at the Cockrell Butterfly Center is also evident in the research and care that she puts into growing specialty cut flowers in her country garden right here in Fulshear.

James Schilling THE OLD-FASHIONED WAY

IS SOMETHING PEOPLE HAVE FORGOTTEN

A DISCONNECT BETWEEN PEOPLE AND NATURE

Soni knew she liked working with her hands and that she wanted a non-traditional type of career. And she wanted to grow more unusual plants. But, what she really wanted was to help people develop a better appreciation for nature. And that is what she does through Fulshear Farmers Market. She brings people and flowers together in an aesthetic and personal way. She brings joy and beauty to our everyday lives.

And…she makes Fulshear a prettier place.

“I PLOWED IT. I PLANTED IT. I HARVESTED IT. I KNOW WHERE IT CAME FROM.”

James Schilling sports a soft knit shirt with a colorful bandana tied around his neck, and atop his head sits a bent and worn felt hat. James lives and farms near Garwood in Colorado County, on land that has been farmed for four generations by Schilling brothers. But, he can be found in Fulshear every Saturday morning at the farmers market. Here, he sells fresh blue-green and brown eggs, plus a tasty assortment of tomatoes, squash, peppers, okra, and eggplant.

“YOUR WHOLE LIFE IS AN EDUCATION”

James says he’s lived a colorful life, and I believe him. He’s been on a tractor since he was 7, been gardening since he was 8, played poker since he was 9, and was a freshman in high school before his family had electricity. He didn’t know until then that you could buy food in cans. He even grew up with a kerosene-fired ice-box and read books by oil lamps. After graduating from TCU in Religious History, he spent a few years as a rice farmer, served as past chairman and Lifetime Director of the International Committee of the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, and traveled all over the world. For a few years, he moved to far west Texas, where he learned to speak fluent Spanish, ran a motel, a steakhouse, and a hardware store. He even served as Constable and president of the local Chamber of Commerce.

James Schilling at the market selling farm fresh eggs and an assortment of vegetables.

If you want to visit with James on his farm in Colorado County, you’ve got to take a few county highways, then drive down a long dirt road and through a mott of oak trees until you come upon a beautiful stretch of land where the creeks are lined with hearty American Beautyberry bushes.


It is there that his hundred or so chickens roam and roost and where his garden flourishes with homegrown produce that he grows, weeds, and harvests on his own. “If you’re a farmer,” he says, “You don’t hire anybody. You do it yourself.”

43

He used to give all of his produce and eggs away for free and, sometimes, it still seems as if he does just that. He doesn’t take credit cards, so if customers at the Fulshear Farmers Market don’t have cash, he simply says, “That’s okay. Pay me next week.”

Historically, Henna was used for cosmetic purposes in ancient Egypt, North Africa, the Arabian Penninsula, the Near East, and South Asia. Weddings were celebrated by adorning the bride’s skin with henna for luck and lasting marriage.

EDUCATING THE CUSTOMERS

Already an active member of Arts Fulshear, Hema became a vendor at Fulshear Farmers Market in the Spring of 2015. “I set up a table and nobody came.” She shrugs and smiles at the somewhat disheartening recollection. “I thought my business was over the moment it began.” Ramona Ridge calmly offered a suggestion. “Hema, you might want to put up a sign.” Hema Narayanan creates a work of art for the customers at the market.

Hema Narayanan Photo by Ramona Ridge

BEAUTY IN THE DETAILS

THE ANCIENT ART OF HENNA

Hema laughs when she tells the story and says that she did indeed put up a sign that read “Henna,” only to quickly realize that the word on the sign meant little to the farmers market visitors. She knew then that she would have to educate people on what henna was, show them some of her intricate designs on hands and fabric, and create a marketable interest in temporary body art.

INTRICACIES OF PATTERNS

Hema’s art does not rely on stencils. She does only freehand drawing, focusing on the details in the patterns. How long the tattoo remains depends on skin type and tone, but normally it will last 7-10 days. While true henna is reddish in color, white henna is a new trend, often used in weddings for a very intricate and lacy glove effect. For holidays, the market will also feature her art on champagne flutes, wine glasses, plates, and even clothing.

Photo by Hema Narayanan

Photo by Makenna Lowe

Hema Narayanan has a unique gift. She understands intricacies of pattern and, with an artist’s eye and a calm hand, can turn those patterns into amazing works of art.

On Saturday mornings at the Fulshear Farmers Market, under Hema’s creative ornamentation, two distinct cultures meld into one beautiful work of art. d

ART KNOWS NO BOUNDARIES

I arrived at her house in time for “Tiffan” — a late afternoon Indian ritual of light snacks and a delicious tea mixed with cardamom, cinnamon, and milk. There, she explained to me the ancient art of Henna. Henna — Lawsonia Inermis — is a flowering plant that grows native to northern Africa and western and southern Asia. From crushing the leaves, a resulting powder is mixed with essential oils to form a paste used for the art of temporary body stain.

Photo by Makenna Lowe

Photo by Hema Narayanan


LAPRADA LANDING

44

A NEW STYLE OF COUNTRY LIVING

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

W

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF HEGER

hat was it about the city of Fulshear that drew you in? For many, it was Fulshear’s small town feel and undeniable charm. It is here where families can acquire sizable property and experience a bit of the country, all while being a short drive away from the city and its multitude of amenities. As Houston continues to push westward and Fulshear grows, open acreage become harder to come by. Nestled along a bend in the Brazos River, Laprada Landing offers that much needed escape from busy city life. This Highland Resources property, located just three miles southeast of Fulshear, is unlike anything else. With 720 acres divided into just nine tracts, buyers will

have the unique opportunity to let their imaginations run wild. The vast views of wildlife, flowers and mature trees draped in delicate Spanish moss overlooking the river, paint a picture of nature at its finest. Whether it be intended as the family ranch, or a second home away from downtown, Laprada Landing is what everyone is talking about.

LAND RICH IN HISTORY

Laprada is no ordinary piece of land, it is part of Texas’ rich history. Its unique narrative begins in 1824 when David Randon and Isaac Pennington acquired land from Stephen F. Austin, joining the prominent group of


45

“THE MORE TRANQUIL A MAN BECOMES, THE GREATER IS HIS SUCCESS, HIS INFLUENCE,

HIS POWER FOR GOOD. CALMNESS OF MIND IS ONE OF THE BEAUTIFUL JEWELS OF WISDOM.”

While they could easily sell to a residential developer who would likely strip away the property of its charm, displacing the wildlife and thinning out the trees, Highland has chosen to divide the acreage into nine tracts, ranging from 60 to 105 acres. “We have owned this property for over thirty years, so we have had a long time to think about its future,” says Charles Wolcott, President and CEO. “It was never in the cards to do a development property, it is just too pretty.” In fact,

they have incorporated protective covenants within the deed to ensure that the location remains secluded and not built up like the tightly packed communities nearby. For example, only one residence is allowed per 60 acres and every home site must be set back off the road a minimum of 300 feet. Highland is so proud of the property’s legacy, that they have taken it a step further and applied through the Fort Bend Historical Commission for a historical marker. They are pleased to say that just recently they have been accepted. The marker will be called the Randon and Pennington Grant of 1824. Charles is pleased knowing that it is no longer hearsay, it is proven historic record. “We hope that by acquiring this historical marker people see the deep history tied to the property and that they are not just buying a piece of ranch land, but a piece of Texas history.”

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Texas’ first settlers – the Old Three Hundred. Randon and his wife Nancy McNeel ran a successful plantation on the property until 1859 when they sold the land. After being passed through a few more hands over the years, Highland acquired the 2,000 acres in the late 1970’s. After thirty years of cattle ranching operations, the decision was made to market the southernmost 720 acres.

JAMES ALLEN


46

NATURE AT ITS FINEST

LAPRADA LANDING

“We are excited to be involved with this property,” shares Gloria Catalani, operations manager at Highland. “I even find myself escaping the city and relaxing amongst the vast wilderness just to get away from the day to day strife.” This comes as no surprise because the aura of Laprada Landing is truly magical. There the air smells sweeter, the grass is greener and the stars seem to shine brighter. Situated on newly named Laprada Trace, a county road that dead-ends within Laprada Landing, buyers can rest assured that there will be no through traffic. Majestic pecans, live oaks and water oaks cover the property. In the spring, the area is draped in color thanks to the beautiful Texas wildflowers. “The river is the large selling point – the gem,” says Charles. There are no land locked tracts. All nine front a large stretch of the Brazos and have buildable home sites. The land is perpetually preserved and protected from dense development as portions of this property are within floodway and floodplain delineations that were finalized by FEMA in 2014. Highland was looking for a name as unique as the property itself – something evocative of the feel of the land. Laprada is a play on words of the Spanish word la pradera, meaning meadow. The name has since been trademarked as to remain unique to the property.

PRIME LOCATION

“We want to be different than anything else in the area, but still blend in,” notes Gloria. “We are working to create understated country elegance in a unique and secluded location.” Located right around the corner from the highly sought after Fulshear area, and only 40 miles west of Houston, there will be no sacrifice of the desirable amenities city living brings. Residents will be minutes from local stores and restaurants. This kind of property is hard to find. Laprada Landing is a place you can go to escape, to breathe, to be closer with nature – and call home. A place with as rich a history as this is meant to be preserved and enjoyed. It is now time for a new generation to be part of that legacy. d

Energy Corridor

10

8

ay Westpark Tollw

99

Fulshear

Sugar Land

59

Houston

For more information about LAPRADA LANDING contact

BILL BLYTHE at (713) 829-3465 or D. LEIGH MARTIN at (713) 835-9839 with MARTHA TURNER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

36

90

The Galleria

610

Bra z

r ve Ri os

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Katy


IT’S ALL IN TH E CARDS

48

IT’S ALL IN THE

CARDS! CROSS CREEK RANCH SUPPORTS TEEN RESIDENTS BUSINESS

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY Teenage years can be tough. For a student, school in itself can be a full time job. Still, many choose to take on extra-curricular activities like sports, music or theater. A smaller number choose to throw a part time job in the mix. Fulshear sisters, Kyleigh, age seventeen, and Emalie, age thirteen, took it to a whole new level – they started their own company. Kyleigh and Emalie Campbell’s mother, Keri, had seen how successful yard cards had been in other communities and presented the idea to her daughters as a way they could earn some extra money. Yard cards are a fun way to congratulate someone, or wish them a happy birthday, in a really big way – a full out display in their front yard!

The girls took a fast liking to the idea and began researching the ins and outs of such a business. Before long, their garage was stacked high with large letters and their webpage was complete. In August of 2015, Ky and Em’s Yard Cards was officially open for business. While mom Keri oversees the Facebook page, for safety reasons, and helps the girls manage their financials, Kyleigh and Emalie are responsible for planning and executing each order, making sure no ones’ special day falls through the cracks. There is no sibling strife here, these sisters work really well together. With Kyleigh performing regularly


“This is teaching them a little bit more about responsibility with money, because they cannot just take all the money they make,” notes their mom, Keri. The sisters set aside a percentage of their earnings from each sale to be able to add to their inventory, thus being able to keep up with demands and offer more variety. “Kyleigh and Emalie are learning that nothing comes free,” Keri concludes.

with Spotlight Acting Academy in Katy, and Emalie an active member on the Katy Aquatics swim team, there comes times when one has to take on a heavier load than the other. They truly make a great team. What has been the greatest lesson they have learned from running their own company at such a young age? “I’ve learned better organization and time management,” says Emalie. Shuffling school, homework, after school activities and their own business is a real juggling act. This is where having the support of one another is key. Unlike most jobs, Kyleigh and Emalie do not have a set schedule. Yard cards are set up late at night when the recipient is likely sleeping, therefore as long as they plan accordingly, they have some flexibility. “With our busy schedules it would be hard for us to take on a regular part time job,” adds Kyleigh. “Yard cards provides a good source of income for us considering the level of flexibility it allows.”

Ky

&

Their community of Cross Creek Ranch has embraced the girls and their young business. While they service the broad Fulshear area, their own community keeps them busy – especially during their busiest week of the year, graduation week! One of their biggest supporters is Misty Day. Misty used Ky and Em’s Yard Cards to help celebrate her two sons’ birthdays. Her one son in particular, Nolan Day, took a strong liking to the signs. “He wanted to pose with them, rearrange them and hang outside to admire them,” smiles Misty. Nolan, just 4 years old, has been battling B-Cell non-hodgkin lymphoma. After two and a half years, on June 20th, 2016, Nolan rang the bell, symbolizing he beat cancer! “The girls came to me and said they wanted to donate a yard card for the big day,” adds Misty. “My heart was truly touched.” That special morning Nolan woke up to big letters across his front yard reading, “Nolan Smashed Cancer!” The girls are proud to call Fulshear home and are happy to give back to the community. They like to do so by donating yard cards to the local schools or businesses for holidays, the principal’s birthday and other special occasions. Keri Campbell is providing her kids, Kyleigh and Emalie, with an opportunity to get out in the community, make a difference, make some money, and learn while doing it. Beyond that, she is giving her daughters a lesson in life that is priceless and will serve them well as they grow. In fact, the girl’s younger sister, Avery, age eight, is looking forward to joining her sisters in a few years and following in their footsteps. The school system can teach our kids about math, science and introduction to business, but experiencing it firsthand is an entirely different story. There is no denying that no matter what profession these girls choose down the road, this experience will have helped lay a strong foundation. d To order a yard card or for more information, you may request to join “Ky and Em’s Yard Cards” Facebook page. Alternatively, you may email Keri Campbell at paulkeri85@yahoo.com.

Em’s

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Emalie , Keri, Avery & Kyleigh Campbell

49


50

ALL ABOARD A BR I E F H I S T O RY O F T H E D INKY WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

At 8:52 in the morning, the 310 pulls into Simonton, and the summons of “All Aboard” resounds across the depot platform. At 9:02, more passengers board in Fulshear. From there, brief stops are taken at Flewellen, Gaston, Clodine, Alief, Jeannetta, and Bellaire, until 10:15am when all passengers step down into Houston’s Grand Central Station.

Through the windows of the passenger car, travelers watch the sun rise in the east over fields and pastures that are dotted now and again by sparsely populated towns. The 310 passes through terrain that is mostly flat with only slight undulations, as if the Earth lets loose a sigh every now and then. In the late afternoon, those same travelers watch that same sun set in the west as the 309 returns to Fulshear and Simonton around 6:30pm.


THE DINKY

51

In 1888, the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railroad (SA&AP) constructed a rail line that ran from a town called Kenedy (named for Miflin Kenedy who financed most of the original construction) through Simonton and Fulshear and on to Houston. Now, if you wanted to go from Fulshear to San Antonio, the ride on the SA&AP took a mighty long time. You would be better served by going from Fulshear to Eagle Lake and then transfer to the Southern Pacific, which would get you into San Antonio a lot quicker. But, if you just wanted a convenient way to spend a day in Houston — for shopping or visiting relatives or watching a movie — you would opt for the Dinky.

As young teenagers, Patsy Sabrsula and her best friend, Mimi Dozier, would often board the train in Fulshear. Mimi’s mother, the local postmistress, would stand on the same platform, while waiting for the mail to arrive, then wave goodbye to the girls as they headed off to downtown Houston for the afternoon. There, they would shop for a few hours at Foleys or go to the picture show, have lunch, then re-board for the trip back home. “The conductor always wore a uniform,” Patsy recalls. “And I know he looked after us.” For much of the year, that Fulshear to Houston trip served as the girls’ Saturday entertainment. In Summer, they usually rode the Dinky

A photo of the Dinky at one of the many depots on the SA&AP line. Courtesy of Otto Perry Photo, George Werner Collection

Photo courtesy of Murry Hammond

from Fulshear to Simonton to spend the long, hot days playing with the Mullins kids. Dave Mullins remembers that, when he was still a very young boy, his mother would pin a nametag on his shirt, load him on the train, and send him off to Houston to visit his aunt. Due to vast improvements in roadways and easier access to automobiles, rail passenger demand dwindled in the years following World War II. On March 31, 1950, the Dinky made its final run. As an old timer from the area once said about the Dinky — “The tinkle of its bell offered a comfort hard to describe and never to be forgotten.” Today, the tracks have all been dismantled and hauled away, as the railroad right-of-way is absorbed into the ever-expanding sweep of suburbia. But the romance of rail travel — with its distinctive clarion call of “All Aboard” — still hovers above the few trestles that hide among tall grass and lingers in the memories of those who reminisce affectionately about the Dinky. d

(Information about the SA&AP, SP, TX&NO, and The Dinky--Courtesy of Ken Stavinhoa, The Eagle Lake Depot Museum, Murry Hammond, and George Werner) (Recollections about the Dinky provided courtesy of Patsy Sabrsula, Harold Daily, Barney Pfeffer, and Dave Mullins.)

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

By 1925, the Southern Pacific had absorbed the SA&AP into its subsidiary Texas & New Orleans Railroad system. With the railroad company looking for ways to cut costs and improve efficiency, the Dinky — as it was affectionately known — was born. Advertised in the 1940 Official Guide of Railways as “motor car service between Kenedy and Houston with airconditioned coach,” and run by a gas-electric engine, the Dinky carried mail and freight in its first car and passengers in the second. Around holidays, when the demand for downtown shopping grew heavier, another car was often added.


53

THE MAN

BEHIND THE TITLE

F BOB HEBERT, F O RT B E N D COUNTY JUDGE, TA L K S PA S T, P R E S E N T, A N D FUTURE

ort Bend County is one of the largest and fastest growing counties in America. With roughly 745,000 residents sprawled over 880 square miles of land, this is not surprising. With that being said, growth is far from over. In fact, it is only the beginning. Recent growth in Fulshear can attest to this. With so much growth comes a lot of possibility and excitement, but also a lot of concern. This is why Bob Hebert’s role is more important now than ever. This year will mark Bob’s fourteenth year serving as County Judge of Fort Bend County. Over the years, Judge Hebert has dedicated himself to the county he loves, always putting its residents’ needs first. There is only one thing that fills his heart with as much joy as his county, and that is his family.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY RHONDA RENEE PHOTOGRAPHY


TH E MAN BEH IND TH E TITLE

54

Bob Hebert’s mother, a fourth generation Texan from Shelby County, was four months pregnant with him when she got on a train in Beaumont and headed west. She was eager to meet up with her husband who was newly stationed in San Bernardino, California. It was the year 1941, and the country felt that a war with Japan was imminent, so they began shipping a lot of freight to California. Bob’s father, who worked for the Santa Fe railroad, was transferred out west to aid in the movement. However, Bob feels it is important to note that his mother always said to him, “You may have been born in California, but you were conceived in Texas.”

While in Hawaii, Pat became pregnant with the couple’s first child. According to Navy policy, women were not allowed to travel after their fifth month of pregnancy, so Pat returned to Houston to be with her family. “I was able to take leave and to fly back to Houston to be there when my daughter was born,” smiles Judge Hebert. “Shortly after, I received my discharge papers and was able to return to my wife and young family.” Their entire marriage up until this point had been unique, in the fact that Bob was out of town just as often as he was in town. “Pat jokes that it was in Houston that she realized what it was actually like to be married to me. I was home all the time now.”

“We moved with the railroad,” says the Judge. “We were never in one place too long.” By age 5, his family moved back to Amarillo, Texas, then briefly to Tyler and finally to Pampa, where he graduated from high school at the age of 17. Weeks into his first semester of college it became clear to Bob that he and his family did not have the sufficient funds to put him through all four years of school. Bob withdrew from LSU and enlisted in the Navy.

In 1963, Bob and Pat made the decision to call Houston home. After a lifetime of moving around, Bob was excited to put down roots – he was even more excited to put down roots with Pat. By 1968, now a junior college graduate with a family of five, Bob decided it was time to get serious and find a job that could support his growing family. “I realized I had a knack for business, and I liked building organizations and providing services,” says Bob. “I started my own company in the water industry, Eco Resources Inc., built it up for thirteen years, and sold it. I retired at 44, but quickly discovered that you can only play so much golf. I eventually became bored.”

Boot Camp Graduation photo, 1959

On Patrol in North Pacific, 1962

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

In between military assignments, Bob was able to attend classes at the University of Texas at Austin using the GI Bill. It was there that he met Pat, the love of his life and a fellow student who caught Bob’s eye and stole his heart. She was perfect; she was intelligent, confident, sincere, and easy on the eyes. Pat also understood Bob’s commitment to serving their country and agreed to follow him to the island of Hawaii following their marriage. Their first year of married life was really a long honeymoon, spent amongst the sun and waves of Oahu, where Bob flew as an air crewman in a patrol squadron. Bob was at sea roughly two weeks every month, but the two weeks he was home were filled with nothing but fun and relaxation. They had no real obligations or responsibilities during that time.

Judge Hebert has over 2,000 hours airborne in this patrol craft, 1961-63

Bob, now sporting an MBA from Pepperdine University, rejoined the world of business when he built one more company from the bottom up, sold it, and became a fulltime consultant to water companies and governmental agencies around the nation. For several years it seemed as though he had found his niche, but everything changed in December of 2001. Bob’s good friend, then Fort Bend County Judge Jim Adolphus, suffered a massive heart attack just days after filing for reelection. Knowing that his health was severely impaired, Jim encouraged Bob to run for his position. “He basically told me, from his hospital bed, that if I chose to run he would withdraw from the race.” Running for County Judge was never a thought prior to those important conversations. With days to make a decision, Bob turned to his wife for advice and much needed support. Pat was there with encouragement and unwavering support, just as she has been in the years to follow. Bob took office in January of 2003. Sadly, not long after Bob took office, Jim passed away.

“Family is everything,” grins Judge Hebert from his corner office on the first floor of the historic courthouse. “I’m not rich, but I sure am wealthy. I’ve got my health, a great family, three daughters, five grandsons, and two great grandsons. And while this job keeps me busy, I still make time to be grandpa.” “I’m blessed because Pat is my best friend, as well as my wife,” the Judge adds. “We’ve been buddies for over 55 years now, and if I did not have her support it would have been very difficult.” Pat is a strong woman who can hold her own. “This job is not intimidating to her at all,” chuckles Judge Hebert. In fact, Pat has been his campaign treasurer and a campaign manager each time he has run for the coveted title. “She keeps me focused and going in the right direction. I may be a tad smarter, but she has more common sense than I do.” Recently, when Judge Hebert


55

announced that he intends to run for one more term, it was no surprise that Pat is standing one hundred percent behind him once again. “It’s a relief my wife isn’t running for County Judge, because I think she would win. I am glad she is on my team.” Judge Hebert and his wife make an excellent team. His family’s support has given him the strength to tackle the often stressful role. Judge Hebert handles himself with grace and confidence. He has proven year after year that he has the knowledge and passion to guide Fort Bend County into a bright future.

handle complex problems. I’ve been the CEO in the private sector for many years. In that sector, the CEO’s rule is law. They make decisions every day that change lives. That doesn’t happen in county government in Texas. The only time that I truly have unilateral executive authority is during a declared state of emergency, because I am also the Emergency Management Director. During the emergency, I can force a city to evacuate or not. I can override a mayor’s decision. I have very strong powers during an emergency, such as a flood, hurricane or terrorist attack. That being said, these powers only last as long as the emergency lasts, they are fleeting. This means that authority has to be used intelligently, and this power cannot be abused. Because when the emergency ends, you’re just a citizen again. It is important to listen, take in what people are saying, and make good decisions. I like to think of it as though I am Chairman of the Board -- someone who has no executive authority but can still influence people -rather than Chief Executive.

THE INTERVIEW I had the privilege of sitting down with Judge Hebert and asking him specific questions regarding his position and the future of Fort Bend County. Here is what he said.

What does it take to be a county judge? First of all, you have to understand business. You also have to understand finance. It is important to know how to work with people, communicate effectively, and

It’s a very complex job. We have a very strong and intelligent court but, that said, if you don’t have business expertise and an understanding of numbers, you can get yourself into trouble. Writing the budget for Fort Bend County is a complicated endeavor. The more confident you are in your team and your own personal understanding of the matter, the better it is. Probably the most important aspect of the role is the ability to work well with people and the capability to work toward building a consensus. If your ego is too big or you try and tell people what to do, you can actually freeze county government. Open discussion is very important. I represent everyone in Fort Bend County, and I always need to represent their best interests, as I understand them to exist.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Judge Hebert , Governor Greg Abott and Chinese Consul General Li at the 2016 Lincoln Reagan Dinner.


TH E MAN BEH IND TH E TITLE

56

What is an average day like for you? I don’t know if there is an average day. But I typically get up at 6:30 in the morning. I have coffee and toast. Afterward, I sit down at my house computer and check my emails, return any calls, and I usually get into the office around 9 am. I often have appointments and meetings throughout the day; however, my staff really tries to have them done by 2pm, if possible. It isn’t uncommon to not leave until 5:30 pm. When I finish with my last meeting, I check with my staff to make sure there is nothing else I need to take care of. If not, I head back to the house to continue with work from home. I attend three to five community events each and every week, after hours and on weekends. Lately I’ve been watching the Astros play in the evenings whenever possible, though these last few days I haven’t been as eager to watch.

Bob & Pat at the 2015 Rancher’s Ball.

Bob giving an address for the Central Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce.

What do you feel has been your greatest accomplishment as County Judge? My most satisfying achievement is that I have been able to hire a competent staff. Ann Werlein, Beth Wolf, Donna Ospina, Jenetha Jones, and Luisa Bowers are all competent, hard workers that keep me prepared and where I need to be. I have absolute confidence in each and every one of them. I know I can leave, and my staff will keep me connected to the office and filled in on any and all important developments. This makes the job a lot easier. Even more satisfying to me is knowing that I have very little staff turnover. In fourteen years, I’ve lost three to retirement, and D’Neal Krisch -- a great help in my early years -- resigned when her third little boy came along. I can rest easier knowing the staff is there. With the exception of D’Neal, everyone I have brought in is still here, and they seem to be happy. I know I’m certainly happy that they are there for the county.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

You have witnessed a lot of change during your time as County Judge. Where do you see Fort Bend County in 10 years? I think Fort Bend County will run through one million in population within 5-7 years. We are creating a lot of high-end jobs within the county, and that tends to bring in more people. We also have quality developers that are creating beautiful, well-planned communities that have the amenities that people seem to want. That, along with the fact that we have great schools and easy access to major roads, makes Fort Bend a great place to live.

I think we are going to see growth in densely populated communities from the North to the South and Southwest of the county. With the county covering 880 square miles, we still have 550 square miles, or well over 60% of the county, that is still open land. There is a lot of space for growth. First, I know that eventually the George Ranch will seek to monetize their land and open it up for development. Second, another big influence will be along the improved I-69 through Richmond and Rosenberg. This 8-lane freeway will give us tremendous road access, which will lead to more development to the South and Southwest. Of course I-10 will continue to drive development in the Katy-Fulshear-Simonton area for years to come. Finally, at some point, the Toll Road Authority is going to bring the Fort Bend Parkway across the Brazos River. This will give us another major connection to I-69 and the Grand Parkway and new access from the western part of the county to the medical center and downtown Houston.

Why do you love Fort Bend County? When I grew up, we moved a lot. We lived in rental properties. Both my parents worked odd hours and would come and go. In some ways, it was a difficult childhood because of that. I moved to Fort Bend County in 1980 when I relocated my business out here. I fell in love with it, because it was a family oriented community – the community I had occasionally enjoyed in my youth but never could hold on to. Pat and I knew this was where we wanted to be. It was beautiful, it was dynamic, and we were warmly welcomed. We’re like a big family in many ways. We have fussbudgets, consensus builders, volunteers, quiet family folk, loners, and other types, but they all are trying to build their lives and improve the community the best way they know how. Today, whether we are out to dinner in Cinco Ranch or at a Skeeters baseball game, we always run into people we know. That’s the best part. Pat and I fell in love with the people of Fort Bend County. d


REVENUERS , BOOTLEGGERS, AND MOONSH INERS

58

MOONSHINERS WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

I

t is a fact that our area boasts several convenient taverns where one can buy an adult beverage. But there was a time, not so long ago, when it proved challenging to land a beer, a brandy, or a whisky. During Prohibition, people often mixed drinks in their bathtubs — Bathtub Gin, they called it — and relied on local moonshiners to provide potent home brews to quench a robust thirst.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

One seasoned citizen, whose father owned and ran Daily Bros. local mercantile at the corner of FM 1093 and FM 1489 in Simonton, had a few things to say about this era of constraint. “Lots of folks in Fulshear and Simonton made wine or beer,” he said. “It was okay if you made it for yourself and weren’t selling it. Our store even sold caps and cappers for beer bottles. Had to be careful though. If it was too hot outside, those capped beer bottles would blow up.”

Daily Bros. General Merchandise Store in Simonton. Photo courtesy of the Dave Mullins Collection


What Exactly Was Moonshine?

59

AND WHO WERE THESE BOOTLEGGERS AND REVENUERS?

Moonshining, or the unlicensed distillation of whiskey, traces its Texas roots back to the “white lightning” concocted by early pioneers long before latenineteenth-century prohibition laws boosted the market for illegal whiskey. Moonshiners occasionally attained the status of folk heroes who beat the system by earning good money and by outwitting meddlesome government agents. The illegal brew was often made on the halves system, where a bootlegger would furnish the kegs and fruit jars, and the moonshiner would supply the still, distill the liquor and, in effect, bear most of the risk of getting caught. A typical recipe for corn whiskey called for mixing fifty pounds of sugar with fifty pounds of steel-cut corn chop — a coarse feed consisting of bran, husk, and germ fragments removed from corn. Gallons of water were added and the mixture was allowed to rot for 4-7 days. When the sour mash stopped bubbling and turned sky blue, it was ready to be cooked off or distilled. The same mash might be used for four or five mixtures, although a little extra sugar, grain, and water were added for each additional run. An average still could produce 45-60 gallons of moonshine a week.

Local authorities often looked the other way in this whiskey trade, but most moonshiners were kept awake at night with fears of being caught by federal agents — the dreaded Revenuers. A successful raid by these agents of the US Departments of Justice and Treasury could cost a moonshiner hundreds of dollars in lost equipment and supplies, loss of income, and the possibility of a jail sentence. Most moonshiners moved their stills frequently to avoid such costly disruptions, and a quick escape route through the woods was an invaluable tool to have at hand.

CHARTER MOONSHINE Considered the very best moonshine, Charter was put in charred oak barrels for several days, where it turned dark after absorbing color and flavor from the charcoal. A variety of ingredients could be added to increase the whiskey’s color and flavor. Red oak chips, peaches, apples, caramel, raisins, syrup, rock candy, tobacco, or spoiled potatoes found their way into whiskey barrels to add zest to the brew. Even Dr. Pepper was a popular additive.

The Vet Who…Well, Maybe Wasn’t

The following Tale recounts how a local moonshiner was put out of business by federal agents in the mid 1930s. His name has been changed to protect his family’s right to privacy.

THE PLAYERS

Photo courtesy of Clark Family Photograph Collection, UNT Libraries Special Collections to The Portal to Texas History

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Mr. B was an honest man, well liked in the community, and married to a most dignified woman who grew quite attached to her garden and her peach trees. As a sharecropper, Mr. B rented land south of FM 1093 between Fulshear and Simonton before earning enough to buy the property and start farming in his own right. He raised a highly-educated daughter who married a well-known mover and shaker in the Civil Rights Movement.

Mr. B, it seems, was also in the M O O N S H I N E business. According to a couple of old-timers, Mr. B made peach brandy and some of the best bootleg whiskey in the area. “No one ever got sick from his whiskey, because he insisted on properly filtering it through charcoal.” I guess that an honest moonshiner who made safe hooch was a valuable commodity in the days of hatchet-wielding-Carrie-Nation kind of folk. Photo courtesy of Britannica.com


REVENUERS , BOOTLEGGERS, AND MOONSH INERS

60

Photo courtesy of the Dave Mullins Collection

THE STAGE

In the height of the depression in the ‘30s, there was a cotton gin in the center of Simonton. During off-season, farmers would sit on benches under the gin’s tin roof to discuss crop yields and various affairs of small-town gossip. One summer day, along comes this chubby, red-faced, middle-aged man who claimed that he could work on any livestock that needed attention. The townfolk took him for his word and, within hours, there were lines of animals that needed teeth floated or worms eradicated or hoof fungus treated. The Vet was a hard worker, of that there was no doubt. He apparently was also a hard drinker. As one elderly citizen recalled, the Vet would constantly inquire of any passersby where he could get some good whiskey. Since almost everyone in the community knew of the illegal distillers in the vicinity, they were more than willing to offer directions to any of the local suppliers. The Vet would disappear for a few days, returning with a scraggly beard and a hung-over demeanor. This scenario of inquiring into some good whiskey and

returning several days later — bedraggled, unshaven, dirty, and hung-over — recurred several times over the next few weeks. When it seemed as if every cow and horse and pig in the area had been properly tended to, the Vet stated that it was time that he move on.

THE CLIMAX

All seemed back to normal until, one day about a month later, federal agents descended on the area and made a great sweeping raid of every still and bootlegger in the entire area. Also exposed by the federal dragnet were some embarrassing revelations of public officials who happened to partake of the illegal libations. The biggest surprise in this small town was that the leader of the feds was none other than the old Vet. But on this visit, he was clean, trim, well-dressed, sober, and very much in command.

THE EPILOGUE

So, Mr. B’s liquor-making business was laid to rest — at least for a while. I’m sure he kept planting his cotton and corn and biding his time until the federal agents turned their interests elsewhere.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Yes, I would surmise that, after a brief but polite spell of non-imbibing temperance, the embers in those country stills stoked up again, and happy times arose once more. But one elderly gentleman recollected that local farmers and ranchers sort of missed the chubby, redfaced Vet. He was, after all, pretty darn good with animals. d **From the recollections of Harold and Abe Daily, residents of Simonton during its heyday.

Photo courtesy of wpafilmlibrary

Moonshine information courtesy of The Handbook of Texas Online, The Texas State Historical Association.


63

SMALL CONCERTS

BIG TALENT

Local couple opens their home and draws a crowd to support up and coming artists

M

usic affects each of us differently. It has the power to bring back old memories and emotions. It can transport us to another time or place. Music can help us escape our problems, even if just temporarily. Whether enjoyed at the local bar surrounded by friends, or from the comfort of our cars as we cruise down the road, music surrounds us. Some insist that music has to be experienced live to really be experienced at all – with the bright lights, big stage and crowds. No matter the location, most of us enjoy listening and relating to every word of our favorite tunes. Just recently I was introduced to an event known as the “house concert.” What is that, you ask? Just as it

sounds, it is a concert that takes place within someone’s home. People of all walks of life come together in an intimate setting to enjoy great music. House concerts are a great way to connect with neighbors and fellow music lovers in an uncommon setting, while supporting the up and coming names in music.

Opening Their Doors Scott and Allison Witt, residents of Weston Lakes, are avid concert goers. In fact, Scott says that he averages sixty to seventy concerts a year. While attending one of his favorite concert establishments, Houston’s own Mucky Duck, Scott heard about house concerts and how musicians travel around the country in search of them. In

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER


SMALL CONCER TS, BIG TALENT

64

December of 2014, Scott and Allison opened their home for the first time to friends and neighbors, old and new, to enjoy good food, live music and company. “This is a donation based event. We certainly do not make any money hosting these concerts,” laughs Scott. Instead, the couple asks each person to toss $20 into a jar for the artist and bring a dish to share amongst neighbors. Where else could you catch a great concert for that kind of price? With an average of sixty people in attendance at these monthly concerts, artists usually walk away with close to fifteen hundred dollars at the end of the night between admittance and cd sales. “There are so many artists that are just trying to pay their bills,” says Scott. “While none of the people you hear at our concerts are on mainstream radio, they are all successful in their own right.”

Emily Earle singing, playing and entertaining guests for a House Concert at the Witt’s home. Photo by Allison Witt

The musicians Scott and Allison host are extremely talented in their own right. Each and every one of them could easily be picked up and be heard on the radio tomorrow. Unlike many of the big names of today, these musicians do not need to please a record label or the masses, they are playing music they wrote that has deep meaning to them. In a way, through their music they are welcoming you into their innermost thoughts and feelings. The music is stripped down, honest and true.

No Bad Seat in the House

That evening’s artist, Emily Earle, looked awfully familiar. I later learned that it was because I had seen her sing Johnny Cash’s “Ring of Fire” during the blind auditions of NBC’s “The Voice.” America watched as Emily chose CeeLo Green’s team on season three of this hit show. Many, however, may recognize her last name, the one she shares with her famous uncle, country and folk singer Steve Earle. This was Emily’s second time performing at the Witt’s, and quite frankly she blew it out of the park! By the third song I came to realize what made this experience so special - it was the unique and intimate environment. It was being up close and personal with the artist – no walls, screens or nose bleed sections. “With this type of environment it is more about the songs and connecting with people, verses just putting on a big show,” says

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

I had the privilege of attending one of Scott and Allison’s concerts. With fruit salad in hand I approached their front door with no idea what to expect. I knew no one, but early on it became clear that it did not matter. The counters were covered with tasty food, Scott’s famous pork loin was in the oven filling the air with its mouthwatering aroma, Allison mingled with guests while

capturing the festivities with her camera, and the chair filled living room and front room was filling up fast.

Emily plays in front of a full crowd of fans at the Witt’s home in Weston Lakes. Photo by Allison Witt


“Sometimes you write lyrics to take you places, and sometimes you write them to help you live a single moment over and over again.”

65

- SINGER SONGWRITER EMILY EARLE -

Emily plays in front of a full crowd of fans at the Witt’s home in Weston Lakes. Photo by Jaclyn Ritter

Here, added stories and anecdotes were welcomed. Emily shared her personal stories, taking the audience on a ride through what ultimately led to the creation of the following song. Breakups, love, loss and in Emily’s case, even a speeding ticket, inspired the musicians to turn to a pen and paper. “Sometimes you write lyrics to take you places, and sometimes you write them to help you live a single moment over and over again,” Emily tells the audience. It was a pleasure to go on the ride with her.

to enjoy an evening of music and socialization in the safety of our own neighborhood,” shares Chuck. Sam, however, particularly enjoyed being able to meet new neighbors, that he otherwise may have not met. Avid music lovers, Mark and Stephanie Korczynski, live in Katy but are regulars at the Witt’s home concerts. “We were so happy to find this venue,” says Stephanie. “My husband and I appreciate the singer songwriters not heard on the radio.” Mark adds by saying, “We really enjoy discovering and following new artists.”

The concerts started small, with just people Scott and Allison knew from work and the neighborhood, but it has quickly caught the eye of those in Katy and Houston. While there are a lot of regulars, there are usually at least fifteen new faces each month.

“People often initially come to socialize with their neighbors and meet new people, but then it turns into a love for finding new musical artists.” Allison Witt continues by saying, “While you may not have heard of these artists, or particularly listen to that genre of music, it is all about the experience as a whole and the special setting in which it takes place.”

First timer Sam Costanzo heard about the house concerts on his community’s news site and invited his neighbor Chuck Friedrichs to join him. “What a great atmosphere

The evening turned out to be a surprising and somewhat magical experience for me. I made new friends, begged for the recipe for the deep dish pizza that Sam brought,

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

Emily. “It’s fun to get to know everyone, chat with them during intermission and answer their questions.”


and I witnessed couples holding hands enjoying a date night while the crowd sang along to Janis Joplin’s song “Mercedes Benz.” I felt that I was more than just a face in the crowd because I was participating in the experience of the music along with many new friends. What a treat to have such great entertainment so close to home!

SNALL CONCER TS, BIG TALENT

66

These “house concert” artists come from all over the United States and Canada, traveling specifically for home concerts and gigs alike. It is because of people like Scott and Allison Witt that these talented singer songwriters who may not reach national or global fame, are still able to pursue their music career and make a living with it. Emily acknowledges this very thing during her first set by saying,

Brennen Leigh

“You can write songs, but it doesn’t mean much when you don’t have anyone to listen to them.” I left that evening with a new appreciation for music and a signed cd that had me singing along the entire way home. d Emily is just one of the talented musicians Scott and Allison Witt welcome into their home. These artists appreciate the hard work that the Witt’s put in to making sure that each concert is enjoyed by all and profitable for each musician.

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

Rod Picott

Amy Speace

Check out these links for upcoming concerts & more information! WEB - fulshearhouseconcerts.org FACEBOOK - facebook.com/fulshearhouseconcerts EMAIL - fulshearhouseconcerts@gmail.com DAWN & HAWKES Saturday, December 17, 2016 BRENNEN LEIGH WITH SPECIAL GUESTS Sunday, January 1, 2017 HARPETH RISING - Sunday, January 29, 2017 LISA MORALES - Sunday, February 19, 2017 SHAKE RUSSELL & MICHAEL HEARNE Sunday, March 19, 2017 JAMIE LIN WILSON (THE TRISHAS) Sunday, April 23, 2017 ROD PICOTT - Sunday, May 21, 2017 EMILY EARLE - Sunday, August 6, 2017 BOB LIVINGSTON Sunday, September 24, 2017 JASON EADY & COURTNEY PATTON November 12, 2017 CLAUDE BOURBON - Sunday, April 22, 2018


GIVE ME TH E BEAT, BOYS

68

GIVE ME THE BEAT, BOYS FROM SMALL TOWN COUNTRY LIFE TO BIG C ITY LIGHTS WRITTEN BY SUSAN LOWE STRICKLAND

Oh, give me the beat boys and free my soul. I wanna get lost in your rock and roll and drift away. F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

When asked in a Los Angeles interview how he — a black, R&B and Pop singer — could sing about the life of a country boy, Dobie Gray answered plainly enough, “I can sing about a country boy, because…well, because that’s what I am.” Born July 26, 1940 in Simonton, Texas to a sharecropper family that raised cotton, corn, chickens, pigs, turkeys, and pecans, Dobie Gray — born with the name Lawrence Darrow Brown — would sit around the radio on Saturday nights with his family, listening to the Grand Ole Opry. His father would not tolerate blues in the house, but country music was acceptable. So, Dobie grew up with a love for Hank Williams and Red Foley. Through his grandfather, a Baptist minister, he also developed a love of singing and gospel music. While his father banned rhythm and blues in the house, this relatively new style of music had a magnetic effect on the young artist. All three styles — Country, Gospel, and R&B inspired his singing and songwriting throughout his professional career.


Dobie’s mother died before he could remember her and, after his father remarried and moved to Houston, he was reared in Simonton by an aunt and uncle. He would walk three miles, occasionally riding horseback with his grandfather, to the big school in downtown Simonton. There, on the upstairs stage, he held his first performance at the age of nine. At eleven, Dobie joined his father in the city and then, at seventeen, he moved to Los Angeles to pursue a singing career. Washing dishes at a place called One Thousand One Nights, he heard and answered a radio ad for a singer. He showed up at the recording studio and auditioned before Sonny Bono who, at that time, was a wellconnected handler at Specialty Records, a studio that sponsored black performers like Little Richard and Sam Cooke. There, he made several records under various names before finally settling on the stage name Dobie Gray — taken from the popular TV sit-com, “The Many Lives of Dobie Gillis.”

69

THE IN CROWD One night in a Detroit taxicab, Dobie and some friends asked the driver what was happening around town. The driver said, “Well, Sister Aretha Franklin is singing down at The 20 Grand. That’s where the in crowd is.”

Shortly after the song hit the radio waves, the Ramsey Lewis Trio sat in a DC coffee shop, trying to figure out what song they could add to their set list that evening in a local jazz club. The waitress stuck a coin in the jukebox and said, “You guys might like this one by Dobie Gray.” They had their jazz piece and, “The In Crowd” remains Ramsey Lewis’ biggest hit. Signed photo to the city of Simonton from recording artist Dobie Gray.

WW W.FU LSHEA R. CO M

The term stuck in his head and, by 1965, Dobie Gray had his first Top 20 hit...The In Crowd, an upbeat and hip Motown-style anthem that happened to capture the social restlessness of the times.


GIVE ME TH E BEAT BOYS

70

ON STAG E A N D O N TH E CH A RT S Gray tried out a range of styles, including country, disco, and gospel. He was hugely popular in the UK with Northern Soul fans, especially with his 1966 hit, “Out On The Floor.” His version of “Loving Arms” was a much-covered repertory item for several big artists, the most famous being Elvis Presley. After taking acting lessons in the late 60s, Dobie spent two years in the Los Angeles production of “Hair,” and eventually replaced Ben Vereen in the starring role. A popular singer and performer in Germany and Africa, Gray stirred controversy in apartheid South Africa when he insisted on performing to integrated audiences. He tried to make a name for himself in Nashville, but couldn’t find a way to break into the big time. He did, however, become a prolific writer of songs for other artists, including Ray Charles, Charlie Pride, Tammy Wynette, John Denver, Julio Iglesias, George Jones, Johnny Mathis, and Leon Russell. He also worked some Dick Clark shows with Bobby Goldsboro and recorded many TV advertising jingles for Budweiser, Coca-Cola, Chevrolet, and McDonald’s. Plus, his voice can be heard on a number of movie and TV soundtracks.

D R I FT AWAY But the big breakaway for Dobie Gray was, without a doubt, the No. 5 Chartbuster, “Drift Away.” With an impressive guitar lick in the intro and one of the most memorable sing-along choruses ever written, Drift Away sold more than a million copies and has been recorded by countless artists like Roy Orbison, Ray Charles, Bruce Springsteen, Ike & Tina Turner, the Rolling Stones, and Rod Stewart, just to name a few. For more than four decades and before passing on from cancer on December 6, 2011, Dobie Gray’s distinctive voice graced record charts all over the world. Through his talent and performing style, he earned the respect and admiration of his peers as a singer’s singer and a songwriter’s songwriter.

HAV I N G TH E T I M E OF H I S L I FE According to All Music Guide to Soul — The Definitive Guide to R&B and Soul, Dobie Gray was an “artist who was totally unafraid to sing what he wanted, whether it be rock and roll, soul, or country”. . .

F ULSHEA R MA G A ZIN E

“Best of all, he always sounded as if he was having the time of his life.” d

Thanks for the joy that you’ve given me - I want you to know I believe in your song - And rhythm and rhyme and harmony - You’ve helped me along - Makin’ me strong

Oh, give me the beat boys...

Letter to the city of Simonton from Dobie Gray.


CHICKEN WITH

CARAMELIZED APPLES

APPLES & BACON

INSTRUCTIONS

CARAMELIZED

6-8 medium-firm apples ½ stick (¼ cup) unsalted butter ½ cup sugar ½ cup unfiltered apple cider 1/8 teaspoon salt ¼ - ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional)

73

- Peel, core and thickly slice apples (roughly into eighths). - Heat a large non-stick skillet over mediumhigh heat. Add butter and stir in apples. Sprinkle with half of the sugar. Cook until the apples begin to brown, roughly 10 minutes. - tir in the remaining sugar. Cook, stirring, until apples are a deep golden color, roughly 10 minutes. - Stir in cider, salt, and cinnamon. - Heat to a boil, cooking and stirring until the apples are tender, roughly 5 minutes. - Remove the apples with a slotted spoon to a plate. Cook pan juices until slightly thickened and pour over the apples.

CHICKEN WITH CARAMELIZED APPLES & BACON Servings: 6

4 strips apple-wood smoked bacon, cut into thin strips ½ sweet onion, chopped 1/3 cup flour ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 6 boneless chicken breast halves 2 tablespoons vegetable oil Caramelized apples (see above recipe) 1/3 cup unfiltered apple cider ¾ to 1 cup whipping cream, to taste ¼ cup chopped chives (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS - Heat oven to 400 degrees. Cook bacon and onion in large skillet over medium-high heat, turning occasionally until golden, roughly 6 minutes. Transfer bacon to a plate lined with paper towel to drain.

WRITTEN BY JACLYN RITTER

F

all is my favorite time of year. Crisp, colorful apples are my go-to ingredient during these cooler months. Homemade apple pie, applesauce, apple butter, and apple cider are just a few of my favorites.

My mother came across this particular recipe years ago in the Chicago Tribune. It always struck me as “autumn on a plate.” The bacon is a surprisingly nice accompaniment to the freshly sliced apples and tangy cider. Firmer apples, like Granny Smith, are best because they are better able to handle the heat without becoming too soft and turning into mush. A dish like this is the ultimate comfort food – even suitable for company. What makes this recipe so great is its versatility. The caramelized apples are perfect all on their own. By adding extra cinnamon atop the apples they can be served as dessert. Or, go lighter on the cinnamon and serve them over chicken or pork. One night, serve the whole chicken breast atop the apples. For leftovers the next day, slice up the chicken into strips and sauté them in a pan with the apples, allowing them to soften a bit more, while adding a little more cider. This makes for a saucier, mash-like dish. The options are endless with this basic recipe, but no matter how you tweak it, it is bound to be a crowd pleaser! d

- Season flour with salt and pepper in a shallow pan. Lightly dredge chicken in the flour mixture and set aside. - Add oil to pan over medium-high heat. Add chicken. Cook in batches if necessary to not avoid overcrowding. Cook chicken till one side reaches a golden brown color, roughly 5 minutes, then turn it over and do the same for the other side. Transfer chicken to a baking sheet and place in the oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through, roughly 10-12 minutes. - Meanwhile, place apples in skillet used to cook chicken. Cook over medium heat until warm. Stir in apple cider and cream. Raise the heat to medium-high. Cook until mixture begins to thicken slightly, roughly 3 minutes. Transfer to a serving platter. Arrange chicken over apple mixture and sprinkle with reserved bacon mixture and chives. NOTE: Feel free to add more apple cider and a splash of water to the apples to make a saucier dish.


* CHARTER MEMBERS

BMW OF WEST HOUSTON

(800) 564-1349 - www.bmwwest.com

CITY OF FULSHEAR DEVELOPMENT CORPORORATION 4B (281) 346-1796 - www.fulsheartexas.gov

COMMERCIAL STATE BANK*

(281) 346-0221 - www.csbec.com

DHK DEVELOPMENT, INC.* FULSHEAR

BUSINESS P A R K

(713) 961-0033 - www.dhkdev.com

FULSHEAR BUSINESS PARK*

(281) 346-2794 - www.rbratcliff.com

FULSHEAR MEDIA PARTNERS, LLC (281) 973-0633 - www.Fulshear.com

HOUSTON METHODIST WEST HOSPITAL (832) 522-0319 - www.HoustonMethodist.org

JOHNSON DEVELOPMENT CROSS CREEK RANCH*

(281) 344-9882 - www.crosscreektexas.com

LEGACY FORD

(281) 342-5611 - www.legacyfordtx.com

WCA

(832) 456-1412

WESTON LAKES COUNTRY CLUB* (281) 346-1967 - westonlakes.net

GOLD

* CHARTER MEMBERS

ALLEN BOONE HUMPHRIES ROBINSON LLP* (713) 860-6470 - www.abhr.com

BLESSINGTON FARMS*

(281) 793-6111 - www.blessingtonfarms.com

CITY OF FULSHEAR DEVELOPMENT CORPORORATION 4A (281) 346-1796 - www.fulsheartexas.gov

GREATER FORT BEND EDC

(281) 340-7902 - www.fortbendcounty.org

HIGHLAND RESOUCES, INC.

(713) 335-4756 - www.highlandresourcesinc.com

ROBERTS MARKEL WEINBERG BUTLER HAILEY, PC (281) 207-7697 - www.rmwbhlaw.com

WELCOME WAGON INTERNATIONAL

(800) 779-3526 - www.welcomewagon.com

MEMBER DIRECTORY

PLATINUM


MEMBER DIRECTORY

SILVER

* CHARTER MEMBERS

TO D D S H I P P

AIRWHEELS AMERICA

ALANIZ SCHRAEDER LINKER FARRIS MAYES, LLP (281) 833-2200 - www.alaniz-schraeder.com

CANE ISLAND OUTFITTERS LLC

(702)524-7580 - www.AirwheelsAmerica.com

BRISCOE MANOR LLC

ALL STAR GAMING LOUNGE

CARDUNIS BAKERY AND CATERING

ALL-TERRA ENGINEERING

CARECOM PHARMACY & COMPOUNDING

ALPINE ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION

CARING4KATY

AMAZING GRACE HOSPICE

CENTER COURT PIZZA & BREW

AMP LENDING

CENTERPOINT ENERGY

AMPED PRESCHOOL RESOURCES

CENTRAL FORT BEND CHAMBER

ANDREW VAN CHAU

CHAMPION RESTORATION

APPY CHICKS

CHASE BANK

AQUA TEXAS

CHERYL STALINSKY

ARLENE HINSLEY BETTER HOMES & GARDENS GARY GREENE*

CHILD ADVOCATES OF FT. BEND COUNTY

(281) 238-4700 - www.briscoemanor.com

DR. DAVID S. BRIGHT ORTHODONTICS (281) 599-1155 - www.brightbraces.com

EHRA*

(281) 202-3250 www.allstargaminglounge.com (713) 574-2371 - www.all-terra.com (281) 953-0044 - www.alpinecompany.us

(713) 784-4500 - www.ehrainc.com

FULSHEAR ANIMAL HOSPITAL*

(832) 437-2089 - www.amazinggracehospice.org

(281) 346-0077 www.fulshearanimalhospital.com

(281) 391-5363 - www.AskMortgagePros.com

FULSHEAR INSURANCE GROUP, INC. / TEXAS INSURANCE AGENCY - FULSHEAR* (281) 533-9067 - www.FulshearInsurance.com

INDEPENDENCE TITLE COMPANY* (281) 533-9922 - www.independencetitle.com

KATY LIVING/GOOD CENTS ADVERTISING* (281) 239-3971 - www.goodcentsad.com

KATY REAL ESTATE ENTERPRISES DBA: KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY (281) 220-2100 - www.katytxhomes.com

MEMORIAL HERMANN (832) 229-6662 - www.memorialhermann.org

MOVE IT SELF STORAGE (281) 346-0919 - www.moveitstorage.com

NEWFIRST NATIONAL BANK* (832) 344-2036 - www.newfirst.com

(713) 369-5215 - www.preschoolresource.org Andrew.VanChau@hotmail.com (832) 271-7229 - www.appychicks.com (281)-651-0174 - aquaamerica.com

(281) 492-5973 - www.har.com/arlenedeclaire

ARNIM & SONS INC / EVO PAYMENTS INTERNATIONAL - (832) 451-9025 ARTS FULSHEAR INC* (281) 756-7446 - www.artsfulshear.org

ASPEN UTILITY COMPANY, LLC (281) 578-1000

ATHENS CAPITAL LENDING

(281) 407-4844 - www.AthensCapitalLending.com

832-437-3651 - caneislandoutfitters@gmail.com (281) 795-3785 - www.cardunis.com

(832) 437-3397 - www.carecompharmacy.com (409) 673-9802 - www.caring4katy.org (281) 665-3152 - www.centercourtpizza.com (713) 207-1111 - www.CenterpointEnergy.com (281) 342-5464 - www.cfbca.org

(281) 395-9000 - www.ChampionRestoration.com (281) 644-1407 - www.chase.com (281) 851-1464

(281) 533-9325 - www.cafb.org

CHILDREN’S LIGHTHOUSE CROSS CREEK RANCH (281 )394-9696 - www. ChildrensLighthouseFulshear.com

CHRIST CLINIC

(281) 574-1455 - www.christclinickaty.org

CHUCK BUCEK, CPA P.C.

(832) 471-6144 - www.chuckbucekcpa.com

CHUCKWAGON BBQ & BURGERS

ATOMIC AERIAL

(281) 394-7784 www.chuckwagonbbqburgers.com

AUTUMN LEAVES OF CINCO RANCH

(832) 449-8712 - www.Cigarenvi.com

BB&T

(281) 392-4900 - www.cincotireandauto.com

BEST SEPTIC TANK CLEANING & TRANSPORT

(281) 394-9170 - www.cincoauto.com

(713) 465-3408 - www.second.org

(281) 342-9891 - www.bestseptictankcleaning.com

SEVERN TRENT SERVICES

BIG FROG CUSTOM T-SHIRTS & MORE OF KATY

(832) 913-1092 - www.clarityeyecare.org

BILL HEEDE

(281) 491-9000

BINGLE VET KATY

(281) 533-6000 - www.arayaclean.com

BLACKBURN FAMILY ORTHODONTICS

(888) 788-4268 - sales@clearchoiceos.com

BOB’S TACO STATION

(713) 345-0144 - www.cloud9c.com

BRAMAN BRANDS

(713) 462-3242 - cobbfendley.com

PRO IMAGE* - (713) 806-3016 www.proimagepromotional.com

RANDLE LAW OFFICE LTD., L.L.P.* (281) 657-2000 - www.jgradyrandlepc.com

REPUBLIC SERVICES (713) 726-7510 - www.republicservices.com

SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH

(281) 646-2364 - www.stservices.com

STATE FARM INSURANCE - TODD SHIPP* (713) 464-4255 - www.toddshipp.com

TAYLOR MORRISON (281) 780-4652 - www.taylormorrison.com

WAGGIN’ TAILS PET RANCH* (281) 533-0500 - www.waggintailspetranch.com

WINGNUT AERIAL VIDEO SYSTEMS W.A.V.S (417) 861-7113 - www.wingnutaerialvideo.com

BRONZE 1ST TEXAS HOME HEALTH*

(281) 829-9314 - www.first-texas.com

24 HOUR FITNESS

(469) 693-2893 - www.24hourfitness.com

5 STAR REAL ESTATE*

(281) 346-1412 - www.wlakes.com

A MIGHTY FORTRESS LUTHERAN CHURCH (281) 533-4121

ACT OF LIFE

(713) 991-5433 - www.actoflife.org

ACTIONCOACH OF TEXAS

(832) 871-7217 - www.actioncoach.com/kevinalft

AG/CM INC.

(361) 443-4572 - www.agcm.cc

AGELESS MED SPA

(281) 392-3700 - agelessmedspakaty.com

(281) 372-6606 - www.atomicaerial.com (281) 392-2050 - www.autumnleaves.com (281) 668-3217 - www.bbt.com

(281) 712-4191 - www.bigfrog.com/katy

(847) 980-7246 - williamheede@aol.com (713) 468-3688 - www.binglevet.com (281) 769-3095 - www.blackburnortho.com (281)232-8555 - www.bobstacos.com

CIGAR ENVI

CINCO TIRE & AUTO CINCOAUTO2

CLARITY EYE CARE

CLASSIC CHEVROLET CLEAN SWEEP PROPERTY SERVICES CLEAR CHOICE OFFICE SOLUTIONS CLOUD 9 COMPUTING

COBB, FENDLEY & ASSOCIATES

The Braman Winery & Brewery (281) 762-1375 - www.bramanbrands.com

COLE INSURANCE GROUP

BRAZOS ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, PLLC

COMMUTA PLUS SERVICES LLC

(281) 394-2933 - www.brazosoms.com

BRAZOS MATERIALS, INC.

(713) 552-1333 - www.brazosmaterials.com

BRAZOS RIVER ROTARY CLUB (713) 931-1242

BRIGHTWAY CARPET CLEANING

(281) 391-2224 - www.brightwaycarpetcleaning.com

BROOKWOOD

(281) 375-2260 - www.brookwoodcommunity.org

BROWN & GAY ENGINEERS, INC.

(281) 558-8700 - www.browngay.com

CALDERWOOD COACHING LLC

(832) 746-7470 - www.calderwoodcoaching.com

CAMMARATA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY GROUP

(713) 910-2886 - www.allstate.com/timothycole (832) 562-0786 - www.Commutaplus.com

CONNECTPLUS POWERED BY ETACTICS (713) 469-2028

CONTROL-IT SMART HOME AUTOMATION (713) 966-9306 - www.controlitav.com

CONVENE IT USA LLC

(713) 865-1621 - www.conveneitusa.com

COSTELLO, INC

(713)-783-7788 - www.costelloinc.com

COUNTY JUDGE BOB HEBERT (281) 341-1454

CRAFT-E CREATIONS

(281) 733-1304 - www.craft-ecreations.com

CROSS RIDGE OFFICE CONDOS

(832) 913-6353 - www.kids-teeth.com

(832) 772-6866 - shbdevelopment.com/properties/ cross-ridge-fulshear

CAMP BOW WOW KATY, TX

CROSSFIT FULSHEAR

(281) 849-3647 - www.campbowwow.com/katy

(832) 773-8558 - crossfit-fulshear.com


(281) 533-4101 - www.watercrestcruisetravel.com

CRUISE PLANNERS - GENE CHIN

(832) 377-6220 - www.mycruisecoordinator.com

CULLIGAN OF HOUSTON

(713) 293-6400 - www.houstonculligan.com

CURING CHILDREN’S CANCER FUND (713) 503-6247 - www.cccfund.org

DANIEL R SLAVINSKI, CPA (281) 342-2674

DAVID R. MELANSON

(979) 541-9297 - drmelanson@yahoo.com

DAVID WEEKLEY HOMES

(281) 249-7705 - www.dwhomes.com

DEANNA KRENEK RE/MAX REALTY WEST (713) 539-8063 - www.movewest.net

DEKKER’S MESQUITE GRILL

(281) 533-0909 - dekkersmesquitegrill.net

DONDULIN.COM, LP

(281) 238-4719 - www.dondulin.com

DOZIER’S GROCERY & MARKET*

(281) 346-1411 - www.doziersbbq.com

DREAM LANDSCAPE* - (281) 744-2669 www.dreamlandscapedesign.com

ECN ENTERPRISES

(832) 405-3184 - www.demandgenpros.com

ECO2 OFFICE

(832) 437-3204 - www.eco2officekaty.com

EDIBLE MOMENTS

(281) 978-2253 - orders@ediblemoments.com

EDWARD BATINGA, CPA P.C.

(281) 222-3307 - www.batingacpa.com

EDWARD JONES*

(281) 242-3307 - www.edwardjones.com

EFTEX BUSINESS SERVICES, LLC* (832) 315-1165 - www.eftexllc.com

ELITE DISCOUNT APP (845) 893-5436

ELIZABETH PRATT, PLLC LAW FIRM

(281 394-4681 - www.elizabethpratt-legal.com

ELKO CONSULTING, LP DBA IMPROVE IT! CONSULTING & TRAINING* (281) 799-0930 - www.improveitsolutions.com

EMPLOYERS ONE SOURCE GROUP (281) 492-9292 - www.eosg.com

ENCHANTMENT KIDS FINE ARTS LEARNING CENTER - (281) 394-5090 - www.Enchantmentkids.com ER KATY* (281) 395-9900 - www.erkaty.com

FAMILY HOPE

(832) 492-5136 - FamilyHopeFulshear.org

FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP TIM O’BRIEN INSURANCE AGENCY

(281) 375-5928 - www.farmersagent.com/tobrien

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM (972) 899-6662 - www.fcer.com

FIRST CHOICE EMERGENCY ROOM KATY CINCO RANCH - (832) 913-8220 www.fcer.com/locations/houston-map/ katy-cinco-ranch/

FIRST CUP CAFE

(281) 989-1171 - www.yourfirstcupcafe.com

FIRST FULSHEAR UMC*

(281) 346-1416 - www.firstfulshear.org

FIRST LINE DEFENDERS

(832) 776-1145 - http://www.firstlinedefenders.com

FIT SENSE, LLC

(832) 600-4474 - www.fitsense-llc.com

FLINT PHOTOGRAPHY

(281) 899-0818 - www.Flint-Photography.com

FONTANILLA ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS

(281) 712-1047 - www.katy.bookkeepingexpress.com

FOREVER FULSHEAR* (713) 703-4129

FORT BEND CARES FOUNDATION

(832) 819-2005 - www.FortBendCares.org

FORT BEND COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION

(281) 342-6171 - www.FortBendCountyFair.com

FORT BEND COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY www.fbcgop.org

FORT BEND RAINBOW ROOM (832) 451-5867 - www.fbrr.org

FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE (281) 341-4664 - www.fbcsheriff.org

FRANK YEVERINO

(713)545-2520 - http://fylawfirm.com

FRECKLES STATIONARY & GIFTS

(281)536-4900 - www.frecklescentral.com

FRONT ROW SIGNS

(832) 222-9385 - www.frontrowsigns.net

FRONTIER TITLE COMPANY

(281) 391-9181 - www.frontiertitletexas.com

FULSHEAR - SIMONTON LIONS CLUB

(281) 346-4156 - www.fulshearsimontonlionsclub.org

FULSHEAR ACE HARDWARE (970) 214-7876

FULSHEAR CITY GRILL*

(281) 346-8196 - www.yongsasianfusion.com

FULSHEAR DENTAL (281) 346-8371

FULSHEAR DIRECTORY

(713) 858-4280 - www.fulsheardirectory.com

FULSHEAR FAMILY MEDICINE*

JOSHUA ESTES CAMPAIGN

(281) 410-8936 - www.estesforjudge.com

JOYCE LONG WELLNESS INSTITUTE (281) 344-0095 - www.joycelong.biz

JUDGE CHAD BRIDGES CAMPAIGN 240TH DISTRICT COURT

(832) 867-0471 - www.judgechadbridges.com

FULSHEAR FLORAL DESIGN - (281) 533-9468

JUDGE MAGGIE JARAMILLO 400TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

FULSHEAR FOOT AND ANKLE

JUICE PLUS

FULSHEAR GRAPHICS*

KATHIE LAUHOFF KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

FULSHEAR OUTREACH & DEVELOPMENT

KATY FAMILY YMCA

FULSHEAR POLICE FOUNDATION

KATY MAGAZINE, LLC

FULSHEAR PRESSURE WASHING

KATY MEDIA ROOMS, LLC

FULSHEAR PROFESSIONALS

KATY PAIN SPECIALISTS

FULSHEAR REAL ESTATE PARTNERS L.P.

KATY PLANTATIONS HANDCRAFTED SHUTTERS

FULSHEAR STAR

KATY TREADMILL REPAIRS

FULSHEAR TREE SERVICES

KATY YARD GREETINGS

FULSHEAR.COM

KELLY BELL - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY

GABY’S*

KELLY FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC

GALLERY FURNITURE

KENT HARRIS

GEOVEND INTERNATIONAL LLC

KIDDIE ACADEMY OF RICHMOND TEXAS

GGG SUSTAINABILITY SOLUTIONS

KINGDOM & WHEELS

GLADIATOR EXCELLENCE

KJT CONSULTING LLC

GLAMOX AQUA SIGNAL , CORP.

KMJ INTERNATIONAL SECURITY SOLUTIONS LLC

GLASS EXPRESSIONS

KRENEK LAW OFFICES

GLENN SMITH EXECUTIVE COACHING

KUSTOM KARVINGS

GNA INSPECTIONS, PLLC

LAMAR CISD

GOLDEN EAGLE TAEKWONDO

LANIER PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES PLLC

HALO PROFESSIONALS

LATHROP DENTAL CENTER*

HANA GARDEN CHINESE RESTAURANT

LAUGHING DOG GLASSWORKS

HEARTLAND PAYMENT SYSTEMS

LAVO NATURAL NAILS

HEMI HIDEOUT

LAW OFFICE OF LEWIS WHITE

HENDRIX INSURANCE

LAZIT INDUSTRIES

HERITAGE TEXAS PROPERTIES

LEGACY AT FALCON POINT

HLG WEALTH MANAGEMENT

LEGALSHIELD

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

LEONETTI GRAPHICS INC.

HOMEWOOD SUITES BY HILTON - KATY

LEVIN & ATWOOD, LLP

HOPE FOR THREE*

LIBERTY STAR MORTGAGE a branch of SecurityNational MC NMLS 3116*

(281) 346-0018 - www.fulshearfamilymed.com www.fulshearfloraldesign.com

(281) 391-1212 - Fulshearfootandankle.com (832) 244-2411 - www.fulshear.graphics (832) 492-5136 - www.FulshearOutreach.org (713) 502-9877

(832) 581-5812 - www.fulshearpressurewashing.com info@fulshearprofessionals.com (713) 302-0555

(281) 665-9678 - www.fulshearstar.com (713) 302-0555 - www.fulsheartreeservices.com (832) 377-6574 - www.fulshear.com (281) 533-0220 - www.gabysetc.net (281) 687-1263 - www.galleryfurniture.com (281) 513-4681 - www.geovendinternational.com (972) 415-3017 - www.greengrovegroup.com (713) 659-9747 - www.GladiatorExcellence.com (281) 944-4100 - www.glamox.com (713) 702-2292

(281) 841-6680 - www.glennsmithcoaching.com (832) 567-3293 - GNAInspections.com (832) 953-4853 - www.goldeneagletaekwondo.com (281) 860-2535 - www.haloalarmshouston.com (832) 437-7852 - www.hanagarden.us

(713) 302-1852 - www.Heartlandpaymentsystems.com (281) 347-HEMI - www.HemiHideout.com (832) 437-5528 - www.yourLTCexpert.com (281) 493-3880 - www.heritagetexas.com (713) 337-2241

(281) 882-9453 - www.homeinstead.com/252 (281) 391-5500 - www.homewoodkaty.com (800) 317-0787 - www.hopeforthree.org

HOUSER ROOFING

(979) 472-9176 - www.houserroofingtx.com

HOUSTON CHRONICLE

(713) 362-5163 - www.houstonchronicle.com

HOUSTON FINANCIAL CENTER

(713) 302-6744 - www.houstonfinancialcenter.com

HOUSTON PEDIATRIC DENTAL SPECIALISTS, PC (281) 346-8326 - www.smilesgonewild.net

HR IN ALIGNMENT, LLC

(281) 889-9075 - www.hrinalignment.com

HUNT LAW FIRM, PLLC

(281) 660-4363 - www.judgemaggiejaramillo.com (713) 703-1554 - /www.carmenizzo.origamiowl.com (713) 562-8502 - www.kathielauhoff.com

(281) 392-5055 - www.ymcahouston.org/katy (281) 579-9840 - www.katymagazine.com (281) 780-9383 - www.katymediarooms.com (281) 665-8552 - www.katypain.com (281)-402-1280 - www.katyplantations.com

(832) 731-6785 - www.katytreadmillrepairs.com (713) 898-4358 - www.katyyardgreetings.com (713) 201-7537 - www.homesearchkatytx.com (281)346-8397

(832) 578-1967 - kentjharris@gmail.com (832) 633-0093 - www.kiddieacademy.com/richmond (832) 437-7039 - www.kingdomandwheels.com (281) 705-6895 (281) 543-7400

(281) 578-7711 - www.tkthompson@kreneklaw.com (281) 616-7053 - www.facebook.com/kustomkarving (832) 223-0330 - www.lcisd.org (713) 504-3755 - www.drstaceylanier.com

(832) 437-3849 - www.lathropdentalcenter.com (281) 346-0099

(281) 346-8636 - www.lavonails.com (713)799-9220 - www.thejusticesite.com (281) 334-9969

(281)394-0628 - www.legacyatfalconpoint.com (281) 750-5317 - www.legalshieldassociate.com (281) 499-4959 - www.leonettigraphics.com (281)-579-6044 - www.levinandatwood.com

(281) 558-0004 - www.libertystarmortgage.com

LIVING MAGAZINE

(972) 882-1300 - www.livingmagazine.net

LJA ENGINEERING, INC.*

(713) 953-5131 - www.ljaengineering.com

LONE STAR TRANSITIONS

(832) 844-2025 - www.lonestartransitions.com

LOUETTA AUTOMOTIVE

(281) 304-2517 - www.louettaauto.com

MADAM DJ

(713) 714-7357 - www.madamdj.com

(832) 315-5494 - www.familylawyerkaty.com

MAID SIMPLE

IDEAL CONSULTING DBA SCHOOLEY MITCHELL CONSULTING

MARTIN MORTGAGE *

(281) 769-1452 - www.rosenbergmaidsimple.com

(832) 802-3300 - www.schooleymitchell.com/thassan

(281) 533-9952 - www.martinmortgageonline.com

INSPERITY

MARY KAY

(281) 312-2065 - www.insperity.com

(805) 558-0533 - www.marykay.com/cfairbanks

IRON TRIBE FITNESS - CINCO RANCH

MAS SOLUTIONS LLC

(281) 303-5671 - www.cinco-ranch.irontribefitness.com

(281) 494-4874 - www.masquality.com

ITALIAN MAID CAFE

MATHNASIUM OF FULSHEAR

(281) 341-1587 - www.italianmaidcafe.com

(832) 437-5033 - www.mathnasium.com/fulshear

JDC FIRETHORNE

MAXIFICIENT INC.,

(281) 395-1440 - www.firethorne.info

(973) 722-6744 - www.maxificient.com

JOE JOE BEAR FOUNDATION

MCFRUGALS DRY CLEAN DEPOT

(281) 398-4522 - www.joejoebear.org

(832) 589-2885 - www.mcfrugalsdc.com

MMEMBER EMBER D IRECTORY DIRECTORY

CRUISE PLANNERS/WATERCREST TRAVEL


MD ANDERSON

R&M LOGISTICS, LLC

THE AD SHEET

MEDINA ORTHODONTICS

RACHEL THE REALTOR

THE ALTERNATIVE BOARD - HOUSTON SW

MEMAMA’S COOKIES N’ MORE

RAFTER B IPM LLC

THE BUNKER ICEHOUSE*

MEMBERS CHOICE CREDIT UNION

RAMEY REALTY

THE ESCAPE SPA AND WELLNESS CENTER

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF FORT BEND COUNTY

RAYMOND L. WIGGINS, D.D.S., M.D. TEXAS ORAL AND FACIAL SURGERY

THE GLASER GROUP MCDONALD’S

(832) 334-3738 - www.mdanderson.org

MEMBER DIRECTORY

(281) 394-9300 - www.medianbraces.com (713) 503-8310 - www.memamascookiesnmore.com (281) 398-9900 - www.mccu.com

(281) 207-2480 - www.mhafbc.org

(281) 346-1142 - www.rgmiller.com (832) 857-4550 - www.RachelTheRealtor.org (832)-474-8369 - www.rafterbipm.com (713) 503-6247 - www.mgramey1@gmail.com

MICHAEL T. McCANN FOUNDATION, INC BIKE FOR MIKE - camccann@me.com MINDFUL ART*

(281) 395-1200 - www.txofs.com

MOMS CLUB FULSHEAR/SIMONTON

(281) 346-0222 - www.movewest.net

MOSQUITO DEFENSE SOLUTIONS

(281) 533-9863 - www.redpotatomarket.com

MOSSWOOD PROPERTIES, LLC.*

(832) 451-6874 - www.reiningstrength.org

N2 PUBLISHING - WEST SIDE STORIES

(281) 391-8555 - www.remedyroofing.com

NANCY GARCIA - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER REALTY*

(281) 342-6969 - www.JohnZerwas.com

NATIONS RELIABLE LENDING

(713) 824-6136 - www.republicanwomensclubofkaty.com

NATURALAWN OF AMERICA*

(713) 294-9691 - www.seetimsell.com

NBD GRAPHICS INC.

(281) 344-4335 - www.govsc.org

NETWORK IN ACTION

(281) 994-5717 - www.pickrick.com

NO LABEL BREWING CO.

(281) 232-1801 - www.rightwaydental.com

NORTH FORT BEND WATER AUTHORITY

(281) 346-2279- www.riverbendbc.org

NOVABAY PHARMACEUTICALS

(281) 660-7769 - www.rmcsolarscreens.com

(713) 303-4381 - www.mindful-art.com (203) 650-6263 - www.mindful-art.com

(281) 889-8499 - www.Mosquito-Defense.com (281) 346-8032

(832) 277-5610 - www.n2pub.com

(713) 503-5171 - www.nancykingrealty.com

(800) 675-6423 - www.freemansalemmortgageteam.com (281) 392-2990 - houstonwest.naturalawn.com (281) 547-8200 - www.nbdgraphics.net (713) 417-6152 - www.networkinaction.com (281) 693-7545 - www.nolabelbrew.com (713)-488-8253 - nfbwa.com

(832) 244-5678 - www.NovaBay.com

NOW CFO

(713) 823- 2134 - www.nowcfo.com

RE/MAX GRAND III (832) 913-8400

RE/MAX REALTY WEST* RED POTATO MARKET

REINING STRENGTH THERAPEUTIC HORSEMANSHIP REMEDY ROOFING, INC.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN ZERWAS M.D. REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB OF KATY

RHONDA POHLMAN KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY RICHMOND STATE SUPPORTED LIVING CENTER RICK HENDERSON - REMAX GRAND RIGHTWAY DENTAL

RIVER BEND BAPTIST CHURCH

RMC SOLAR SCREENS BLINDS AND SHUTTERS

(713) 409-0420 - theadsheet@gmail.com (832) 840-8481 - www.tabhoustonsw.com (281) 923-8833

(281) 202-4271 - www.theescapespa.net

(254) 833-1488 - www.theglasergroup.net

THE GROWLER SPOT

(832) 600-5856 - www.thegrowlerspot.com

THE GYM STATION WEST CINCO*

(281) 394-7844 - www.gymstation.com

THE KATY PLUMBING COMPANY

(281) 646-1700 - www. katyplumbers.com

THE KELLY CLINIC

(281) 828-0675 - www.kellyclinic.net

THE LACY TUMBLEWEED GENERAL STORE (281) 232-6033

THE ORCHARD - ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE - (281) 371-3000 - www.theorchardkaty.com THE OUGHTNESS GROUP (281) 769-2846 - oughtness.net

THE POPCORN SHOP

(832) 437-7016 - www.thepopcornshops.com

THE SALONS OF FULSHEAR / THE LYME LEOPARD (281) 533-9332

THE SPORTS MARKETING COMPANY

(832) 945-2220 - www.thesportsmarketingcompany.com

THE SUMMIT FITNESS STUDIO

(832) 978-3809 - www.thesummitfulshear.com

THE UPS STORE 6650

(281) 396-4645 - www.katy-tx-6650.theupsstorelocal.com

THE VINEYARD II, TEXAS WINE AND CRAFT BEER TASTING

(979) 232-3111 - www.thevineyard2.com

RONALD M. COHEN AND ASSOCIATES ATTORNEY AT LAW - (281) 762-0492 SAFARI TEXAS

THE WELLPET CENTER VETERINARY HOSPITAL (281) 394-2355 - www.thewellpetcenter.com

THRIVE CHURCH*

(979) 884-7483 - thrivechurch.cc

OAK PARK RESORT LIFESTYLE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY - (281) 398-1500

(281) 277-7888 - www.safaritexasballroom.com

SAMPICA’S ANTIQUES, GIFTS & MORE

TODAY’S VISION KATY

OCUSOFT

SANDEFUR CPA, P.C.*

TOMMY FOR MAYOR

OFFICEMAKERS

SANTIKOS PALLADIUM AVX

TOPMARK REALTY

OLD FOSTER COMMUNITY MUSEUM

SAPORE RISTORANTE ITALIANO

TOUCHSTONE CRYSTAL BY SWAROVSKI

OLD REPUBLIC NATIONAL TITLE

OLSON FOR CONGRESS COMMITTEE

SCHOBEL IRRIGATION & LANDSCAPE SERVICES, INC. - (832) 250-5807 SENATOR LOIS KOLKHORST

TRACY BOGIEL BETTER HOMES & GARDENS GARY GREENE*

OPERATION ENDURING BROTHERHOOD

SEND OUT CARDS

TRACY GREMILLION - KELLER WILLIAMS PREMIER

(281) 772-3971 - www.sendoutcards.com

(281) 723-9890 - www.isellkatytx.net

ORANGE LEAF FROZEN YOGURT

SERVPRO OF WEST FORT BEND COUNTY* - (281) 342-5326

TRICIA TURNER PROPERTIES

(832)-563-0916 - www.har.com/TriciaG

SHERWOOD FARMS

(281) 497-1040 - www.turnerduran.com

www.OakPark-Retirement.com

(281) 239-9801 - www.ocusoft.com (281) 574-3800 - www.officemakers.com (281) 239-2178 - www.fostercommunitymuseum.org (281) 265-9500 - www.oldrepublictitle.com/houstonnational (281) 980-0750 - www.olsonforcongress.com (281) 804-6996 - www.operationenduringbrotherhood.org (281) 960-9833

(713) 899-8979 - sampicas.agm@gmail.com (281) 533-0911 - www.sandefurcpa.com (281) 239-4205 - www.santikos.com (281) 394-5999 - www.saporestaurant.com

(979) 251-7888

(281) 828-2020 - www.todaysvision.com/location/katy (832) 594-0878 - facebook.com/tommyformayor (281) 698-7787 - topmarkrealty.com (469) 826-3564 www.touchstonecrystal.com/triciawright

(281) 646-1136 - www.ilovefulsheartx.com

TURNER DURAN ARCHITECTS, LP

OWEN AND SHERRI BEMENT

www.servproofwestfortbendcounty.com

PAMELA MURRAY - (832)841-0399 PARKWAY FELLOWSHIP

(713) 578-0449

SIGNARAMA-KATYFULSHEAR

(832) 398-4676 - www.tutusbowtiesevents.com

(713) 471-5398 - www.signarama-katyfulshear.com

UNITED HEALTHCARE

PATHPOINTS TO WELLNESS HEALING ARTS & RETREAT CENTER* - (832) 461-6936

SJR FAMILY PARTNERSHIP, LTD* - (281) 468-3588 SPORTS CHIROPRACTIC PERFORMANCE - SCP

(281) 413-6614 - www.prsinsurancesolutions.com

UPCLOSE MAGAZINE LLC

PAUL LYTLE INSURANCE AGENCY

SQUIRREL HOLDINGS LLC*

USANA HEALTH SCIENCES - (281) 610-3767

PAULA RUCKY PROPERTIES - REMAX GRAND

STATE FARM INSURANCE - JEFF GILBERT*

VAN HOLTEN LAW FIRM*

PAYCHEX*

STEWART TITLE COMPANY*

VICTOR’S MEXICAN GRILLE* - (281) 533-0040

PENDLETON REAL ESTATE / RE/MAX CINCO RANCH

STIEBER INSURANCE GROUP LLC*

VINES OF WINE - WINESHOP AT HOME

PERCHERON TITLE AGENCY, LLC

SUGAR LAND SKEETERS

PET SUPPLIES PLUS - (281) 346-4535 PETERSON CONSULTING SERVICES

SUNRISE OF CINCO RANCH - (281) 240-0500

PHOTO BOOTH ON WHEELS

SUNSET GLASS TINTING

WATERCREST AT KATY

PHYSICAL THERAPY CARE & AQUATIC REHAB OF FORT BEND

SWEET TOOTH SHOPPE INC.*

WAUSON | PROBUS

TANCHES GLOBAL MANAGEMENT INC.

WESTHEIMER LAKES DENTAL

TEMPERATUREPRO OF FORT BEND

WESTSIDE GRILL AND FIREPLACE, INC.

TERRA POINT REALTY, LLC

WHITE OAKS ON THE BAYOU

TEXANA CENTER*

WORDSERVE CHURCH

TEXAS COUNTRY PROPERTIES*

WORKFORCE RESOURCES/FAMILY HERITAGE

TEXAS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS

WORLD-WIDE TELECOM

TEXAS PRIDE DISPOSAL

YEN TEPPANYAKI & SUSHI STEAK HOUSE

(281) 346-0299

(832) 222-8282 - Parkwayfellowship.com

www.pathpointstowellness.com

(832) 266-0153 - agents.allstate.com/paul-lytle-fulshear-tx.html (281) 793-5779 - www.paularucky.com (832) 914-3721 - www.paychex.com (281) 734-7342 - www.pendletonre.com

(832) 300-6500 - www.percherontitleagency.com

(713) 819-2461

(281) 202-5988 - www.photoboothonwheels.com

(281) 347-8900 - www.ptcare.net

PIVOTAL STEEL BUILDINGS & ROOFING

(888) 75-STEEL - www.pivotalconstruction.net

PRESCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS WEST

(832) 545-0645 - preschoolofperformingartswest.com

PRESTIGE PROPERTIES TEXAS (281) 238-0800

PREVALENT HEALTH

(713) 554-6100 - www.prevalenthealth.com

PROSPECT MORTGAGE - (832) 286-6371

www.prospectmortgage.com/NNavarroSung

PROSPERITY BANK

(281) 574-8674 - www.ProsperityBankUSA.com

R.G. MILLER ENGINEERS

(713) 461-9600 - www.rgmiller.com

(832) 222-9727 - www.scpfit.com (713) 302-6873

(281) 347-6200 - www.yourareaneighbor.com (281) 346-1333 - www.stewart.com/houston (281) 341-7141 - www.stieberinsurance.com (281) 240-4487 - www.sugarlandskeeters.com www.sunriseseniorliving.com/communities/sunrise-of-cincoranch/overview.aspx (281) 494-7161 - www.sunsetglasstinting.com (281) 533-0477 - www.sweettoothshoppe.com (281) 903-7103 x 102 - www.tanches.com

(281) 616-5999 - www.temperatureprofortbend.com (281) 346-2112 - www.terrapointrealty.com (281) 239-1427 - www.texanacenter.com (281) 346-1136

(281) 346-8326 - www.texasorthodonticspecialists.com (281) 342-8178 - www.texaspridedisposal.com

TUTUS & BOWTIES EVENTS

(281)-235-0600 - UpCloseMagazine.com www.usana.com/webhosting/cherrylsenergythrough (713) 865-0229 - www.vanholtenlaw.com www.victorsmexicanrestaurant.com

(602) 300-2888 - www.wineshopathome.com/ sschlangen

W.A. “ANDY” MEYERS

(281) 238-1400 - www.andy.meyers@fortbendcountytx.gov

WALLIS STATE BANK

(713) 935-3720 - www.wallisbank.com (832) 972-8000 - www.watercrestkaty.com (281) 242-0303 - www.texbusinesslaw.com (281) 394-7581 - www.westheimerlakesdental.com (281) 392-5535 - www.westsidegrillandfireplace.com (832) 862-3037 - www.whiteoaksevents.com (281) 455-5258 - www.wordserve.org (713) 392-7128 - www.workforcelife.com

(281) 346-6200 - www.world-widetelecom.com (281) 665-3917 - yenhibachi.com


Fulshear Magazine Vol 02 No 03  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you