Page 1


EXCLUSIVE! ON THE ROAD WITH BOB IZUMI

Canada Post Mail Product Agreement No.40015689

VOLUME 16 • ISSUE 1 Just $3.95

DISPLAY UNTIL APRIL 15,2010

Winter 2010


, THEY LL NEVER CATCH UP TO OPTIMAX.

their top speed pales in comparison Mercury® OptiMax 225 hp Pro XS is 8.2 km/h faster than Yamaha® 225 hp HPDI® and 9.3 km/h faster than Evinrude® 225 hp E-TEC® HO.

EVINRUDE 225 hp E-TEC HO YAMAHA 225 hp HPDI

250

YAWN HO HUM

MERCURY OPTIMAX 225 hp PRO XS

225

#@% $#!+!

175

NEW

SEE MORE TESTS AT MercuryMarine.com

When it comes to top-end speed, no one comes close to the OptiMax Pro XS by Mercury. And, not only is it faster, it’s also more fuel-efficient. In fact, when the fuel needle hits empty on an Evinrude 250 hp E-TEC, the OptiMax 250 hp Pro XS still has up to 55 more

kilometres in its tank. While they’re looking for more fuel, you’ll still be chasing fish. To see just how far in front we truly are, look deeper at MercuryMarine.com.

Source: Bass & Walleye Boats® magazine “The Main Event” – June 2005. Tests conducted on a 20’ fiberglass fishing boat with a Mercury OptiMax 225 hp Pro XS, an Evinrude 225 hp E-TEC HO and Yamaha 225 hp HPDI VMAX.® © 2009 MERCURY MARINE. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Bass & Walleye Boats is a registered trademark of Ehlert Publishing Group Inc. E-TEC is a registered trademark of BRP-Rotax GmbH & Co. Evinrude is a registered trademark of Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. HPDI and VMAX are registered trademarks of Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki Kaisha. Yamaha is a registered trademark of the Yamaha Corporation. All other trademarks belong to the Brunswick Corporation.


M aking the most of your time gets a little tougher everyday. It’s why Ranger developed a whole new level of leadership in the revolutionary Z-Comanche® Series. With muscle-car-inspired engineering and a long list of best-in-class features, these designs continue to take acceleration, handling, space, fishability and head-turning performance to new extremes. So take charge of your time and space. Surround yourself with the pace-setting freedom of the Ranger Z-Comanche® Series. It’s an all-out reminder of the power that comes from turning things loose!

For The Name Of Your Nearest Ranger Dealer, Call:

1-800-373-BOAT (2628)

©Copyright MMIX Ranger® Boats R-9011


Contents Features 36 10 STEPS TO ICE FISHING SUCCESS This simple checklist will ensure that you’ve got all the bases covered when you head out on your next ice fishing excursion. By Howard Martin

46 CANADA’S RARE FISH A look at some of Canada’s rarest sportfish and the tactics you need to catch them. By Jeff Holmlund

54 WINTER STEELHEAD Tips and techniques for catching steelhead throughout the winter. By Naoto Aoki


Winter 2010 Volume 16, Issue 1 Editor Jerry Hughes Art Production Rossi Piedimonte Design Publisher Fred Delsey National Advertising Izumi Outdoors Tel: (905) 632-8679

Columns

President Wayne Izumi Contributors Naoto Aoki, Patrick Daradick, Jeff Holmlund, Heather Holmlund, Bob Izumi, Wayne Izumi, Howard Martin, Steve May, Dave Taylor, Charles Weiss, Lawren Wetzel Real Fishing is published by Izumi Outdoors Inc. 940 Sheldon Court Burlington, ON L7L 5K6 Tel: (905) 632-8679 Fax: (905) 632-2833 Privacy Policy: Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies whose products and services might be of interest to our subscribers. If you prefer to have your name removed from this list and not receive these mailings, please write to us at the above address.

We welcome manuscripts, but will not be held responsible for loss of manuscripts, photos or other materials. Published four times each year: January (Winter) April (Spring) July (Summer) October (Fall) One year subscription is $9.95. For USA add $10 all others add $30. Subscriptions: Real Fishing 940 Sheldon Court, Burlington ON L7L 5K6

6 OPENING LINES By Jerry Hughes

10 SPORTSMEN’S ALMANAC News, trivia, event listings and more from the world of fishing

16 WHAT’S NEW The latest in fishing tackle, gear and accessories

18 FISHING Upgrading your Rig By Bob Izumi

22 UNDERSTANDING ELECTRONICS By Lawren Wetzel

24 THE WATER’S EDGE By Dave Taylor

26 REAL FISHING FISH FACTS 20 FLY FISHING

Yellow Perch

By Steve May

28 THE VINTAGE TACKLE BOX By Patrick Daradick

Subscription inquiries Please call: 1-877-474-4141 or visit www.realfishing.com

30 THE HOT BITE

Canada Post Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement No. 40015689 Customer Account No. 2723816 GST Registration No. R102546504

32 BEST FISHING TIMES Doug Hannon’s moon phase calendar

Postmaster: Please return front cover/label only of undeliverables to: Real Fishing 940 Sheldon Court, Burlington ON L7L 5K6

58 FISH FOR EVER UPDATE

Contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material without prior written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Printed in Canada

60 TALES FROM THE ROAD The trials and tribulations of life as a professional angler By Bob Izumi

65 WHAT’S COOKING

On the cover: Ice Fishing Success Photo by Izumi Outdoors

24

66 ART OF ANGLING

20


opening lines By Jerry Hughes

A Reason To Smile I never thought I’d see the day when I would get excited about anything the Ontario government did, especially when it came to our natural resources. For far too long, anglers have been faced with confusing fishing regulations, a serious shortage of conservation officers, the downloading of services like fish rearing and stocking to the private sector and a host of other impediments to enjoyable angling. I don’t like to think that there was any intentional bias against anglers but at times it sure looked that way. As we head into 2010, it seems I may have to rethink my position. Over the past few months, the Liberals have pulled out all the stops by gifting Ontario’s anglers with several new fishing opportunities as well as by introducing new regulations to protect some of our at-risk species. As this issue goes to press, anglers throughout southern Ontario are positively giddy about the newly announced rules allowing ice fishing in the Kawartha Lakes region, effective January 1, 2010. For the last few years there have been serious concerns about the decline of walleye populations in these lakes so, at first glance, allowing ice fishing may seem counterproductive. After much study, however, it was determined that the invasive black crappie and a boom in other panfish populations were major contributing factors to the problems faced by walleyes. The discovery of northern pike in some of the lakes was also cause for concern. In a surprisingly forward thinking move, the Ontario government and the Ministry of Natural Resources decided to try tackling the problem by allowing anglers to pursue several panfish species, as well as pike, on these lakes all year long, including throughout the winter months. Not only is this great news for anglers, it will undoubtedly have many positive economic benefits for local communities and the fishing industry. Another present to southern Ontario anglers is the extension of the bass and 6 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

musky seasons in the Kawartha Lakes from November 15 to December 15. Along with this, the minimum size limit on muskies has increased to 44-inches. While this may not attract as much attention as the all year seasons on panfish and pike, it does offer additional open water fishing opportunities for folks who may otherwise give up on fishing from mid-November until ice-up. In northern Ontario, large sections of Lake of the Woods have been designated as catch and release only areas for lake trout in order to protect certain populations from over-fishing. Some areas of the lake receive extremely heavy trout fishing pressure and this new regulation is aimed at protecting those valuable fish. In another move aimed at reducing pressure on an atrisk species, 2010 will see the closure of angling for sturgeon throughout zone 5 in north-western Ontario. Thunder Bay area anglers will see extended seasons for lake trout and simplified size restrictions on certain species. In addition, 42 lake trout and brook trout lakes in Ontario will have extended seasons and/or reduced catch limits to either provide additional angling opportunities or to protect fish stocks, depending on the particular lake. There are dozens of other changes to Ontario’s 2010 fishing regulations so I would advise everyone to pick up a copy and read the sections that pertain to your area before heading out this year. You can pick up a hard copy at most fishing licence retailers or at any ServiceOntario/Government Information Centre, or you can visit the Ministry of Natural Resources website and view or print the electronic version. One final announcement that will undoubtedly have a positive effect on recreational fishing in Ontario is the news that

the annual summer Family Fishing Weekend has been extended to a full week. Along with the winter Family Fishing Weekend that runs from February 13th to the 15th, Canadian residents will be able to fish licence-free in Ontario from July 3rd right through to July 11th this year during the new Family Fishing Week. I never thought I’d see the day that I agreed with politicians but I have to hand it to Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty and Minister of Natural Resources, Donna Cansfield. They’ve given all of us good reason to smile as we head into a new year. ?


A Pot of Gold 8 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


Despite an otherwise grey looking day, these intrepid anglers were fortunate enough to enjoy a window of sunshine on a late fall fishing trip. We don’t know what they were fishing for but walleyes would be a pretty safe bet. After all, there’s supposed to be a pot of gold at the end of every rainbow…

Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 9


Kawartha Lakes Open For Ice Fishing On November 18, 2009, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources announced several changes to the fishing regulations in FMZ 17 including the opening of the Kawartha Lakes to ice fishing. Beginning January 1, 2010, year-round fishing will be allowed for northern pike, yellow perch, crappie and sunfish; the bass and muskellunge seasons will be extended to December 15 and new catch and possession limits on walleye, yellow perch, black crappie and sunfish will come into effect. “We’re working to ensure fish populations remain sustainable and continue to provide angling opportunities for years to come,” said Minister of Natural Resources, Donna Cansfield. “I am pleased that new ice fishing seasons and extended fall angling will offer additional year-round opportunities for anglers in the Kawartha Lakes area.” The regulation changes for FMZ 17 can be viewed on the Ontario Ministry of Natural

Resources

website

at

www.mnr.gov.on.ca/278711.pdf as well as in the 2010 Ontario Fishing Regulations Summary which is scheduled for release by January 1.

10 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


Giant Sparrow Lake Musky Who said that small lakes can’t produce big fish? On October 17, Phillip Baltic was trolling for musky in Sparrow Lake when hooked an enormous 54-inch fish that would rank as a trophy in any musky lake in the world. Chris Bayley and his 12-year old son were fishing nearby and witnessed the catch. “I'm sure my son will be a fisherman for life after seeing this fish,” said Chris. “If you have ever seen a 50-pound class musky thrashing around at the side of the boat you would be amazed at the power they have.” The Barrie Bassmasters were just finishing a tournament on Sparrow Lake when Phillip caught his giant musky. One of the club members weighed the fish on a digital scale which indicated the fish was between 42 and 48-pounds. “The real story here,” says Chris,“is that this incredible fish that has no reason being in Sparrow Lake.From what I can research,this is the biggest musky ever caught in Sparrow by almost 20-pounds. There are 3 major sets of locks and a marine railroad between Sparrow and Georgian Bay and there is another set of locks leading to lakes Couchiching and Simcoe. Either way that’s quite an unlikely journey for a fish to make. How it got there and how it got that big,that's the real story about this fish.“

Blue Perch While fishing from his dock on Pigeon Lake last summer, Sean Oxtoby caught this unusual looking blue perch. Unsure of why the fish was tinted blue, he snapped a photo with his cell phone and sent the picture to us. We forwarded it to Professor and Fisheries Biologist, Dr. Bruce Tufts, at his lab in the Department of Biology at Queen’s University to see if he could explain the fish’s odd colouration. Here’s what he had to say: “I connected with Bev Scott, who coauthored "Freshwater Fishes of Canada" with the late Ed Crossman. He confirmed that blue forms of perch have been reported here and there, although very rare. He explained that this is not too surprising because perch and walleye are closely related, and walleye also

E V E N T S Calendar TORONTO INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW January 9 - 17 Direct Energy Centre, Exhibition Place Toronto, ON www.torontoboatshow.com GREAT GEORGINA ICE FISHING DERBY January 30 – February 14 Lake Simcoe Georgina, ON www.georginafishingseries.ca CALGARY BOAT & SPORTSMEN’S SHOW February 4 – 7 BMO Centre Stampede Park Calgary, AB www.calgaryboatandsportshow.ca SPRING FISHING AND BOAT SHOW February 12 – 15 International Centre Mississauga, ON www.springfishingandboatshow.com ONTARIO FAMILY FISHING WEEKEND February 13-15, 2010 Licence-free fishing in Ontario www.familyfishingweekend.com CANADIAN ICE FISHING CHAMPIONSHIP February 20 – 21 Lake Simcoe Georgina, ON www.georginafishingseries.ca

Phillip Baltic’s 54-inch Sparrow Lake musky proves that even small lakes can produce trophy fish.

have a blue form that was once fairly common in Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, but are now considered to be extinct in these waterbodies. A recent paper (Paradis, Y and P Magnan. Environmental Biology of Fishes (2005) 73: 357-366) that I found in the scientific literature reported blue walleye living together with the yellow walleye in 5 Quebec Lakes, so there are still some blue walleye and blue perch around. These are both just different phenotypes of the same (yellow) species.”

MONTREAL HUNTING, FISHING & CAMPING SHOW February 25 – 28 Place Bonaventure Montreal, QC www.salonexpertchassemontreal.ca WINTER PERCH ATTACK March 7 Lake Simcoe Georgina, ON www.georginafishingseries.ca QUEBEC HUNTING, FISHING & CAMPING SHOW/QUEBEC BOAT SHOW March 11 – 14 Centre De Foires D’expocité Québec City, QC www.salonexpertchassequebec.ca TORONTO SPORTSMEN’S SHOW March 17 - 21 Metro Toronto Convention Centre Toronto, ON www.torontosportshow.ca EDMONTON BOAT & SPORTSMEN’S SHOW March 18 – 21 Edmonton Expo Centre Edmonton, AB www.edmontonboatandsportshow.ca

OTTAWA BOAT & SPORTSMEN’S SHOW February 25 - 28 Lansdowne Park Ottawa, ON www.ottawaboatandsportshow.ca

Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 11


READ ALL ABOUT IT PAINT THE NEXT SUNRISE: A FUTURE FOR HUNTING AND FISHING By Mark Strand Foreword by Larry Dahlberg

Are fishing, hunting, and shooting destined to gradually die away, victims of modern society and an altered landscape? This new book by lifelong outdoorsman, Mark Strand, tackles that question and lays out an innovative vision for solving this challenge. Paint the Next Sunrise: A Future for Hunting and Fishing opens by describing the current situation - declining participation, increasing human population, increasing urbanization, single-parent households and fewer people taking up traditional outdoor activities. Additional chapters explore how these sports fit into our modern world and the benefits they offer to people’s lives. The book ends with the vision for a new nonprofit organization dedicated to reversing the trend of declining participation. “What’s missing,” says Strand,“is the elementary school for these sports - one place to go where beginners can sample any activity that sounds fun, where they are quickly taught how to find success. Helping beginners succeed, encouraging them to explore, and letting them freely choose their favorites is the formula that will produce a steady stream of new participants.” This book is destined to shape the national debate over the future of hunting and fishing in America. If you care about these traditional outdoor sports, it’s a must read. Soft Cover: $12.95 USD. 80 pages, 5.5” x 8.5”. ISBN: 978-1-59298-296-7 Beaver’s Pond Books, 7104 Ohms Lane, Suite 101, Edina, Minnesota 55439 952-829-8818 www.bookhousefulfillment.com

HOW SPORTMEN SAVED THE WORLD By Don Thomas

Outdoor sports like fishing and hunting are receiving ever-increasing levels of criticism from other elements of the wildlife advocacy community, often based on the belief that these activities are harmful to wildlife.This fact is quite incorrect - the historical record shows that North American sportsmen have been at the forefront of almost every significant advance in the protection of the continent’s wildlife.These efforts have led to a system of wildlife and habitat management superior to that in any other region in the world. Acclaimed outdoors writer Don Thomas' latest book, How Sportsmen Saved the World, tells the complete story of how sportsmen have managed to make the world a better place by saving some species from extinction; protecting habitat and enacting policies to safeguard wildlife into the future. Some, like Theodore Roosevelt and Aldo Leopold, are well know; others may be unknown even to lifelong outdoorsmen. Examining the lives and work of the giants in the history of wildlife conservation,Thomas concludes that the contributions sportsmen have had on protecting the environment have been far more substantial that those of "environmental" organizations that have taken a stance against hunting and fishing. Hardcover: $24.95 USD. 240 pages, 6” x 9”. ISBN: 1-59921-522-5 The Lyons Press, 246 Goose Lane, P.O. Box 480, Guilford, CT 06437 203-458-4500 www.globepequot.com

12 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


BOB IZUMI’S REAL FISHING SHOW SCHEDULE Pitching for Largemouth/Original Social Networking Sunset Country White Fish Cranking for Largemouth/ Early Season Crappies Port Colborne Smallmouth with Sue Watson Backwoods Ice Fishing for Trout Salmon Fishing at Langara Lodge Crappies Through the Ice Fishing in Belize at St. George's Caye Resort Multi-Species Action at La Réserve Beauchêne B.C. Salmon at Long Beach Lodge Resort St. Lawrence Smallmouth with Russell Peters and Mike Brown Mattagami Walleye Derby Ice Fishing in Bracebridge Lake Erie Smallmouth

January 2 January 9 January 16 January 23 January 30 February 6 February 13 February 20 Februaray 27 March 6 March 13 March 20 March 27 April 3

STATION LISTING & AIRING TIMES* MARKET Atlantic Canada Calgary Edmonton Manitoba Ontario Quebec Regina Saskatoon Vancouver Canada/USA

PROV./STATE Atlantic Canada AB AB MB ON QC SK SK BC Canada/USA

STATION Global (CIHF) Global (CICT) Global (CITV) Global (CKND) Global (CIII) Global (CKMI) Global (CFRE) Global (CFSK) Global (CHAN) WFN

*Station listings, airtimes and show descriptions are subject to change. Please refer to your local television listings for the latest show schedules.

DATE & AIR TIMES Saturday 10:00 am Saturday 12:00 pm Saturday 12:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am Saturday 9:00 am Saturday 9:00 am Saturday 9:00 am Saturday 9:00 am Saturday 10:30 am Check www.wfn.tv for dates and times


READER’S PHOTOS Shelby Wettlaufer Tavistock ON Yellow Perch

Send us a photo of your best catch and you could see your picture in a future issue of Real Fishing Magazine! Send photos to: Real Fishing, 940 Sheldon Court, Burlington, ON L7L 5K6

Eric Angellotti (right) and his dad, Nick Markham ON Smallmouth Bass

Patrick Doherty Ennismore ON Whitefish

Brett Nishizaki Oakville ON Chinook Salmon

Kaylan Evers Trout Creek ON Walleye

Doreen Fedyniak Courtice ON Rainbow Trout

14 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


What’s

NEW NEW

2010

LINDY DARTER The new Lindy Darter is a perfectly balanced minnow jig that has the most lifelike action of any ice fishing lure available today. The bait makes a slight turn at the top of the jigging stroke and then swims in a unique, nose-down circular pattern as it falls to the bottom, perfectly imitating a live baitfish. Four rattles call fish in and the erratic darting action closes the deal, evoking savage strikes from walleye, sauger, pike and all other fish eating species. The Darter comes in 9 holographic finishes and two glow colours, features premium treble hooks and is available in 1 1/3”, 1 3/4” and 2” sizes.

www.lindyfishingtackle.com

RECHARGEABLE HEATED BOOTS Columbia Sportswear has just introduced BugaThermo™, their first-ever heated winter boot for men. An internal, rechargeable battery provides the power for an integrated toe heating element that keeps your feet warm for up to eight-hours. Recharging is as easy as plugging the adapter cord into the back of the boot. Designed to provide ultimate warmth, BugaThermo™ boots feature three heat settings, Thinsulate™ lining and additional insulation in the insole to prevent heat loss.

www.columbia.com

NEW CHRONARCH D Shimano’s new Chronarch D has been redesigned with new features including an ultra-lightweight A7075 aluminum spool, Magnumlite spool design, six S A-RB ball bearings and high efficiency gearing. Compact, lightweight and powerful, the new Chronarch D offers excellent castability and line control regardless of the weight of lure being used. The Chronarch D is available in two models; the D5 featuring a powerful 5:0:1 gear ratio and the super-high speed D7 with 7.0:1 gearing. Both models can hold 110 yards of 10-pound test monofilament or 130 yards of 30-pound test PowerPro® line and are approved for use in fresh or salt water.

www.shimano.com

16 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


We welcome submissions from manufacturers and distibutors for our New Products section. Products that appear in this section have not necessarily been tested or endorsed by the staff at Real Fishing. Submissions can be sent to: Editor, Real Fishing Magazine, 940 Sheldon Court, Burlington, ON L7L 5K6

ETHANOL FUEL TREATMENT CRC Phaseguard4™ Ethanol Fuel Treatment protects all 2- and 4-cycle vehicles and equipment from the damaging effects of ethanol in gasoline. Regular use prevents phase separation, protects against corrosion, cleans the entire fuel system, restores power and stabilizes fuel for long-term storage. 30 ml of Phaseguard4™ treats 37 litres of fuel for in-season protection; 30 ml treats 19 litres for storage. Phaseguard4™ is effective in protecting fuels from E10 to E85 and is available in 237 ml and 474 ml sizes.

www.crc-canada.ca

HANDHELD THERMAL IMAGER FLIR Systems has announced the launch of its new First Mate line of hand-held maritime thermal night vision cameras, the ultimate tools for night time navigation. First Mate maritime thermal cameras give users the power to see navigation hazards like channel markers, land, other boats and people in the water more clearly – and from farther away – than ever before, even in total darkness. Built to survive the most demanding environmental conditions, the First Mate is fully submersible, runs for over five hours on a single battery charge, and has more than 120 hours of standby battery life.

www.flir.com

GULP! ALIVE! MICRO BAITS The new Berkley® Gulp!® Alive!™ Minnow Heads, 1-inch Fish Fry and 1.5-inch Jigging Grubs will be a hit with anglers in search of panfish this season. Created for multiple freshwater species, all of these new baits offer the irresistible scent and flavour of Gulp! Alive! which has been proven to outfish and out-last live bait. With their lifelike gills, eyes and entrails, Gulp! Alive!™ 1-inch Minnow Heads are perfect for tipping spoons and jigs. The 1- inch Fish Fry are designed to be rigged on a bare hook, fished under a bobber or on a jig while the 1.5-inch Jigging Grub offers a proven shape that works perfectly when fished on a jig, dropshot rig or plain hook. The new Micro Baits are available in a wide range of colours and come packaged in convenient, re-sealable jars.

www.berkley-fishing.com

ELITE FISHFINDER/CHARTPLOTTER Scheduled for release in March 2010, the new Elite-5x fishfinder, Elite-5m chartplotter and Elite-5 fishfinder/chartplotter from Lowrance deliver new standards in feature-rich, high-performance, easy-to-use electronics. All of the new Elite models are fully waterproof and feature 5-inch, 480x480-pixel SolarMAX™ 256-color display screens and a quick-release, tilt-and-swivel mounting bracket for convenient removal and storage. The Elite-5x and Elite5 fishfinders can reach depths of 1,000 feet, provide accurate temperature readings and come with Lowrance’s unique TrackBack™ function that allows users to review the fishfinder’s display history. The Elite-5 and Elite-5m chartplotter models feature a built-in 16-channel GPS+WAAS precision antenna, a waterproof micro SD memory card slot and can store up to 3,000 waypoints. All of the Elite series units are protected by a one-year limited warranty.

www.lowrance.com Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 17


fishing

Bob Izumi is the host of The Real Fishing Show.

By Bob Izumi

Upgrading Your Rig Now that winter has settled in most of you have probably stored your boat and won’t think about it again until the spring. It makes sense since you can’t go boating on ice, but the winter is the best time to start outfitting or upgrading your rig for the coming season. Retailers usually offer great deals on their existing inventory and service shops aren’t nearly as busy as they will be in March or April. If you are looking for new boating gear there are dozens of boat and outdoor shows running throughout the winter where you can check out all of the neat new things that will be available for the new season. One of the easiest ways to get a little more performance out of your rig is to upgrade the standard propeller. For many years stainless steel has been the best upgrade but Mercury is changing that with their new Fury propellers. These props are made from X7alloy which is 30 percent stronger and four times more durable than conventional stainless steel. They have thinner blades and higher rake angles for unbelievable durability, hole-shots and top-end speed. While I’m on the subject of propellers, how about picking up a spare one for your trolling motor? Standard weedless props are great for shallow water fishing but they

Everything you need to upgrade your boat like Bob’s can be found at a Boat or Sportsmen’s Show this winter.

18 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

aren’t as efficient in open water as a 3-blade version so it’s a good idea to have one of each on hand. Chipped or cracked propeller blades won’t be nearly as efficient or powerful as a new one and they will tend to catch a lot of weeds which can be frustrating when you’re out fishing. And what could be worse than breaking a blade and not having a spare on board? I can tell you from experience that carrying a spare trolling motor propeller is one of the cheapest bits of fishing insurance you can have. Another great piece of insurance for your boat is PhaseGuard 4 ethanol fuel treatment. Ethanol is prone to separating from gasoline in a process called “phase separation” which can cause everything from decreased fuel economy to rough running to engine corrosion and severe engine damage. Adding PhaseGuard 4 to your fuel tanks eliminates the problem of fuel separation and gives you piece of mind whether your boat is on the water or in storage. Getting your boat to the lake safely is something a lot of us take for granted but we shouldn’t because ignoring your trailer

MEET BOB AT THE SHOW Bob Izumi will be sharing some of the tips and tactics that have made him the most successful angler in Canada when he takes to the stage at several outdoors oriented shows this winter. There’s no better opportunity to pick up a few secrets, get an autograph or just meet Bob in person so be sure to mark the following dates on your calendar. Toronto International Boat Show January 16 Ottawa Boat and Sportsmen’s Show February 26, 27 Toronto Sportsmen’s Show March 17, 19, 20 results in hundreds of ruined fishing trips every year. I see it all the time – abandoned boats sitting on the side of the road while the owner is off trying to locate a tire, wheel bearing or some other piece of equipment. If you don’t already carry a spare tire, a trailer jack and wheel wrench and a portable compressor you are just asking for trouble. And what about your wheel bearings? They need to be lubricated regularly and even with regular care they will wear out after time. One of the greatest advancements in trailer design is the introduction of oil filled hubs. These sealed units are pre-filled with oil and, unlike standard grease filled bearings, they never need servicing. If it’s time for new bearings on your trailer, take a look at a set of oil filled ones; I guarantee you won’t be disappointed. There are thousands of other products out there to upgrade your boat and make your fishing more productive. From the new Lowrance high definition sonar equipment to updated Navionics electronic charts; from special electrical connection lubricants to safety gear it’s all on display at a boat or outdoors show. And, if you are in the market for the ultimate upgrade, you’ll never get a better deal on a brand new fishing rig than what you’ll get at one of the shows! ?


Not so much held as embraced.

Â?I^b=dgidch!'%%.


fly fishing

Steve May is the Stewardship Coordinator for Waterloo Region with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. When not working to improve local fisheries Steve can be found guiding or fly casting on his local rivers.

By Stephen May

The Wooly Bugger Yes, I am a closet Woolly Bugger lover – and no, I am not talking about your curmudgeonly relatives. In case you haven’t heard, the woolly bugger is probably the most versatile and effective fly pattern on earth. The first person to whip up one of these creations was Russ Blessing from Pennsylvania. In the early 1980’s he designed this fly to imitate hellgrammites in his local stream. Since then, fly fishers around the world have been thanking him and untold numbers of fish have been licking their wounds. The original woolly bugger was tied on a #6 nymph hook and consisted of a black marabou tail, a dark olive green chenille body and an oversized black hackle feather wrapped up the fly. Anglers have taken liberties with the original design and you can now find woolly buggers, and countless variations of it, in an assortment of sizes and a rainbow of colors, most of which are incredibly effective. I have to say, the original doesn’t look a lot like a hellgrammite in a fly tying vice but add water and stand back! A woolly bugger can actually deliver on infomercial fishing bait promises. It simply looks alive and edible when you put it in the water.

20 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

I don’t know exactly what a ‘bugger imitates. The fact that it looks alive, vulnerable and edible means the fish can decide what they are eating. When tied in a variety of colors and sizes a woolly bugger can resemble a leech, a minnow, a nymph, a crayfish, or any number of other aquatic creatures. Throughout history some fly patterns have been looked down on by experienced fly because they are too easy to catch fish with and thus considered “unsporting.” Woolly buggers and egg flies are two patterns that definitely get his bad rap. Think about that for a moment. “I don’t want to use that fly because it works too well”. Would you ever say that about a bait? If you would, thanks for leaving more fish for me and my friends to catch! When I give fly tying lessons to beginners, woolly buggers are the flies of choice. They are simple to tie with cheap and easily available materials. As a bonus, even ugly buggers that don’t look great in the vice often look really good to the tough critics at your local fishing hole. It is difficult to fish this pattern in the wrong way because once it is in the water the materials come alive. If you can get it in front of a fish, you are on your way to fooling them! Of course matching an appropriate woolly bugger to your local fishing conditions

can help. I often add a bead head or lead wire to get it down to more fish and I’ll also add some flash material to improve its appearance. I have used other things like deer hair heads, rubber legs and even spinner blades to adapt the fly to different river conditions. I like to mix different colors of hackle, chenille and marabou. One of my favourites is an olive bugger with a splash of orange in the tail. Many salmon and steelhead anglers add a head of bright chenille or bead head to create what is called an “egg sucking leech.” Feel free to experiment. The next time the fish are turning their

noses up at your standard offerings give this “unfair” fly a try. I am sure you will get over using a lowly woolly bugger when you look at the photos of the fish that you caught with it. ?


© 2009 Columbia Sportswear Company. All rights reserved.

BUGATHERMO™ IS NO ORDINARY BOOT. AN INNOVATIVE, RECHARGEABLE HEATING SYSTEM KEEPS FEET WARM FOR UP TO EIGHT HOURS. THREE TEMPERATURE SETTINGS ADJUST TO THE COLDEST CONDITIONS, AND WITH WATERPROOF, BREATHABLE OMNI-TECH™, FEET STAY DRY. ALL THIS, PLUS OUR TECHLITE™ CONSTRUCTION KEEPS THE BOOTS LIGHTWEIGHT AND COMFY. PERFECT FOR COOKING IN THE GREATER OUTDOORS. LEARN MORE AT COLUMBIA.COM/BUGATHERMO.


understanding electronics

Lawren Wetzel is the Repair Coordinator for Navico Canada and an avid fisherman.

By Lawren Wetzel

Side Imaging Sonar - Part 2 In the first part of this series we discussed the technology behind imaging sonar. In this second part we will take a look at some of the applications for side imaging sonar. I have had a chance to personally use Lowrance’s new StructureScan on the HDS units and was blown away from the minute I first turned it on. Before getting into the details of the unit’s operation I’d like to make a point of mentioning how important correct installation of the transducer is. While testing the unit last fall I had rigged up a portable suction cup mount for the transducer so it could be taken from boat to boat. On our first test the transducer was affixed high on the driver’s side of the transom which caused the left sonar beam to be useless as the signal was hindered by the outboard engine. It’s important to remember that not only is there a sonar beam looking down, but to the left and right as well. With that said, you shouldn’t have any problems finding a good mounting location because the StructureScan transducer is the most flexible transducer I have ever seen in terms of its multiple mounting options. Once installed correctly there are two frequencies to choose from. For higher detail with less coverage area use the 455kHz setting and for a larger coverage area but with less detail use 800kHz. I recommend starting out with the 800kHz frequency because you will be able to see much further away from the side of your boat than with 455kHz. Once you find an object of interest you can then switch over to 455kHz to scan the object in greater detail. The feature I most frequently used was the TrackBack cursor. This feature allows you to save waypoints and measure distances of objects off to the side, as well as behind your boat. For example, if you see a rock pile or weedbed off to the right, just 22 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

In the last issue I outlined the importance of finding the right speed to get the best images on the screen and I found out that even at slower speeds (or not moving at all) the Side Scan still was of great benefit. The StructureScan black box allows you to output the information through the Ethernet port to up to three other units. This allows you to feed the signal to the unit on the bow so you can monitor what is off to the sides while you are fishing. When I was chasing smallmouth bass on Lake Simcoe last fall I saw something off to the side of the boat so I used the TrackBack feature to save a waypoint on the object and then headed in that direction. Even though I didn’t know exactly what the object was, I knew it was something worth checking out. In this case it turned out to be a small, isolated rock pile which held a couple of bonus fish; something I would have missed without SideScan on my bow mount unit. You are probably noticing this article coming to a close without even a mention of the best part of StructureScan DownScan. Unfortunately I’m out of space so you’ll have to pick up a copy of the spring issue where I will discuss how the innovative DownScan imaging system will revolutionize the way we look at structure. ?

move the cursor over top of it and save a waypoint. Not only will the cursor show up on the SideScan page, but also on the map page so you can see exactly where that spot is in relation to your boat. Then all you need to do is drive over to it and start fishing. With imaging sonar it’s generally easier to identify objects than with traditional 2D sonar because of its extremely narrow sonar beam. It’s almost like watching a photo being printed. The picture begins to take on its full shape with each line of ink the printer lays down and side imaging sonar is just the same - as you pass by the object the screen begins to draw a highly detailed, exact representation of what is there. If you aren’t certain of what an object may be, one tip I can give you is to scan it from a few different angles. Last fall I found what looked like an airplane on the bottom of the lake. On the first pass I was heading north to south so I used the TrackBack feature to save a waypoint and then made a wide turn and drove past it in an east to west direction. In this direction the plane was perfectly laid out and I could clearly identify the fuselage, wings, The fuselage, wings, and tail of a sunken airplane are clearly visible with StructureScan. and tail.


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Dave Taylor is a well known photographer and naturalist from Mississauga, Ontario

water’s edge By Dave Taylor

Northern Short-Tailed Shrew Last fall I made the acquaintance of a mammal whose reputation preceded it. You probably have never seen one alive even though there may be up to thirty of them living in a single hectare. What is this mammal that eats up to three times its own weight in food, has a poisonous bite, tastes so bad other mammals won't eat it, lives in pairs, and, if all of that was not enough, actually hoards its food in the fall and winter? The eating habits of this mammal should suggest to that it is a small mammal, likely an insectivore and the northern short-tailed shrew is indeed an insectivore; however, it is also an omnivore. It includes far more vertebrate animals in its diet than do other shrews, moles and other insect eating predators. It will eat young mice, voles and even nestling birds knocked out of their nests. Its bite is mildly poisonous (but not to you) and it can paralyze prey up to its own size. The northern short-tailed shrew is not above visiting bird feeders to feast on fallen seeds and suet either. Protein is protein.

know to eat shrews. Owls and hawks are far less discerning and will prey upon them. A very high number of shrews do not survive their first year. Winter temperatures kill large numbers as they cannot get enough food to maintain their body weight. The shrew responds to this pressure by producing lots of babies. They will have two to (rarely) three litters of between five and seven young per year. The young of the first litter may even breed during the fall of that year.

The northern short-tailed shrew is about the size of your thumb. The smaller a warm-blooded animal is, the greater the area of its skin relative to its body mass. Even though it is well furred, the shrew loses heat far more rapidly than humans do so it must continually replenish its energy supply by eating. You would think that other animals would find shrews to be easy prey but predators such as red fox, coyotes and even squirrels, find this vole too smelly and not at all to their taste. While they may kill one from time to time, these predators are not It was by our bird feeders that we first noticed the shrew. At first we thought it was a meadow vole but it was silvery in colour and voles are usually brown. It seems that we were seeing one in its fall/winter coat. The speed with which it moved impressed me but some of its moves were so fast it appeared to be in two places at once. It was then that we realized that we had a pair of them. While they are polygamous, males and females sharing a territory is not that uncommon. So why are they not seen more often? They spend a good deal of their time underground or under ground cover. Their preferred habitats are moist and provide ample leaf litter. They can be found in grasslands, old fields, fencerows, marshy areas, deciduous and coniferous forests, and in household gardens - especially if there are bird feeders there! ?

24 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


real fishing fish facts

Yellow Perch Perca flavescens

Yellow flanks highlighted by dark, vertical bars are the unmistakable trademarks of one of the most popular and recognizable sport fish in Canada; the yellow perch. These fish are relatively small, averaging between 4 and 10-inches in length, and they have an elongated, oval shaped body. Perch have two separate dorsal fins; the first is tall and rounded with 13 to 15 strong spines while the second is smaller and has 1 or 2 spines at the leading edge followed by 12 to 15 softer rays. The tail is slightly forked and has rounded tips. Scales cover most of the body except for the fins and a small area on the gill plate. The lateral line is complete and unbroken. The most distinguishing feature of the yellow perch is its color pattern. The back ranges from bright green to olive, the flanks are yellowish-green to yellow and the belly is light grey to milky-white. A number of dark, tapered bars run down the flanks of the perch, giving it a vertically striped appearance. Spawning males are more brilliantly colored with brighter yellow flanks, darker bars, and lower fins that may appear bright orange or red. Yellow perch are common across most of Canada and the central and eastern United States. In Canada they can be found in Nova Scotia, west across New Brunswick and through western Quebec, as far north as James Bay. Perch are found throughout Ontario as far north as the Albany River, across most of Manitoba except the extreme northeastern portion, throughout Saskatchewan as far north as Great Slave Lake, and across Alberta as far west as the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. They can also be found in some regions of southern British Columbia. Perch are adaptable to a wide range of habitats and can be found in lakes, ponds and rivers throughout their range. They are most abundant in clear water environments with moderate amounts of vegetation although they can adapt and thrive in more turbid conditions. Lakes lacking sufficient 26 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

weed growth generally do not support large perch populations. It has been determined that the perch’s preferred water temperature is 68ºF and they will flourish in water ranging from 66ºF to 77ºF. Yellow perch spawn in the spring, usually between mid-April and early May, in water temperatures of between 44º and 54ºF. Spawning takes place at night and into the early morning, generally over soft bottomed areas with weeds, submerged brush or fallen timber, although they will occasionally use sand or gravelly areas. Perch do not build nests for spawning. Instead, the females extrude eggs in a transparent, jelly-like tube which may be up to seven-feet long and weigh as much as two-pounds. The egg mass is semibuoyant and will drift until it adheres to weeds or the bottom. The eggs hatch within eight to 10-days under normal conditions but can take over 20-days if water temperatures remain in the low 40ºF range. Neither male nor female perch guard the eggs or the fry. Perch are an important species in Canada as both a commercial and a recreational fish. In the early part of the 1900s the commercial fishery was unrestricted and the harvest went through several boom and bust cycles. In 1934, 72.1 million pounds of perch were caught by commercial fishers; by 1948 the catch had dropped to 3.2 million pounds then rebounded to 27 million pounds in 1968. With quotas now in place the annual catch has stabilized at around 5 million pounds per year. Recreational anglers target yellow perch throughout the year. Although they do not fight hard and they do not grow very large, perch are plentiful and are one of the best tasting of all sport fish. Perch are aggressive feeders and will hit a variety of live and artificial baits. Their tendency to flourish in warm, shallow water makes them easily

accessible to both boat and shore anglers. The combination of being easy to catch and delicious on the table are undoubtedly the main reasons for their popularity. ?

DID YOU KNOW? Yellow perch are one of the most important sportfish species in Canada and are sought after by both recreational and commercial fishers.

FAST FACTS Colour: Bright green to olive or black on the back, yellowish-green to yellow on the flanks and light grey to milky-white on the belly. A series of dark, tapered bars run down the sides giving the perch a vertically striped appearance. Size: The average perch ranges from 4 to 10-inches in length and weighs under a pound but specimens stretching to over 12-inches and weighing over a pound are fairly common. Life Span: Yellow perch can live up to 12-years.In general,fish in northern regions grow more slowly than their southern counterparts but they tend to live longer. Habitat: Perch are most abundant in lakes, ponds and rivers with clear water and moderate amounts of vegetation although they can adapt and thrive in more turbid conditions. Spawning: Spawning takes place in the spring, in water temperatures of between 44º and 54ºF. Perch spawn at night and in the early morning over soft bottomed areas with weeds, submerged brush or fallen timber.

RECORD The all-tackle world record perch, as listed by the IGFA, stands at 4-pounds, 3-ounces for a fish caught in New Jersey way back in 1865.


the vintage tackle box By Patrick Daradick

Patrick Daradick has been collecting vintage fishing tackle for over 23-years and is a specialist in Ontario made tackle. He enjoys sharing his passion and knowledge of tackle collecting on his website at www.ontariolures.com

Busty’s Baits Fish decoys and the art of attracting fish are part of a long and rich ice fishing tradition. In the 1800s, Canadian natives on Lake Simcoe made small, dome-like houses from pine tree branches that they covered with animal skins and placed over a hole in the ice. The fisherman lay prone in the hut, using a decoy to attract fish and a pointed wooden or flint-tipped spear to catch them. In the 1930’s William Stanley (Busty) Flesher designed a fish decoy that he used on Georgian Bay while using this method of spear fishing. With the banning of spear fishing in Ontario, Busty re-designed his decoys into Busty’s Baits by adding his patented hook and body design. Busty was born into a distinguished pioneer family on August 29, 1890, in the district of Parry Sound, Ontario. His grandfather, William Kingston Flesher, founded the village of Flesherton in 1853 and was the Reeve from 1853 to 1867; the Warden of Grey County from 1855 to 1867 and an elected Member of Parliament from 1872-1876. In approximately 1902, Busty’s father, John Flesher, was sent to New Zealand to build the first sawmill for the MasseyWaters lumber company and he never returned. Busty was 12-years old. His mother died approximately two years later, leaving Stan, as he was known at the time, on his own. To support himself he worked at a variety of jobs including fishing, boat livery, logging, and part-time guiding. Busty was most widely known for his fishing, hunting and trapping skills and during the next 20-years he would guide for many distinguished out-of-town clientele. Stan also had interest in sports and he was a pretty fair hockey player. In fact, he was scouted by the Toronto Maple Leafs and this is where his nickname came from. His abilities as a defenseman got him labelled, “Buster,” and “Bust-Up,” so the crowd hung the name, “Busty,” on him and 28 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

it stuck. World War l put an end to his budding hockey career and Busty enlisted in the army 1918. He served in France and Belgium and was discharged in 1919 after being injured by shrapnel. In 1921 Busty received a gill net license and he commercially fished the public waters of Georgian Bay from the Limestone Islands to Head Island until 1938, when his boat burned. He then went to work building roads near Callander, Ontario but was struck by a car and his back was broken. After recuperating, Busty went to work for the Department of Transport, where he tended and stocked lighthouses, painted and repaired buoys, and as he got older, became a night watchman until his retirement in 1955. During that time, Busty had a shoal in the outer harbour of Parry Sound named after him. Today, “Busty Shoal” has its own buoy and light and appears on official nautical charts. Busty hunted and fished throughout his life. He had been making his own lures, flies, spoons and sinkers from a very early age but the concept for Busty’s Baits was born in the early 1930s. He sold his first bait to a long-time friend in 1941 for $4.50. It was an early version of the green bait pictured in this column and his friend caught 27 fish with it in one day while fishing in

Shawanaga Bay, just north of Parry Sound. Word spread and it soon became difficult keeping up with the demand. Aside from the personal sales from home, Busty sold his baits in local hardware stores as well as in other towns in Ontario and the U.S.A. Busty Flesher produced his baits in his basement for over 20-years. They were made of hand carved and sanded white cedar. The fins were hand-cut, lead weights were poured, steel pins and hooks were applied and paint was patiently applied. The baits were available in green or red & white, in sizes from four to seven-inches in length. They were packed in red or green boxes with an instruction sheet neatly folded inside. Busty’s Baits are still used today by locals in the Parry Sound area. Anglers lower it through a hole in the ice until it touches the bottom then give it a very hard pull upwards. When the bait descends, it falls with a large circular motion that fish cannot resist. Busty’s Baits are highly sought after and the value of one in the original box with paperwork would fetch $250 on today’s market. ?


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.&&C;H9KHO Š 2007, Mercury Marine, All Rights Reserved


When freelance writer and fishing guide, Ben Beattie, moved to Sioux Lookout a year ago he knew was facing a new fishing addiction – catching his first musky. After successfully guiding several clients to muskies, Ben knew it was only a matter of time before he would catch one for himself. It was early July and Ben was fishing with his friend, Cory McKeil, when Cory got snagged on a stump.Not wanting to waste valuable fishing time, Ben continued casting while Cory worked on freeing his bait. “I fired a cast towards the area we had already worked and got in about three cranks when this musky exploded on my Top-Raider. She hit it so hard that I didn't even have to set the hook! I remember yelling at Cory,‘put it in the net, put it in the net!’Cory still laughs at me because the fish was at least 20 yards out! My hands were shaking after Cory finally netted the fish – 49-inches of pure Lac Seul adrenalin! The hooks came out easily and after a quick measurement and a few photos we turned her loose to thrill another angler on another day. I guess I set the bar pretty high with my first muskie!”

30 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


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am 3:30 - 5:30 am 4:18 - 6:18 am pm 3:54 - 5:54 pm 4:42 - 6:42 pm am 9:57 - 11:27 am 10:45 - 12:15 am pm 10:21 - 11:51 pm 11:09 - 12:39 pm

am pm am pm

1:06 1:30 7:33 7:57 -

16

9:54 - 11:54 am 10:18 - 12:18 pm 4:21 - 5:51 am 4:45 - 6:15 pm

3:06 3:30 9:03 9:27

4:30 - 6:30 am 5:18 - 7:18 am 6:06 4:54 - 6:54 pm 5:42 - 7:42 pm 6:30 am 12:33 10:57 - 12:27 am NA 11:21 - 12:51 pm 12:09 - 1:39 pm 12:57 -

29

am pm am pm

am pm am pm

7:30 7:54 1:57 2:21 -

5:54 - 7:54 am 6:18 - 8:18 pm am NA 12:45 - 2:15 pm

29

9:06 - 11:06 9:30 - 11:30 3:33 - 5:03 3:57 - 5:27

3:06 3:30 9:03 9:27

am pm am pm

2

7:06 7:30 1:03 1:27

am pm am pm

8:18 - 10:18 8:42 - 10:42 2:45 - 4:15 3:09 - 4:39

1

4:18 - 6:18 am 5:06 4:42 - 6:42 pm 5:30 10:45 - 12:15 am 11:33 11:09 - 12:39 pm 11:57 -

10

am pm am pm

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am pm am pm

10:42 - 12:42 am 11:30 - 1:30 am NA 11:06 - 1:06 pm 11:54 - 1:54 pm 12:42 - 2:42 5:09 - 6:39 am 5:57 - 7:27 am 6:45 - 8:15 5:33 - 7:03 pm 6:21 - 7:51 pm 7:09 - 8:39

7

1:54 - 3:54 2:18 - 4:18 8:21 - 9:51 8:45 - 10:15

am pm am pm

9 7:06 7:30 1:03 1:27

am 3:30 - 5:30 am 4:18 - 6:18 am 5:06 pm 3:54 - 5:54 pm 4:42 - 6:42 pm 5:30 am 9:57 - 11:27 am 10:45 - 12:15 am 11:33 pm 10:21 - 11:51 pm 11:09 - 12:39 pm 11:57 -

9:30 9:54 3:27 3:51

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7:06 7:30 1:03 1:27

3

5:06 5:30 11:33 11:57 -

15

28

8:18 - 10:18 8:42 - 10:42 2:45 - 4:15 3:09 - 4:39

NA 12:42 - 2:42 6:45 - 8:15 7:09 - 8:39

am 9:54 - 11:54 am 10:42 - 12:42 am 11:30 - 1:30 am pm 10:18 - 12:18 pm 11:06 - 1:06 pm 11:54 - 1:54 pm am 4:21 - 5:51 am 5:09 - 6:39 am 5:57 - 7:27 am pm 4:45 - 6:15 pm 5:33 - 7:03 pm 6:21 - 7:51 pm

21

2:42 - 4:42 3:06 - 5:06 9:09 - 10:39 9:33 - 11:03

am pm am pm

8

14

9:06 - 11:06 9:30 - 11:30 3:33 - 5:03 3:57 - 5:27

27 9:30 9:54 3:27 3:51

10:42 - 12:42 am 11:30 - 1:30 am NA 11:06 - 1:06 pm 11:54 - 1:54 pm 12:42 - 2:42 5:09 - 6:39 am 5:57 - 7:27 am 6:45 - 8:15 5:33 - 7:03 pm 6:21 - 7:51 pm 7:09 - 8:39

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7:06 7:30 1:03 1:27

am pm am pm

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1:54 - 3:54 2:18 - 4:18 8:21 - 9:51 8:45 - 10:15

8

5:06 5:30 11:33 11:57 -

13

8:18 - 10:18 8:42 - 10:42 2:45 - 4:15 3:09 - 4:39

7:30 7:54 1:57 2:21 -

7

am 3:30 - 5:30 am 4:18 - 6:18 am pm 3:54 - 5:54 pm 4:42 - 6:42 pm am 9:57 - 11:27 am 10:45 - 12:15 am pm 10:21 - 11:51 pm 11:09 - 12:39 pm

19

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11:30 - 1:30 11:54 - 1:54 5:57 - 7:27 6:21 - 7:51

7

7:30 7:54 1:57 2:21 -

6

2:42 - 4:42 3:06 - 5:06 9:09 - 10:39 9:33 - 11:03

12 9:30 9:54 3:27 3:51

17

2

11:30 - 1:30 11:54 - 1:54 5:57 - 7:27 6:21 - 7:51

10:06 - 12:06 am 10:54 - 12:54 am 10:30 - 12:30 pm 11:18 - 1:18 pm 4:33 - 6:03 am 5:21 - 6:51 am 4:57 - 6:27 pm 5:45 - 7:15 pm

32 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

WEDNESDAY

1

NA 12:42 - 2:42 6:45 - 8:15 7:09 - 8:39

FEBRUARY

TUESDAY

Excellent Time

10

MARCH

Best Fishing Times 2010

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SUNDAY

am pm am pm

20

26

am pm am pm

27 am pm am pm


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F ISH F OR E VER F UNDRAI

An Evening in Support of Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Photos by Rolly Astrom

Chief Administrative Officer of the Police Association of Ontario, Ron Middel (R), and Mark Harrison of Canadian Tire (L) renew their commitment to the Kids, Cops and Canadian Tire Fishing Days program.

Searching for deals at the silent auction table

34 Real Fishing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Winter 2010

Fish For Ever Ambassador Award Winner Frank Turnbull


ISING

D INNER & A UCTION

Recreational Fisheries Michael Burgess and Jessica Lane perform the National Anthem

Rick Weatherill of The Canadian Bass Anglers Federation makes a donation to Fish For Ever

Wayne Mariko and Jocelyne Izumi

Nelson Murikami of Natural Sports and Tina Deutsch of The Canadian Sportfishing Industry Association

Wib Willows is all smiles after winning the eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s raffle prize of a Lund Boat and Mercury Motor

Fish For Ever Ambassador Award Winner Sergeant Brian Eadie

Winter 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Real Fishing 35


10 Steps to Ice Fishing Success By Howard Martin

Each year around November or December, Canadian anglers are faced with the task of storing their boats and tackle as winter moves in and ice locks down the lakes and rivers. For some, the next five-months are spent tinkering with gear, shopping for new fishing supplies, watching fishing shows and generally doing anything remotely fishing related as a means to stay sane until the spring. For others, the arrival of winter signals the beginning of a whole new fishing season. Snowmobiles and ATVs take the place of boats; long rods give way to short jigging sticks and chopping or drilling holes through the ice replaces casting as the method of offering baits to fish.

36 Real Fishing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Winter 2010


Ice anglers routinely head out to groups of huts or packs of other anglers and assume that those are the hotspots.

Despite the obvious differences, the basics of ice fishing are really no different than for open water fishing. The goal of finding and ultimately catching fish is the same, regardless of the season, and many of the same principles still apply. The fact that the water is hard instead of soft shouldn’t make a difference in how anglers approach ice fishing but in a lot of cases it does. For example, a great number of winter anglers seem happy to plunk a shack out on the ice and call it home until the spring thaw rather than moving from spot to spot as is common when fishing from a boat or walking a shoreline. They fish with one or two ice rods or tip ups - regardless of the species or technique they are using - and they often use just a couple of approaches, generally a set line and a jigging line. Instead of studying the lake and planning an effective approach, ice fishers routinely head out to the groups of huts or packs of other anglers and assume that those are the hotspots. Occasionally these folks will enjoy some good fishing but more often they will have much less success than they do at other times of the year. The main reason is that their approach to winter fishing is inefficient compared to their open water system. With that said, all it takes is a little attention to detail and some refinements in techniques and tactics for anyone to increase their success on the ice.

PLAN YOUR ATTACK • Open water anglers go bass fishing, pike fishing, perch fishing or some other species-specific type of fishing – they almost never just go “fishing.” On the other hand, ice fishermen tend to go ice fishing – there’s rarely a species mentioned. Without some idea of what the target 38 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

species is, how can anyone know what lake to select, where to fish once they get there or what type of tackle to bring? Before heading out for a day of ice fishing it’s always a good idea to have a species or two in mind, whether you are going to a favourite lake or heading to a new one. • Pull out your paper or electronic lake charts and highlight some of the areas that

will attract the species you’re after. Some of the best winter anglers will mark dropoffs, rockpiles, flats and other areas on their gps units during the open water season so they can return to the exact spots once ice covers the lake. This simple step can help eliminate huge expanses of water and let you focus your fishing on a few, key locations. • Ready your gear according to the lake and species you’ve chosen so you’ve got everything you need and none of what you don’t. A four-inch auger, an ultralight rod and a handful of micro jigs may be ideal for perch fishing but you’ll need a bigger hole in the ice, bigger baits and tougher tackle if trophy pike or lake trout are the quarry. • Try to get some recent fishing information from websites, tackle shops or a buddy who fishes the lake you’re heading to. You’ll get a sense of the ice conditions, how well the fish are biting, what type of approach is working and maybe even an area of the lake to try.

Calling ahead can give you a head’s up on the fishing as well as on the ice conditions.


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BE MOBILE • You’ve got to get to the fish before you can catch them so being able to move yourself and your gear around is a key to ice fishing success. Whether you walk, ski, snowmobile or ride an ATV doesn’t matter as much as the fact that you are prepared to move if the fish aren’t cooperating. Mobility may mean fishing 20 holes drilled along a few hundred feet of a breakline for 15-minutes each, it may mean fishing for two or three minutes in each of 50 holes cut across a weed flat or it may mean heading 10-miles across the lake to a completely new area.

The ultimate in ice fishing mobility .

are going to be cutting dozens of holes during the course of the day. Let’s face it, if you’re exhausted after cutting a few holes in one area you’re probably not going to want to move every half-hour to drill more. You’ll likely hunker down and decide to wait them out which is, of course, the opposite of being mobile. • A sled or portable ice hut are both ideal for transporting your equipment from place to place. Depending on their size, these can be hauled manually or behind a motorized vehicle. Obviously the main limiting factor here is weight and your means of transportation. • While a power auger weighs more than a manual version, it’s well worth it if you

STAY COMFORTABLE • Cold, wet feet and frozen fingers do not make for a pleasant ice fishing outing. Frostbite and hypothermia are always a danger and can lead to serious medical problems if not treated quickly. The best way to deal with them is to avoid them by wearing appropriate cold weather clothing and waterproof footwear. A flotation or 40 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

survival suit is ideal for ice fishing. If you don’t have one, dress in several layers so you can add or remove clothing as needed. • A portable shelter and heater can take the chill of even the coldest fishing day. There are many sizes and designs of portable huts on the market or you can make your own from plywood and a heavy duty tarpaulin. Keep weight in mind whether you’re buying a commercial shelter or making your own, especially if you will be pulling it while walking.


and whether the bait you’re using is attracting or repelling the fish. • For the ultimate in underwater sight, you can’t beat an underwater camera. With one of these you will be able to see the bottom composition, the health of weeds and possibly even fish. Besides being useful tools, underwater cameras can be a whole lot of fun, especially when you can see a fish’s response to your bait and watch it hit.

BE VERSATILE

• Walking around on the ice and cutting dozens of holes can tire you out in short order. To keep your energy level up, pack some warm drinks and some high energy food. It’s amazing how rejuvenated you’ll feel after a quick snack break.

• Versatility is all about changing location, presentation, baits or any other aspect of fishing as the situation dictates. That could mean going to a different size, weight or colour of bait; it could mean fishing deeper or shallower water; it could mean a change in presentation or even a switch in species if your target fish are not cooperating. If what you are doing isn’t working it’s a sign to change something or risk going home fishless. • Different fishing conditions call for different setups and you should be prepared by carrying a selection of gear to match the mood of the fish. The rod and line you use for tempting lake trout with big, flashy spoons will be far too heavy for finessing lightweight tube baits or presenting a minnow on a dropshot. Regardless of species, you should always be ready with a selection of rods and lines that will properly handle a variety of baits for the species you are targeting.

SEE UNDERWATER • Electronics are an angler’s best friend and that’s as true in the winter as it is in the summer. In fact, electronics may be more important in the winter since you don’t have the option to make repeated casts or use a trolling motor to work along structure. Most good sonars will read through the ice so you can position yourself precisely before you start cutting holes. Sonar units can also alert you if a fish moves into the area you’re fishing. With a little practice you can actually watch how the fish responds to your presentation on the screen. This can give you valuable information on their location in the water column, their mood, 42 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

• Along with jigging sticks for aggressive fish, a couple of tip-ups can be invaluable for live bait duties and should be part of any ice fishing arsenal. There are models that will catch the wind and jig for you while others will hold your line stationary. Some come with spools to hold your line while others are designed for line to be wrapped around the tip-up’s body. The main factors in deciding which style of tipups to use are the size of your quarry and the type of presentation you want to use.

TRY EXPERIMENTING • Ice anglers often get stuck in a rut by using their pet baits or favourite techniques every time they go out. While there’s nothing wrong with using what works, a little experimenting might lead to even better catches. This is especially true when the fish are biting well. Aggressive fish are more likely to hit a wider range of baits presented in a number of different ways so your chances of success with a new or A walleye jig was just the thing to tempt this chunky lake trout.


untried approach are higher when the fish are hot. Success will add confidence and the more confidence you have with a variety of tactics the more versatile an angler you will be. If you never try anything new you could miss out on some great fishing. • If the fish are hitting small jigs, try going to a slightly bigger one. Big baits catch big fish and a simple change from a 1/8-ounce jig to a 1/4-ounce model may up the average size of your catch. Conversely, a change from a heavier to a lighter bait may be just the ticket if the fish are in a neutral or negative mood. A change in colour or jig style can often tempt additional fish to bite after the action has slowed. If you’re using live minnows, experiment with different types and sizes until the fish tell you what they prefer. • Vary your jigging approach to determine the mood of the fish. Sometimes they want a fast, aggressive action while at other times a slight jiggle or even a deadstick approach will be better. • Along with changing baits, experimenting also means trying different locations. That could be moving from six to twelve-feet of

water or it could mean fishing in the middle of a weed flat instead of on the edge.

LIGHTEN UP • No matter what species you’re fishing for, a stealthy approach is almost always the best approach. Try to use the lightest line and the most sensitive jigging rod you can get away with. • If you need to use heavier line to tackle big

fish, consider going to fluorocarbon. It’s virtually invisible in the water meaning you can go much heavier line without spooking the fish. • For even greater sensitivity, especially in deep water, no-stretch lines excel. Tie on a three to five-foot fluorocarbon leader and you’ve got the best of both worlds – a super strong and sensitive main line along with an undetectable leader.

Whitefish are often caught with set lines and minnows but this one fell for an aggressively worked jig and soft bait combination.

Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 43


FISH WITH FRIENDS

STAY SAFE

• Ice fishing is always more fun when you share it with someone. It helps lessen the workload of hauling gear and it makes drilling holes a lot easier too! • You can be much more versatile as a group than you can on your own. It’s easier and more efficient to determine where the fish are and what they’re biting if several anglers work an area as a team.

• It goes without saying that safety on the ice should be everyone’s first concern. That starts by knowing the ice and weather conditions and by planning your trip accordingly. • Let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return. If you have a cellular or satellite phone, be sure it’s fully charged and is included in your

Covering large areas of frozen water is easier and more efficient if you work as a team.

• Having someone to talk to and to plan strategy with is always better than doing it on your own. It helps you avoid getting in a rut and it may open up a whole new approach that you hadn’t considered.

Be alert to the ice conditions and be extremely cautious around current areas or incoming creeks.

gear kit. These can be lifesavers in emergencies and they also offer peace of mind knowing that help is just a call away. • Be extremely cautious if you are traveling on unknown lakes or if you head off of the main trails. If you’re on a motorized vehicle, keep your speed at a level where you can stop in a hurry if you need to. Tempting fate is not a wise decision when you’re literally walking or driving on water. • When you are finished fishing for the day, do the other anglers a favour and mark your abandoned holes with a stick or tree branch.

HELP THE ENVIRONMENT • When the ice melts, everything left on top of it will eventually make its way into the lake so remember to pack your trash out with you. 44 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

• Try to avoid oil or gas spills on the lake by topping up snowmobiles, ATVs, augers and heaters on shore. • Don’t dump leftover minnows down the hole unless they were caught in the same lake you’re fishing. In fact, you shouldn’t even be using live bait unless it was caught from the same waterbody you are fishing. Your baitfish can transfer parasites and diseases to native species and they may

even establish themselves in the lake. Besides that, it’s illegal to transfer live fish or spawn from one waterbody to another without the authorization of the Ministry of Natural Resources. Ice fishing is a great way to feed your fishing fever through the winter no matter how serious you are about it. From hardcore angling for trophy fish to relaxing while catching panfish, spending time outdoors in the winter with a hook and line can be just the cure for an angler’s winter blues. Hopefully these tips will help make your next ice fishing experience a successful one. ?


Canada’s Rare

Rare {adj.}: thin; not dense; uncommon Back in grade 11 history class my mind was not on Webster’s definition of rare, but on world record walleye, huge lake trout and an undisclosed anatomical part of the girl sitting in front of me, when I heard two words that would chart a course for my fishing life.

46 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


Fish

“Billy Tkachyk was fishing up the Cedar Narrows road last weekend and he found this little pot-hole lake that has a rare stain of walleye,” whispered my buddy Wes, who was sitting behind me. Upon hearing the words “rare” and “walleye,” I immediately snapped out of my semi-conscious state and tilted my head back so as not to miss a word. “He doesn’t know what it is, but these

By Jeff Holmlund Map illustration by Heather D. Holmlund

walleye are blue and it seems to be in the mucus on their skin,” Wes continued. The vast, unused portion of my teenage brain was instantly filled by a flood of questions. What was it that gave these fish their blue colour? Was it from the water? Were they the same as a normal walleye? How big were they? Where could we catch these rare fish? By the time school was out that day we had launched our first expedition in

search of the rare blue walleye. Since that day in school, over 30-years ago, I have waded muskeg bogs, braved mosquito-infested forests and even gotten lost in the bush, traveling the north in a quest to find this rare fish. Not only have I found blue walleye but I have encountered several other rare fish throughout Canada. Here’s a brief look at some of them and how you can go about catching one of them for yourself.

Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 47


INCONNU Have you ever dreamed of a trip to Canada’s Arctic or sub-Arctic regions to fish for a rare fish that possesses tremendous fighting ability and that few people have seen, let alone caught? If so, you are like an increasing number of anglers who are heading north to try their luck on the largest member of the whitefish family, the inconnu, known as the “Tarpon of the North.”

FISHING FACTS -

INCONNU • The Yukon Territory requires anglers to have a sport fishing license while fishing and there is a limit of one Inconnu over eight-inches in length. Barbless hooks are recommended.

BLUE WALLEYE Genetically identical to a golden walleye, the blue walleye is lacking in yellow skin pigment and is covered in blue mucus. This color forms on the dorsal part of the body and is particularly noticeable on the two dorsal fins and the upper part of the tail. The mucous is more prevalent during the summer than in the winter although ice fishermen report seeing blue stains on the snow were a fish has been lying. This blue pigment in the mucus is a protein that carries a product secreted in the urine of all

FISHING FACTS -

BLUE WALLEYE • The Blue walleye is genetically identical to the yellow walleye and is covered under general provincial walleye regulations. World record: 25-pounds Secret weapon: jig and minnow

48 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

vertebrate animals and forms when the sun’s ultraviolet rays break down the protein. This same compound acts as a sunscreen in some species of animals. Dr. Wayne Schafer, who is studying the blue walleye, speculates walleyes use the very chemical that forms in their blood from too much sun as a sunscreen. “We have fishermen now who are targeting the blue walleye exclusively,” says Northern Wilderness Outfitter’s Vic Davis. “We get calls from across the country and the USA from fishermen wanting to book a trip for these rare fish.” Blue walleyes are found intermingled with schools of yellow walleyes in scattered, isolated lakes from the eastern Manitoba border across northern Ontario and into Quebec. Some fishermen say they fight harder and school more densely than yellow walleye but they are the same fish so to catch them, use the same walleye techniques you normally would. Over the years my personal favourite bait for blue walleye is a blue jighead tipped with a minnow or a leech.

• In British Columbia, a non tidal license with a classified water license is required. There are regional regulations in place for region six (an area where Inconnu are found) that include a one fish limit and a requirement that only barbless hooks be used. • The Northwest Territories require a sport fishing license and there is a daily limit of five fish. • Great Slave Lake and its tributaries impose a daily limit of one, with two in possession. World record: 53-pounds Secret weapon: Williams Wabler “We might only catch eight or ten of these fish per season,” says long time Inconnu Lodge guide Ken Richardson, “but that’s exactly why, with seven species of fish calling this part of the Yukon home, it’s the first species on our guests’ lists.” The inconnu, as it was named by early explorers, means “unknown fish” in French. It is also known as the sheefish. Found in the Yukon, Pelly, Peel and Teslin river systems as well as in the Mackenzie


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Delta, they are a big, powerful fish that can weigh up to 30-pounds. The streamlined body is covered with large, silvery coloured scales with a darker colouring on the dorsal surface giving the fish a phosphorescent, purplish sheen. Its strong, extended lower jaw is longer than the upper jaw and sports a large mouth which is full of teeth that are used to feed on any available smaller fish. “Being fall spawners, late summer is the time to catch a truly giant inconnu,” adds Richardson. Try casting the back eddies, river mouths and inlets of creeks, with medium action spinning or bait casting gear and 10 to 20pound test line. Casting with gold or silver spoons, spinners, Daredevils or Len Thompson’s; drift fishing with rubber tailed or marabou jigs; offering minnow imitations or fly casting large white or silver streamers all work on these elusive biters. When you hook into one of these bottom feeders hang on because they head straight for the surface and when they jump they literally explode out of the water.

50 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

AURORA TROUT Perhaps one of Canada’s rarest fish, and an example of how man can affect nature both positively and negatively, is a subspecies of the brook trout known as the Aurora trout. Originally found in only two lakes in northeastern Ontario (White Pine and Whirligig) the Aurora was all but wiped out by acid rain in the early 1960s. Whether by luck or determination, nine adult fish were saved by the Ministry of Natural resources and fish from that original brood stock carry on the ancestral line of the Aurora trout today. Some fish are hard to catch and some are hard fighting but the Aurora trout is a species you want to catch for its sheer beauty. Auroras have no spots and a coloration ranging from olive-green to dark brown on the back, iridescent steel blue and silver on the sides and bright, fluorescent orange along the belly. A subspecies of the brook trout, the Aurora trout’s life history is similar. Its average size ranges from one to three-pounds with the largest growing up to seven-pounds.

FISHING FACTS -

AURORA TROUT • Considered a species at risk, Ontario imposes a one fish per day catch limit on Aurora trout. You can keep the fish or you can let it go but once you have caught one you are not allowed to fish for the rest of the day on that lake. • An Ontario outdoors card and full sport fishing license are required – anglers cannot fish for Aurora trout with a conservation license. • Aurora trout lakes are open annually on a rotating basis. The season generally runs from August 1st to September 15th. World record: 4-pounds 14-ounces Secret weapon: Panther Martin spinner


Fishing in the Aurora trout’s natural and refuge lakes is closed, but the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources has instituted a trophy trout fishing program in nine Northeastern Ontario lakes that have been stocked with Aurora trout. Three of these lakes are open to catch and keep angling on a rotational basis each year. The Aurora trout season generally runs from August 1 to October 15 with a daily catch and possession limit of one fish but check the regulations for the particular lake you plan to fish before heading out. When caught from deep water in the midsummer Aurora trout can be susceptible to barotrauma and temperature shock, hence the catch and keep policy. They’re ravenous eaters and are known to eat half their body weight in minnows, worms, leeches, crustaceans, aquatic insects, terrestrial insects, spiders, molluscs, frogs, salamanders and a number of fish species. One of the best methods to use if you are targeting Aurora trout is to cast small spinners or to use techniques you would use while fishing for brook trout.

52 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

BULL TROUT When it comes to fishing for bull trout, remember the saying, “No black put it back.” Unlike other trout, the bull has no black spots and is open to catch and release fishing only. Often mistaken for the Dolly Varden, bull trout are now considered a separate member of the char family. They are found throughout the Rocky Mountain river systems of British Columbia, Alberta and the Yukon Territory. “It’s special when you catch a bull trout,” says Canmore Alberta guide, Nick Schlachter. “In many respects it’s an extremely important species. Like the grizzly bear, it’s an indicator species, indicating the health of our environment.” Alberta’s provincial fish, the bull trout has an olive-green to grey back and silvery sides. There are pale yellow, orange and red spots on the back and the fins have white leading edges typical of chars. Its head and mouth are unusually large and fully grown bull trout can weigh up to 32-pounds. Bull trout may be either migratory, moving throughout large river systems, lakes,

FISHING FACTS -

BULL TROUT • The bull trout is a threatened species in Alberta and is of special concern in British Columbia. • In Alberta, bull trout anglers require a provincial fishing license and the fishing is catch and release only. Barbless hooks are required. • In the Yukon there is a two fish limit with one allowed to be over 20-inches. • British Columbia regulations require a non-tidal and a classified water license. There are regional regulations as well, with daily limits ranging from zero to three. • In the Northwest Territories a license is required, there is a daily limit of two and barbless hooks are the rule. World record: 32-pounds Secret weapon: Kamlooper spoon


and the ocean; or they may be resident, remaining in the same stream for their entire lives. To catch bull trout you should fish the deep, cold areas of lakes or clean gravel beds, snags and cutbacks in large rivers. Some of the top lures include Kamloopers, Buzz Bombs, Little Cleo’s, a variety of crank baits and silver streamer flies.

GOLDEN TROUT High in the Rocky Mountains of southwestern Alberta is where you will find the golden trout, the crown jewel of the trout world. The most intensely coloured of all trout, the golden trout has an olive-green back, black spots above the lateral line and

FISHING FACTS -

GOLDEN TROUT • An Alberta fishing license is required as golden trout are found only on the eastern slopes in Alberta. • There is a size restriction and a limit of one. Depending on zone, a barbless hook rule may also apply. World record: 11-pounds Secret weapon: Buzz Bomb bright, red-to-gold sides and belly. Thriving in pristine, secluded mountain lakes above 5,000-feet elevation, guldens are rather small but highly sought after by the adventurous fishermen. Catching golden trout isn’t about size; it’s about the adventure of targeting such a rare and beautiful fish in the surroundings of the majestic Rocky Mountain wilderness. “Shortly after we were married I took my new wife hiking up in the Crowsnest Pass area to three remote little lakes that held golden trout,” says ex-fishery research tech-

nician, James Weibe. “You could see a big school of them through the crystal clear water but we couldn’t entice a bite. After a night camped out we tried again but, despite trying everything in my tackle box, we still couldn’t get a bite. Finally around noon, after tying on a stone fly nymph, the largest fish in the school hit. After a short battle I landed a 2.1-pound beauty which turned out to be the largest golden trout caught that year in Alberta.” The golden trout’s main forage is aquatic insects and freshwater shrimp so if you are fly casting it’s wise to match the hatch. Spin casting with small Buzz Bombs, silver or gold spoons and spinners is also effective. When you are fishing for golden trout you have to stay alert because when they finally decide it’s time to feed they like to hit on the drop. Remember that barbless hooks are the rule in Alberta and single hooks help in the release of this beautiful fish. Oh, did I mention to wear good hiking boots if you plan on fishing for golden trout? Trust me; you will need them to access the remote lakes where they live. Golden trout are found in only five lakes in Canada, west of Rocky Mountain House and in the Crowsnest Pass area. And don’t forget bear spray as golden trout live deep in the heart of grizzly country.

GRASS PICKEREL Overlooked for some of the more glamorous rare fish, the diminutive Grass Pickerel is a handful on ultra-light tackle. Often mistaken for a juvenile pike or musky, its gill covers are fully scaled with six to eight submandibular pores on the underside of the jaw and a black teardrop below its eye. It has a pale to dark green upper surface, a rusty brown stripe down the back and several thin, dark, wavy vertical bars on the sides. The fins are dusky to amber in colour with black leading edges. Grass pickerel are found in three sections of the St. Lawrence River as well as in lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron, St. Clair and the Severn River system. This fish is a top predator and hunts by sight, either stalking or ambushing its preferred prey. Young fish feed primarily on insects while adults target other fish. Try fishing in shallow warm bays or slow moving creeks that have an abundance of vegetation. Ramp down the size of the same

lures you would use for pike to get into some fun action with this rambunctious little battler. Some people might ask why would you include the Grass Pickerel, a fish that rarely grows longer than 10 inches, in a rare fish story. I counter with, why not. The Grass Pickerel is rare; it is accessible, and so what if it’s not big.

FISHING FACTS -

GRASS PICKEREL • Grass Pickerel are covered in the Ontario and Quebec sport fishing regulations under northern pike • Considered a species at risk, the standard Ontario limit on grass pickerel is six, the conservation limit is two. In Quebec you can keep between six and 10 fish depending on which zone you are fishing in. World record: 1-pound Secret weapon: Miniature red and white Dardevle

Fishing for rare fish doesn’t have to be about size or numbers. It’s about the intangibles in fishing, things like rekindling your sense of adventure, having a fishing goal and a sense of purpose to the trip. It’s about the location and visiting that one special place you have always dreamed of fishing. It’s about the company you fish with - your friends, family and relatives are vital and enhance every catch. It’s about targeting, planning and executing a fishing trip for a rare species. Most importantly, it’s about conserving, protecting and enjoying catching Canada’s rare fish. ?

Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 53


WINTER STEELHEAD By Naoto Aoki

54 Real Fishing – Winter 2010


For most of us in Ontario, November brings the end to another fishing season. Rods are put away, boats are stored for the winter, and we start thinking about hard water fishing. I do enjoy ice fishing from time to time; however, for me it’s just not the same. There’s something about fighting a fish in open water that nothing can compare to. It would be a long and cold winter if it wasn’t for one thing… winter steelhead!

Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 55


The first rains of November bring a wave of chrome and silver into Great Lakes tributaries and from that point forth, until the runs peak in the spring, I live and breathe steelhead! Their sheer speed and power along with their beauty - bright silver with hues of pink, red and purple - make them one of Ontario’s finest game fish yet far too few people take advantage of this incredible fishery. Perhaps it’s because of the cold weather or the difficulty involved in fooling one, or maybe people just don’t realize such a fishery exists throughout the entire winter. One thing’s for sure though, once you catch your first steelhead; you’ll be hooked for life! There’s a perception that steelhead are extremely difficult to catch. You’ll be standing alongside a deep pool with half a dozen fish a rod-length away and none of them will show the slightest sign of interest. Yes, just as with any other fish, steelhead turn on and off throughout each day and are capa-

ble of being completely locked-jawed. However, if you follow a few basic steps they can be a fairly simple and extremely rewarding fish to hook - although landing them can be a whole deferent story! Whether you’re fly fishing, float fishing or throwing small spinners or cranks, there’s one rule that I find to be more important than all the others and that’s to use light line. Not doing so is one of the biggest and most common mistakes that first time steelhead anglers make. Even if the water clarity is low, I run no heavier than five-pound fluorocarbon as my leader. 56 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

In the dead of winter, when the water is low and clear, I’ll use three-pound test line and have, on occasion, even used two-pound. It’s true that you will lose fish with line that light, but I would rather hook and lose a fish than never roll one all day long! With light line it’s important to become familiar with its breaking point. Threepound test seems much too light for a fish that can reach double digits in weight yet if you max out the line’s strength and capacity you will have the fish landed in no time. Many anglers who run as much as eight to 10-pound test never put three-pounds of pressure on a fish! Fluorocarbon is the key; not only is it next to invisible in the water, it’s much more durable than monofilament

and that can be the difference between landing and losing a huge steelhead. The next, and equally important, part to successful steelheading is allowing your fly or bait to get down to the fish while drifting naturally through the current. Especially in cold water situations, steelhead are reluctant to move more than a few inches from side to side and most certainly won’t come up in the water column to consume even the tastiest of meals. This means that whatever you’re presenting to the fish must be next to perfect. Add small BB split shot to your line until you are drifting through the water while occasionally bumping along bottom. Once you achieve this drift, you know you’re in the zone. As long as you’re using light line and you’re drifting naturally down amongst the fish, the rest is easy. Steelhead will eat almost anything that is small, from roe to insects to small baitfish but float fishing with roe is certainly the most usual method of catching them here in Ontario. Most serious steelheaders tie their own roe bags as this allows them to control the size of bags they’re using. In cold water conditions single eggs are often the most productive. Adding fish oils to your roe can also pay dividends on those slow days on the water. The nice thing about float fishing is that it allows you to make huge, long drifts in the slow moving water which often holds fish through the winter months. Any deep, slow moving water with structure near the


mouth of the lake will usually have steelhead and is a great place to start if you’re new to winter steelhead fishing. Any warmer weather during the winter months brings along with it snow melt which, of course, creates runoff. This raises the water levels which in turn brings the steelhead further up into the rivers. Make sure you have a good understanding of the regulations before you go venturing too far from the lakes though as different rivers have different “extended” or “all year” seasons in certain sections. Because the water is usually clear at this time of the year, sight fishing is a definite possibility. Invest in a good pair of polarized sunglasses and take full advantage of the clear conditions. As mentioned earlier, the fish will hold in any sort of deep pocket or pool with structure and should be more than willing to eat! Float fishing is a great choice for these conditions; however, the longer the fish are in the rivers, the more aware they become of float fisherman. Steelhead can quickly become wise about roe and other artificial scented baits. It is for this reason that fly fishing is often the best method when you’re faced with pressured fish. As smolts, steelhead spend their first couple of years gorging on insects and when they return to the rivers as adults their old feeding habits return with

them. Drifting small nymph patterns can be incredible! More times than I can remember I’ve stood there with float fishermen all around me as I hooked fish after fish on a fly rod! Very few anglers fish with flies for steelhead and if they do their flies are usually rather large and of a more common type, such as an egg sucking leech. Don’t be afraid to go small! I have had great days on flies as small as a number 18 glass bead scud. Normally though, I’ll use either number 12 or 14 bead head nymphs. In low and clear water a size 14 bead head prince nymph is my go-to fly! I’ve caught more steelhead on this fly than any other fly in my boxes. The key to presenting a fly properly is to weight your line enough to get your fly down to the fish while still allowing it to drift naturally through the current. I usually add a few small split shot around 12inches up the line and in most situations this is perfect.

sounds simple, but applying it on the water is harder than it sounds! Allow the fish to run - it’s incredible how fast these fish can move especially once the water warms up a degree or two! Unlike the early fall and spring steelhead fisheries, first light is often not the most ideal time to hit the water in the winter. Allowing the sun to warm the water even the smallest amount can really get the fish going. Wake up, make a coffee, have a nice big breakfast and then head out for a day on the water - there’s no rush to get to the river too early. More often than not there are only a handful of other people fishing (even in central Ontario) during the winter months so you don’t have to worry about beating the crowds. We’re very lucky to have a world class steelhead fishery in Ontario that’s available to us all winter long, so don’t allow the winter blues to sink in. There’s no reason to go for months without picking up a rod. Put on some warm clothes and make

There’s a bit of a trick to setting the hook with a fly rod as well. Remember that when using light line it’s important not to over set the hook, yet still snap it hard enough to get a solid hook-set. Normally when a fish is hooked it will go crazy and it’s important not to put too much pressure on the fish at first. Allow it to make its initial run before really putting the boots to it or more than likely you’ll break the fish off. This was a mistake I made for a long time in my younger years and it took me a while to figure out exactly what was happening. It

your way down to one of the Great Lakes’ tributaries and try your hand at steelheading. Remember these few tips while you’re out there and you’ll be sure to hook into fish! Keep in mind that these are a beautiful and valuable fish that deserve to be handled carefully. Practice good catch and release techniques to ensure that the fishing will be just as bright for future generations. Good luck and enjoy the winter steelhead season! ?

Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 57


FISH FOR EVER FOUNDATION UPDATE On October 20, 2009, some 500 people attended the Fish For Ever Dinner and Auction to celebrate and support recreational angling in Ontario. Thanks to the generous donations from dozens of conservation minded organizations and individuals the auction tables were filled with wonderful items for sportsmen, campers and outdoor enthusiasts. The bidding was fast and furious and at the end of the evening nearly every item had been sold. All of the monies raised will now be earmarked for various fisheries related projects

to ensure the future of Ontario’s fish populations and to provide angling opportunities today and for the future. For more on the Fish For Ever Dinner and Auction, take a look at the photo spread on pages 34 – 35 of this issue. To learn about the Fish For Ever organization, visit their website at www.fishforever.ca. ?

A special thank you to all of the generous sponsors of the 2009 Fishing For Ever Dinner and Auction Advanced Taxidermy & Wildlife Design

Linear Response

Angling Outfitters

Lund Boats

Artitexture/ Louise L’Abbe

Mangrove Cay Club

Bass Pro Shops Boaterexam.com Bradley Smokers Caledonia Bait and Tackle

Mark Alford Mercury Marine Mitten Vinyl Natural Sports Navionics

Canadian Tire

Normark

Canadian Home Workshop

OFAH

Canadian Sport Fishing Industry Association

Outdoor Canada Magazine

Orion Capital

Coleman Canada

Patterned Concrete Ontario

Columbia Sportswear

pH Japan Lure

Cottage Life

Pure Fishing

Coyote's Run Estate Winery

Queen’s University/Dr. Bruce Tufts

Curtis Atwater Diamond Key Resort

Richard McCrory, Optimus Ltd.

Dr. John Pepper

Rob Hyatt Outdoors

Drifter II Charters

Rolly Astrom

Fergie Jenkins Foundation

Ron & Mike Bauman

Graham Sanborn Media Ltd Grand River Fishing Charters Graywood Sporting Group Inc. Grimsby Tackle Horizon Plastics

Royal Ready Mix & Construction SC Johnson Shimano Canada Skyler Canada Steel City Tool Works Canada Stephen Bates

Haworth’s

Stoeger Canada (1990) Ltd.

Izumi Outdoors Inc.

Sun Media

Jencor International

Taylor Made Home

Johnson Outdoors Canada Inc.

Tim Hortons

Kesagami Wilderness Lodge Kooy Brothers Lawn Equipment Ltd. KTL Canada Lakeside Logistics Langara Fishing Adventure La Réserve Beauchêne Le Baron Outdoor Products

58 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

Lowrance Canada

Transcontinental Media Tri-Con Concrete Finishing Turtle Creek Golf Club Turkstra Lumber WILSON'S Canada Fly Fishing Store Wolf Lake Lodge Yamaha Motor Company


Tales from the Road By Bob Izumi

As you’re reading this you’re probably either thinking about ice fishing up here in the North Country or heading somewhere warm in the sunny south. If you’re like me you’re probably doing a little bit of both. For a couple of years now Bryan Pollock, from eastern Ontario, and I have been talking about doing a show on vertical jigging for lake trout and late last summer I finally had a chance to take him up on his offer. I could not believe how productive, simple and downright fun this technique is. To make a long story short, I managed to get out with him for about 45-minutes one evening. I can’t count how many fish we got into but we landed, lost and missed a bunch of awesome lakers. Unfortunately we had some microphone issues that made the footage unusable but that’s a great reason to do this again next summer. I can’t wait to go back and next time I’m definitely going to give myself more than 45-minutes! Then my son, Darren, and I were off to a Renegade Bass tournament on Dog and Cranberry Lakes and for once we had the time to get a couple of days practice in. To have two full days on Dog and Cranberry lakes, an area I’d never fished before, was exciting and we were able to establish a number of patterns before the tournament started. The tournament started off great. I was

60 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

flipping a Texas Rigged black/blue Berkley Crazy Legs Chigger Craw and Darren was using the black Sabretail Tube. We were using fairly heavy weights and flipping into some pretty thick, deep weeds. Darren got the first fish, a 4-pounder, and after a high five we were back to fishing. About half an hour later Darren got another 4-pounder and I started thinking that it was turning into a pretty good day. Then he got another 4-pounder and I’m thinking that we’ve got a shot at winning this tournament. Then I got a hit, set the hook and landed a 13-incher. Then I got a 3 3/4-pounder. Over the rest of the day we caught a number of 2 1/2-pound fish and ended up in fourth place with just under 18-pounds. All in all it turned out to be a pretty good tournament. There’s definitely an advantage to spending a couple of days figuring out what the fish are doing! Then it was off to Langara Island Lodge in British Columbia for three days of fishing with the CEO of Columbia Sportswear, Tim Boyle, and the Canadian Marketing Manager, Jeff Timmins. Langara Island is located just south of the Alaskan border and is one of the most beautiful places in all of Canada. We ended up catching a number of Chinook and Coho salmon as well as a number of other critters including a salmon shark that Tim fought for over 45minutes before it finally severed his line. My son, Darren, got a break from shooting video and caught his largest fish to date, an 86-pound halibut. Overall this was an absolutely luxurious trip. From the floating chuckwagon that goes from boat to boat with coffee, pas-

tries, sandwiches, chocolate bars - you name it – to the gourmet meals and fine wine at the lodge to the guides and professional staff, this place is as 5-star as you can get for a wilderness fishing lodge. When I got back from Langara Island it was time to head to the two-day Renegade Bass classic on Big Rideau Lake. In threedays of practice and two-days of tournament fishing we did not get one 4-pound fish yet we still weighed in over 15-pounds a day. It was amazing to catch so many 2 to 3pound fish. We fished a number of patterns and caught fish on all of them. When it was all said and done we were happy to end up in 9th place overall. What I liked about the Renegade classic is that I walked away learning something new. The winners, Bryan Pollock and Crystal Brown, ended up catching their fish suspended over very deep water. The irony is that I was fishing with Bryan for lake trout two weeks before this tournament. At one point there were a couple of fish surfacing and I asked him if they were smallmouth and Bryan just grinned. I guess I know now why he was grinning! Big Jim McLaughlin is a fishing legend from the Ottawa Valley who has been battling prostate cancer for the last couple of years. To help support Big Jim, the Canadian Professional Anglers Association, Shimano and a number of other partners put on a two-day event in Kingston called the Big Jim Showdown. This is a fun-filled, two-day pro-am type tournament where we take a number of members of our Canadian military and other amateur anglers out fishing. It’s the professional angling community’s way of showing support for a genuinely great guy. I was quite happy finishing in sixth place but even more so for being able to help support this great cause. Then it was up to Bark Lake in Haliburton to host a fishing day for some prize winners from contests held by BoaterExam.com and OFF! Deep Woods. Everybody had a great time and I think all of the winners caught some smallmouth and walleyes.


A nice rainbow trout taken from a small lake in the Muskoka region.

My personal highlight of this trip was the fact that Paul and Mark were so organized. These guys are the most detail oriented people I have ever met in my life. I’m talking about planning exactly what lake we would fish each day and how we would approach it; having all of the equipment organized and leaving very little room for anything to go wrong. For example, when I took the Lund jon boat off of the trailer I realized that I didn’t have the plug for it. Of course Mark had a spare plug in his vehicle. These guys looked after all of the finer details, including the meals. We’re talking lobster, filet mignon, lamb and several different types of pies. The only thing they couldn’t control was the weather. I have to say that Paul and Mark are my type of guys to go fishing with. Then it was down to Lake Erie with Derek Then I was off to Muskoka for three days Strub to fish a couple of the Competitive to fish a number of small lakes with Sport Fishing League’s one-day wild card G.Loomis field staffers, Paul Shibata and bass tournaments out of Chippewa Creek on Mark Fuller. On this particular outing we the Niagara River. Our game plan was to fish decided that we were going to fish for as deep on Lake Erie for big smallmouth bass many species as we could but the weather but high winds had the water churned up was going to be a big challenge. It was pretty good. In fact, visibility was about a absolutely miserable with high winds and tenth of what it normally is which made for rain. Despite the weather we got out for very tough fishing. We ended up getting a brook trout, rainbow trout, muskies and couple of top-ten finishes but were far from some coincidental smallmouth bass that we happy with our performance. Overall caught while we were fishing for muskies. though, it was great getting out with Derek Even though we faced some of the most and having fun for a couple of days. The next day was Thanksgiving and I took challenging conditions you could imagine, we ended up getting a couple of shows shot. the day off and spent it with my family. Then it was time for the annual One of several coincidental Fish For Ever Dinner and smallmouth bass that were caught while musky fishing. Auction. We hold this unique dinner event every year in October as a way to raise funds for our fisheries. This year’s dinner was attended by over 450 people and went off very well despite the tough economic times. At the end of October my brother, Wayne, and I decided we would get into the Bass Pro Shops Lake Simcoe Open. This one-day tournament is held in late October every year on Lake Simcoe.

The weights for the top five or ten teams are usually astronomical but things really drop off after that and many teams finish this event with a big, fat zero. I don’t want to dwell on this too much, so I’ll just say that Wayne and I ended up in the latter category. I can’t remember the last time we blanked in a tournament. It seemed like you were either on the fish or you were on another planet and I think we had definitely touched down on some remote, bass-less planet. After the Simcoe tournament fellow Renegade Bass competitor, Robert Greenberg, joined me for a day of smallmouth bass fishing on Lake Erie. Even though the water was still murky, we ended up catching a number of fish in the 3 to 5-pound plus category. This was Robert’s first trip on the big pond and I think he was quite impressed. Then I was off to Edmonton for the grand opening of the new South Edmonton locaWith over 50,000 square feet of hunting, fishing and camping equipment,Wholesale Sports is an outdoor lover’s dream store.

tion of Wholesale Sports; over 50,000 square feet of nothing but hunting, fishing and camping equipment. What a beautiful store! While I was out there I also had a chance to visit a company called Super Fly, the largest supplier of flies and fly tying materials in Canada. It was pretty cool to see all of the various hides, hackle and other materials that they distribute around the world. They had washing machines and tanks where they dye all these materials to match the colours that fly fishermen are looking for. While I was there I couldn’t resist picking up some bonefish and permit flies for an upcoming trip to Belize. Throughout all of my trips I’ve still got to take care of my television production work and attend meetings. Sometimes it seems Winter 2010 – Real Fishing 61


Tales from the Road like it never ends but that’s one of the things I love about my job - there’s never time to get bored. Speaking of meetings, one of the meetings I had was with the Canadian National Sportsmen’s Shows and I’m happy to say that I will be speaking at the Ottawa Boat and Sportsmen’s Show for two days and at the Toronto Sportsmen’s Show for three days this year. I mentioned earlier that I picked up some flies for a trip to Belize. That was because the folks at St. George’s Caye Resort in Belize had invited us down to do some taping. Belize has been on my top ten list of places that I’ve wanted to go for many years so I jumped at the chance. I invited a couple of dozen friends and the next thing you know we ended up filling up the resort. Belize is known for world class diving on the Belize Barrier Reef, which is the second largest in the world next to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Many of the folks on our trip did do some scuba diving and snorkeling and they said it was the most incredible experience that they had ever had, but I was more interested in exploring the sport fishing. We had a lot of weather fronts go through while we were there, making the fishing a bit more challenging than normal, but overall it was a phenomenal week. Derek Strub and I had a number of 100-pound plus tarpon which we lost, broke off or missed. It was the most heart wrenching, exhilarating, adrenaline-rush type of fishing you could ever imagine. On one cast a huge, 100pound plus tarpon hit my Strike King Red Eye Shad and when I set the hook it jumped about 8-feet in the air, went down, jumped again, went down again and then the hooks pulled out. Talk about exciting fishing! Frank Guida and his friend, John Zanelli, caught a 30-pound tripletail and several snook up to 15-pounds. We also got grouper,

62 Real Fishing – Winter 2010

king mackerel and wahoo – it was just one of those places that has it all. It’s got river fishing, flats fishing, reef fishing and bluewater fishing. To make a long story short, this place is paradise. We’re talking about thatched roofed, air conditioned huts with all the comforts of home; warm, friendly people; an endless array of activities and incredible fishing opportunities. It was so much fun to have a number of my friends join us on this trip. Between the camaraderie, the fishing and the ambiance, it really doesn’t get any better than this. Being in Belize was an all-around great trip. I got home just long enough to throw the suitcase down, grab another bag and head down to Arkansas with my buddy, Rick McCrory, for the annual Ranger Pro-Staff boat tour. Rick and I had the chance to jump into the new Z521 Ranger and as we were running 70-plus miles per hour down Bull Shoals Lake I decided that I need one of these boats. By the time you read this column I will have mine on order! Even though I’ve done this tour many times, I’m still fascinated at how these boats are built, one at a time. You could basically say that they are hand made. Then it was off to Cornwall to fish for walleyes with Brent McNamee from BoaterExam.com. We got on the road about 7:30 in the morning and by the time we got on the water about 5 ?-hours later, we had less than 2-hours to shoot our video. We caught half a dozen good, eating sized walleyes as the sun was going down but decided that they weren’t quite the grade of fish that we wanted for the show. Because of the low light conditions we probably won’t be able to use the footage anyway. As I rolled into the house just before midnight, after an 1100-kilometer trip and 2-hours of fishing in the cold wind, it confirmed the fact that I am crazy about fishing. Come to think of it, maybe I should leave the “about fishing” part out. After a day at home I got on a flight to Ottawa to visit Orleans Boat World just outside of Ottawa. It was a great evening where a number of fellow Renegade tournament anglers and other guests had the chance to check out some of the latest Ranger boats. As I stood in the Ranger Z521 I couldn't help but reminisce about running down Bull Shoals Lake a week earlier. Very sweet! As I’m finishing this column I’ve just found out that I will be inducted into the

Bob Izumi with a barracuda, one of the many species available to anglers in Belize.

Milton Walk of Fame, which honors past and present Milton residents who have earned significant national and/or international recognition. Each inductee is permanently recognized in the glass corridor which links the historic Town Hall (Town Hall West) to the new addition (Town Hall East). It’s a great honour for me to be included in the Walk of fame and I’m really looking forward to it. Until then though, I think I’ve still got time to get on the road for at least one more short fishing trip. ?


To celebrate our mutual passion for good food and great wine, Coyote’s Run has teamed up with Bob Izumi, the great Canadian Outdoorsman, to produce a set of signature Bob Izumi wines. With the sale of each bottle of Bob Izumi wine $1 will be donated to the Fishing Forever Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to providing fishermen with a vehicle to renew and preserve Ontario's fishing resource for the continued enjoyment of the sport today and for future generations. The wines are produced by Coyote’s Run Estate Winery, a small craft winery located in Niagara-on-the-Lake. This award-winning winery has been producing wine since 2003 and focuses on hand-crafted, small batch VQA wines. Coyote’s Run produces a variety of other wines include Pinot Noir, Meritage, Chardonnay and Riesling and are available at the winery retail store located on the vineyard property.

2004 Bob Izumi Red

Bob Izumi Wines

2005 Bob Izumi White

Introducing

To purchase your Bob Izumi wines please go to www.izumiwines.com and for more information about the Fishing Forever Foundation can be found at www.fishingforever.ca.

485 Concession 5 Rd, St. David’s, ON, L0S 1P0 • P: 905.682.8310 or 1.877.COYOTE.3 • www.coyotesrunwinery.com


Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s COOKING

Pork Chop Sandwich This sandwich is ideal either as a hearty lunch or as a light dinner. You can adjust the seasonings to your own taste and you can substitute different breads or buns for the French bread. Experiment with the basic recipe to come up with your own taste sensation.

INGREDIENTS

2 2 tbsp 4 1 1

boneless pork chops vegetable oil lettuce leaves sliced tomato medium onion, sliced

Salt and pepper to taste All-purpose seasoning French bread cut and sliced for sandwiches Mayonnaise or mustard METHOD

1) 2) 3) 4) 5)

Sprinkle salt and pepper on the chops then add all purpose seasoning (to taste). Heat oil in pan over medium heat. Add chops to pan and cook until done, flipping once. Spread mayonnaise or mustard on the bread. Assemble sandwich by adding lettuce, tomato slices and onion to the bottom of the sandwich. Place a cooked pork chop on top and add another layer of tomato, onion and lettuce. 6) Add the top piece of bread to finish the sandwich.

Winter 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Real Fishing 65


2010 CLASSIC MUSKIE CALENDAR Description:

The 2010 Classic Muskie Calendar contains 12 reproductions of original artworks by renowned outdoor artist and musky angler Charles Weiss. All of the paintings used in the calendar

Size 8-1/2” x 11” Medium: Acylic on paper Artist Charles Weiss

depict scenes from Charles’ fishing excursions throughout Ontario and Quebec during the 2009 season.

66 Real Fishing – Fall 2009

Contact: Charles Weiss Art 34 Hughey Cr. Toronto ON M1K 2V4 416-752-4363 charlesweiss@mail2chuck.com www.charlesweissart.com


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