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SEXUAL REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS!


TA B L E O F

CONTENTS

06

WEEK ONE

DAY 1 TO 3

09

14

WEEK THREE

DAY 9 TO 1 3

WEEK TWO

DAY 4 TO 8

20

WEEK FOUR

DAY 1 4 TO 1 9

24

WEEK FIVE

D AY 2 0 TO 2 2

For more information about the Peer Educators Academy 2018, please visit our websites www.reachahand.org and www.sautiplus.org or follow us on our social media platforms; on facebook at www.facebook.com/reachahandug or www.facebook.com/sautiplusuganda, Twitter @REACHAHAND & @sautiplus Instagram: reach_a_hand and join the hashtag #PEA2018


WEEK ON E

0 1 ST - 0 5 TH J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 8

1 OUR

5TH

PEER

CAME

The lead facilitator Amon Mulyowa set the pace, tasking the

READY TO TRAIN FRESH

participants to form 5 uniquely named groups, that would be

EDUCATORS’

WITH THE NEW YEAR,

ACADEMY

CHANGE AGENTS WHO WILL EMPOWER THEIR

sub families during the academy. They are Auntentico, The Hive, Sober Serenade, Portal Elites and The Elites. They even

PEERS ALL THROUGH 2018. THESE ENGAGING,

came up with slogans and anthems that they would identify

RELENTLESS AND THOUGHTFUL YOUNG PEOPLE

with (bingo)!

(AS WE EXPECTED THEM TO BE) ARE FULL OF ENTHUSIASM TO LEARN. THIS FIRST WEEK WAS

The participants then nominated and voted for their class representatives. Class rules were set so that discipline within

FOR INTRODUCTIONS OF PARTICIPANTS AND THE

the class is emphasized without losing the fun. As day one

COURSE, SETTING EXPECTATIONS. THE CATCH WAS

came to an end, Maureen Andinda, RAHU’s Monitoring,

IN THE, INTRODUCTION OF SOCIAL INCLUSION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES. HERE’S HOW WEEK ONE ROLLED OUT.

Learning & Evaluation Manager gave opening remarks, telling the participants about RAHU, objectives and expectations of a peer educator and how to be a role model. Participants were told to give feedback on today’s class whether positive or negative. The day was summed up, with the peers full of optimism for day two.

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2 Communications skills are a must have for any behaviour change agent, and that’s why Day 2 met a very eager class. The sessions rotated around behavioral change anda its stages. Feedback from of the previous day was collected (this process is casually known as ‘Kalombolombo’) because that’s one sure way of making any day better. Through a fun exercise, we learnt how messages can be altered due to the many channels they go through, with emphasis on how to handle such channels to ensure effective communication. This can be achieved through being clear, choosing the right channel to communicate their message and being sensitive to the kind of society/ people they are delivering the message to. Other values of effective communication like active listening, understanding body language and knowing your audience were discussed. When it comes to persons with disabilities, the need for an interpreter, audibility, empathy, trust and sensitivity was emphasized by Eric the facilitator for the session. He raised issues on ignorance of proper language to address PWDs and illustrated that PWDs can also communicate effectively just like any other person if given the right tools.

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07


3 Friday, the dance day finally came! Day 3 is here! We started off with a hilarious kalombolombo, backtracking the previous day’s events. The first session meaningful youth participation and empowerment (MYP) was led by our very own Sexual Reproductive Health Rights (SRHR) Alliance youth country coordinator Olga Namukuza. To understand this session, she introduced a game where the peer educators introduced their names with an adjective to describe themselves and asked them to share the experience behind these adjectives. This was to show that MYP starts with an inner process before it goes to community, country & globe. As peer educators we need to take charge of our lives in order to be agents of change. She tried to bridge the misconceptions between youth and adults which hinder youth participating with adults on an equal platform. Eric Wakoko, our second session facilitator engaged our participants in understanding that inclusion is making everyone part of a process despite of their state. An illustration was adopted that exposed the discrimination PWDs face in society and concluded that we must minimize on the impairment and maximise on the skill. The day was wrapped up in groovy style, jiggling to hit bangers with moves choreographed by Tasha, an ‘Old Girl’ of the academy. If you think week one was fun, look forward to week two, because it is all this and more!

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THE WEEK IN REVIEW

WEE K T WO 08

TH

- 12

TH

JANUARY 2018

NEW WEEK, NEW PLOT, NEW LEARNING AND NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR OUR NEW CLASS OF PEER EDUCATORS. GREAT TO SEE PARTICIPANTS NOW FULLY SETTLED IN AND MET NEW PEOPLE. HERE’S WHAT HAPPENED LAST WEEK!

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4 We kicked off the new week with a session on community mobilisation by Ibrahim Nkonge our Programs Offer who defined it as a process that involves reaching out to people in order to address a common issue. The relevance of his attire to the topic was to address the issue of trying to mobilize yet the community are uncomfortable with you. Everyone must participate and be involved in community decisions and addressing community challenges.

We then had a session on report writing and its relevance to a peer educator by Maureen Andinda, our Monitoring & Evaluation manager. She emphasized how the peer educators should document their work using different methods like recording, photography and observation. As a peer educator, report writing is very important because it is an accountability tool and a skilling tool as it creates opportunities to work with certain organisations.

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5

6

The first session on Human Anatomy was led by Zaituni Nabaterega.

How can you call it a training of young people without life skills?!

The first activity required our peer educators draw themselves at

Alex Kamukama took the day by explaining why teaching life skills

the age of 7 and their present bodies, compare the changes and

important to peer educators. Alex stated that life skills has three

discuss them with the opposite sex. Some of these changes in boys

stages which are; knowing yourself, knowing and living with others,

included; development of beards, increase in height, enlarged

and decision making. He further went on to say it’s very important

penises, and deeper voices and in girls;menstruation, developed

to know yourself. If you have a strength at something according to

rounder bodies and breasts and got vaginal fluids. This session was

Alex, you have to make that strength better and better. If you have a

aimed at understanding how the human body works.

weakness, then make it your strength/elevate that weakness.

The second session was menstrual hygiene management facilitated

Session two of the day was still done by Alex and focused on Self

by a team from the public Health Ambassadors Uganda. Key things

Efficacy. Alex noted that the life skill of how to cope and control your

discusses were how to keep our pubic areas healthy and clean?

emotions is so important because in life we meet and deal with so

What is menstruation? How to handle the menstruation period and

many people who may impact us positively or negatively. Therefore,

consequences of poor menstrual hygiene management for example

Life skills of learning how to cope with your emotions are important

Urinary Tract Infections.

because we deal with so many people that give off different types of energies. Alex encouraged peer educators to be positive and feed

We had the pleasure of hosting Maggie Kigozi, a medical doctor,

their mind with positive thoughts. Learn interpersonal skills, be

investment promotion expert, a farmer and an entrepreneur. She

empathetic and good to others. Think critically he concluded.

encouraged the peer educators to be hard working, great leaders, and well disciplined. She encouraged them to start businesses early in life through their passions like dancing, farming, advocacy and leadership.

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7

8

This day was about healthy and unhealthy

Award for Business then gave an inspirational

The day started off with kalombolombo

relationships led by Olga Namukuza from

talk by sharing his story and how far he has

and with the participants raising concerns

the Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights

come and what inspired him to start it. He

about the material like books, water bottles

Alliance. She kicked off by explaining the

engaged with participants by encouraging

to which they were requested to finish up

different kinds of relationships for example

them to do their thing and earn a living out

on payments. Today’s topic is about team

family relationships, casual relationships,

of their passion.

dynamics - The facilitator from Roland

romantic

relationships,

romantic

Tayebwa from Bwongo taught lessons

relationships. Olga noted that it’s not wise to

When you are young, you need to follow

on achieving results that we hope for. He

go into a relationship thinking you will give

your dreams but you need to understand

emphasized that you don’t have to rush

your virginity or sex as a sign of love because

that there is nothing straight as you will

to give answers and different methods

your dreams will be shattered.

meet obstacles. He shared how the friends

can be used to achieve the same result.

he had at the beginning of his business are

He explained that people work in teams in

Ricky Thomson the co-founder of SafeBoda

no longer with him because they were not

order accomplish tasks one person can’t

and winner of the 2017 Young Achievers

persistent.

accomplish. Session two was facilitated Ambrose Akanyihayo

from

Reproductive

Health

Uganda (RHU) and it was on setting life goal setting and how to set smart goals. What is the difference between a dream and a goal? A dream is a fantasy, but it can only come to reality if you have made it into a goal. A goal makes purpose, so you have to work towards the dream. The importance of having goals; keeps you motivated, keeps you positive, keeps you focused, it allows you measure and evaluate what you have achieved and what you have not. Take your goals seriously and create no excuses. Be smart while setting life goals (specific, measurable, Attainable/ achievable,

relevant,

time-bound)

or

smarter (Evaluate, Revise). Steps to goal setting – some people do not set goals so they just live lives as they are. A life without goals is purposeless. You have no direction so you flow where it flows. Goals must be realistic, make priorities. Attitude is the way we choose to look at things. Develop a positive attitude. The difference between an obstacle and opportunity is one’s attitude.

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S AU T IPLUS TV MEET S T H E PE E R EDUCATORS ACAD EM Y !

Sautiplus TV, the home of the freshest SRHR and life skills vibes for young people made its debut at the academy this week. Being manned by the Peer Educators, it is giving them a platform to master reporting skills, and confidence to reach out to their peers online.

Just log onto www.facebook.com/sautiplusUganda and get in sync!


W EE K T H R E E 1 5 TH - 1 9 TH J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 8

WE ARE IN WEEK 3 OF THE ACADEMY AND WE ARE BEYOND EXCITED FOR WHAT THIS WEEK HAS IN STORE FOR US. FROM A RANGE OF INSPIRATIONAL SPEAKERS TO GOOD MEALS, TO INFORMATIVE TOPICS LIKE GENDER BASED VIOLENCE AND CONTRACEPTIVES, WEEK THREE WAS NOTHING SHORT OF AMAZEBALLS!

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THE WEEK IN REVIEW

9 Day 9 kicked off with Winnie Akeso facilitating a session on sex and sexuality. She tasked the participants to write down what they think when they hear the word sex and explain why they wrote that. Most participants classified this in terms of gender, sex the act and the right to have sex. Winnie went ahead to state that human beings are sexual beings and sexuality entails values which begin from within the person. Furthermore, Sexuality is about being confident in oneself, knowing who you are and how you relate with others. It also requires one to take care of their reproductive systems like keeping clean. Winnie pointed out that as peers, we need to realise that people have different goals and interests at particular times and stages in their lives. It is okay to say ‘I don’t want’ to seductive or flirtatious people. There is a misconception that when people dress in a certain way, then they are calling for sexual advances which is false and we need to address. When you dress up, dress up to please oneself so be comfortable in your skin. Winnie cautioned our peers not to take advantage of an invite from a person who has trusted them with information.

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10 We kicked off our morning with our facilitators Lillibet

dries or else it will smell. When using cotton, put a gauze on

Namakula and Catherine Naluggya Guntesse from Public

it so that it can be held in place and wear a tight knicker that

Health Ambassadors Uganda (PHAU) who engaged the

will not allow the cotton to move but don’t wear suffocating

participants on menstruation and pregnancy. The session

trousers. The menstrual cap can be inserted if one squats or

started with participants sharing their expectations on how to

raises one leg up and inserts it there. Warm bottles are used

wear a sanitary towel, understanding the menstrual cycle, the

when one is in periods and help ease blood flow and relieve

misconceptions associated to menstruation and other options

pain. But if you don’t have one, you can use an ordinary bottle

apart from sanitary towels and how to wear them.

but cover it with a cloth because it will burn you if used directly.

The team went on to display and illustrate different products

In our last session we had Anne Praise Niwagaba a former peer

for example pads, menstrual caps, cotton wool with a gauze,

educator who interacted with the participants and told them

toilet paper and reusable sanitary towels. The session had our

the importance of venturing into entrepreneurship while still a

participants engage practically as they demonstrated to each

student. Praise is the founder of Annellah Agency, an ushering

other how to use sanitary towels during menstruation.

and marketing company. She started this while studying and during her time as a peer educator at RAHU, she looks forward

The participants also learnt the do’s and don’ts of using a

to going into digital marketing and others with her business.

reusable sanitary towel that include; wash it in cold water, do not use detergent, do not iron and put it in the sun so that it

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11 The day’s session started off with first

is so because there are people try to abort

aid lessons. Our second session on

on the assumption that they are pregnant.

post abortion care was by Dr. Fred

He went ahead to state that there are safe

Charles Kiggundu, an obstetrician and

and unsafe methods of abortion and what

gynaecologist. The session was aimed at

causes the former- informed doctors and

equipping the participants with knowledge

the latter – quack doctors who use poor

on abortion and what every peer educator

methods of abortion. Safe post abortion

should know about it. Dr. Kiggundu noted

care includes; medical, comprehensive,

that the act of sex may lead to procreation.

emotional, social, physical, psychological

Some of the procreation may be desirable

care. Post abortion care; support offered

or undesirable. To trigger the debate, he

after, during an abortion. – it should be

asked questions like when people have

immediate emergency, it must be high

sex, it is for procreation and pleasure? What

quality, and the aim is to save life and

factors influence removal of pregnancies?

reduce complications. He listed the signs and symptoms of unsafe abortions which

Furthermore, he stated that abortion is the

include

same as miscarriage. A miscarriage shows

damaging of the cervix, damaging of the

the stereotype attached to abortion. It is

uterus, chronic pain, death.

complications

like

bleeding,

the termination of a pregnancy of less than 7 months. A baby born before their time is

When concluding, he emphasized young

premature. He further noted that before

people to always make informed decisions

you abort, you must be pregnant and this

every time they want to decide to have sex.

12 Day 12 of #PEA2018 was led by Doris Tuhirirwe from Marie Stopes Uganda educating us on family planning and contraceptives. Birth control, fertility control and contraceptives are methods and devices used to prevent pregnancy and some to prevent STDs and STIs. Planning, making available and using these methods is called family planning.There are hormonal and non hormonal methods of contraceptives. Hormonal methods contain progesterone and oestrogen. Safe sex practices like condoms and abstinence as birth control methods also prevent STDs like HIV and others. Emergency contraceptives are for short term use only with specific time frames of use. We had the pleasure of hosting Ministry of Education and sports to talk to us about the HIV epidemic and how prevent it. Most importantly, abstain, if you can’t abstain, use condoms. If it’s not on its not safe. You can’t tell that a person has HIV/AIDS simply by looking at them. Go for testing and find out the status of your sexual partners. However, if you contract the disease, it’s not the end. There’s life after HIV! Live positively by taking care of yourself, take your ARVs as prescribed, eat healthy and exercise and avoid stigma.

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13 The last day of the week was led by Safepal (an initiative by UNFPA Uganda) that talked about gender based violence. The discussion centered around understanding what is sexual gender based violence. Another key thing noted was that marital rape is wrong and has been overturned. Any sex without consent is rape. The law protects women against rape. Respect a woman’s no. it’s not an invite for persuasion. Most rapists are normal people. They are not necessarily mentally ill. UNFPA encourages young people to visit their offices and share their ideas so that the Program can help bring it to scale and turn it into a real product. The Safepal team further noted that as peer educators, engage and counsel others in our community over the dangers of gender based violence through the SafePal application that be downloaded and used to report cases of GBV. The inspirational speaker of the day was Mr. Timothy Egweru who encouraged the peer educators to be very confident in themselves and always have a positive attitude. He went on to state that disability is not incapability.

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WEE K F O U R 2 2 ND - 2 6 TH J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 8

IF YOU HAVE BEEN READING OUR #PEA2018 WEEKLY NEWSLETTERS THIS FAR, THANK YOU! WE’RE IN THE LAST STRETCH OF THE TRAINING AND THE DAYS KEEP GETTING MORE AND MORE FABULOUS, ENLIGHTENING AND INTENSE. HAVE YOU MADE AN IMPACT SO FAR IN THE ACADEMY? IF NOT, DON’T WORRY, YOU STILL HAVE TIME TO DO SO.

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14 The topic was Sexually Transmitted Diseases/

Did you know that 3 in 10 women carry

Infections and Cervical Cancer. STDs are also

the Human PapillomaVirus (HPV) which is

known as STIs or venereal diseases that are

responsible for cervical cancer? This virus is

spread through sexual contact. The effects

sexually transmitted although people with it

being more severe among women than men

don’t develop any symptoms. Cervical cancer

Common STDs include gonorrhea, syphilis

can be cured if detected early although the

and genital herpes with syphilis being the

HPV virus can’t be.

commonest. Symptoms

of

cervical

cancer

include

Syphilis is painless, and when ignored can

bleeding from the vagina that isn’t normal,

go into secondary syphilis the stage coming

pain in lower pelvis/belly, pain during sex,

ARVs simply slow down the damage that

with rash on the body, or palms and tongue.

abnormal vaginal discharge. Pap tests can

HIV does to the immune system and allow

Genital herpes is marked by pain, sores from

be used detect cervical cell changes before

people to live long, productive lives like

ulcers and scabs and itching. On the other

they turn cancerous. We had the pleasure

everyone else without succumbing to the

hand, Gonorrhea is caused by a bacteria.

of hosting Doreen Sandra Kawuma from

Many people have no symptoms but signs in

Uganda National Association of the Deaf for

disease.

men include painful urination,discharge from

an inspiration talk who stated that the lives

the penis, testicular pain whereas in women,

of people with disabilities are made much

it includes vaginal bleeding between periods,

easier when they are included in society.

pelvic pain, burning urination. Complications

Barbara noted that the downside of not taking ARVs once you have been infected or skipping medication or taking it at the wrong times is that the virus will become

of gonorrhea include pelvic inflammatory

They face the same challenges as everyone

disease, inflammation of the epididymis,

else and some worse. We should learn sign

septic arthritis and endocarditis and infertility

language in order to communicate with

said that along with taking ARVs, eat well

among women.

them. PWDs inclusion starts with YOU!

balanced diets, exercise regularly, have

resistant and advance into AIDS. She further

enough sleep and most importantly, have ABSTAIN, BE FAITHFUL or USE A CONDOMS. Our second session was led by Mr. Richard Kiranda Kizito from Uganda AIDS Commission who explained the 90-90-90 strategy by UNAIDS adopted to curb HIV spread in the next upcoming years globally. The first 90 stands for 90% of HIV positive knowing their status by 2020 through scientific measures, the second 90 stands for every HIV positive person availed with treatment and care and the third 90 stands for every positive being on treatment having their viral load reduced and not reaching

15

the advanced AIDS stage. We were happy to host Dr. Naboth Coole, our

We kicked off with a session on HIV positive living and how young people can protect

Advisory Board member who encouraged

themselves from the virus. The session was led by Barbara Kemigisa who is living with HIV

the peer educators to be ambitious and

and has had the virus for over 9 years. She encouraged people living with HIV/AIDS to take

purpose driven.

their ARVs once they have been diagnosed with the virus. ARVs are used as treatment for HIV/ AIDS but they don’t cure it. There’s no cure for it yet and it doesn’t go away by itself.

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16 Winnie Akeso came back conduct a session on gender stereotypes. She defined gender stereotypes as preconceived ideas whereby female and males are arbitrarily assigned characteristics and roles determined and limited by their gender. Traditionally, female stereotypic role is to marry and have children, be nurturing, and put the welfare of family before their own. Male stereotypic roles include being financial providers, courageous, assertive, career focused, hold their emotions in check and initiate sex. These stereotypes are harmful because they stifle individual expression and creativity as well as hinder personal and professional growth. The second session was on inclusion of People With Disabilities by our facilitator Dorcus from Light for the World. As peer educators if we go out to societies that have people with disabilities, we must be sensitive about how we communicate with them. Their inclusion goes beyond simply hearing and speaking to them. We must acknowledge their strong senses and use those as a medium to communicate. Mind the language you use to address them. Don’t call them stupid, mad or dumb.

17 Alcohol, drug and substance abuse is led by our facilitator Joshua Thembo from Naguru Teenage Center. He noted that the commonly abused drugs and substance include marijuana locally known as joints, ganja, weed and kuba, tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, spirits and petrol. Why do young people abuse drugs? To relieve stress, peer pressure, to get confidence. A common belief is that drug and substance is that drug abusers should just be able to stop if they are willing to change their behaviour. It’s not that simple. We were honoured to host General Elly Tumwine to inspire us on how to chase our dreams, passion and purpose. He stated that each one of us is on earth as a special unique individual with a special purpose. The attitude you have determines your altitude. You won’t catch your passion like a flue. After loving God, love yourself. It’s from loving yourself that you’ll be able to love your neighbour and your country. Don’t allow negativity to overpower you.

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18 The facilitator for the day was Fahd Maliik Kayondo the CEO of Telesat who conducted a session on financial literacy and money matters. He stated that we are mature and it’s time to start thinking of ways

19

to make money and this starts with us understanding spending, saving and credit. How do we make money? First step should be learning/understand how to mobilise working capital, pay religious taxes like tithe and within your budget, add a component of social responsibility. Encourage your children to invest at a young age. Don’t think you’re too young to earn but mature enough to spend. Don’t spend on more than you need, be wise about spending. Avoid

The academy stretched a little into the weekend, just for photos, food, sharing ideas; basically, for fun. We had our yearly peer photoshoot on Saturday. If our week had been a cake, the photoshoot was the icing. Good music, cool outfits, camera clicks, lights and flashes, and everything glam you have ever seen. These

dependency like borrowing money. Sacrifice today for tomorrow.

photos take all this effort because they help us in communicating

Our second session was led by Joel Ssevume took us through

easier believed.

professional attitude. He emphasized that a positive attitude gives you power over your circumstances instead of them having power over you. Every storm runs out of rain. Your attitude determines

and advocating for key SRHR and livelihoods, since what is seen is

Keep following #PEA21018. The best is yet to come.

your directions. Unlearn negative beliefs.

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29

TH

WEE K F I V E

JANUARY- 02

ND

FEBRUARY 2018

THE 2018 ACADEMY HAS COME TO AN END. NOPE, WE ARE KIDDING; IT IS JUST THE TRAINING THAT ENDED, BUT DOUBLED UP AS THE BEGINNING OF A YEAR LONG JOURNEY OF EDUCATION,MORE LEARNING AND FUN WITH OUR PEERS. IN THE LAST THREE DAYS, WE HAD A RANGE OF ACTIVITIES THAT SENT OFF THE PEER EDUCATORS IN STYLE. FROM OUR CULTURAL ICONS SHARING THEIR LIFE EXPERIENCES TO FORMER PEER EDUCATORS SHARING THEIR LIFE AFTER THE ACADEMY AND TO THE ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING VISITS, HERE IS THE LAST WEEK OF #PEA2018 IN SUMMARY.

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20 Joshua Thembo from Naguru Teenage Center returned to continue the conversation on drug and substance abuse. He explained in detail the methods of drug administration and the far reaching effects of addiction, like uninformed decisions and reckless spending. The peers were woke, suggesting ways of solving the drug problem such as edutainment and social media campaigns. John Ssenkeezi, a social media expert at Vodafone Uganda, then facilitated the second session on effective online communication. Did you know that after China and India, Facebook has the largest population in the world? Now you do, and you may want to exploit social media for business, networking, news and more. By the way, your digital image matters, so it is crucial that you put out stuff that you are sure you won’t regret.

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21 This day was literally the homecoming. Peer educators from the previous classes, as well as our musical cultural icons Naava Grey and Geosteady came to interact, mentor and chill with the class of 2018, and what a time we all had! They re-echoed the need for persistence to create that change we want to see and a continued reminder of who we are as people to keep on track of what our purpose is, before the icons excited the crowd by performing some of their music and even shared tips on how one can strengthen their vocals (how ‘bout dat?).

22 We all came knowing that the training would end on this day, but with one last hoorah in the organisational visits, we were going out in style. We visited Reproductive Health Uganda, Safe Boda, Set Her Free, Uganda Health Marketing Group, Marie Stopes, Naguru Teenage Center and ASTEC. The participants made contact with what each of these organisations do in relation to entrepreneurship and SRHR, and appreciated each organization’s mode of operation.

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For more information about the Peer Educators Academy 2018, please visit our websites www.reachahand.org and www.sautiplus.org or follow us on our social media platforms; on facebook at www.facebook.com/reachahandug or www.facebook.com/sautiplusuganda, Twitter @REACHAHAND & @sautiplus Instagram: reach_a_hand and join the hashtag #PEA2018

#pea2018 main newsletter  

Missed moments at our #PEA2018? Here's the full month in review. Sit back, relax and take a read. Clue: Its a nice magazine!

#pea2018 main newsletter  

Missed moments at our #PEA2018? Here's the full month in review. Sit back, relax and take a read. Clue: Its a nice magazine!

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