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M u s e u m

Chronicle

Gorgas House’s Square Grand Piano Restored Also in this issue: Summer Expedition 34 / Indian Summer Day Camp / Discovering Alabama Tornado Episode / Fusing Red Earth / Americorps Vista Worker / Native Garden / Sanders Lecture / Oak Grove Hodges Meteorite Festival / New OAR Employee N e w s f r o m t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f A l a b a m a Mu s e u m s • N u m b e r 4 0 • S P RI N G 2 0 1 2 Alabama Museum of Natural History • Discovering Alabama • Moundville Archaeological Park Office of Archaeological Research • Gorgas House • UA Museum Collections


M A Y 26 Alabama’s Coal Age Fossils – AMNH

J U N E 4-8 Indian Summer Day Camp Session 1 – MAP 11-15 Museum Expedition 34 - Middle School Camp – AMNH 18-23 Museum Expedition 34 - High School Camp – AMNH 25-30 Museum Expedition 34 - Public Archaeology Camp – AMNH

In February, Dr. Ned Uehling visited Jerry Adcox at the Allegro Piano and Organ Service shop in Reform, Alabama.

J U L Y

12 Tubing the Little Cahaba River – AMNH 13 Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossils – AMNH 14 Bear Creek Canoeing – AMNH 17 Tubing the Little Cahaba River – AMNH 18 Coosa River Canoeing – AMNH 19 Sipsey River Canoeing – AMNH 21 Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossils – AMNH 24 Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossils – AMNH 25 Cahaba River Canoeing – AMNH 23-27 Indian Summer Day Camp Session 2 – MAP 27-28 Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossils Overnight – AMNH 30 Adventure Day Camp - Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossils – AMNH 31 Adventure Day Camp - Tubing the Little Cahaba River – AMNH

Dr. Ned Uehling’s Gift Restores Square Grand Piano at Gorgas House

This summer, the Gorgas House Museum will be filled with sound from an 1875 square grand piano that has likely not been played for almost a century. The piano was originally purchased by John Jesse Westmoreland for his wife, Olive. Mr. Westmoreland had it sent by river and rail from Louisville, Kentucky to their home in Florence, Alabama. In the 1950s, the piano was donated to the Museum by Olive’s grandson, Dr. Hirim Kennedy Douglass.

A U G U S T 1 Adventure Day Camp - Canoe Clinic on Lake Tuscaloosa – AMNH 2 Adventure Day Camp - North River Canoeing – AMNH 3 Adventure Day Camp - Coosa River Canoeing – AMNH 4 Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossils – AMNH

O C T O B E R 10-13 Moundville Native American Festival – MAP AMNH – Alabama Museum of Natural History MAP – Moundville Archaeological Park

M u s e um

Chronicle Published periodically during the year by The University of Alabama Museums Robert Clouse, Ph. D. Executive Director The University of Alabama Museums

Board of Regents Ben Barnett, Board President Tuscaloosa, AL

Steve Johnson Tuscaloosa, AL

Tom Semmes San Antonio, TX

Larry Taylor, Board Vice President Moundville, AL

Thomas Joiner Tuscaloosa, AL

Leah Ann Sexton Tuscaloosa, AL

Prescott Atkinson, Ph. D., M. D. Birmingham, AL

Eleanor May Tuscaloosa, AL

Craig Sheldon, Ph. D. Wetumpka, AL

Catherine Sloss Crenshaw Birmingham, AL

Douglas McCraw Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Kristie Taylor Tuscaloosa, AL

Darla Graves Birmingham, AL

Tom McMillan Brewton, AL

Nick Tew, Ph. D. Tuscaloosa, AL

Tommy Hester Tuscaloosa, AL

Howell Poole Moundville, AL

Terry Waters Tuscaloosa, AL

Mike Jenkins Montgomery, AL

Beverly Phifer Tuscaloosa, AL

Tom Watson Tuscaloosa, AL

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Jerry Adcox and John Boutwell, of Allegro and Organ Service,remove the legs from the so that it can be taken out of the Museum. I

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Square

grand pianos were most popular during the 18th and 19th centuries, in both the United States and Europe. The Museum’s square grand piano was made by the Haines Brothers Company of New York. The company was established in 1851, by English brothers, Napoleon and Francis Haines. Beginning in the 1870s, the company began phasing out square grand pianos with the newly popular, upright piano. After Napoleon Haines’ death in 1900, his brother sold the company, but the Haines Brothers name was used into the 1930s. There is no record that the piano was playable when it was donated to the Museum. However, a ceiling collapse in 2010, from a leaking air conditioning system in the attic, assured that the piano would not be playable.  In the summer of 2011, Dr. Ned Uehling, a University of Alabama Museums member, expressed an interest in undoing the damage. Through recommendations of the University of Alabama’s School of Music, Jerry Adcox and John Boutwell, of Allegro Piano and Organ Service were selected to undertake the restoration. The piano was disassembled in December 2011 and taken to their piano service shop in Reform, Alabama. The restoration process is preserving as many of the historical

o Piano e piano

The UA Museums family consists of the following:

1875 Haines Brothers square grand piano with visible water damage.

elements of the piano as possible, including the ivory and ebony keys and rosewood casing. It is anticipated that the restoration will be completed in May.   Dr. Uehling’s generous gift in memory of his beloved cousin, Katherine D. Uehling, has allowed the piano to be restored back to a fully playable condition. Once it is returned, the piano will be available for concerts, educational activities, and special events. Please plan to visit the Gorgas House Museum over the summer to see firsthand the results of this extraordinary preservation effort.

MOUNDVILLE ARCHAEOLOGICAL PARK

Jerry Adcox, of Allegro Piano and Organ Service, prepares the piano to be taken to his service shop in Reform, Alabama. M

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The plan view of the park's proposed new garden incorpoA sample of some of the plants proposed for the new Three Sisters Garden, including sunflowers (back left), rates a Mississippian symbol, the bi-lobed arrow. giant red amaranth (middle) and goosefoot (foreground).

Volunteers prepare the soil in a past garden at Moundville Archaeological Park.

Moundville: How Does Our Garden Grow? With the help of the UA Museums’ Office of Archaeological

Research, volunteers and staff recently laid out the placement of the raised bed garden plots for Moundville Archaeological Park’s Three Sisters Garden. Currently, staff members are lining up materials, supplies and prospective gardeners to construct the new beds and start planting crops. In addition to the traditional Three Sisters crops of corn, beans and squash the new garden will begin featuring fruit trees and berries and other plant life that was traditionally collected rather than being domesticated. Medicinal plants will be another garden component as well as flora that Native Americans used for making everyday items such as cordage and containers. Some of this vegetation includes several types of sunflowers, amaranth, goosefoot, gourds, bear grass, coneflowers, mints and balms, plum and persimmon trees as well as blueberries and possibly blackberries. The project is being coordinated by Tyler Fox of Moundville Archaeological Park's education office. MAP is also partnering with Aldridge Botanical Gardens in Hoover, Alabama and the Hale County School System on the garden project. Rip Weaver, Director of Aldridge Gardens and a landscape architect, developed the garden’s layout in the shape of a bi-lobed arrow, a symbol found on artwork at Moundville and many other Mississippian Indian sites. As a green-friendly garden,

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the containers are going to be made of hay bales. The dirt used to fill the containers is from a nearby pile of dirt dredged from the Black Warrior River, the exact type of soil used by ancient Moundville farmers. David Skelton, an agriculture instructor at Hale County High School and a former park employee, has donated his time and labor as well as that of his students to help construct the garden. As importantly, a recent gift of $2000 from the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma will fund a large portion of the materials and supplies for constructing the new garden. MAP also received a grant for $500 from the Center for the Study of the Black Belt which was spent on the project's watering system. According to Education Coordinator Betsy Irwin, “With the small staff we have at Moundville it would be impossible to create this outdoor exhibit without the help of dedicated individuals and organizations. It is our intention to teach the students who volunteer with the garden about sustainable agriculture as they grow and later harvest and eat some of these vegetables. In the long run everyone wins.” If any readers are interested in helping with the garden or would like to donate compost, mulch or native plants they may have, please contact Moundville Archaeological Park’s Education Department at (205) 371-8732 or email Tyler Fox at tpfox@ua.edu.


Indian Summer Day Camp

Billy Whitefox (Muscogee-Panama City, FL) demonstrates the flute and tells stories during a recent day camp.

June 4-8 and July 23-27

Campers investigate different The atlatl, a spear throwing device, is one of the many technologies plants used by Native Americans. Indian Summer campers learn about.

Indian Summer Day Camp is an outstanding weeklong program teaching kids, ages 9 through 13, Native American arts and life ways. Held on the bluffs of the Black Warrior River at Moundville Archaeological Park, activities include arts and crafts such as pottery, basketry, and gourd maskmaking. Past participants have made reproductions of Moundville artifacts in the park’s museum, or have made their own Native American inspired creations. Children also enjoy museum and park tours, storytelling, nature hikes, sampling Native American foods, and playing both outdoor and indoor Native American games. Children especially enjoy learning to play Toli, or stickball, an

important Southeastern Indian game similar to Lacrosse. Optional daily transportation is provided from the University of Alabama campus. Day campers may meet for van pick up at the Alabama Museum of Natural History at 8:30 a.m. or meet at Moundville Archaeological Park at 9:00 a.m. Children are picked up at 4:00 p.m. at Moundville, or at 4:30 p.m. on campus. Cost (covers all materials, transportation, and snacks): $200 per child (museum members, $175 per child). Students need to bring their own sack lunch with drink and wear old clothes. Discounts are available for multiple children. To register and for more information, contact Catie Cooper at (205) 371-8732, or by e-mail at crcooper@ua.edu.

Fusing Red Earth

Pottery Gathering

L-R: Chip Wente, potter and longtime volunteer, views prehistoric pottery on display at AMNH; Bill Glass, Cherokee Nation, teaches sculpture and figuremaking; A multitude of beautiful contemporary ceramics were displayed at the Kentuck Arts Center as part of the NEA grant project.

Fusing Red Earth was a four-day gathering of scholars, students and artists at Moundville on March 28-31 and included a symposium, hands-on workshops, two off-site exhibitions, and a public exposition with the goal of exchanging knowledge on what was, and is, Southeastern Indian pottery. Fusing Red Earth was supported by a grant through the National Endowment for the Arts.

Americorps VISTA Tyler Fox at Moundville We are happy to welcome Tyler Fox to our team at Moundville Archaeological Park.

Tyler is stationed full-time at the park as an Americorps VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America). Americorps VISTA is the national service program designed to strengthen community, foster sustainability, and fight poverty. At Moundville, Tyler will work to increase economic development in the area through heritage and nature-based tourism. A Native of Troy, Ohio, Tyler graduated from Lee University in Cleveland, Tennessee where he studied anthropology.

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Get Away for the Day! Join us on one of the Alabama Museum of Natural History Summer Programs.

Reconnect with nature. Spend a day searching for ancient shark’s teeth in a creek bed or experience whitewater rapids in a canoe with Spanish moss hanging above you in the trees. See our calendar on page two for specific dates and times, or contact our naturalist, Todd Hester, at 205-348-9482 or mthester@ua.edu to schedule your day away. Alabama’s Coal Age Fossils - Explore the remnants of ancient Coal Age forests that are preserved today as the many coal seams and rocks rich with Coal Age fossils that are found throughout much of northern Alabama. Age 10 and up.

Summer Program participants get away for the day.

Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossils - Our most popular summer field trip! Travel to the Black Belt of Alabama in search of fossils from the Dinosaur Age. Come prepared to get wet and collect shark teeth and other 80 million year old marine fossils from stream gravel deposits. Age 10 and up. Little Cahaba River Tubing - Float in an inner tube down a shallow stretch of river and over rapids created by limestone outcroppings. Enjoy a leisurely, wet day observing nature, eat a picnic lunch on the sandbar beach and take a swim at Limestone Park. Swimmers only, please. Age 10 and up. Cahaba River Canoeing - Explore an unusual stretch of one of the most biologically diverse rivers in North America. Join us as we canoe down the Cahaba River through the coastal plains and paddle along gravel bars below the fall line. Swimmers only, please. Age 12 and up. Coosa River Canoeing - Whitewater rapids with Spanish moss in the trees. This is a fun and adventurous trip for experienced canoeists. Surf the waves at Moccasin Gap! Swimmers only, please. Age 12 and up.

Kyle Page educates campers about local snake populations.

Hodges Meteorite Returns to Home Town

Sipsey River Swamp Canoeing - A canoeing favorite! Explore the mysterious world of this wetland wilderness. This trip takes you through a quiet, wetland ecosystem full of beautiful bottomland plants and wildlife. Swimmers only, please. Age 12 and up. Bear Creek Canoeing - Splash through class I and II rapids on a five-mile stretch of creek flowing through northwest Alabama near Haleyville. Enjoy your picnic lunch on the rock bluffs at Factory Falls and watch as other canoeist and kayakers float through the rapids. Swimmers only, please. Age 12 and up. North River Canoeing - Come spend a lazy day canoeing down North River and enjoying the sights on our great lake. Enjoy a picnic lunch on Treasure Island and escape the hot summer sun in beautiful Lake Tuscaloosa! Swimmers only, please. Age 12 and up. *Children under 10 or 12, in some cases, may come accompanied with adult.

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For the third year, the Hodge’s Meteorite, one of the Alabama Museum of Natural History’s most popular specimens, will be on display at the town of Oak Grove for their annual Festival at the Park. In 2010 the meteorite was loaned to the town for the dedication of a historical marker, “Stars Fell On Alabama”, placed near the site of the Hodges home where it struck Ann Hodges. This marked the first time that the meteorite was reunited with the location where it originally fell. “We are honored to have the meteorite back in Oak Grove for a day and hope that this will continue to be an annual event,” said Mayor Charles Merkel.


Alabama Museum of Natural History

MUSEUM EXPEDITION 34 ALA B N AT A M A M U U Box 870 RAL H SEUM 340 I , Tu STOR OF Y 354 s 87- caloosa 034 TEL , AL 0 E P (20 5)3 HONE 48 755 0 A WEBS MN I H.U TE: A.E DU

Summer 2012

Number 34

Not Your Ordinary Summer Camp!

Work side-by-side with scientists in the ďŹ eld of archaeology and ecology. Enjoy the natural wonders of Alabama while having fun and forging friendships that will last a lifetime.

THREE EXCITING SESSIONS

Looking for something different and exciting to do this summer? Join us as we set out on an expedition to uncover the mysteries of Alabama's earliest occupants. The Museum Expedition combines science and history with the fun and adventure of the outdoors. This year, you are invited to work side by side with scientists on an archaeological ďŹ eld research project at a site once occupied by Paleo-Indians. This is a rare opportunity to gain insights into the prehistoric societies that once lived in North Alabama. No experience is necessary to participate!

Middle School Camp June 11-16 High School Camp June 18-23 Public Archaeology Camp June 25-30 Space is limited so sign up soon!

www.amnh.ua.edu

High School Camp June 18-23

Middle School Camp June 11-16

Public Archaeology June 25-30

Discover the fun and adventure of archaeology camp!

! "

Visit us at www.amnh.ua.edu | Contact Us at 205.348.7550 or email museum.expedition@ua.edu M

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Preserving a Place in Tuscaloosa’s History The Alabama Historical Commission saw the damage to The Downs, Glendale Gardens, and Hillcrest in the aftermath of the April 27th storm and feared the worst for their historic designations. The University’s survey reassured the AHC and the residents of the three neighborhoods that their historic status remained intact.

An historic house in The Downs before April 27, 2011 tornadoes.

The same house after tornado and repairs.

Last year’s April 27th EF-4 tornado inflicted serious damage on the city of Tuscaloosa and surrounding communities. Three of the City’s neighborhoods, The Downs, Glendale Gardens, and Hillcrest were among the many historic areas impacted by the storm. The twister damaged or destroyed 34 homes in these neighborhoods, and in the process imperiled their status as recognized historic districts. Shortly after the storm, the Alabama Historical Commission (AHC) surveyed the wreckage of the neighborhoods and came away with several concerns about their historic standing. The AHC recommended that additional efforts be undertaken to preserve their historic status. The Office of Archaeological Research (OAR) began to investigate the impact of the storm on behalf of the City of Tuscaloosa. Prior to the tornado, the districts featured 69 historic homes in the Downs, 36 in Glendale Gardens, and 28 homes in Hillcrest. In January, OAR documented only 62 homes in The Downs, 24 in Glendale Gardens, and 18 in Hillcrest. The integrity of the individual homes and districts was evaluated based on such factors as intact historic architectural and environmental features and district continuity. Numerous sources were referenced during

research for the project. These included courthouse documents, newspaper and magazine articles, historic aerial photographs, and historical contexts. A National Park Service publication entitled National Register Bulletin: Historic Residential Suburbs Guidelines for Evaluation and Documentation for the National Register of Historic Places provided the necessary information for understanding the national historical, social, and architectural forces that influenced and dictated pre- and post-World War II housing developments in Tuscaloosa. Research determined that The Downs, Glendale Gardens, and Hillcrest occupy a rarified place in Tuscaloosa’s history. These historic neighborhoods are unique examples of Garden City, cul-de-sac, automobile, and garden suburbs, all residential development trends that became popular at the time. OAR presented its findings at a meeting of the Tuscaloosa Historic Preservation Commission in March. Based on updated surveys, integrity evaluation, and additional research, OAR recommended that The Downs, Glendale Gardens, and Hillcrest retain their designation as historic districts, preserving their status as significant examples of Tuscaloosa’s development.

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Discovering Alabama

produces episode about April 27th tornado

Dr. Doug Phillips offers a very personal look at the aftermath of the tornadoes that ravaged our state on April 27, 2011. Remarkable before and after footage of natural areas laid bare speaks for itself.

“The lives rent asunder by this tragedy will never be the same. We would fool ourselves to think otherwise. Yet with each other’s support, care, with the love we have for one another, we share the pain of remembering and the hope for tomorrow.” –Dr. Doug Phillips

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Mike Gilbert demonstrates the atlatl at the Moundville Native American Festival.

Wendell White shows Moundville park visitors the proper stance for atlatl throwing.

A Collections Department T

Top: different types of atlatls; Above: Bannerstone weight; Top right: owl hook.

he artifact pictured here from the Museum's collections is a carved atlatl hook, one element of an early sophisticated Native American spear thrower. Unique in its representation of an owl, this particular hook was carved from animal bone and was instrumental in launching the spear. The word “atlatl” comes from Nahuatl, a group of related languages and dialects from the Nahuan branch (traditionally called “Aztecan”) of the UtoAztecan language family, spoken by an estimated 1.5 million people today, most of whom live in Central Mexico. An important piece of indigenous hunting equipment, the atlatl acted as a lever that increased force and speed. An atlatl is comprised of a shaft, usually carved from wood, and a hook at one end which supports and propels the butt of the spear. The atlatl increased the velocity and accuracy with which a spear could be thrown. A weight, commonly called a bannerstone, was

‘What is it’? often strapped to the midsection of the atlatl shaft, further increasing accuracy and force. The earliest examples of atlatls recovered from sites in Alabama date to early Archaic times, perhaps as early as 8000 B.C., and remained in use during the time of European contact. This atlatl hook was excavated from the Perry site located in Lauderdale County, Alabama (1Lu25) in 1938, an excavation that was part of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration activities. The site was inhabited from about 3600 B.C. to A.D. 1300. Because the site was a shell midden and shells have a high calcium carbonate content which slows the normal rate of decay caused by soil acidity, it yielded extremely well-preserved bone artifacts.

Ben Lundberg Joins the office of archaeological research Team Benjamin Lundberg has accepted the position of Graphic and GIS (geographic information systems) Analyst at the Office of Archaeological Research. Ben comes to us from the University of Alabama’s Department of Geography where he recently defended his Master of Science thesis on non-motorized transportation in the Tuscaloosa and Northport area and will graduate this coming August. Ben has several years of experience both in archaeology and in the natural sciences. He received his BS from The University of Tennessee in Chattanooga where he also worked for the Jeffrey L. Brown Institute of Archaeology. He was presented with an Outstanding Senior Award in Environmental Science from UTC.

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Following graduation, Ben helped excavate and map a deeply buried Late Archaic site on the banks of the Tennessee River in downtown Chattanooga. His environmental science background is varied and includes projects conducted all over North America. Ben spent several summers working in the Subarctic and Arctic regions of Alaska and Canada conducting geochemical surface sampling and mapping of gold deposits. He also worked with geophysical surveying efforts across the Southwest and has monitored environmental conditions on the Ahakhav Tribal Preserve in Arizona. His experience will be a great asset to OAR as we expand our use of GIS mapping strategies and database development.


New Moundville Docent Training Date Set for August 25th Fourteen new volunteers attended our first training class of 2012 on Saturday,

January 21st at Moundville Archaeological Park. Many of these first trainees now work as on-site, weekend docents in the newly renovated Jones Archaeological Museum. A docent is someone highly able to lecture or teach on a particular subject in a museum setting. Moundville’s docents learn the fundamentals of archaeology, the prehistory and history of Moundville and the site’s cultural significance. These volunteers also learned in-depth information on the museum’s new exhibits as well as different strategies for interpreting the exhibits and the park as a whole. But, we don’t want to stop there! The newly renovated museum’s popularity has increased the park’s demand for guided tours of the entire site, as well as the museum. We are now recruiting for our second training class of 2012, held August 25 from 10 am to 4 pm. While the first class specifically prepared volunteers to

host museum tours, this session will focus on outside tours. Initially, learning the same basic information these tour guides will later learn various other aspects of Southeastern Indian culture such as plants and foods, Native American games and Mississippian arts and ornamentation. If you can spare us at least one day per month, then Moundville Archaeological Park needs you! All materials are provided as well as coffee and snacks in the morning and lunch in the afternoon. Presentations on various aspects of Moundville are followed by a site and museum tour. Potential docents will shadow experienced guides as they give their tours before ultimately conducting a tour on their own. We ask that anyone volunteering for the training be able to work at least one eight hour day per month. For more information or to sign up for the class, email Catie Cooper at crcooper@crimson.ua.edu or call 205-371-8732.

universit y of alabama museums membership

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g i v i ng l e v e l s & b e n e f i t s

uch of the natural beauty of Alabama is found among its many rivers. To recognize the vital role these rivers play in making our state unique, the University of Alabama Museums has designated gift membership levels with the names of some of Alabama’s best-known and beloved rivers.

All membership levels are important to the Museum. We hope you will be as generous as your circumstances allow.

Alabama River $40

cahaba River $250

• Unlimited admission (except for special events) to: Moundville Archaeological Park Alabama Museum of Natural History Gorgas House Paul W. Bryant Museum • Membership newsletter • Discounts on Museum programs and Summer Expedition • Membership card and decal • Recognition in newsletter • Invitations to special member events

• Free admission to Moundville Native American Festival • Unlimited admission to Museums for member and 5 guests • Gift membership for one year at Alabama level • 20% discount at University of Alabama Museum Shops • Other benefits as listed in previous level

B l a c k wa rr i o r R i v e r $100 • Receive Discovering Alabama DVDs • 10% discount at University of Alabama Museum Shops • Other benefits as listed in previous level

coosa River $500 • Unlimited admission to Museums for member and 7 guests • Book on natural history from The University of Alabama Press • Reduced rental rates for Museum facilities • Other benefits as listed in previous level

Sipsey River $1000

D OUGLAS E . J ONES society $2500 • Unlimited admission to UA Museums for 12 guests • Special recognition in Smith Hall Foyer • Three gift memberships for one year at the Cahaba River Level • Other benefits as listed in the previous level

eugene allen smith society $5000 • Special recognition in Smith Hall foyer • Special Museum excursion lead by Executive Director of The University of Alabama Museums • Unlimited admission to Museums for member and 15 guests • Other benefits as listed in previous level

• Unlimited admission to Museums for member and 10 guests • Three gift memberships for one year at Black Warrior level • Other benefits as listed in previous level

Yes, I/we want to support The University of Alabama Museums Alabama River $40

Charge to:

B l a c k Wa rr i o r R i v e r $ 1 0 0

MasterCard

Cahaba River $250

Account Number_______________________________________________

Coosa River $500

Expiration Date________________________________________________

Sipsey River $1000

My Signature__________________________________________________

D OUGLAS EPPS J ONES S o c i e t y $ 2 5 0 0

Name(s)_____________________________________________________

Eugene Allen Smith Society $5000

Address______________________________________________________

My/our membership is enclosed My employer will match this gift

Visa

Phone_______________________________________________________ E-mail_______________________________________________________

Please make checks payable to the University of Alabama Museums and mail to: Box 870340 • Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0340 Your annual gift is tax deductible to the extent provided by law. Thank you for your support.

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nonprofit org. u.s. postage

paid

tuscaloosa al permit #16

Box 870340 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487–0340 (205) 348-7550 museums.ua.edu museum.programs@ua.edu

Connect with UA Museums on Facebook Your visit to Moundville Archaeological Park, the Alabama Museum of Natural History or the Gorgas House doesn’t have to end at the front door lobby. Stay connected with UA Museums online, wherever in the world you may be! Become a fan on Facebook. This is the place to connect with the museums and lovers of natural and American history from around the world. Connect with Moundville Archaeological Park, the Alabama Museum of Natural History, the Office of Archaeological Research or the Gorgas House on Facebook by visiting our pages and clicking on the “Like” button.

J.C.C. SANDERS LECTURE SERIES

Photo of some of the over 200 attendees at the 16th Annual J.C.C. Sanders Lecture Series on April 7 with Wilson Green lecturing on Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard.

Museum Chronicle 40 Spring 2012  

Newsletter of the University of Alabama Museums

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