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v a l l e y

f a m i l y

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2 01 2 R MBE E V NO

Humor

Holiday Stress and Diaper Rash

Social Trends The Neighborhood Gets Bigger

Nutrition

Happy Thanks-Dipping


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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012


EDITOR’S LETTER

Shorter Days Longer Nights

I

t seemed like summer might never end, but it’s finally feeling a bit like fall. And while this means much-needed cooler weather, it also means the days are shorter and night is beginning sooner. Kids aren’t able to play outside as long, and when you call them inside many parents are left wondering, what now?

How many of us remember playing outside as a child, with strict instructions to come inside before dark? I would have rather skipped dinner all together in exchange for just five more minutes to play. Some things never change, but as parents it’s our job to make sure our kids stay safe and sound. Keeping a curfew is a great place to start. Today, our neighborhoods are getting even bigger and in keeping with safety, District Attorney Phil Cline ends his series on social trends highlighting our responsibility of warning our children of strangers, not only in our neighborhood, but on the Internet as well. For this and a recap of his Top 10 reminders for social media safety, turn to page 16. But also with fall comes the joy of the holidays. If you think your family is a bit unique (we affectionately refer to ours as “the circus”) during your Thanksgiving and Christmas gatherings, you may find you lean more toward normal after reading humor writer, Crystal R. R. Edwards’ article this month. Turn to page 6. The weeks between Halloween and Christmas are some of the worst (for kids and parents) in terms of healthy eating. Even the strictest of families tend to break the rules during the Holidays, and finding a way to balance all that sugar is a good idea. Parents and nutritionists Rebecca and Justin Reynolds, share insightful tips and ideas on adding healthy dips to snacks and entrees, encouraging their children to eat vegetables and fruits, while making them fun and delicious. Turn to page 18. The seasons may change, but our desire to provide you with valuable tips and resources for raising healthy and happy children does not. We’ve heard from so many of you and we thank you for your wonderful feedback. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and be sure to check us out on Facebook at www.facebook.com/RaiseMagazine.

Karen Tellalian, EXECUTIVE EDITOR For more information or to submit a story idea, email Karen@dmiagency.com or call (559) 739-1747 or fax (559) 738-0909. RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

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8

Behavior

V NO

ABCD … ADHD Are They Just Letters?

EMB

ER

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PUBLISHED BY DMI Agency 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 EDITORIAL Executive Editor Karen Tellalian Assistant Editor TAYLOR VAUGHN Content Editor Kyndal Kennedy ART & PRODUCTION Art Director ROSS Yukawa

in this issue

Graphic Designer CHRIS BLY CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Crystal R. R. Edwards DAVID RICHARDS

6

Humor

17 Dental Health

Holiday Stress and Diaper Rash

23 Adventures

10 Education

Promote Language Arts Skills

12 Positive Parenting

24 Calendar 26 Performance 27 Resources

Structure Gives Kids Security and Freedom

Fun with Flower Blubs

Brighten a Child’s Winter Sky!

22 College Prep

Scholarship Strategies That Work!

Raise Magazine is distributed in Visalia, Exeter, Woodlake and Tulare. If you would like copies available at your business, call 559.739.1747 Raise Magazine is published 12 times a year and distributed at hightraffic locations in the South Valley av rea. For a list of locations, call the DMI Agency office. Views expressed in columns are those of the columnist and not necessarily those of DMI Agency or its advertisers. © 2012 DMI Agency

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BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Malkasian Accountancy LLP Gary Malkasian CPA JEFFREY Malkasian EA

SALES OFFICE 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 559.739.1747 • Fax 559.738.0909

Happy Thanks-Dipping!

20 Charity

Phil Cline Susan Schieferle

The Neighborhood Gets Bigger

18 Nutrition

mariya Grigoryan

ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Bridget Elmore

16 Social Trends

Justin & Rebecca Reynolds

Operations Manager Maria Gaston

14 Gardening

Jeri Burzin Jesus & Adriana Gonzalez

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

VIEW THE MAG ONLINE! issuu.com/raisemagazine

Facebook.com/RaiseMagazine

Cover Photo: Conor Sanders, 6, from Visalia. Photo by Jamie Campbell, JC Photography


RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

5


HUMOR

Text by Crystal R. R. Edwards

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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012


HUMOR

A

nd with the words, “My butt is spicy!” the holiday season began. Birdie Sue, then two years old, had fired the starting gun of embarrassing actions and stressful circumstances that opened the Christmas Marathon of Misery.

Why is it, exactly, that children who are more or less respectful, good and charming during the balance of the year become machines of parental ego destruction during November and December? The holidays, when that cousin you have been secretly jealous of since that Easy-Bake Oven incident in 1978 is standing there, beautiful and zit-free, with her pearls and cashmere sweater and engagement ring the size of a Mini Cooper. Meanwhile, you are trying your best not to let your bra strap show and hold your abs in and stop that tic in your left eye ... then your kid comes in screaming about her butt being spicy. (We later found out this meant she had a bit of a rash in her Pull-Up.) Holiday stress is always joked about by everyone, but it is generally couched in polite, understated phrases or watered-down terms. “Oh, my family is just a little unusual,” you might tell a friend, “so Christmas dinner is somewhat chaotic.” I have always been more of a tell-it-like-you-see-it gal, so I tell my friends, “Well, my ultraconservative parents have expressed their desire to give the kids Bibles again this year, and for dinner my widowed father-in-law will be bringing a date who we suspect is a stripper.” That is not “my family is just a little crazy.” That’s “I’ll be in the locked bathroom with a bottle of bourbon and a box of Kleenex” holiday stress. And in the same way “somewhat chaotic” is related as “There was a knock-down drag out fight with chairs and Gideons’ New Testaments flying everywhere. With luck, however, the Christmas bonus can be used to replace my dining set.” I’m, overall, a glass-half-full person as well as brutally honest about my psychotic family interactions. (Mom, if you are reading this, sorry! I honestly did not know we were going to have a mini Career Day and demonstration. How are you doing on the new meds?) A few years ago we made the 17-hour drive from Texas to Ohio to visit my parents’ home. We had a 1.5-year-old, a 3.5-year-old, and an almost-seven-year-old in the car. We loaded up a video player with hours and hours of Mr. Bean episodes and various Care Bear cartoons. By the time we made it to the halfway point of Memphis, Tennessee, and were ready to bunk down for the night at a hotel, we were all in a daze. The children were bouncing off the walls, my husband was staring at a doorknob like he’d never seen one before, and I was glaring at them all and yelling “Care Bear stare!” The next day we finished the drive in near-silence, shocked and dismayed by how very close we had all come to the abyss of madness. Overall, that particular Christmas visit wasn’t too bad. Oh, there was a moment or two of insanity when Hedgehog decided to wander out the back door to walk on the ice of Mom’s koi pond, and a brief but hysterically funny run-in with the local police department when Tapper picked up an apple and stashed it into his pocket at the grocery

while we were distracted by the holiday dinner shopping list. But other than hypothermia and fast-talking my baby out of a shoplifting rap, it was relatively smooth going and stress-free. And then we had the drive home, complete with three flu-suffering children and a car that suddenly started going whump-a-whump-a-flort-SMACK-whump three hours outside of Dayton. As I said, not too bad. This year I think I am going to make a sign and hang it on the front door of the house to dissuade visitors from bringing their crazy past the threshold of my home. In previous years, I’ve tried to lay out ground rules in simple, easy-to-understand English, and it has failed miserably. This year I am taking a new tack: Achtung Alles Visitouren! Dis Haus is nicht fer gercrazymaken und politikken. Ist easy stressen der Hostessen, screwen up der Kinders, und maken der Host a hidden-drinken in das closet. Dis Haus is nicht fer dummkopfen to bring der Issues und Dysfunction as der guesten fer Festessen und Diner. Relaxen und watchen das Tannenbaum blinkenlights. Danke! There is, of course, some chance of this failing to work. For that, I am prepared to bring out the Big Guns: the family photo albums. By forcing, encouraging, them to revisit family history and past good times, it may be possible to derail their attempts to stress me into an early grave before we unlid the goose and start stuffing our faces. I have to admit, however, there is a very strong, almost overwhelming temptation, to simply back off and let them fly their Freak Flags. I will, of course, video record the entire evening so I finally have the chance to YouTube a viral, worldwide comedy video trend that you’ll probably find in your email inbox on December 27. Hey, everyone needs a life goal, right? More seriously (yes, I can be serious), I hope everyone reading this has a warm and happy holiday season. From Thanksgiving to Christmas, I do look forward to sharing time of especial communion with my family and close friends, and I like to use the time to watch them all interact and weave a story for me and for my future grandchildren. I remember as a child sitting on the couch, nestled up to an aunt or grandparent and drowsing while listening to the rumble of men’s voices and the laughter of my mother. The smells and sounds and lights dazzled me then, and dazzle me still. No matter your religion or philosophy, dear Reader, this is a glorious time of family, sharing and self-evaluation and I hope and pray we are all able to bring away perhaps a bit more love to share amongst everyone. Happy holidays! And if you need me for anything, you’ll find me sipping Jefferson Reserve out of a Harry Potter cup and rocking back and forth on the bathroom floor.

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

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BEHAVIOR

AB

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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012


BEHAVIOR

CD … ADHD

Are They Just Letters?

Lisa Miller, Ph.D., Child Psychologist

H

ow many calls have you received from school about your child’s behavior? How much time have you spent hunting down soccer cleats, textbooks, favorite toys, etc.? How often does your child do their homework and then forget to turn it in? Does your child often seem to not hear you when you are speaking directly to them? Do they get lost along the way when asked to complete a task? If any of these questions describe familiar experiences, your child may have Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This disorder (I prefer the term “difference” ) was once divided into ADHD and ADD. Now it is divided into three types: ADHD, predominantly inattentive type; ADHD predominantly hyperactiveimpulsive type; and ADHD, combined type. The inattentive child appears to be a “daydreamer”. Most of us have experienced the latter two types (the children who may turn a small group gathering into an exhausting marathon of interruptions and accidental incidents). ADHD is a neurobehavioral disorder. In other words, what is happening in the brain is displayed by the child’s behavior. Even a child with severe ADHD may be able to sit still for hours playing video games and/or watching television. These activities consist of constantly changing stimuli, thus they are not good measures to

determine if a child has ADHD. While there are no medical tests which can make the diagnosis of ADHD (any type), the diagnosis may be made by the child’s primary care physician, a psychiatrist, or psychologist, by gathering information from the parents, the school, and by observation of the child. So what does one do when the diagnosis is made? The treatment may involve parent education, individual and family therapy for the child, school support, and medication. Practical interventions include things such as a “there chair” or other area in which all items necessary for the following day’s activities are placed. A chart with pictures for younger children may help them stay on track with their daily activities. A special brightly colored folder just for homework may help. Some children study best with no distractions while others may find background music helps. Allowing a child to walk around while reading or practicing spelling words or math facts has been found to help some children. Finally, rewards for target behaviors, like remembering to feed pets, are always helpful. Rewards do not have to cost money, and can be things such as having one-on-one time with a parent, or getting to stay up a few minutes longer. With the help of your physician, therapist, and school, you and your child can overcome the deficits that may be created by ADHD. For more information visit the Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder website at: www.chadd.org.

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

9


EDUCATION

HOME ACTIVITIES:

Promote Language Arts Skil s Text by Jeri Burzin, Board Certified Educational Therapist

1. Read, read, read with your child. ✿ Read books your child is interested in; reading materials can also

be magazines, comic books, etc. ✿ Preview the page before reading and review difficult words first. ✿ Take turns reading paragraphs or pages. ✿ Read the title and make a prediction (“What do you think this story will be about?”). ✿ What do the words make you envision? Ask choice/contrast questions as necessary, like, “Was it a building or boat?” or, “Did you see an animal or a person?” ✿ Ask questions about cause/effect relationships (“Why did this happen?”). ✿ Ask inference questions and have your child look for clues or evidence to support their answer. ✿ Retell the story in sequence, and give clues to help your child remember it. ✿ Ask what title they would give this story or book? ✿ A follow up activity for reading a story is to have your child say what might happen next, and make up a sequel to the story.

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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

2. Hands-on and real-world activities. ✿ Read directions for mapping routes, cooking, and playing games. ✿ Develop shopping lists for groceries, hardware, clothing, etc. ✿ Develop an itinerary for your next trip or vacation. ✿ Explain unfamiliar words and have your child give examples of

them and use the word in a sentence. ✿ Put the new word on a 3x5 index card and save in a box. Write the new word on the front and the sentence or picture on the back. ✿ Practice these words daily until your child can get them right five times. ✿ Play games like Boggle, Scrabble, Tic-Tac-Toe, Concentration, and Bingo with the vocabulary words. ✿ Make up stories, puzzles, and riddles using these words. 3. Use a new word daily at dinner.


EDUCATION

An Independent Practice Association providing

excellence in mental and behavioral health care delivery in Central California Kristin Sorensen Alldredge, LMFT

Melinda L. Mauro, LCSW

Ross M. Becker, PhD, LCSW

Mary K. McDonald, PhD

Frances E. Becker, LCSW Paul C. Bennett, LCSW

Mike Mayo, LCSW Lisa A. Miller, PhD

Sandra T. Bennett, LCSW

Lori Pasion-Gonzales, PhD

Linda Del Rio, LMFT

Diane B. Post, LCSW

Lynn W. Gonzales, LCSW

David G. Richards, LCSW

Sue Enterline, LCSW

Colleen Richards, LCSW

Jacquelyn Harris-Groeber, PhD Kent Henry, LMFT

John A. Mauro, LCSW

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Michael H. Shaffer, LCSW, LMFT Barry Sommer, LEP, LMFT

1212 W. Main Street Visalia, CA 93291 559-738-0644

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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

11


POSITIVE PARENTING

Structure Gives Kids Security and Freedom Text by Child Services Network of Tulare County

A

s adults, we sometimes believe that living our lives by routine can be dull and uninspiring. For children, however, routines provide a comfortable consistency, which then allows them the flexibility to grow and explore. According to the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning: “Studies have documented that schedules and routines influence

children’s emotional, cognitive, and social development. Predictable and consistent schedules in preschool classrooms help children feel secure and comfortable. Also, schedules and routines help children understand the expectations of the environment and reduce the frequency of behavior problems, such as tantrums and acts of aggression.” Believe it or not, the spontaneity of your children’s youth can actually be enhanced by having a structure they can rely on; routines involve repetition, which leads to predictability, in turn leads to stability and security. And with that security, children feel free to experiment and explore their worlds more freely. Structure can also reduce the stresses of everyday parenting. When your child is able to predict how things are going to go—when expectations are clear—there will be less nagging, whining, and arguing.

Here are some ideas for routines that you can try implementing in your family: Homework and Chores. Designate a specific time for doing homework and chores every day. When it is understood to be just a part of the daily schedule, it may be easier for your child to accept without argument. Knowing exactly when these potentially unpleasant tasks must be done helps children to plan ahead and be prepared for it, rather than being suddenly interrupted in their play, without warning. Again, the safety and predictability of a routine helps children to develop a sense of mastery over their lives. Additionally, you might want to establish another routine after chores are completed – something your children will look forward to, like a snack or a story. This is a good life lesson, because they’ll learn that after a necessary task is completed, they can move on to other, more enjoyable things; the more organized and self-disciplined they are, the sooner they can move on. Mealtime. Regular mealtimes help children develop healthy eating patterns and habits. Try to plan to eat at least one meal together as a family each day, or once every two days. It’s especially important when things are hectic to make time for the whole family to be together and catch up on what is going on in each other’s lives. This is also a routine that will help your children

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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

observe planning in action and learn responsibility (such as setting the table, clearing the table, or for older kids participating in preparing the meal). For younger children, eating together as a family helps them to learn self-feeding skills and to experiment with new foods, simply by imitation. Bedtime. This is a battle that has probably been fought between parents and children since the beginning of time. Having a pre-bedtime routine is important because it can help take the struggle out of getting your child to go to bed, and it can also help mornings go a little easier. A consistent bedtime ritual can be soothing and help your child wind down. Evidence also suggests that a calm bedtime routine can help reduce bedwetting and nightmares. One of the most important parts of a bedtime routine is having a consistent and appropriate bedtime. Even during school breaks and throughout the holidays, try to maintain a bedtime schedule that is almost identical to your family’s school routine (it will make the transition back to school easier for everyone, too). After a good night’s sleep, your child will wake up refreshed and energized for the day ahead. Every child is different, so experiment to find out what bedtime activities will be most relaxing for your child. For some, having a warm bath or shower right before bed helps; others may want to listen to music or talk about their day, or simply hear a story or two and enjoy some snuggle time. Bedtime can be a great opportunity for one-on-one, quality time together, when you can give each child your undivided attention for a time. Interruptions. That being said, we all know what can happen to even the best-laid plans: there will sometimes be circumstances beyond your control that will disrupt your family’s normal routines. In these instances, there is usually no choice but to deviate from your usual plans. The important thing here is how you respond to these events and to the changes that result from it. Children observe and often adapt the behaviors of their parents, so by remaining calm and flexible during unpredictable times, you will teach your children to respond in a similar way. Keep things as regular as possible, but set an example of, when life throws you a curve ball, you adjust accordingly, and then return to your normal routines as soon as it is practical. As a parent, it is important to take the initiative to establish and enforce a routine for your children that facilitates their development. April Dodd, a licensed marriage family therapist at Tulare Youth Service Bureau, stated, “Children need routine to feel secure. Inherently, children are not skilled enough to set their own routines, so parents need to be the ones to set and hold those routines for children (i.e., certain time and place for homework, same bath and bedtime each night). When children feel secure, they are able to explore their world and grow.”


POSITIVE PARENTING

JC

Photography www.jcphotoz.com

559-967-3027

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

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GARDENING

Flower Bulbs Fun with

Text by Susan Schieferle, Master Gardener, University of California Cooperative Extension

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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012


GARDENING

W

hat are bulbs? Bulbs are underground structures that contain stored food (sugars and carbohydrates) which nourishes new plants to grow. Bulbs contain a true plant inside. Tell your child that a bulb is like a lunch box filled with enough food for the growing season. What food is not used up this growing season will be saved inside the bulb for the next. Bulbs come in different sizes and shapes, just like seeds do.

The best time to plant bulbs outside (to bloom next Spring) is between the pumpkin and the turkey, or between Halloween and Thanksgiving. This is because the ground is cool enough to put the bulb asleep for the winter. Then in early spring, you will observe green shoots coming out of the ground – leaves first, and then flowers. The fascinating thing about bulbs is that they will bloom year after year. But having to wait until spring to see the flowers is a long time. This month, we are going to plant amaryllis bulbs in a container inside the house that should bloom in six to eight weeks.

Let’s get started! 1. Look around your garage and yard for an empty 12- or 16-inch pot with drainage holes, or buy one at the store. Make sure the pot has drainage holes, or drill some for your child. You can use a plastic one and insert it into a decorative pot. 2. Go to your local nursery with your children. Packages of bulbs are everywhere. Look for and purchase three amaryllis bulbs. They are available individually or in packages. Purchase container potting soil if you do not have any at home. 3. Put a coffee filter over the drainage holes and fill the pot half full with damp potting soil. 4. Place bulbs so the bases have firm contact with the soil. 5. Put soil over the bulbs until the top 1/3 of the bulb peeks out of the soil. Leave this part of the bulb uncovered. 6. Water slightly, but be careful not to overwater. A good rule to check for moisture is putting a finger one inch deep into the soil. If no moisture is felt, it is time to water. November Gardening Tip: If you have a veggie garden that you will not be using until next spring, then it’s time to remove all plant material and dispose of it in your compost bin or green can, or chop it and turn it into the soil. When you rake up leaves from your yard, add some to your garden soil along with a bag or two of composted steer manure (from the nursery) and dig them under to ready the soil for spring planting.

7. Place pot in a bright, warm spot in your home. 8. Turn the pot often to expose all bulbs to sunlight. 9. Shortly, you will notice green tips (leaves) popping out of the bulbs. In about six to eight weeks, you should have amaryllis flowers.

October Follow-up: Your succulent table bowl should have some growth, but you should still be able to see the initial or design you made. We will trim these in December to make something very special. You won’t want to miss the December issue of Raise! Wood Industries will provide a FREE gallon bag of garden soil to any child who stops in to start a garden project! 7715 Ave. 296, Visalia | 559.625.9426

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

15


SOCIAL TRENDS

The

Neighborhood Gets BIGGER

I

Text by Phil Cline, District Attorney

n wrapping up this series of the potential dangers and pitfalls of texting and social media, it is clear that our youth are facing both challenges and adventures in this digital world. As a child growing up in Farmersville, I knew my neighborhood. I knew the boundaries of how far I could travel, and I knew who I should avoid. My parents could be fairly certain whom I would come in contact with on my way to school. However, when we place a cellular telephone with Internet accessibility in the hands of a child, the neighborhood just got a lot bigger.

Protecting a child from strangers on the Internet is not going to be a one-time conversation; it must be ongoing and continuous. Adult predators posing as teenagers are very common. They know how to groom a child into sharing private information, innermost thoughts, and even photographs. That same predator may be easily recognizable to you, if he or she lived in your neighborhood. You might detect something that made you uneasy in the way this person approached children, or appeared to be on narcotics, or some other sign that caused you to warn your child to avoid that house. When this predator operates on line, they can assume any persona and can contact your child while your child is safely tucked away in your own home. If your child has “friends” beyond your physical neighborhood, it is important to be vigilant in questioning the true identity of the person, inquiring about the person’s motives, the time of day of the contacts, and whether this person would mind if you contacted him or her directly. Anyone not willing to meet a parent or guardian should immediately cause concern. Although this is my last article in this series on social trends, my hope is that I have left you with talking points for conversations with your children, and made you more aware of the complex and potentially criminal aspects of social media. To the right is a Top 10 list of reminders for social media safety. If you have any questions or comments regarding this topic, please do not hesitate to contact the Tulare County District Attorney’s Office at (559) 636-5494.

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Do not assume any communication (photos or text) sent via a phone or computer is private. 2. Do not send any nude pictures of yourself or anyone else over the phone or computer. 3. Refuse to forward or pass along cyberbullying messages. 4. Report cyberbullying to a trusted adult. 5. Block communication with anyone who engages in cyberbullying. 6. Do not share personal information with a stranger over the Internet. 7. Consider a “technology break” after school – put the cell phone away. 8. Remember your legacy on the Internet can be long lasting. Think twice before posting. 9. If someone asks you to do anything that makes you uncomfortable, tell a trusted adult. 10. Research any spontaneous gathering advertised on the Internet before attending (i.e. flash mobs). 1.


DENTAL HEALTH

Oral Manifestations of Hypophosphatemic (Vitamin D-Resistant) Rickets Text by Mariya Grigoryan, D.M.D.

R

ickets is a childhood condition caused by Vitamin D deficiency. Hypophosphatemic, Vitamin D-resistant rickets is an X-linkeddominant inherited kidney disorder; this is the most common form of rickets in developed countries. The hypophosphatemia leads to rachitic bone changes that are not responsive to therapeutic doses of Vitamin D, hence the name “Vitamin D-resistant rickets.” Affected patients have a short stature with bowing of the legs.

The treatment for rickets primarily involves correction of the conditions which led to the disorder. This can be as simple as a change in diet to include foods high in Vitamin D, such as milk, fish, or liver. Treatment might also mean a gradual increase in the amount of sunlight received by the child. Severe cases may require surgery for the correction and repair of bones. Children with rickets are likely to suffer

from stunted growth, bone pain and abnormalities. The dentist as well as the pediatrician should be made aware of the features of this disorder so early intervention can prevent subsequent serious and more invasive dental procedures. Other dental defects which should be intervened early are abscesses. Multiple dental abscesses can develop in the absence of dental carries. These patients have very large pulp (nerve) chambers. These defects are more severe in males, and affected males also have been shown to be at increased risk for impacted carries. It is also associated with defective dentin, allowing ingress of micro-organisms to the dental pulp once attention had removed the overlay protective enamel. The enamel of these patients is relatively thin, hypocalsified or hypoplastic. The teeth usually show taurodontism, poorly defined lamina dura and hypoplastic olvelar ridge. Spontaneous periapical abscess formation is due to bacterial invasion through enamel cracks and dentinal micro cleavage of the teeth. Intra-oral findings suggest that patients are missing baby incisors’ (central or laterals).

Gentle, Caring Touch Dentistry At the office of Dr. Mariya Grigoryan your child's smile is our priority. We offer comprehensive care for the whole family.

• Periodontal Care • Laser Treatments • Restorative Work • Orthodontics • Teeth Whitening • Implants THE OFFICE OF

Dr. Mariya Grigoryan, D.M.D. 2634 W. Walnut Ave. Visalia CA 93277 p 559.732.7224

The Grigoryan family Simon, Mariya, Hyke and Gary

Boston Graduate School of Dentistry, Certificate for Orthodontic Treatment Certificate for Oral Conscience Sedation, Fellowship Recognition for Implant Placement Member American Dental Implant Association, Certificate for San Francisco Implant Placement

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

17


NUTRITION

F

Happy Tha

ootball game get-togethers, family and friends parties, and Thanksgiving gatherings are just around the corner. It’s a wonderful season with so much to be thankful for – delicious, healthy, homemade food included. With the parties arranged, what food is there to supplement the main courses? Never fear! Nutritious-family-fun-food-makers are here.

What do you add to the greasy football game party food? What will compliment a turkey or ham, dressing, potatoes, gravy, salad, and green beans? Try a delicious dip. Adding a dip to the table can encourage the eating of vegetables, fruit, and whole grains. Be prepared to say, “Wow”; we are bringing the antioxidants, betasitosterol, and protein to the table, in a bowl of dip! For friendly gatherings and parties, there are many different healthy and delicious dip options, including fresh tomato salsa, zesty bean dip, hot artichoke dip, roasted eggplant and feta dip, creamy herb dip, ranch dip, guacamole, and French onion dip that will impress your party guests. Fresh tomato salsa can be served with whole grain sun chips, corn chips, or to add flavor to the meat. It has many benefits from fresh vegetables, including lycopene (tomatoes), vitamin C, B6 (peppers), vitamin B1, vitamin K, biotin, chromium, calcium, folic acid, dietary fiber (onions), and the enzyme alliinase (garlic and onion). The benefits of these vitamins and minerals include stroke and heart disease prevention, obtaining the daily intake of the needed vitamins and minerals to keep our bodies balanced and helping our bodies fight off free radicals. Bean dips, in all varieties, give your guests (and children) the opportunity to help themselves to multiple bites of protein. Beans are also packed full of fiber, B vitamins, calcium, potassium and folate. Beans help us feel full longer, and

get full faster so that we don’t overeat – and they are delicious, so that’s a huge perk. With dips like hot artichoke, roasted eggplant and feta, creamy herb, ranch and French onion, it is easy to assume that you could probably find a delicious dip with any ingredient you have sitting in your fridge. The amazing thing about homemade dips is they are less expensive, they don’t have any preservatives, you (the parent or host) have complete control of sodium levels and ingredients (in case of allergies), and the ingredients are fresh, which is healthier and more desirable. When you make dips at home you can use honey instead of sugar and make other supplementations that are wiser for your family and friends. With the dips that are creamier, I purchase wheat thins, veggies, make homemade whole wheat pita chips or buy heavy whole wheat bakery bread and cut it into cubes to enjoy them with. Among delicious homemade dips is guacamole dip made with avocados, the miracle fruit! Avocado delivers oleic acid (helps in the prevention of breast cancer), carotenoid lutein (protects against macular degeneration and cataracts – two agerelated eye diseases), vitamin E, monounsaturated fat and glutathione (great for heart disease prevention), folate (prevents strokes), and beta-sitosterol (a compound that lowers cholesterol). What more needs to be said? Serve guacamole with pita or corn chips, on tacos, tostadas, burritos, with turkey or ham, or whatever you like – the list could go on.

Tip: Your kids will love making their own crispy, crunchy corn, pita, or potato chips, and they are less expensive and much healthier being homemade. Remember, you control the ingredients when making it yourself, so you can know exactly what your family is eating. There is nothing sweeter than watching your kids help and feel accomplished when their first batch of snack chips come out hot from the oven!

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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012


nks-Dipping!

NUTRITION

Text by Justin and Rebecca Reynolds, Local Business Owners

In charge of dessert? Try semi-sweet or dark chocolate fondue. This is our dessert for family night; we warm up the semi-sweet chocolate chips (make sure you stir every 30 seconds in order to prevent scalding), and put the warm bowl on the counter with sliced apples, peaches, strawberries, mangoes, and any seasonal fruit. It’s a dessert we all can enjoy, guilt free! Why semi-sweet or dark chocolate? Semisweet chocolate contains about 60 percent bitter chocolate and 40 percent sugar. Unlike milk chocolate, semi-sweet chocolate contains no dairy products. Bitter chocolate is the product of the cacao bean, which contains flavanols that act as antioxidants, fighting dangerous free radicals that damage your cells. The more cocoa in your chocolate, the more antioxidants. Dark chocolate, like semi-sweet, contains more antioxidants than milk chocolate, and actually scores higher than

blueberries, raspberries and cranberries in antioxidant levels. When the parties are over, is the dipping? No way – kids love to dip! With three children under the age of three, I have found that if I can work a dip into one meal a day, I have more success with healthy eating. My kids enjoy dipping veggies into ranch or bean dip; two of them have started eating freshly sliced bell peppers and sliced white onions with their dips.They obtain a lot of their needed daily intake of vegetables during their snack or lunch of “dipping time,” and they have fun, too. Have a blessed month filled with full bellies and wonderful holiday memories … and happy dipping!

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

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CHARITY

E

very child looks forward to the joy and magic of the holiday season, but there are many children in Tulare County who won’t be able to have a magical holiday without the community’s help. The Child Welfare Services (CWS) Children’s Toy Drive is counting on your help to spread a little magic this year. Through the generosity of community partners—agencies, businesses, and individuals—CWS and Friends of Tulare County’s annual “Brighten a Child’s Winter Sky” Toy Drive hopes to provide at least one gift to each child in the CWS system.

Without the help of the community, hundreds of previously abused or neglected children may not receive any holiday gifts. Although foster and group homes receive funds for providing basic necessities, such as clothing and food, it is difficult to stretch that allowance to purchase any additional items, such as gifts during the holiday season. When you contribute to the CWS toy drive, you can be confident that every donation benefits the children in our foster care system. With the assistance of community members, the nearly 1500 children and youth in Tulare County’s child welfare system will be able to experience this holiday tradition, just like their peers. “We truly appreciate the community supporting our children who, through no fault of their own, are spending the holiday season in foster care,” said Jason T. Britt, director of human services for the Tulare County Health and Human Services Agency. “This work demonstrates that our children are not forgotten and creates a brighter holiday for the children within our child welfare system.” Taking part in this annual campaign, which began on October 8 and runs through Friday, December 3, is truly a heartwarming experience. The dedicated staff

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members who work with these children day-in and day-out can tell you that the rewards of participating in the Toy Drive are well worth the effort. “Seeing the childrens’ eyes light up as they realize there is a special gift just for them … that’s the best part,” said Miriam Sallam, a child welfare social worker. “It’s quite a privilege to be a part of these children’s lives. One pair of siblings was surprised to know Santa was able to locate them and had brought gifts for them. Helping make their holiday special by showing them that they are remembered and cared for is what makes the Toy Drive so magical.” In order to make sure all of the children are remembered this season, a “star” containing the child’s name, age, and gift preference has been created for each child. To sponsor a star by making a donation to the Toy Drive, please go to TulareHHSA.org to find more information, as well as the locations where you can drop off your donation. Participating in the toy drive is an opportunity for you, your family, or your business to spread the warmth of the holiday season. We welcome, encourage, and, most of all, thank all of you who show your support for foster care youth by sharing the spirit of the holiday season with them.


CHARITY

THE BRIDGE VIRTUAL ACADEMY ACCREDITED the online school option

623-0581 Children of all ages throughout Tulare County need safe place as they go through a difficult time in their lives.

Are you ready to be their shelter in a storm? Tulare County Foster Care Licensing offers: • Ongoing training • Support and mentors • Networking

Attend one of our orientations Thursday, November 1, 2012* Thursday, November 15, 2012* Thursday, December 6, 2012*

*Call

623-0581 to RSVP

We will hold your big hands as you connect with little ones.

THE BRIDGE VIRTUAL ACADEMY PROVIDES: • Interactive Online Program to keep students engaged • A-G University-Approved Full Curriculum to fill gaps or move ahead • Opportunities for Virtual Classroom Setting for socialization • Learning Inventories to understand individual learning modes • Career Exploration to assist in seeking jobs • Liaison to Online Community Colleges or 4-Year Universities to move beyond the high school diploma • Certified Teachers to counsel and keep students on track • Flexible hours and days to meet needs of various situations • Parent Portal to view student progress • Open start and end times • Open 24/7/365 for work access

THE BRIDGE VIRTUAL ACADEMY IS CURRENTLY ACCEPTING STUDENTS 6TH GRADE - 12TH GRADE PLUS Be part of education’s 21st century learning. Get on The Bridge to find YOUR best success. Let us help your find your gifts, skills, talents and passions that will lead you to your best career fit.

call: 559.375.4805 | email: scarl@passionineducation.com Click on THE BRIDGE ACADEMY for registration forms, view a list of classes and payment options at www.passionineducation.com

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

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COLLEGE PREP

Scholarship Strategies That Work! Text by Jesus and Adriana Gonzalez, Educational Consultants, ILEAD

A

common reality parents and students come to understand is that a scholarship is not an automatic award. A student will not earn a scholarship they have not applied for, and therefore are encouraged to utilize one of the best strategies: apply.

Searching and applying for scholarships takes time and effort on your child’s part, and involves more than their high school counselor making bulletin announcements and distributing applications. Typically, students must submit an individual application for each scholarship they are seeking an award from. Chances of receiving an award increase when your child submits multiple applications. Another useful (and often overlooked) scholarship application strategy is paying attention to detail. No matter how insignificant or arbitrary the details may seem, encourage your child to utilize appropriate scholarship application etiquette. This includes: neatness, completeness with all supporting documents, and most importantly, a timely application submission. When it comes to applying for scholarships, the applicant who does the best job of presenting his or her case is often times the one who is awarded. Scholarships regularly have set criteria and require information such as background, proof of grades, volunteerism, involvement in extra-curricular activities, and letters of recommendation. Whether your child is a first-generation college student, an excelling scholar, or involved in every possible activity on campus, encourage them to list these activities in their application, and to elaborate on each throughout their personal essay. Letters of recommendation are strongest when they come from someone able to speak to their abilities, strengths, and potential for success than when they come from someone with a specific job title. Students need to remember to not wait until the last minute to request a recommendation,

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providing sufficient time for a strong personalized letter. The personal essay is a critical component in the scholarship application process, allowing a selection committee an in-depth perspective about the applicant, their field of study, and an opportunity to hear about how they would benefit, should they be awarded. Committees love to hear about how applicants will become contributing members of society upon completion of their studies. While there are many competitive scholarships for high achieving students, there are also scholarships available to average students that focus on qualities other than academic merit. In essence, students should not automatically exclude themselves from seeking or applying for scholarships because of a belief that they are not suitable or qualified. Be aware of scholarship organizations that ask you to pay a fee and in turn guarantee you a scholarship (or several); this should raise a red flag. There may be some legitimate professional organizations that specialize in conducting scholarship searches, however, if you come across a source you are skeptical about, encourage your child to speak to their high school counselor as a precaution. One way to think about this is whether or not it makes sense to pay a fee to apply for free money ‌ most would say, probably not. Scholarship committees receive applications from numerous students each year. With so many deserving students, helping your child with these basic scholarship application strategies will give them a competitive edge.


ADVENTURES

Crystal Cave M ost visiters go to the Sequoia National Park to revel at the Giant Sequoias, standing tall and strong, high above our heads. However, the park is also privy to a vast underground world, full of adventure and surprises you wouldn’t expect from the park in our very own backyard. This underground world consists of more than 270 caves sprawled throughout the Sequoia National Park, just beneath our feet. So, pack up the family and head out for a fun day-trip to the Sequoias. There is one cave in particular that draws visitors from all over the world: Crystal Cave. Crystal Cave was discovered on April 28, 1918, by Alex Medley and Cassius Webster, two trail workers exploring the land on their day off. After finding the opening, they reported it to the park superintendent, Walter Fry. The cave has been explored, mapped, and researched from then on. Since 1941, Crystal Cave has been one of the Sequoia National Park’s primary visitor attractions, and continues to be the park’s only commercialized cave. To reach the Cave, you must drive down a seven-mile, twisty road, west of the General’s Highway, until you find the parking area. Once parked, hike down a steep, half-mile trail to the cave entrance, where the unique and haunting Spider Web Gate will greet you. (The 48-degree temperature in the cave will be sure to cool you off after this worthwhile trek.)

After passing through the Spider Web Gate, the guide will give a brief history of the cave and point out unique formations and features. Crystal Cave is adorned with curtains of icicle-like stalactites and stalagmites, impressively large rooms, and ornate marble, polished naturally by a subterranean stream. These features are only made visible from the lighted pathways and the flashlight of the guide, making a tour of Crystal Cave an unforgettable experience. A variety of tours are available depending on just how rugged visitors are willing to get. During the 45-minute Regular Daily Tour, visitors will be led from room to room on paved, lighted pathways, pausing to listen to the water and echoes in the cave, immersed in total darkness. For a more rustic adventure, give the 1.5-hour Candle-Light Tour a try, and explore the cave with only the light from your lantern; much like Medley and Webster did when they made their discovery. For those looking for a more in-depth experience, Discovery Tours are available for smaller groups. This 1.5-hour tour emphasizes the geology and biology of the cave environment providing a fascinating educational opportunity. Next time you plan your trip to the Sequoias, don’t just stop and look up at the beautiful trees … venture down into the earth on one of the unique underground tours of Crystal Cave. Tickets are not sold at the Crystal Cave; tickets can purchase at Lodgepole or Foothills visitor centers only. Call (559) 565-3759 for more information about Crystal Cave in California’s Sequoia National Park, or visit www.sequoiahistory.org.

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

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CALENDAR

november 2012

calendar of events

NOV Exeter’s Chili Cook-off 10

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Candy Cane Lane Parade

Race Against Hunger

dates to remember

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Earth, Moon & Sun

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Visalia’s Most Talented

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Wildest Weather in the Solar System


CALENDAR

2 Earth, Moon & Sun

16 Wildest Weather in the Solar System

How do the Earth, Moon and Sun work Join us on a spectacular journey to witness together as a system and what is the myth the most beautiful, powerful, and mysterious and science behind it? Why does the Sun rise weather phenomena in the solar system. and set? What is an eclipse? Learn about the When: Nov. 16, 7p Moon’s phases and orbit. Explore past and Where: Pena Planetarium, future space travel to our moon and beyond. 2500 W. Burrel Ave., Visalia When: Nov. 2, 7p Contact: Impact Center 737-6334 Where: Pena Planetarium, or www.tcoe.org/impactcenter 2500 W. Burrel Ave., Visalia Contact: Impact Center 737-6334 22 Race Against Hunger The 5K run/2-mile walk offers a challenge or www.tcoe.org/impactcenter to businesses, organizations, families, friends and co-workers to form a team, dress for the 10 Visalia’s Most Talented A talent competition for any Visalia Unified event and join together on Thanksgiving student performer (solo or group). Proceeds morning. This event will inspire all who are to benefit the Visalia Education Foundation present on this most thankful day. The race in support of grants and scholarships for the will also feature a KIDS’ RACE. The _-mile performing arts and classrooms in Visalia. race provides kids a way to give back while When: Nov. 10, 2p promoting health, fitness, and fun. Now Where: L.J. Williams Theatre, included is a kids’ camp, provided by the 1001 W. Main St., Visalia YMCA in the Garden Plaza for the children Contact: www.visaliaef.org to play, face paint and enjoy arts and crafts. The streets are lined with family, friends, and Run for HOPE children of all ages who want to start a new The Visalia Rescue Mission is teaming up tradition on Thanksgiving morning. with the Central Valley Roadrunners running When: Nov. 22, 6:30a (Registration Begins) team to organize this First Annual Run For Where: Downtown Visalia Hope. It will consist of a 10k race, a 2-mile Contact: http://veac.org/ race and a 2-mile walk along the St. John’s River Trail. The event promotes community 26 Candy Cane Lane Parade “A Fairy Tale Christmas” with Grand health and fitness; with the proceeds Marshall Mr. Jack Hayslett. Kick-off benefitting the Visalia Rescue Mission. Christmas in Downtown Visalia with the When: Nov. 10, 7a 67th annual Candy Cane Lane Parade! The Where: Cutler Park, Visalia _-mile route heads down Main Street so grab Contact: cvroadrunners@gmail.com your blankets, hot chocolate, and get a seat on or 362-2722 the sidewalk! Exeter’s Chili Cook-off When: Nov. 26, 7p Bring the whole family out for this year’s chili Where: Main Street, Visalia cook-off and sample the various recipes while Contact: www.DowntownVisalia.com enjoying activities and entertainment. When: Nov. 10 Where: Exeter Contact: Lynn 592-7177; Charlotte 592-1648

Visalia Farmers’ Market – Harvest of the Valley

Weekly event open to the public featuring free live music, kids’ activities, cooking demonstrations and local, fresh produce available for purchase. The market also accepts EBT and WIC. When: Saturdays, 8-11:30a Where: Sears parking lot at Mooney and Caldwell, Visalia Contact: 967-6722 or www.visaliafarmersmarket.com The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Sequoias

Offering children ages 6-18 a safe and fun place to go to after school. Programs focus on education, sports, arts, healthy life skills and character building. $10 annual fee. When: Monday – Friday, hours vary by community Where: Visalia, Exeter, Tulare, Porterville, Farmersville and Ivanhoe Contact: 592-4074 or www.bgcsequoias.org Imagine U Interactive Children’s Museum

Imagine U offers a variety of weekly interactive exhibits, events, and activities designed to entertain and engage your preschool child. Cost: $5 ages 2 & up When: Wednesday-Friday, 10a-4p & Saturday, 12-4p Where: 700 E. Main St., Visalia Contact: 733-5975 or www.imagineumuseum.org AgVentures at Heritage Complex

Agricultural Learning Center and Farm Equipment Museum with nearly 15 professionally designed interactive displays. Children learn about science and technology, food and nutrition, environmental issues, social studies and more! When: Mon.-Fri., 9a-4p

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

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PERFORMANCE

Y

ou might recognize them from the Disney Channel, but the educational rock band, Imagination Movers, have hopped out of the tube and on to the stage this year for their “Rock-O-Matic� performance tour on October 8 at Visalia Fox Theatre. (The inspiration for Imagination Movers came from band member Scott Durban, who wanted to offer a live kids show, emphasizing strong male role models for kids. Other members of the band include: Rich Collins, Dave Poche, and Scott Smith; all are friends from New Orleans, Louisiana.)

Photos by CJ Hopper Photography

Assessment. Evaluation. Instruction. 2924 West Main Street Visalia, CA 93291 559.967.8635 JERI BURZIN, MED, BCET Bd Certified Educational Therapist

jeriburzin@clearwire.net

www.jblearningtools.com

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RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012


RESOURCES City Information

important numbers at a glance:

• Tulare County website www.co.tulare.ca.us • City of Visalia website www.ci.visalia.ca.us • City of Tulare website www.ci.tulare.ca.us • City of Exeter website www.cityofexeter.com • City of Woodlake website www.cityofwoodlake.com • Visalia Parks & Recreation, (559) 713-4365

Other Important Numbers County & City

Fire & Police • Tulare County Fire Department, (559) 747-8233 • Visalia Fire Department, (559) 713-4266 • Tulare Fire Department, (559) 684-4300 • Exeter Fire Department, (559) 592-3714 • Woodlake Fire Department, (559) 564-2181 • Tulare County Sheriff’s Department, (559) 636-4625; (559) 733-6218 • Visalia Police Department (Non-Emergency), (559) 734-8116 • Visalia Police Department, Gang Suppression and Narcotics Unit, (anonymous tip hotline) (559) 713-4737 • Tulare County - End Gang Hotline, (888) 363-4264 • Tulare Police Department, (559) 684-4238; (559) 686-3454 • Exeter Police Department, (559) 592-3103 • Woodlake Police Department, (559) 564-3325 • Kings & Tulare County California Highway Patrol, (559) 441-5400

Medical • Kaweah Delta Medical Center, (559) 624-2000 Emergency Room, (559) 624-2213 • Visalia Walk-In Medical Clinic, (559) 627-5555 • Tulare Regional Medical Center, (559) 688-0821 • Tulare County Health and Human Services Agency, (559) 624-8000 • Children’s Hospital Central California, (559) 353-3000

Education • Tulare County Library, (559) 713-2700; www.tularecountylibrary.org • Tulare County Office of Education, (559) 733-6300; www.tcoe.org • Visalia Unified School District, (559) 730-7300; www.vusd.org • Tulare City School District, (559) 685-7200; www.tcsdk8.org • Exeter Union School District, (559) 592-9421; www.exeter.k12.ca.us • Woodlake Public Schools, (559) 564-8081; www.woodlakepublicschools.org

Add your numbers below

• Tulare County Services - United Way, Dial 2-1-1; www.211ca.org • Delta Vector Control District, (559) 732-8606; www.deltavcd.com • Tulare & Kings Counties Suicide Prevention Task Force (Non-crisis), (559) 624-7471; www.sptf.org • Child Abuse Prevention Council, (559) 735-0456; www.tularecountycapc.org • Domestic Violence/Shelters, (559) 732-5941, (559) 685-9515; www.fstc.net • Sexual Assault 24-hr Confidential Hotline, (559) 732-7273; www.fstc.net • Alcohol/Drug Programs, (559) 733-6123 • Parenting Network, (559) 625-0384; www.parentingnetwork.org • Tulare-Kings Right To Life, (559) 732-5000; www.tkrl.org • The IRMA Network, (559) 732-5000; www.theirmanetwork.org • Latinos4Life, (559) 732-5000; www.latinos4life.org • Tulare County Animal Control, (559) 713-4957 • Visalia Animal Control, (559) 564-3346

Nationwide • American Association of Poison Control Centers, (800) 222-1222; www.aapcc.org • Center for Disease Control and Prevention, (800) 232-4636; www.cdc.gov • California Poison Control, (800) 222-1222; www.calpoison.org • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, (800) 273-8255; www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org • The Trevor Project (LGBTQ), (866) 488-7386; www.thetrevorproject.com • Child Abuse 24-hr Hotline, (800) 331-1585 • Missing Child Hotline, (800) 843-5678 • Road Conditions, (800) 427-7623

REMEMBER, WHEN IN DOUBT, DIAL

9-1-1

Add your numbers below

RAISE MAGAZINE | NOVEMBER 2012

27


WANTED

Great people who care about kids to raise funds and challenge others to

Race Against Hunger 8th Annual Thanksgiving morning!

Sign up NOW for either the 5K Run or 2-Mile Walk November 22 • 2012 Main St. Garden Plaza • Downtown Visalia NEW 5K RACE ROUTE! We encourage businesses & families to form teams!

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Kids Race Thanksgiving Morning 2012 FIGHT HUNGER • LIVE BAND FUN FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY

Ages 4-10 7:30 AM AND A

Chip Timing System FOR ACCURATE & FAST FINISH RESULTS.

L E vent

ighting

H

2O

PROTEIN

Phil Cox District 3 Akers & Hwy 198

Korsgaden/Jansma Insurance Agency

Go the Distance to Fight Hunger!

Pre-register online at www.veac.org or at Sole 2 Soul, 4241 S. Mooney Blvd., Visalia (559) 627-5522 VS-SPAD0928132021

10:09

November 2012  

Raise Magazine is the primary resource guide for parents raising kids in the Central Valley.

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