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Portfolio

Moonho Lee


Moonho Lee mlee106@syr.edu

(+1) 949.491.3458 220 South Warren Street (#508), Syracuse NY, 13202 10 Cattail, Irvine CA, 92604 (+82) 010.6395.5406 6, Ogeum-ro 15-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, Korea, 05549

Languages English Korean Japanese

Lived Worked Traveled


Education Professional Experience

Education


Syracuse University Master of Science in Architecture Graduate School of Architecture, 2016 Syracuse, New York

Iroje Architects & Planners Project Manager Beijing, China, 2011-2012

Iroje Architects & Planners Assistant Architect Seoul, Korea, 2008-2011

Hongik University Bachelor of Engineering in Architecture School of Architecture, 2006 Seoul, Korea


Syracuse University Graduate School of Architecture

Syracuse, New York


Dynamics in Architecture in terms of the City of Syracuse Syracuse, New York, 2016

Void in Void Mute Icon in honor of Royce Hall, UCLA Los Angeles, California, 2016

Future Platform from the Past Community Innovation Experimental Center Shenzhen, China, 2015


Dynamics in Architecture in terms of the City of Syracuse Syracuse, New York

Thesis for Master of Science in Architecture, 2016 Advisor : Fei Wang, Professor, Syracuse University Individual Work

All drawings were created by Moonho Lee


Abstract

Introduction

From prehistoric times to modern era, Architecture had been composed fundamentally based on Place. Architecture from the context of the place had matured with inhabitants as time went on and it had inversely reinforced the connatural identity to the place. Since modern era, however, the identity, which each place had, began to be threatened as new forms of architecture have emerged. Particularly, the conflict between Iconic Architecture and existing Urban Context is dramatically exposed in the global age. Although the iconic architecture has been served as an agent to keep up with the global status of a city and to promote economic growth, it does not seem to harmonize with existing urban context as well as to guarantee economic success anymore. For the competitiveness for City Branding in this epoch of ours, I would argue that a clue to the solution can be found from Urban Components, which cannot be seen in any other places, and its distinctiveness will be its com-petitiveness. In this respect, this research will define Urban Identity as Place Identity in a city in comparison to Iconicity and examine urban components such as Built Heritage, which can be measurable and compose urban context, so that give the fundamentals to create architecture upon existing urban context in order to amplify its distinct urban identity as well as to enrich its urban images in terms of Urban Morphology in harmony with the neighbors. Eventually, it will suggest an alternative meth-odology for City Branding, thereby providing an inspiration to sustain Place Identity.

Since the end of twentieth century, the advancement of information communication tech-nology has resulted in expanding the extent of the economic and cultural sphere throughout the world beyond physical limitation and economic activities have been enacted across nation at the corporation level as well as the city level (Sklair, 136~137). As a result, the competition for economic growth has significantly intensified and cities struggling for economic performance put stress on City Branding. The buildings, so called Iconic Architecture, started to be used as a tool to publicize a city and to be served as the symbol or icon of a city in order for creating new urban images (Macdonald, 14). The Bilbao Effect proved the potential of the iconic architecture that could promote economic growth and create new urban images in hopes with establishing new urban identity. Constructing an iconic building seems to be one of the way to strive to leap to or maintain global status of a city. However, we have encountered inherent problems soon after our society tried to apply the similar remedy to their cities. As the iconic architecture is driven by an economic purpose to attract tourists and investment in a city (Macdonald, 14), it is likely to transform the built environment intentionally without the consideration of existing urban context in a city (Sklair, 138). Furthermore, such urban images by the iconic architecture can also distort Reality due to the lack of correlation with its urban com-ponents (Zavattaro, 5). Ultimately, the distinct urban identity is at risk of being destroyed. Another problem is that many cities is developed in favor of coherent strategies in common with other places and the style of architecture also became homogeneous to meet the global taste


since the world has become unified, (Patteeuw, 20). The competitiveness of the iconic architecture will be lost if such an inventive form of the building can be seen anywhere. Consequently, the purpose of establishing new urban identity and boosting economic growth cannot be reached as the irregular shape of build-ings in disharmony with existing urban context and in association with a large-scale construction costs will not only eliminate its urban identity, but also burden its local economy. In current global economic structure, however, a change is inevitable. As the competition at the city level becomes increasingly intensified, architecture will play a substantial role in expressing urban images that help a city enhance global status. So, it is necessary to discuss the orientation of architecture for both amplifying the place identity in a city and securing the global status of a city. A clue to the solution of the problem can be found from urban context, which cannot be seen in any other places, and its distinctiveness will be its competitiveness. Therefore, it comes to be important to place architecture upon the foundation of existing urban context that express its urban identity. In this respect, this research will define Urban Identity as Place Identity in a city in comparison to Iconicity and examine Urban Components, which compose its urban context and eventually shape its urban identity, by literature investigation research. Later, the research will be continue to focus on urban components such as Built Heritage, which can be measurable so that give the fundamentals to create architecture upon existing urban context in order to amplify the distinct urban identity as well as to enrich its urban images in terms of Urban Morphology in harmony with the neighbors.

Macdonald, Susan. “Contemporary Architecture in Historic Urban Environments.” Conservation Perspective Volume 26. Issue 2 (2011): 13~15. Web. 02 Aug 2015. Patteeuw, Véronique. City branding : image building & building images Rotterdam: Nai Uitgevers, 2002. Print. Sklair, Leslie. “Iconic Architecture and the Cultural-ideology of Consumerism” Theory, Culture & Society Volume 27. Issue 5 (2010): 135~159. Web. 31 July 2015. Zavattaro, Staci M. Place Branding through Phases of the Image: Balancing Image and Substance. NewYork City, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.


City of Syracuse Moonho Lee Oil Painting, 2016


Void in Void Mute Icon in honor of Royce Hall, UCLA Los Angeles, California

Visiting Critic Studio, Fall 2016

Advisor : Georgina Huljich, Principal , P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S Collaborative Work with Joshua Intorcio

All drawings here were created by Moonho Lee


Introduction

Georgina Huljich, Principal , P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S

Suprematist Composition White on White Kazimir Malevich Silver gelatin print, 1918 Museum of Modern Art, New York

The present status and contemporary role of the icon comes into a deeper scrutiny and its cultural relevance definitely under stress. While culture at large always needs icons, the question here is what constitutes a contemporary icon, and whether its image could sever its ties to former notions of iconicity. Challenging, and provoking at the same time is the notion of muteness, or the “mute icon”, a kind of anti-monument. No longer concerned with either narrative excesses of meaning and communication, nor with the shock and awe of sensation making, architecture can do what it does best. A mute icon in architecture is at the same time object and building. As such, it requires a strong posture and with it, an attitude that is absolute and unstable, anticipated and strange, manifest and withdrawn. By limiting its appearance, the mute icon demands closer scrutiny, its resistance conveys resilience and its introversion stimulates communication. The relation that the term ‘black box’ has to questions of functional flexibility, atmospheric darkness and plain mystery, or the connotations that it entails to the most pure form of art are important aspects. Can a black box be a mute icon? Can a mute icon be a black box? Given a certain semantical flexibility in the understanding of the word [from theater to popular culture and the arts], these questions become productive by suggesting a possible inversion, albeit still a dichotomic one, between interior and exterior, object and receptacle. The studio speculates on the idea of mute icons as it applies to distinct and often competing pressures. In this case, those of a university campus context with a clear neoclassical plan and an advanced multidisciplinary performing arts program destined to create new cultural audiences.


Inflexible Programmed

Flexible Unprogrammed

Opaque Filled Enclosed

Transparent Unfilled Opened

Black Box

White Box

SOLID

Antinode Foreground-Background

in terms of “Black Box” and “White Box” on White

VOID


Flexible Unprogrammed

Inflexible Programmed

Transparent Unfilled Opened

Opaque Filled Enclosed

VOID

Black Box

Antinode Foreground-Background

in terms of “Black Box” and “White Box” on Black

SOLID

White Box


Inflexible Programmed

Flexible Unprogrammed

Opaque Filled Enclosed

Transparent Unfilled Opened

White Box in Black Box

Black Box in White Box

SOLID

VOID

Cognition of Background in terms of Existence on White

Flexible Unprogrammed

Inflexible Programmed

Transparent Unfilled Opened

Opaque Filled Enclosed

VOID

SOLID


White Box in Black Box

Cognition of Boundary in terms of Existence on White

White Box in Black Box


Collision of Space in terms of Illusion

Moultonboro II, 1966 Frank Stella Collection Mr. and Mrs. David Mirvish, Toronto


Literal Boundary

White Implied Boundary

Collision of Space

in terms of Allusion on White

White Box in Black Box


White Box in Black Box

White

Literal


White Box Literal and Implied Boundary in terms of Allusion on White

Abstract


Robert Wilson

Curated by Isabelle Huppert, 1976 Silver gelatin print 40.6 x 50.8 cm (16 x 20 in) Since the late 1960s, Robert Wilson’s productions have decisively shaped the look of theater and opera. He is widely acknowledged as one of the most creative forces in the art and theater and has fused the roles of director and designer in a highly visual approach that gives formal independence to the elements of light, space, and sound. He sees what he wants, and is able to translate his inner vision into stage terms, and to circumvent the crippling conventions of dramatic presentation.

Opera in Four Acts Einstein on the Beach

Avignon, 1976 by Robert Wilson and Philip Glass Choreography by Lucinda Childs People said in the beginning, well it’s obviously not a play because it didn’t have a text which told a story and said well this kind of dance is not just dance. It’s not a painting because not a painting. So, I called them operas because it means the opus of work and I still think that’s the best way to describe it and with Einstein on the beach. You have all the conventions of an opera that it’s within a proscenium arch of an orchestra pit with musicians, singers. In this sense, it is an opera. It doesn’t tell us stories on a narrative forms and something that is trying to illustrate the way history books do Einstein, but it’s trying to present a critical interpretation of this man. - Robert Wilson


List of Properties Modernity

from Pespective to Flatness Geometry Point Line; Horizontal and Vertical Line, Oblique Line Plane; Rectangle, Triangle, Circle/ Semi-circle Lighting Shadowless Light Bulb(Oragne); Point Fluorescent(White); Line, Plane Contrast Darkness-Brightness ; Foreground-Background


Proposal

Scene Analysis

Robert Wilson’s unique style and attention to composition made him a pioneer in the performing arts field. Officially titled as a director, he contributed under many roles throughout his career; with an unprecedented style of set design. Wilson’s stage scenes displayed careful manipulation of geometric objects to maintain a “balanced” composition of the set. We are concerned with the properties of Wilson work that can display incongruity and disparity. We look to create an interior mass which displays incongruity; similar proportions as a result of the spontaneous combination of a form creates relationships within the dissimilar volume. The auditorium space with have an articulated manipulation of the seating arrangements. We want the performers to be conscious about how the audience views the stage. How can the stage become the heart of the project? This space could perform as a reception space for audience members to enter into the auditorium before and after the show. This gives audience members an initial opportunity to understand the production from the perspective of the actor- a very articulated element in the work of Robert Wilson.

Knee Play 1

Moonho Lee, Joshua Intorcio

from Structure of Einstein on the Beach

Act I Train, Trial Knee Play 2

Geometry

Lighting

Act II Dance 1, Night Train Knee Play 3 Act III Trial/ Prison, Dance 2 Knee Play 4 Act IV Building, Bed, Spaceship Knee Play 5

Configuration

Composition


Knee Play 1, 2, 3, 4

Train Act I

Trial Act I


Night Train Act II

Trial/ Prison Act III

Building Act IV


Bed Act IV

Spaceship Act IV

Knee Play 5


Experiment on Profiles

Extracted from Knee Plays and Four Acts


Knee Play

Act I

Selected Profile

Extracted from Knee Plays and Four Acts

Act II

Act III

Act IV


Process of Formulation for Creation of White Box organized from Profile of Knee Play


Collision of Space

organized from Profile of Knee Play


Enclosed Void as White Box

created by Collision of Space


Fundamental Segments of Black Box on White

Deconstruction of Segments


Fundamental Segments of Black Box on White

Disclosed Void as White

through Deconstruction of Black Box

Deconstruction of Segments


Void in Void as White on White

through Reconfiguration of Deconstructed Segments


Void in Void

through Collision of Void


Department of Communication Studies Department of Linguistics

Perloff Hall

Fowler Museum

Royce Hall Siteplan

Haines Hall

UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

Dickson Court

Powell Library

Humanities Building


Lounge

Requirement of Space Area

Ahmanson Auditorium Lobby West Lobby

Ahmanson Lobby 5,600 sq. ft.

West Lobby

3,000 sq. ft.

Auditorium 19,000 sq. ft.

25 ft

60 ft

25 ft

Open

in terms of Four Programs

Lounge

2,000 sq. ft.


Black Boxes on White

UCLA, Los Angeles CA


White Box in Black Box on White UCLA, Los Angeles CA


White Box + Black Box on Whitev UCLA, Los Angeles CA


White on White

UCLA, Los Angeles CA


Porch Gallery Entrance

Auditorium

Control Box

Entrance

Ground and Auditorium Floor Plan


Amphitheater

Banquet Hall

Floor Plan Terrace

Amphitheater Floor Plan

0

100

200 ft


Void in Void with Context

0

100

200 ft


Future Platform from the Past Community Innovation Experimental Center Shenzhen, China

Architectural Design Studio, Fall 2015 Advisor : Fei Wang, Professor, Syracuse University Individual Work

All drawings were created by Moonho Lee


Lon gTe ng

Roa d


Introduction

Fei Wang, Professor, Syracuse University

Site

Shenzhen, China

HengPing Highway

Located at the northeast portal of Shenzhen, as well as the connection area of Shenzhen, Dongguan and Huizhou, Shenzhen International Low Carbon City occupies a total planning area of 53km2. Since it is situated at the 2-hour Economic Circle of Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Hong Kong, the low carbon city is less than 2-hour drive away from the center of Guangzhou, Dongguan, Huizhou, Zhuhai and Hong Kong, which covers most part of the Pearl River Delta, and offers a greater space for development in the future. Pingdi Subdistrict is home to Shenzhen International Low Carbon City. As one of the most underdeveloped areas in Shenzhen, this subdistrict is very similar cities and towns who are undergoing nationwide industrialization today. Therefore, through model innovation, planning guidance, environment construction, along with the improvements from endogenous power and integrating technology with market, the low carbon city will gradually discover a new way for the leapfrog sustainable development of underdeveloped areas. The planning of the low carbon city exhibits extremely strong innovation and exploration. As one of the first batch of international cooperative projects introduced into low carbon city, as well as pioneering the research, development, and exploration of both low carbon buildings and low carbon communities, the Future Center will become the bellwether which represent the development of the low carbon city in the coming years.

0

50

100 m


Lon gTe ng

Roa d


Proposal Moonho Lee

This project proposes a new Community Innovation Experimental Center as a part of Shenzhen Low Carbon City. The proposal emerged as a consequence of a careful consideration of the site’s surrounding context. The project is located on an important intersection of two axes, the first running between the older and emerging urban districts, and the second between the neighboring mountains and the river. In this way the proposal can be understood as mediating between urbanity and nature.

Site Condition

HengPing Highway

Wind

0

Wind

50

View

100 m


Ol dU rb an

Ax is

Old Village

New Urban Axis

Development District


To pursue these goals, our proposal seeks to reinforce the existing urban axis. In doing so, the proposed Community Innovation Experimental Center is able to operate (metaphorically) as a platform connecting the past and future. The proposal consists of the 9x9x9 meter system of cubes capable of dividing and determining the interior arrangements with each set of cubes arranged in two rows to maximize the potential for linkage with nature.

Urban Axis

0

50

100 m


Required Volume

Total Floor Space

65,000 m2

Underground

12,000 m2

Building Height 6m Setback; 9m Setback;

< 100 m Under 24 m Height Over 24 m Height

Building Coverage

< 50 %

0

50

100 m


9. 0m

9x9x9 Cube

9. 0m

0m 9.

Enclosed

Interactive


Invertible


Interactive Cube

Potentials of Combination

Linkage with Nature

Communication


Expansion

Circulation


Sequence of Layout

5.4 m 1.8 m

m 1.8

9*9*9 Cube

m 5.4

0m 9.

9. 0m

m 1.8

1.8 m

in terms of Typical Unit

Set of Communication Layer


5.4 m 1.8 m

m 1.8

1.8 m

m 5.4

5.4 m

1.8 m

1.8 m

m 1.8

m 1.8 m 5.4 m 1.8

Set of Core Space

Installation of Main Structure


3.0 3.0 3.0 m m m

in terms of Typical Unit

3.0 3.0 3.0 m m m

Sequence of Layout

Set of Unit Ceiling Height

Installation of Unit Floor


0 1.5 .6 m m

4. 8m

1 0. .5 m 6m

m 1.5 .6m 0

8m 4.

6m 0. .5 m 1

Set of Functional Layer

Installation of Functional Layer


Variables of Ceiling Height

4. 5m

4. 5m

3.0 3.0 3.0 m m m

in terms of Typical Unit

3.0 m Ceiling Height

4.5 m + 4.5 m Ceiling Height


3.0 3.0 3.0 m m m

6. 0m 3.0 m

6.0 m + 3.0 m Ceiling Height

3.0 m Ceiling Height for Laboratory


Variables of Expansion in terms of Functional Layer


Desk and Chair

Variables of Functional Layer

Book Shelve


Shelve

Kitchen Gadgets


Bed

Variables of Functional Layer

Equipment


Room


Combination of Functional Layer Housing


0

2

4m


Combination of Functional Layer Office


0

2

4m


Combination of Functional Layer Commerce


0

2

4m


Combination of Functional Layer Laboratory


0

2

4m


Response to Context


Layout Strategy

Orientation to the South Wind

0

Wind

50

View

100 m


Linkage with Nature


Formation Strategy

Arrangement of Cubes

Wind

0

Wind

50

Adaptation to the Site

View

100 m

Reduction in Density

Adjustment of Volume


Traffic System


Circulation Strategy along with Urban Planning

Pedestrian System

0

50

100 m


Green System


Green Strategy

in terms of Urban Planning

Water System

0

50

100 m


Underground Floor Plan -9.0 m Level


0

8

16 m


Ground Floor Plan 0.0 m Level


0

8

16 m


Podium Floor Plan +9.0 m Level


0

8

16 m


Typical Floor Plan +36.0 m Level


Wind

0

Wind

View

8

16 m


Elevation 01


0

8

16 m


Section 01


0

8

16 m


Elevation 02


0

8

16 m


Section 02


0

8

16 m


Iroje Architects & Planners Project Manager

Beijing, China, 2011-2012


Taiyuan Bus Company Business Facility Taiyuan, China, 2012

Iroje Architects & Planners Exhibition Beijing, China, 2012

Danzhou Art District Masterplan Housing Complex Hainan, China, 2012

Pindu Housing Culture Center Cultural Facility Pindu, China, 2012

Beijing Gongjian Siheyuan Housing Beijing, China, 2012

Chongqing Urban Complex Business Facility Chongqing, China , 2011-2012


Seung H-Sang, Iroje Architects & Planners Exhibition was held in Beijing, China in October, 2012. For this exhibition, I had worked as a coordinator. I had designed the exhibition space and had met a lot of people who were related to the exhibition. Furthermore, since the concept of this exhibition was to create a city in the space, it was necessary to build walls to express the street and served as display panels. I had also supervised it while under construction.

Iroje Architects & Planners Exhibition Beijing, China, 2012

Exhibition Image

pictured by Inhan Kim

Project Team

Assignment

Sunghee Kim Moonho Lee Lee Hyewon Taeyong Kim

Exhibition Coordination Detail Drawings Site Supervision Exhibition Installation


Detail

Exhibition Desk

drawn by Moonho Lee translated into Chinese by Taeyong Kim


When I was working at the Beijing Office of the Iroje Architects & Planners, I was in charge of all projects that were proceeded in China. Among those, there was the Danzhou Art District Masterplan as a urban planning project. At the beginning of the project, I explored a site and collected research materials to initiate the project. While working on this project, it provided me with the macro-view and mirco-view for the urban planning.

Danzhou Art District Masterplan Housing Complex Hainan, China, 2012

Site Area 500,000.0 m2 Building Area 72,500.0 m2

Masterplan

drawn by Moonho Lee translated into Chinese by Taeyong Kim

Project Team

Assignment

Sunghee Kim Moonho Lee Hyeon Choi Gwangjae Yoon Taeyong Kim Sunju Kim

Data Survey Data Analysis Concept Development Design Development Planning Site Floor


Siheyuan is the traditional dwelling form of China. Once I moved to Beijing, I got an opportunity to review it. Over three days, I recorded all the dimensions of the house. I was fortunate to investigate the spatial composition of Siheyuan dwellings.

Beijing Gongjian Siheyuan Housing Beijing, China, 2012

Street Image

pictured by Hwi Jeon

Project Team

Assignment

Moonho Lee Hwi Jeon

Field Measurement Measured Drawings Site Floor Elevation Section


Elevation

Beijing Gongjian Siheyuan

drawn by Moonho Lee


Chongqing Urban Complex, which is a large scale project with the height of approximately 200m, is located in China so it was necessary to collaborate with a local architectural firm for building permits. After completing the third schematic design phase at the IROJE Seoul Office, this project was handed over to the IROJE Beijing Office. At the time, the company relocated me to Beijing, China in order to handle it. In Beijing, meanwhile, I developed the design with the Seoul Office, which included a conference with the local company. When necessary, I went on business trips to Chongqing to have meetings.

Chongqing Urban Complex Business Facility Chongqing, China , 2011-2012 Site Area 100,736.8 m2 Total Floor Area 102,960.0 m2

Elevation

drawn by Moonho Lee

Project Team

Assignment

Sunghee Kim Junghan Han Moonho Lee Namyoung Son Gwangjae Yoon Taeyong Kim

Schematic Design Planning Floor Elevation Section Consultation


Exterior Wall Detail Chongqing Urban Complex

drawn by Moonho Lee translated into Chinese by Taeyong Kim


Iroje Architects & Planners Assistant Architect

Seoul, Korea, 2008-2011


Hangzhou Villa, A Block Housing Hangzhou, China, 2011-2012

Jisan Wald House Complex, Unit 9AB Housing Jisan, Korea, 2011

MizMedi Hospital Annex Medical Facility Seoul, Korea, 2009-2011

KIST L4 Research Center Laboratory Facility Seoul, Korea, 2009-2010

KIST Research Complex Masterplan Laboratory Facility Seoul, Korea, 2009

Arvo Part Memory Hall Cultural Facility Rakvere, Estonia, 2009

Hyundai Hillstate Culture Center Cultural Facility Seoul, Korea, 2009

Shin Dong Yeop Literary Museum Cultural Facility Buyeo, Korea, 2008-2009

Ra On Chae Housing

Seoul, Korea, 2008


Before this project, I had done projects with colleagues so I handled some parts of the projects. When I took part in the Jisan Wald House project, however, I implemented the entire design process from schematic design to construction drawings as well as documents for construction permits. I drew all documents in consideration of the construction carefully since I had supervision experience at the time. I could improve my ability to organize drawings and to deal with documents for permits.

Jisan Wald House Complex, Unit 9AB Housing Seoul, Korea, 2011

Site Area 464.0 m2 Building Area 119.0 m2 Total Floor Area 179.1 m2

Elevation

drawn by Moonho Lee

Project Team

Assignment

Sunghee Kim Moonho Lee

Schematic Design Planning All Drawings


Sundry Detail Jisan Wald House

drawn by Moonho Lee


I belonged to not only an architectural design department but also a supervision department because I have a certificate as an authorized building engineer. Thus, I had designed as well as supervised the building that was under construction as an assistant supervisor. MizMedi Hospital Annex was my first task of supervision. I was able to look deep into the process of construction and figure out how to apply my drawings to actual buildings.

MizMedi Hospital Annex Medical Facility Seoul, Korea, 2009-2011

Site Area 504.6 m2 Building Area 245.7 m2 Total Floor Area 2,044.6 m2

Exterior Image

pictured by Moonho Lee

Project Team

Assignment

Dongwook Kim Moonho Lee

Construction Supervision Drawing Revision Documentation Administrative Support


L4 research center is the part of the KIST Research Masterplan. When the company won its competition, I took part in a working design for L4 research center as I was a member of its competition team. In this project, I was able to learn how to convert schematic design into construction drawings. Particularly, in order to draw each drawing, I had to look for a lot of related drawings or contact various companies. I have become familiar with and interested in construction drawings.

KIST L4 Research Center Laboratory Facility Seoul, Korea, 2009-2010

Building Area 2,847.8 m2 Total Floor Area 17,609.9 m2

Siteplan

drawn by Moonho Lee

Project Team

Assignment

Kitae Lee Hyunjun Yang Jungmin Lee Moonho Lee Bohyun Yoon Hyeon Choi Donghee Lee Fei Liang

Planning Material Site Section Construction Document Material Specification Standard Specification


Section

drawn by Moonho Lee


After I had made a number of models for several months, I was involved in a competition team by making perspectives via computer graphic programs and I participated in a variety of architecture competitions. Arvo Part Memory Hall project gave me an opportunity to implement not only computer graphics but also a schematic design. Since It had a strong concept, I was excited to develop schematic designs from the concept and express it through computer graphics.

Arvo Part Memory Hall Cultural Facility Rakvere, Estonia, 2009

Site Area 1,425.7 m2 Building Area 1,787.4 m2 Total Floor Area 2,979.1 m2

Aerial View

drawn by Moonho Lee

Project Team

Assignment

Yongsoon Chang Kitae Lee Ahjoo Kwon Moonho Lee Bohyun Yoon Donghee Lee Yehwon Kim

Data Survey Concept Development Computer Graphic Perspective


After entering Iroje Architects & Planners, I was in charge of making models being proceeded at the company from concept to final. I have done many material experiments to express the concept of a variety of projects. Through this process, I was able to get a sense of what is needed for a three dimensional space.

Ra On Chae Housing

Seoul, Korea, 2008 Site Area 641.0 m2 Building Area 383.2 m2 Total Floor Area 2,126.9 m2

Physical Model

pictured by Hyowon Jung

Project Team

Assignment

Hyowon Jung Jungmin Lee Moonho Lee

Physical Model


Honors/Awards


Design Energy Futures in Low Carbon City Exhibition Selected Work, 2016 Shenzhen, China

Building Engineer National Certificate of Technical Qualification Human Resources Development Service of Korea, 2006

24th Korean Institute of Architecture International Competition Selected Work, 2005 Seoul, Korea

2nd DOCOMOMO Korea Design Competition Selected Work, 2005 Seoul, Korea


Portfolio Moonho Lee

949.491.3458 mlee106@syr.edu 220 South Warren Street (#508), Syracuse NY, 13202

Portfolio, Moonho Lee  

Graduate School of Architecture, Syracuse University

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