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Our Spirit Soars For 40 years the Queens Tribune has been exploring the lives of the residents of this growing borough. From our founding in 1970 to our coverage today, this newspaper has continued to seek out the stories that touch us all. For this special celebration, we have asked 40 of our former staffers and associates to come back to us for one special edition – to share memories about their time, to recall some of their favorite stories and to reflect on the spirit of Queens, embodied in part by sculptor Marshall Fredericks’ “Freedom of the Human Spirit” bronze sculpture from the 1964-65 World’s Fair that still stands in Flushing Meadows today. Fredericks once described the people who would see his piece as “great multitudes of people, of all ages, and from all walks of life” who would see that “we can free ourselves… from the material forces which try to restrain and hamper us.” For 40 years, the Tribune and its staff has sought to do no less. To that end, we devote this issue to those explorers who ventured into uncharted newspaper territory to tell the story of the greatest borough in New York City – Queens.

“Freedom of the Human Spirit” in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Tribune Photo By Ira Cohen


Table Of Contents 1983 – David Keisman

1997 – Jeremy Olshan

.....................................Page 7

A Rising Star .................................. Page 25

Choking It Down .................................. Page 46

1970 – Gary Ackerman

1984 – Gabe Escobar

1998 – Liz Goff

Our Founding Father .................................. Page 10

Crack War Escalates .................................. Page 30

Where Do You Live? .................................. Page 48

1971 – Alan Manheim

1985 – Marty Lipp

1999 – Marcia Comrie

Seeing Visions .................................. Page 12

...The Harder They Fall .................................. Page 31

Making Our Skin Crawl ...................................Page 49

1972 – Hank Sheinkopf

1986 – Tom Zambito

2000 – Tamara Hartman

A Good Friend .................................. Page 13

Meet The Mets .................................. Page 32

Brutal Execution .................................. Page 50

1973 – Mark Weiss

1987 – Lisa Colangelo

2001 – Dominic Nunziato

Retail Revolution .................................. Page 14

Boro Puppetmaster .................................. Page 33

The Long Walk Home .................................. Page 51

1974 – Alan Gershuny

1988 – Marsha Schrager

2002 – Shams Tarek

Housing For All .................................. Page 15

Ander Our National Shame .................................. Page 35

Art Revolution .................................. Page 53

1975 – Bob Citelli

1989 – Tom Allon

2003 – Steve McGuire

Lights, Camera, Queens! .................................. Page 16

This Trash Stinks! .................................. Page 36

Fly Our Friendly Skies .................................. Page 54

1976 – Jeff Tarlo

1990 – Tom McCarthy

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Fantastic Flushing .................................. Page 16

Gay Bashing .................................. Page 38

Taking Cautious Steps .................................. Page 56

1977 – Rich Sandomir

1991 – Mickey Z

2005 – Aaron Rutkoff

Summer Of Sam .................................. Page 18

Here Comes The Judge .................................. Page 39

Preserving Character .................................. Page 57

1978 – Jedd Moskowitz

1992 – Mike Nussbaum

2006 – Azi Paybarah

Goodfellas Gone Bad .................................. Page 20

In The Seat Of Power .................................. Page 40

Downfall Of A Leader .................................. Page 59

1979 – David Oats

1993 – Barbara Arnstein

2007 – Ellen Thompson

Open Doors .................................. Page 23

Border Wars .................................. Page 42

A New City Grows .................................. Page 60

1980 – Regina Vogel

1994 – Marcia Gelbart

2008 – Juliet Werner

From The Streets .................................. Page 25

Glorious Decay .................................. Page 42

Citywide Asian Voice .................................. Page 63

1981 – Robert Manas

1995 – Sarina Roffé

2009 – Peter Sloggatt

Grand Dame Of Queens .................................. Page 26

Falling From The Sky .................................. Page 43

Outbreak Epicenter .................................. Page 64

1982 – Mitch Albom

1996 – Matt Higgins

Scandal Rocks The City .................................. Page 27

Returning To The Pulpit .................................. Page 45

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Queens Tribune 40th Anniversary Story Gary Ackerman put to rest months of speculation and formally announced his candidacy for the post of councilman-at-large for Queens. Ackerman stepped down as editor of the paper in order to run for the Democratic nomination, and David Oats was named executive editor of the Tribune. I served as Ackerman’s campaign chairman. In 1978, the Tribune became the first newspaper in the city to obtain a full one-on-one interview with the new mayor. Ed Koch sat down with Tribune editors and reporters for an extensive question-and-answer session in his still-bare office at City Hall on his fourth day in office. MY 30 YEAR JOURNEY BEGINS In 1979, Gary Ackerman stepped down as Tribune publisher and was sworn in as State Senator. That’s when I, a New York City school principal, took over running the paper, after school, part-time. Three years later, this writer, the Tribune’s second Publisher, became Ackerman’s partner, and left the school system to run the Tribune full-time. And the long strange trip continued — a trip of community journalism based on the principle that all news is local and community advocacy is not only the right but obligation of those charged with bringing neighborhood news to the neighborhoods. In 1981, a young musician who wanted to be a writer took his first job as a journalist with the Queens Tribune. This former Tribune managing editor would go on to set records on the NY Times Best Seller list. Mitch Albom, author of “Tuesdays With Morrie,” like so many others, got his start with this paper. In 1983, Gary Ackerman won a special election to replace Ben Rosenthal in the Congress of the United States. In 1985, Borough President Donald Manes proclaimed Queens Tribune Week i n honor of this newspaper’s 15th birthday. Manes cited the “dedication, commitment and hard work of its publisher, editors and staff.” In the same year, I married my wife Lillian, a former Tribune art director I had met at the paper. In 1987, this columnist and this column’s predecessor, “QUIPS – Queens In Politics,” was recognized by the New York Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest in the “Best Column” category. Next, was a time of growth for the Tribune. The East Coast saw its first four-color community newspaper page as the Tribune continued its tradition as industry innovator, introducing color to community journalism. The launching of three editions of the new Western Queens Tribune completed the community picture and created the first and only boroughwide Queens newspaper chain. COMMUNITY NEWS GOES PUBLIC In 1989, Ackerman and I sold the Queens Tribune to a publicly traded media company News Communications with me continuing on as Publisher while both of us served on the Board of Directors of the public company. For its 20th Anniversary Edition, the Trib bound itself inside of a glossy cover. This was the first time a community newspaper was stitched-trimmed and wrapped in a glossy – a practice that set the industry standard for (continued on page 8)

Mayor John Lindsay stops by the first Tribune storefront to meet with Publisher Gary Ackerman.

Ackerman celebrates his victory in a congressional special election with Gov. Mario Cuomo and Mayor Ed Koch.

Mike Schenkler holds an editorial meeting with members of the News Communications editorial board.

Not 4 Publication.com by Dom Nunziato

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 7

By MICHAEL SCHENKLER I’m not the father . . . but I raised the kid. The father, Gary Ackerman, gave birth to the Tribune 40 years ago – yes, the Congressman is a multi talented guy – he even sued the NYC Board of Education for a Paternity leave while birthing the Trib; but that’s a story for another time – it’s true, remember to ask me. It was 1970 – 40 years ago — and as you’ll read on these pages, Gary and a handful of brave colleagues began the Flushing Tribune, a monthly newspaper from a single desk in the rear of a Main Street real estate office. A year later, in May of 1971, the Tribune moved its offices to a more spacious storefront at 46-25 Kissena Blvd. in Flushing. Within a year it would expand to another storefront next door, which it shared with its new printing and typesetting arm, Multi-Media, Inc. And as 1971 became 1972, the Tribune launched the first of its regional editions in Forest Hills and announced that it was changing its name to the Queens Tribune, saying that “The second-largest county in New York State and the sixth largest in the nation needs its own paper.” And a college friend of Gary Ackerman by the name of Mike Schenkler began a series of Tribune contests. Although the contests are only very occasional now, I have been a fixture at the Trib for the past 30 years. In 1972, in an extensive Tribune expose, reporter Hank Sheinkopf revealed the squalid living conditions in old houses on 137th Street in Flushing. Ramshackle, boarded-up and burned-out houses were the rule in what looked like a scene from the Ozarks during the Depression. Sheinkopf would go on to blaze trails as one of the nation’s leading media advisors serving an impressive list of clients including President Bill Clinton. He’s still spinning around. The Tribune began 1973 by entering its third year as a weekly, rather than a bi-weekly paper. The National Newspaper Association gave the Tribune a special award for its 1975 fifth anniversary, souvenir bicentennial edition — third place in the entire nation for bicentennial coverage. President Gerald Ford presented the award in Washington, D.C. Robert Moses, New York’s master builder, wrote a full-page exclusive column for the Tribune on his concerns about the upcoming celebrations of the nation’s bicentennial in 1976. “Cousin” Bruce Morrow of rock ‘n’ roll radio fame began a regular music column for the Tribune. A local weather column was started by a Queens teacher, Irving Gikovsky, who later went on to fame as television weatherman “Mr. G.” Vice President Nelson Rockefeller came to Queens to speak before the county’s Republican Committee at a dinner at Antun’s restaurant. Tribune photographer Joe Ullman photographed the event, marking his 1,000th assignment for the paper. The year of the nation’s bicentennial started off with New York Magazine calling the Tribune’s special bicentennial supplements a “gold mine of information on old Queens.” The Tribune endorsed Jimmy Carter for president in late October. Carter, standing with Governor Hugh Carey, Mayor Abraham Beame and Borough President Donald Manes, smilingly accepted the Trib’s endorsement from publisher Gary Ackerman at Antun’s restaurant in Queens Village. In February 1977, Tribune founder and publisher


40 Years: Thanx For The Memories

Gary Ackerman, longtime editor David Oats and Mike Schenkler.

Page 8 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Publisher Mike Schenkler greets newly elected President Bill Clinton.

The Queens Tribune is read by decision makers across the city.

After 40 years of the Tribune, college buddies Schenkler and Ackerman remain good friends.

The Trib Online at www.QueensTribune.com thrives (continued from page 7) today with well over two million unique visits each special editions that endures 20 years later. The Tribune moved its offices from Kissena Boule- year. As the Tribune entered the new millennium, it welvard to 174-15 Horace Harding Expressway in Fresh Meadcomed a new partner in the news, as the PRESS of ows — the building that serves as its home today. I was named president of News Communications Inc., Southeast Queens made its debut – offering in-depth with overall responsibilities for the operations of it and its weekly coverage to a previously underserved area of our sister papers, Our Town, Manhattan Spirit and Dan’s borough. Papers. The company moved its corporate offices from the west side of Manhattan to the Tribune Building on THE TRIBUNE RETURNSTO ITS ROOTS the service road of the LIE making it one of the top 10 As 2002 drew to a close, the ownerQueens-based public companies. ship of the largest weekly newspaper in Former Mayor Ed Koch began writQueens changed hands as the Queens ing a movie review column for the TriTribune was acquired by an investment bune and other papers of the News Comgroup headed by myself and founder munications group. Congressman Gary Ackerman. The Queens Tribune celebrated its Committed to the same principles 22nd anniversary with a record 116-page of community journalism which marked issue that proclaimed Queens County as its growth, the new, old Tribune ownerthe epitome of the classic Melting Pot, ship remembered the past and blazed formore than 100 nationalities calling this ward towards the future. borough home, and filling its streets with This writer was recognized for the secthe aromas, sounds and sights of the “old ond t ime by the Ne w York Press country,” wherever the old country may Association’s Better Newspaper Contest be. Walt Whitman founded the Longin the “Best Column” category. In 1993 former Tribune advertising Islander in 1838. The Tribune began a monthly glossy salesman John DiGiovanni was among the five people killed by the first terrorist bombing of the wrapped stitched and trimmed magazine issue one of World Trade Center, reminding us just how personal the which you hold in your hand – or view on screen. The year 2006 began with a new and exciting acquinews really is. In 1994, the Queens Tribune, along with News Com- sition for our Tribune publishing company. In 1838, America’s poet, Walt Whitman was a jourmunications’ other publications, became the first New neyman printer whose addiction to the written word was York City newspapers to be printed on 100 percent recycled paper. We challenged other city newspapers to fol- only equaled by his passion for people. Whitman put the two together when, at age 19, he established a newspalow suit. Later that year, I won kudos from the Queens Cham- per in the town of Huntington. He gathered the news, ber of Commerce when I was named their first Business- put it in words, set the type and, from behind the blacksmith’s shop, he pulled each impression of The Longman of the Year. Under my leadership, News Communications grew Islander by hand. And when it was done, he hitched a and by this time was publishing the nine-edition Queens wooden wagon to his horse Nina, and peddled his paper Tribune, four papers in Manhattan, two papers in the along a route from Huntington to the south shores of Bronx, 11 titles on the south shore of Nassau County, present-day Babylon, gathering news for his next edition and a weekly chain in southern Brooklyn. The Com- along the way. Today, 172 later, we have the privilege of publishpany was now preparing a most ambitious launch – The Hill, a weekly covering the Congress of the United ing Whitman’s Long-Islander, the second oldest weekly in New York State, serving on the Board of Directors of States. Yes, it was an exciting period of corporate growth, the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association in Huntingbut the real memories were the news stories that were the ton and working in Queens and on Long Island to further the tradition of one of the greatest American chroniheart of the Queens Tribune: The Tribune exposed the dangerous friable asbestos clers in our history. The acquisition and the legacy of at Terrace on the Park resulting in a clean-up of the build- Whitman, has given me new insight into publishing history and perspectives on the legacy of a newspaper. ing and dismissal of the franchisee. Today, as the Tribune celebrates its 40th AnniverThe Tribune claimed victory in its 10-month, eightpart battle with the U.S. Postal Service to preserve the sary, I look back with pride at its many scoops, victories and accomplishments. names of Queens neighborhoods in addresses. And to me, an educator turned journalist, among the Former Tribune reporter Kendra Webdale was killed by a schizophrenic who pushed her beneath the wheels of greatest reasons for pride are the scores of bright, crean oncoming Manhattan subway train – several years later, ative, curious and talented journalists who received their training at the Queens Tribune. Kendra’s Law was named in her memory. And so for this edition, we reached out to our graduAnd there was Avery Mendez, a homeless man who told the Tribune that his Thanksgiving wish was for a ates — our alumni — who were spread far and wide and warm place to sleep and a meal, only to be found the day invited former Tribbies – one for each of our 40 years — after Thanksgiving on his Flushing streets dead . . . of to share their memories of covering the news of Queens for the Queens Tribune. well, homelessness. Our legacy can be found in brief on the pages that The Tribune continued to innovate, and by the mid 90’s was publishing three annual glossy-bound specials: follow. Our commitment will continue to be found each the Official Guide to Queens, the Best of Queens and and every week on the pages of the Queens Tribune. Thanks for the memories . . . and those to come. an Anniversary Edition. Please send your comments to me at: Almost 15 years ago we launched the Web’s first MSchenkler@QueensTribune.com comprehensive community news site in the Metro area.


Thank You We want to thank our customers for their patience as we worked tirelessly to restore power to everyone affected by the most destructive storm to hit New York City and Westchester County in decades. We know how difficult this time was for you, and appreciate your understanding. Thousands of employees worked around the clock to restore power to our customers, neighborhood by neighborhood, block by block. Utility crews from Michigan, Ohio, Georgia, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Kentucky and Massachusetts came to help us get your lights back on as quickly and safely as possible. As always, we urge customers to report power outages immediately at 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633) or conEd.com.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 9

Š2010 Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Ad: Arnell

Our 14,000 employees take great pride in serving our customers. Thank you again for your patience and understanding.


Our Founding Father:

Ackerman Opens Doors To The Trib BY JOSEPH OROVIC

February 1970: Armed with $500 from his mother and living in a City housing project, a young Gary Ackerman sat in the back of the thenShalda Real Estate office, at a desk he rented for $50 a month, and began the Flushing Tribune.

Page 10 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

The first edition of the Flushing Tribune.

“We started it at a time when everyone said, ‘This is not a good time to start a newspaper,’” Ackerman said. The major dailies, of which there were nearly a dozen, faced tough times. But the then-27-year-old felt there was a need for a more nuanced look at Flushing. “There was a tremendous need in the community for a medium in which people can communicate what was going on, what was happening. Daily newspapers were moving more and more in a direction of what I call megalopolis coverage,” he said. This acute focus on neighborhood issues drove the launch of the Tribune. “Queens is the only borough of the City of New York where the federal government recognizes the communities,” Ackerman said, noting the postal service’s use of neighborhood names in mailing addresses as opposed to Manhattan for example, which gets a blanket “New York City.” “We had that separate sense that we were kind of in our own neighborhood. But you didn’t read about our local schools, local events, in the dailies.” Starting off as a monthly, the allvolunteer staffed paper reached the doorsteps of Flushing residents via school kids who delivered 50,000 copies of the inaugural issue door to door. The early days were not without

their tribulations, as A c kerman recounted various speed bumps along the way. Among them, there was the power loss on a sweltering mid-August night that forced the staff to migrate their equipment onto the sidewalk, their typewriters and machinery juiced by an extension cord from a neighboring business. Today, 40 years later, the paper has grown and expanded into the largest community weekly in the borough. Ackerman didn’t imagine it’d get Gary Ackerman steps down as editor to run for ofthis far. fice. “It’s like a grown up child, you can’t tell it what to do. I’m with the paper. “I thought we were goproud the paper has spawned a whole ing to wind up with three desks in the industry now,” he said, pointing to the real estate office,” he added with a numerous weeklies that now compete laugh.

1970: Gary Ackerman After leaving a career in education, Gary started the Queens Tribune in 1970, was elected to the New York State Senate in 1978, and then to Congress in 1983, where he still serves the people of Queens today. He is still a part owner of the Queens Tribune. It was 1969 when a 27-year-old school teacher finished teaching his eighth grade social studies class and rushed to Main Street in Flushing where he’d seen an ad in a window that said “desk space for rent.” It was there, in the back of the then-Shalda Real Estate storefront, that for $50 a month – which merely included an old metal desk and a limpy old fourdrawer file cabinet – that the Queens (then Flushing) Tribune was born. Starting out as a monthly, volunteer-staffed community newspaper, the first issue hit the streets in February 1970 with news stories close to the hearts of the people of Flushing, who were then (and sometimes now) mostly undiscovered by New York’s many citywide daily newspapers. The Tribune heralded itself as a place where stories near and dear to community residents could find their place in print. It was also a spot that local advertisers, who could not afford the still-enormous prices to advertise their merchandise to millions of people, could find a place to market their goods to 50,000 doorsteps at an affordable price. The first issue was eight pages. The Flushing Boys Club, operating from the back of Hy Segal’s dry cleaning store and looking for a permanent home, made the front page. Jack’s men’s and boy’s clothing store boasted that it could outfit any man or boy regardless of his size. It also told the story of a new plan for the decentralization of the Board of Education which was soon to come and now has gone. In addition, it promised local residents a place to find the score of their son’s high school bas-

ketball game, a space to promote the church bake sale and it covered local politicians whose decisions helped shape local everyday life but whose names never found their way into the big time press. The paper would take bold stands and would fight for the community. Local people could write letters for the whole neighborhood to read. The publication grew while still having an all-volunteer army – except for the hundreds of paid youngsters who soon brought the monthlyturned-weekly newspaper to 50,000 doorsteps in Flushing alone. In addition, the Tribune’s fabled “Beautiful Baby Contest” found its way into national prominence, featured on Archie Bunker’s All in the Family. The paper, currently printed in nine local community editions and covering most of Queens, pioneered local urban-crusading community journalism in a way not envisioned previously. The paper’s demise was predicted by the editors of many dailies that are no longer in print. Successful beyond anyone’s wildest dreams, that tiny paper has evolved into the huge success that you now hold in your hands and read, hopefully with delight. Fortunate to have been there at its conception and birth, relishing in the fact that for 40 years its promise has been met, I now look forward as the most professional of staffs take on more promises to keep. Many thanks to the hundreds of volunteers and staff, some of whom have made news and history themselves, and all of whom over the years have made the Trib the quality journalistic product that it is today.


www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 11


Seeing Visions:

Veronica’s Followers Flood To Her Doorstep BY CATHERINE MANZIONE

Page 12 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

the assassination of U.S. Sen. Robert June 18, 1970: Bayside resident Kennedy and smelled a sudden odor Veronica Lueken will hold the first in of roses. Lueken took this as a sign a series of vigils at St. Robert from Saint Theresa of Lisieux that she Bellarmine Church in Bayside tonight was present. The second vision occurred after allegedly being asked to establish April 7, when Mary appeared to Lueken and told her that if she a shrine and hold Rosary constructed the shrine and vigils by the Virgin Mary held the vigils that the herself. Blessed Mother would apLueken said she was pear to her and all who given specific instruction have traveled to the by the Vi rgin Mary to church. Since then, hold these vigils every Lueken has reported seeeve of Catholic feast days ing Mary several more at St. Robert Bellarmine times until the final conchurch in front of the struction of the shrine was statue of Our Lady of completed. Grace, despite all posThese “apparitions” sible weather conditions. caused a large controversy Lueken is married to local construction engi- Thousands came to in the Bayside community n e e r A r t h u r L u e ke n , Bayside to see Veronica with local residents and has five children and Lueken, who claimed to members of the clergy h a s l i v e d i n B a y s i d e have been visited by the calling Lueken and her visions “false.” Some resim o s t o f h e r l i f e a s a Virgin Mary. dents claim she is a phony housewife. But, what seemed like an ordinary life became and her claims caused an outrage a little more complex when Lueken against the church and community. However, despite the controversy, reported having apparitions of the thousands of people were reported to Virgin Mother. Lueken said she first received mes- attend the vigils, some traveling from sages from heaven when she heard of across the country to attend.

1971: Alan Manheim One of the founders of the Tribune, Alan continued a career as an educator while serving as managing editor of the Trib. He is currently retired from teaching would like to serve as an occasional Manhattan correspondent. When I was asked to write about the 40th anniversary of the Queens Tribune, the thought that came to my mind is, boy I’m getting old! When Henry Levy, Gary Ackerman and I founded the then Flushing Tribune in February 1970 we were in our 20s. But I wrote a piece for the 35th anniversary of the Tribune, so what’s so different about the fortieth? Does five years change a person’s life? Does five years change your understanding of life, death, age and time passing? The answer in my case is a resounding, “yes.” In January 2007, my wife Nancy had a routine physical examination which showed she had an unusually high white blood cell count. It was determined after visits to Sloan Kettering, the Mayo Clinic and NYU Cancer Center that Nancy had a rare form of leukemia. For 17 months she endured a constant barrage of doctors, medicines, injections and experimental drugs all in a vain attempt to stop the deadly disease. She died on Nov. 8, 2008. Her memorial service was attended by over 500 people and Gary Ackerman was one of the several friends who spoke. He stood and said how difficult it was for him to speak on this occasion. He spoke of Nancy’s beauty and goodness and her outspokenness. He

called her stature and demeanor aristocratic and after all those special words, he turned and looked at me in the first row and said, “And we always wondered, ‘why did she marry HIM?’” Laughter erupted and even I had a grin on my face. But I knew why she married me and why, after 36 years of being together, I was so devastated by her loss. She loved me and I loved her. After Nancy’s death I felt that life was a difficult burden to bear. But my children and family and wonderful friends all supported me and each day brought a sense of needing to live, needing to move on, needing to love. I learned that nothing in life is forever, we need to embrace each day we’re given. The Queens Tribune is 40 years old and this anniversary is very different than all the others. Death takes a toll but on Feb. 15, 2010, exactly 40 years after the first Tribune publication, Norah Butelli Manheim was born; our first grandchild. My son David Manheim and Linda Butelli are the proud parents and my daughter Lauren is expecting twins in July. So life moves on in its strange and fascinating way. And by the way, beautiful Norah lives in Astoria, one of the first neighborhoods to receive the Queens Tribune.


A Good Friend:

Oats Steers The Trib BY BRIAN M. RAFFERTY

Nov. 2, 1972: David Oats was, by all accounts, charming, focused, dedicated and a friend to all who knew him. His first byline appears in the Queens Tribune on Nov. 2, 1972. As a kid, David rode his bike around Flushing Meadows Park. Then one day there were fences up, so he snuck his way in and found somebody to complain to. That somebody was Robert Moses, and this chance encounter started a decades-long friendship, with David – a student of history and a dreamer of enormous magnitude – picking the brain of the mastermind behind so much of New York City’s infrastructure. Shortly after Gary Ackerman opened the Tribune, in walked David, eager to learn. He worked for years for peanuts, getting to know the business from old professionals and young kids straight out of college, many of whom had either been at or were headed to stellar careers in other locales. But David stayed here. His heart was in it. In 1977, when Ackerman decided to run for office, Gary stepped down as Executive Editor, and handed the position to David, who by this time had been the longest standing employee of the newspaper. Various changes and differences in opinion made David leave the Tribune,

but he would come back several times, after spending time editing another paper or working on pet projects. A protector of the park he biked through as a kid, David sought to get a third World’s Fair located in Queens, and had a very clear vision of what were and were not acceptable uses and appropriate care of his park. Though the World’s Fair never materialized, David kept a watchful eye on his baby, calling when the light atop the towers went out, writing diatribes against the Parks Dept. for allowing cars to park on the grass during the U.S. Open – and making sure that the history and sanctity of the park were maintained. He also continued to write on and off for the Tribune, and I was lucky enough to work with him on a couple of pieces, including a massive anniversary edition from 2007 honoring the 350th anniversary of the Flushing Remonstrance. The document that signified the birth of religious freedom in the Western Hemisphere came home to Flushing, and David, who helped make it happen, was there to welcome it back. Less than a year later, David was dead. His presence is still felt by all who knew him. He looms large in spirit above the park he sought to protect, and this spring a bench near the Unisphere and small rose garden will be dedicated in his honor.

1972: Hank Sheinkopf Hank was 22 when he became a reporter for the Trib, and he has since moved to a 35-year career as a political consultant, working on Bill Clinton’s 1996 re-election campaign and some 600 other endeavors, domestically and internationally. Walking down the street in New York these days, you hear the angst in the voices of passersby. Jobs are scarce. Crime is up. The government has no money. Political leaders are overwhelmed. New Yorkers’ complaints today seem quaint when I think back to the 1970s, when the Queens Tribune printed its first words. Grimy streets and dangerous subways gave birth to the iconic rough and tumble image of the City that persists to this day in the imaginations of Midwesterners and foreigners. Bankers were not worried about the size of their bonuses, but whether they would be mugged for their wallets. Our government’s fiscal issues were defined not by deficits but by bankruptcy. Queens always had it a little better in those days. Nicer streets. Suburban homes. But for some reason, it always got off worse. When the famous snow storm blanketed the City and almost sent Lindsay into early retirement, our streets were the last to be cleared. It’s been a constant struggle over the last 40 years to get the same attention as its neighbors to the west and south. It was during those days that Gary Ackerman gave a cub reporter with some crazy ideas named Hank Sheinkopf a few bucks to cover the

borough. I wrote about cops, crime, city jails, dirty streets, unsafe parks, and learned to drink at Pep McGuire’s across from Borough Hall. The Trib used its pages not only as a tool to inform, but a forum to fight for the oft-forgotten resident of Queens. We fought for the people of Sunnyside, Kew Gardens and Bayside and everywhere in between, giving a voice to the voiceless. In the subsequent years, journalism has changed as much as the city itself. The clack and crank of typewriters have been replaced by the hum of hard drives and blinking lights of modems. But the job of the community newspaper never changes. There are still community board meetings and school rallies that need to be covered. Online papers and blogs have challenged the role of a weekly paper, but the Trib continues to find stories where no one else bothers to look. When I see how the Trib still matters today, I am proud for my contributions and all the other reporters that have followed. No matter what else changes, there will always be a need for the work they do. So in 40 years, when the Trib is beamed directly into my head, I won’t mind. It’s already in my heart.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 13


Retail Revolution:

Queens Center Mall Opens Its Doors BY CATHERINE MANZIONE

as the store’s anchors. In the years since its opening, the Queens Center saw major swings in stores, but kept its popularity – so much that a major expansion opened in 2004. The mall’s $275 million expansion b rought dozens of new stores to Queens, including H&M, and expanded old favorites like JC Penney, the GAP, Nine West, Bath and Body Works, and Victoria’s Secret. Add a food court with treats from all over the world, and Queens Center Mall became a destination all its own. When measured by sales per square foot, Queens Center Mall is the nation’s most profitable, ringing up $935 in sales per square foot. The formula, company officials said, was to increase the total square footage from 620,000 to nearly one million. With 175 stores (up from 69), and 794 additional parking spaces, mall officials plan to attract a wider swath of shoppers than have tradiThe Queens Center Mall opened in 1973 and t i o n a l l y h e a d e d o u t o f has gone on to become the highest grossing mall Queens, back. per square foot in the country.

Page 14 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Sept. 12, 1973: Queens’ shoppers celebrated today as the ribbon was cut at Queens Center Mall, heralding the beginning of a massive retail expansion for the borough and the first mall of its kind in New York City. Instead of having to travel to Manhattan or Long Island for their favorite name brands, Queens’ residents can now enjoy the luxury of having all their favorite brands in their borough. Abraham & Straus and Ohrbach’s serve

1973: Mark Weiss Mark, a founding partner of Harbor Group Communications and the former president and CEO of the Rowland Corporation, had also served as president of the Windsor Park Tenants Association. Congratulations on the 40th Anniversary of the Queens Tribune – the heart and soul of Queens County. While I’m sure some will reflect on this occasion in terms of the number of issues published, the number of pages printed, the circulation growth and maybe even the incredible number of advertisers that have sought exposure through the Trib, for me, a long time community activist, I choose to focus on the Tribune in its role as a neighborhood “soap box” – a platform for those individuals and civic organizations that would otherwise have had little chance to take their vision, mission or points of view to the community at large. From my start as the President of the Windsor Park Tenants Association, the Queens Tribune was recognized as a vehicle for taking tenant concerns to the surrounding community. As tenants, we took our citizenship seriously and we understood the important role well maintained rental properties played in attracting young residents to the neighborhood – residents who often planted seeds in Windsor Park and either stayed in the complex or moved to other parts of the borough. The Queens Tribune gave us a place to voice our concerns about landlord policies and practices with

an eye toward their impact on tenant’s quality of life and ultimately their impact on the entire neighborhood and the borough of Queens. To garner the support of all Queens residents and the political and legislative communities, we maintained a direct line of communications with the reporters at the Queens Tribune and we benefited always from the paper’s fair and accurate coverage of what turned out to be some of the most critical landmark court decisions governing landlordtenant relations. Whether it was a fight to keep a local public school from closing, a battle to keep Department of Sanitation trucks out of our parks, a drive to convert a closing library into a senior center, the Queens Tribune was there – to listen, investigate and report. In my role as a tenant and civic leader, I learned that the strength of a community can best be found in its people, its institutions and most importantly in the spirit that guides the progress of both. The Queens Tribune has in the past, and continues today to bolster each of these community assets and for this reason, deserves the respect and admiration of the entire borough of Queens.


Housing For All:

Queens Residents Resist Public Housing Facility BY KAITLYN KILMETIS May 28, 1972: New York City Mayor John Lindsay set in motion the wheels of compromise in the widely-contested low-income housing development debate in Forest Hills. A fter considerable prodding from State Sen. Emanuel Gold and Queens Borough President Donald Manes, the Mayor appointed Queens Attorney Mario Cuomo to conduct an independent study to determine if some type of compromise can be reached between the City and a coalition of enraged Forest Hills residents passionately opposing the construction of a massive low-income housing facility in their neighborhood. The controversy surrounding the project began

1974: Alan Gershuny Alan was an early contributor to the Queens Tribune, served as Executive Director of the NYC Bd. Of Standards and Appeals and has spent a career dedicated to public service.

Later that month, community members voiced their vehement disapproval of Cuomo’s compromise in a public hearing. Two months later the Board of Estimates voted overwhelmingly to approve Cuomo’s plan over the angry heckles of Forest Hills residents who picketed outside City Hall. The decision, reached after 11 hours of heated debate, was hailed as a valuable compromise that set a precedent for the battle against low-income housing facilities, leading “affordable housing” to emerge as the battle cry for any developer looking to construct facilities in Queens.

HEALTH CARE INSURANCE REFORM:

YEAR ONE

This week, President Obama signed the new health care insurance reform act. Starting This Year: • Your insurance company can’t drop your coverage when you get sick • Children may remain on their parents’ health plan until they are 26 years old • Your children’s coverage can’t be denied because of pre-existing conditions • Your insurance company can’t place lifetime limits on your coverage • Your insurance company’s ability to place annual caps on your coverage is severely restricted • Small businesses will receive tax credits of up to 35% of health care premiums for this tax year • Medicare beneficiaries about to hit the doughnut hole will receive $250 rebates • Preventive care under Medicare and new private plans will be free of charge • Americans who are uninsured because of pre-existing conditions will immediately have access to affordable coverage

And there’s much more to come.

A message from Congressman Gary L. Ackerman Paid for by Ackerman for Congress, Bob Barnett, Treasurer

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 15

Shortly after the birth of the Flushing Tribune, I volunteered my services as a reporter and columnist. That I can remember, the first story I ever wrote for the paper concerned the rumor that E.J. Korvette’s was going to open a store in Downtown Flushing. Although I enjoyed reporting the news, I really loved writing a column called “One Man’s Opinion.” And while the Flushing Tribune was ostensibly a local newspaper, the column was mostly devoted to national issues and politics. I’ve been asked to share some memories from those days. There are three that really stick out. The first involves a controversy when a local school board decided to remove the book “Down These Mean Streets” from the school library. Gary and I differ on some issues, but not at all in our obsessive, compulsive belief in and reverence for the First Amendment to our Constitution. We authored an editorial that strongly criticized the school board for its actions and took particular aim at a local Rabbi (I can’t remember his name) who was a member of the board and had voted to ban the book. I guess we both thought that the “teacher” should have known better. The following week we received a Letter to the Editor from the Rabbi in which he threatened to excommunicate us using an ancient ritual from Deuteronomy. I remember that our first reaction was shock at the thought that Jews could actually be excommunicated. And then we laughed. During the Watergate scandal I wrote perhaps 13 columns, pretty much week after week, excoriating President Nixon for his crimes against the Constitution. I particularly remember the one I wrote in the form of an open letter to my three sons (who were not even old enough to read it) wherein I explained what had occurred and why I had come to the conclusion that the President needed to resign or be impeached and removed from office. I believe that I may have been the first columnist (albeit it was a column in the Flushing Tribune) to call for the President’s resignation or impeachment. And then there was the column I wrote about generational change that was awarded Best Column of the Year by the New York Press Association. I’m not sure, but I think the award certificate still hangs on the wall at the Tribune’s offices today. Funny, it was one of the most non-serious columns I ever wrote. All in all, it was a great experience and a lot of fun My congratulations to the Queens Tribune for four decades of exceptional local journalism.

in the fall of 1971 after Forest Hills residents criticized the project, which would house 840 families in twin 24-story towers. On Sept. 5, 1972, Manes announced that a compromise had been reached. Cuomo had drafted a plan to convert the facility to a “cooperative low income housing development” and also increase the number of buildings by one and halve the facilities height from 24 stories to 12 stories. Cuomo’s recommendation was adopted by Mayor Lindsey and received the support of many public officials.


Lights, Camera, Queens:

Fantastic Flushing:

Old Paramount Site Community Upstarts A Reborn Film Studio Spark Revitalization BY CATHERINE MANZIONE Oct. 24, 1978: What was once the U.S. Army Pictorial Center was reignited as a full-fledged motion picture studio in Queens with the production of the Wiz, which hit movie theaters today. Moviegoers were thrilled to learn that the Kaufman Astoria Studios was back in business for the first time in 30 years. The studios were opened in 1920 by Paramount Pictures so that actors who couldn’t leave town had a place to work and shoot nearby. However, in 1942, at the beginning of WWII, the U.S Army took over the studio and started using it as a place to produce newsreels as an effort to support World War II and named it Signal Corps Photographic Center. When the war was over, the studio stood vacant and was labeled as “sur-

plus property” by the Army. The Federal government offered the property to New York’s City University to be used by LaGuardia Community College. However, due to insufficient budgets the $4.5 million development plan could not take place. The soundstage has been the home of two huge Marx Bros. Films, The Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers, and has been the site for the production of more than 120 silent movies. A $50 million makeover of the Kaufman Astoria Studio came in 1982, the year of the cosmeticallychallenged leading men: a cross-dressing Dustin Hoffman starred in Tootsie; a long-necked, flat-headed alien starred in “E.T.”, and “Diner’s” leading man was Mickey Rourke. In 2008, another $22 million expansion was announced to add a 44,000square-foot stage and support area.

1975: Bob Citelli

Page 16 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

An assistant editor of the Queens Tribune in its early years, Bob moved to California, where he held a number of senior posts in Silicon Valley before starting @Sales & Marketing, providing help to start-up high-tech companies. According to Dictionary.com: Community is defined as "a social group of any size whose members reside in a specific locality, share government, and often have a common cultural and historical heritage." While there was no definition for community newspaper found therein, it is easy to recognize that the Tribune has touched all the bases within the meaning of the word over the decades it has successfully served Queens. What makes a community newspaper truly successful? Some would say it is the business staff and certainly, Mike Schenkler and his team have done a remarkable job of sustaining this publication over the years, particularly more recently when the Internet has driven many papers off the newsstands and out of business. Drawing upon my own experiences as a staff member and writer some 30 years prior, I am certain it is more than just a great sales team. After all, any publication can subscribe to a news service and pull down syndicated copy, report it as news and try to sell advertising around the content. Perhaps a few even succeed in doing so. What has made the Tribune successful over the years is the quality of its organization, its people and the surrounding neighbors and neighborhoods it serves. Starting internally, the Tribune has been a launching pad for young graphic artists, journalists and cartoonists seeking to cut their teeth on a real publication and start their careers. Several of my associates during my tenure at the Trib were certainly able to accomplish this, myself included. The management at the time, led by now-Congressman

Gary Ackerman, became a magnet for talent, attracting gifted individuals, many from challenged home environments, and giving them the chance and the playing field on which to succeed. Outside the walls of our offices, we all shared in a government in turmoil. The City of New York was in the midst of a perilous financial crisis. Streets were unpaved, garbage was uncollected, schools were cutting back, and hospitals, fire and police stations were at risk of closing or being closed. The Tribune served its neighbors and neighborhoods well during these times and continues to do so today. The Tribune has been diligent in its defense of people, citizens who might not otherwise have their story told, defending school administrators unfairly being ousted, students lobbying to save no cost/low cost tuition at CUNY, or drawing attention to candidacies for underdogs seeking elected office who could be counted on to serve the people of Queens well. Finally, the Tribune helped bring a sense of history to the Queens community at large. We were the paper of record when it came to all things Bicentennial and David Oats, himself a part-time historian and then Managing Editor, culled local stories, drawings and photographs from his sources providing definition to names and events dating far back into the history of Queens, New York and our nation. Time and the Tribune marches on. Congratulations to the current staff and Mike Schenkler for keeping the proud tradition of a great community paper alive all these years.

BY JOSEPH OROVIC June 1979: The Flushing Fantastic II created a sea of humanity on Main Street, as about 200,000 people attended the street festival. At a time when Flushing’s economic and social prospects dwindled, with porn shops moving in and mom and pop shops shipping out, Jo-Ann Jones and Downtown Flushing Development Corp.’s Aaron Weiss set out to revitalize the area through the arts. The neighborhood was undergoing a change of face, with a growing Asian population that was – at times – a source of tension. Weiss and Jones actively embraced the new members of the community, and strove to integrate their culture in

the annual Queens Day Festival at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. Eventually, the idea blossomed into something greater. The result was the Flushing Fantastic International Street Festival. The day-long event featured a parade, the usual battery of food and games, as well as cultural events highlighting the area’s diversity. The success of the event spawned a rebirth in Flushing, and created a closely-knit group of merchants and locals. The reverberating good vibes led to the creation of organizations like the Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts, which begat the restoration and use of the Flushing Town Hall, which continues to this day.

1976: Jeff Tarlo Since leaving the Trib as Executive Editor in 1977, Jeff edited several newspapers and magazines, including Health Care Week and Vending Times, making a major career change in the late 1980s – to classical music retail. He now oversees the classical music department of J&R Music World in lower Manhattan, the largest classical music section in the nation. Happy Birthday, Queens Tribune. May 40 be just the beginning of many more years of major community service. I joined the Trib in 1972 from Queens College, where I had cofounded a student newspaper, Newsbeat. Both Gary Ackerman and Newsbeat used the same typesetter and printer. Gary asked me to join the staff and I agreed. The Trib was a phenomenal learning experience for me. I was Managing Editor and later Executive Editor. Yes, we used typewriters and typesetting equipment, kind of like out of the dark ages. Thank God there were no dinosaurs around. We worked out of two storefronts on Kissena Boulevard in Flushing. We had a small editorial staff of Gary, two reporters and I. Many contributors helped make our lives easier. The staffs, both editorial and business, were great to work with. As I write this piece so many names and faces flash in front of me. But most of all, we were respected journalistically throughout the State. Many of our staffers went on to do amazing things. So many stories: like when we got credentials to the Nixon inauguration in 1973 and press passes to the Democratic National Convention and saw Jimmy Carter chosen to make the run for the Presidency. The lunch we had for Mayor John Lindsay. The day, while listening to the police radio, Gary notified me that my father’s car was just stolen. The raffle lady, who tried to sell raffles to Gary. He had her convinced that he was a twin, since he made use of both storefronts. I remember when I was called by Norman Lear’s staff because they wanted Archie Bunker from “All in the Family” to know what was happening in Flushing. They even designed their own Flushing Tribune with

its own reporter, Harley Benson. There was never a dull moment at the paper. We broke many important stories when I was there. When people had problems they came to us. When they had things to publicize, they knew we would take care of them. Regina Vogel made Queens Today, a section that made everyone so proud and she is still doing a dynamite job. So many stories, so little time and space. I remember in that Summer of the Son of Sam we tried to out-Post the New York Post, using huge red headlines to attract attention. Now the portion of my piece, which by far is the most difficult, talking of my friend and co-worker: David Oats. He was one of our first contributors, always bringing material about Queens and his love: Flushing Meadow Corona Park. He always had a way with him that you just had to listen to whatever he had to say and make room in the paper for it. Soon he was offered a post with the Trib. He was always there for everyone. He made the Tribune a better place to work. When I was Executive Editor, David was appointed Managing Editor, an excellent choice. When I left the Trib, David was appointed Executive Editor. There was no other choice. After I left the Trib, I kind of lost contact with David, something I regret. What he truly wanted was a New York World’s Fair that was not to happen. Guess we blew it, David. They should just rename the park after you. The more I write, the more I remember. Maybe I should write a screen play, maybe not: just don’t want to leave anyone out. It is truly a wonderful thing this 40th anniversary. May it continue forever. So where’s the cake? Do I get a piece?


www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 17


Summer Of Sam:

Serial Killer Breeds Fear Across Borough BY KAITLYN KILMETIS

Page 18 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Jan. 30, 1977: A fter a Saturday night date, early Sunday morning Christine Freund and her fiancé John Diel sat in their Pontiac Firebird before departing for their next location. Suddenly, the sound of deafening shots, fired at close range, rang out through the Queens neighborhood. Diel suffered only superficial injuries. Freund, 26, was shot twice. She died hours later at the hospital. Police soon determined the gunman had used a .44 Bulldog in the attack. Based on the evidence, the NYPD connected the attack to three other shootings that had taken place in Queens and the Bronx since July 1976, leaving an 18-year-old woman dead and five other young people injured. On March 8, Virginia Voskerichian, a 19-year-old Forest Hills resident was shot on her way back from classes at Barnard College. She attempted to use her textbooks to shield her face to no avail; Voskerichian was killed instantly in the attack. Days later, the NYPD held a press conference where police officials and Mayor Abe Beame informed the public they had evidence that the same .44 Bulldog had been used in all the shootings. Panic spread rampantly across the borough, along with the rest of the city, as residents feared a serial

killer on the loose. Dark-haired women, who fit the description of a majority of the shooter’s victims, dyed their hair blonde and young people remains cloistered in their homes. The media spurred concern with constant sensationalized coverage of the case. A month later, on April 17, two more young people, a man and a woman, were shot and murdered. Blocks away from the Bronx street where the murders took place, a handwritten note, addressed to an NYPD captain, was recovered. In the frightening letter, the killer identified himself as the “Son of Sam” and made multiple mentions of the borough, including a declaration that the women in Queens were the prettiest of all. On May 30, the killer reached out again with a hand-written letter to Daily News columnist Jimmy Breslin. The Daily News published parts of the eerie letter, causing alarm to continue to plague the city. On June 27, Son of Sam shot Sal Lupo, 20, and Judy Placido, 17, in their car after a night out in Bayside. Both survived with minor injuries. In his last attack, on July 31, the serial killer murdered a 20-year-old woman and wounded her 20-year-old boyfriend in a Brooklyn park. A woman who had been in the park earlier told police she had could identify a myste-

rious man in the park that night, who she believed to be the killer. After a number of fortuitous leads pointed the NYPD in his direction, police arrested David Berkowitz for the six murders and eight attacks that terrorized New York City during 1976 and 1977.

Berkowitz confessed to the murders and added that he was ordered to kill by commands from his neighbor’s demon dog. He pleaded guilty to the murders and was sentenced to 365 years in prison in the Attica Correctional Facility.

1977: Rich Sandomir

This current Sports Media and Business columnist of The New York Times got his start in the newspaper business as a typesetter at the Tribune while in high school. He moved on to reporter and later editor in the days of the 1978 Blackout and Gary Ackerman’s first successful bid for public office. I came to the Queens Tribune through the back door: as a high school typesetter. A very fast one, but a very bad one, I might say. My MultiMedia co-worker, Betty, was far more accomplished, but I was pathetic, and so, it should be noted, was the eventhen-ancient Compugraphic system. We typed the stories onto a paper tape that resembled very narrow toilet paper and fed it into a computer, which regurgitated the article in a form that could be pasted up. Betty and I could count on a busy day when we had to type up Regina Vogel’s community listings and Robert Elkin’s voluminous sports reports. A year or so after I started working there, I became the features editor of the Queens College paper, Newsbeat, and I segued from typesetter/employee role to client/customer. A year after that, I became the paper’s editor-in-chief, so it became my responsibility to pack up the written copy, pick up the great and nocturnal typist, Barbara Johnson, in the wee hours of Saturday mornings, drive her to Multi-Media, case the storefront for any burglars (such was her worry and paranoia), then return Sunday mornings to oversee my staff, or at least keep them from playing too much roller-chair hockey in the office or go wild with food fights. Things were really overseen by Melanie Tarlo and Meryl Wittenberg; if not for them, there would have been no Newsbeat. Late Sunday, it was another traditional responsibility to drive to Joe Wolf ’s godforsaken printing plant in Williamsburg, where I slipped the finished mechanicals under a garage door that was open slightly to accommodate my delivery. The next morning, or sometimes the afternoon, about 10,000 or so copies were delivered to a loading bay, and I loaded up my Dodge Dart and started delivering. Simultaneously, I had become a reporter for the Queens Tribune, and for some reason (perhaps being that nobody else wanted the job) was named managing editor, or something like it, during the summer of 1978. (Did I get paid for that? I don’t recall.) Through these years, I became attached to the ebullient David Oats, whose enthusiasm for local news (and most prominently, anything about the ‘64 World’s Fair) was infectious, as were his stories about becom-

ing friendly with Robert Moses. Always looming over the Tribune/MultiMedia empire, was Gary Ackerman, whose eventual electoral victory as a Congressman (which occurred well after my last days in his employ) is less vivid to me than his earlier and epochal campaign for councilman-atlarge against the incumbent Eugene Mastropieri. Being a journalist for the Tribune meant doing just about anything, short of selling ads. I was reporter, editor, photographer, newspaper delivery person (driving a beaten-up van to the post office) and gofer to the homes of photographers Joe Ullman, the most polite man on earth, and Carl Schaum, whose residence had what can only be called as a memorable odor. Some would call it a stench. Only two stories stand out: the first was an expose of a street in Flushing that we called Queens’ version of “Tobacco Road.” The second was being the photographer when Gary attended President Carter’s signing of loan documents to the nearly bankrupt New York City. Gary got on one reception line that led up to the second floor of City Hall and photographers got on a second line. If our luck held, I’d get up to the second floor when Gary did. But the dignitaries’ line moved slowly; mine moved quickly. I waited as long as the Secret Service would allow, but an agent plunked his hand in my chest and told me to leave. Just as I was about to disappear through a door, I heard Gary shout, “Richie! Richie!” I was probably 30 or 40 feet away, and I said to the agent, “That’s my boss. Can I get back there?” I reasoned that Gary would shake the president’s hand for as long as it took for me to get back in position. He let me, but as I unscrewed my lens cap and tried to focus, the clearly annoyed president leaned over to Mayor Koch and said, ‘“Who are these guys?” Koch replied, “What do you expect, they’re from the Queens Tribune!” The caption for the resulting blurry photo read: “Heads of State.” I am certain that my years at that Flushing storefront, with nourishment from the Good Food Deli across Kissena Boulevard contributed to the confidence that would, a dozen years after my college graduation, lead me to employment at The New York Times.


Goodfellas Gone Bad:

$5 Million Robbed From JFK Hangar BY DOMENICK RAFTER

Queens College Salutes the Queens Tribune on its four decades of community-oriented publishing. We offer special congratulations to our alumni for their vision and leadership:

Page 20 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Founder GARY ACKERMAN ’65 Publisher/Editor-in-Chief MICHAEL SCHENKLER ’66 Associate Publisher MICHAEL NUSSBAUM ’69

James Muyskens, President

www.qc.cuny.edu

activities in the borough. The sloppy Dec. 14, 1978: Federal law enforce- repercussions of the heist spearheaded ment swarmed a black van yesterday in by usually meticulous mobsters triggered the Canarsie section of Brooklyn they the beginning of the end of mafia domibelieve was the getaway van from nance. The Feds caught a break when Monday’s robbery at the Lufthansa Air- the getaway driver, Parnell “Stacks” lines cargo hanger at Kennedy Airport, Edwards, ignored orders to destroy the getaway van and instead visited the largest cash robbery his girlfriend in Canarsie, leavever committed in the ing the van illegally parked, United States. Federal inwhich tipped off law enforcevestigators searched the van ment. Edwards would pay for for fingerprints and discovhis mistake with his life only a ered a muddy shoeprint few days later. near the van that may point Over the course of the next to a suspect. six years, one by one, suspects In the heist on Dec 11, at in the case were murdered by least five robbers made away with over $5 million in cash The Lufthansa heist mastermind mobster Jimmy and over $850,000 in jewels was chronicled in Burke or forced into witness that were being stored in the Martin Scorsese’s protection. According to incargo hanger of Lufthansa “GoodFellas,” star- formant Henry Hill, an assoAirlines, Germany’s state air- ring Ray Liotta as ciate of Burke, the mob boss line. The money, which con- mob turncoat Henry became paranoid after the FBI found the van and began sisted of both foreign and Hill. to plot to kill anyone who U.S. currency, was being flown from Frankfurt, Germany for could implicate him in the crime. Burke was eventually arrested and transfer to Chase Manhattan Bank and the Federal Reserve in Lower Manhat- convicted of killing one of the men; Richard Eaton, in January 1979, leavtan. Thereafter known as the “Lufthansa ing his body hogtied in a refrigerator Heist,” the robbery and its chaotic af- truck in Brooklyn. He died of lung cantermath became part of Queens folk- cer in a Buffalo, New York hospital lore, solidified the borough’s reputa- while serving a life sentence for Eaton’s tion as a major hub of Mafia activity, murder. Burke was never convicted for and was famously portrayed in two any other the murders he may have television movies and a blockbuster committed or been an accessory to. To this day, the Lufthansa heist reAcademy Award-winning film directed mains the largest cash robbery in the by Martin Scorsese: “GoodFellas.” The heist marked the climax of mafia nation’s history.

1978: Jedd Moskowitz Fresh out of college, Jedd came to work for the Tribune in 1973 as a reporter and is currently still attached to founder Gary Ackerman – he serves as the Congressman’s Chief of Staff. My first job out of college was a reporter for the Trib. This was in 1973, just a few years after the Trib was born. As the new guy on staff, I got the most exciting assignments – covering interminable Community Board meetings, chronicling out-of-sync traffic lights, counting the crowd of last-minute filers at the Main Street Flushing Post Office at midnight on April 15. (The latter was a favorite story of Trib founder and Congressman-to-be Gary Ackerman, who personally recorded the event in detail each year. Nevertheless, the charm of photographing angry people mailing bulky envelopes at the stroke of midnight escapes me to this day.) The one story I remember with some clarity, though with few of the details, centered on newly-installed Criminal Court Judge Richard Brown, who had the poor judgment one day to be presiding when some confused defendant thought it would

be a good idea to whip out a gun and take a few shots at His Honor. The future Queens DA was unharmed, finding quick protection by ducking down behind the bench. (“I didn’t have far to go,” I seem to recall Judge Brown quipped.) Indeed, it was my phone interview with the Judge – my first conversation as a “real” reporter with anyone of some distinction – that is fixed in my mind. Judge Brown was charming, friendly, and patient with a raw journalist trying to figure out which way to hold the pencil. (This was many years before MS Word.) He made light of his personal predicament, without dismissing the severity – and real personal danger – of what had occurred. It’s no surprise to me that Dick Brown has remained a fixture our judicial system, and I smile a little inside whenever I read an account in the Trib of the Judge’s work.


NEW YORK

IT’S HARD GETTING BY IN . . . AND ONLY GETTING HARDER

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Page 22 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

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1979: David Oats

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This column is republished from out 35th Anniversary edition. David Oats, who was the heart and soul of this newspaper for the better part of two decades, died two years ago. No anniversary edition would be complete without him, so we are recounting his tale here. Reading your column this week brought back some very vivid Trib and Ackerman memories from “disasters” gone-by. Gary is correct in stating that the only missed Tribune deadline in the paper’s history was due to a snowstorm in early 1978. But at least I’m proud to say it wasn’t for want of trying. The blizzard that hit the city was reminiscent of the famous ‘69 storm that blanketed and shut down Queens, and almost destroyed Mayor John Lindsay’s political career when Manhattan’s streets were cleared but Queens remained unplowed for days. (Only the 1969 Miracle Mets victory helped boost Lindsay to an almost miracle-like re-election later that year.) I remember enjoying the vast whiteout of ‘69 – but the ‘78 storm seemed as big and presented an almost impossible task on deadline night. A hearty group of Trib staffers stayed until the paper was done (with paste-up and “computers” that were “modern” to us but dinosaurs by today’s standards). The paper was completed – but there was one problem. Our printer (Joe Wollf ’s International press in Long Island City) was so snowed-in they could not get their doors or gates open. Hence, we had a paper – but no printer. I wish we had saved the original boards of that edition – the only one that never saw the light of ink. Unable to walk to my home on Roosevelt Avenue in Flushing, I remember staying at the Trib office for almost two days, but grateful to the

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David Oats (l.) and Steve McGuire (r.) heroes at Shea Stadium. street. And on, and on. Frustrated by not having any cameras with us we walked the darkened streets back to the blackened Trib storefront where we attempted to coordinate some kind of coverage of that dark night. It was a very hot and humid night (no moonlight as in ‘65) and the City was already paralyzed in fear by the mysterious, bloody rampage of the Son of Sam. In fact, it’s said that many actually believed he, whoever he was, caused the blackout. In the end, the early scenes we saw in Flushing were repeated – in huge scale – all around the tense city. All the lights were not turned on until about 10:30 the next night. But there had been 3,400 arrests, 558 cops injured, 851 fires and $1 billion in damage. A nightmarish night that makes our most recent blackout of ‘03 stand as a model of civic pride. But the early light of the next morning (still without electricity) Gary, myself and some other staffers were trying to make the best of our time to come up with ways to get an original story out of this – and get Gary in the news. In a flash, so to speak, it came. They were saying a lightning bolt hit the big Con Ed plant up in Westchester, causing the blackout. Paul O’Dwyer, then the City Council President, doubted this scenario and saw it as a big Con Ed cop-out for other major failures. So we decided to drive to the plant upstate. Gary went to a local store and, when everyone else was searching for batteries, flashlights, etc., he was looking for a kite. The idea was to get into the facility and have Gary fly the kite, á la Ben Franklin’s famed lightning experiment, and tell Con Ed to “Go Fly a Kite!” with their blackout excuse. Needless to say some incredulous guards turned us away, but we got the shot of Gary, the kite and the plant in the background and our “Ackerman to Con Ed: Go Fly A Kite” headline on the next Tribune front page. To think, from this, future great newspapers and Congressmen are born. Fresh from our victorious journalistic-political coup upstate, we returned late afternoon to a still powerless Queens. We decided to pick up a few other reporter-campaign volunteers to ride around the borough with

spend the day with one their all-time Gary in his old red, white and blue van which was our rolling campaign headquarters. We stopped to pick up one of our people at his home in Fresh Meadows to join our boroughwide jaunt. Now this was a quiet, residential, one-family home street on a day where everyone is trapped at home and there is really no sound or activity. Except for the red, white and blue “Acker-Van,” as we called it – blaring John Philip Sousa marching music from a loudspeaker on top and a huge car-top sign for ACKERMAN AT LARGE. As we pull up, some young children playing in the street are fascinated by the arrival of this blackout day diversion. The circus had come to town! Residents were looking out their windows at the unusual scene as we waited to pick up our worker. Then, Gary decides it’s hot – we ought to all be wearing the Ackerman t-shirts we had just made up. So Gary gets out of the van, and proceeds to take his shirt off to change into the t-shirt. The little kids stared in wonderment at this large man from the red, white and blue truck – loudly blaring Sousa marching music – apparently undressing in the street. The bemused residents are also watching from their windows. In the middle of a blackout afternoon! And then, quite unexpectedly, Gary raises his arms to put on the shirt – and his pants fall down! Quickly pulling them back up, Gary smiles and waves at the kiddies and neighbors, and we all pile back in the van, which in music and signs loudly proclaims to anyone within seeing and hearing distance – ACKERMAN AT LARGE! Needless to say, Gary lost that election. The position was later abolished. But the fact that Gary was wearing an extra large pair of boxer shorts that day may have saved the whole political and newspaper history of Ackerman and the Trib from ending on that blackout day with a case of public lewdness. In fact, Gary went on the next year to become elected to the State Senate and, eventually, the hallowed halls of the U.S. Congress. And the Trib went on to reach a ripe maturity. As the old cliché goes – only in America.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 23

Good Food Store across the street on Kissena Boulevard, which was able to open, and a crew of volunteer photographers who braved the cold and snow to provide the pix for the next-published Tribune. Then there was the Blackout of 1977. Again, I had fond memories of New York’s first great Blackout in November 1965. It was a frighteningly beautiful night for the city – full of the same grace in crisis spirit we saw in 2003. But the ‘77 Blackout was a very different story. At the Tribune, we were in a dual-mode. At that time we were not only attempting to put the paper out, but also much of the staff was happily moonlighting on another task – getting the Trib’s founder and publisher Gary Ackerman elected to public office. He was running for the first time – for a now-discontinued position of Councilman-at-Large. This was a major, boroughwide elective post (later ruled unconstitutional by the courts – another story). It was an energetic, grassroots, exciting campaign in which the paper was very much a vehicle. After a day of work at the paper, I went out with one of my reporters/campaign workers for relaxation at Baciagalup’s Restaurant on Main Street in Flushing to talk about the campaign and also the Trib’s coverage of the Son of Sam case that was terrorizing Queens and the City in a time later to be known as “The Summer of Sam.” At about 9:30 p.m. on that July 13 night, the lights flickered in the restaurant, and then went dark. As you recounted in your column, at first it’s all very local to you – until Larry Reich and I went out the doors and saw it wasn’t confined to Baciagalup’s. All of Main Street was dark and transistor radios were able to break the news that, once again, all of New York – and beyond – was out. I remember it was only a few minutes before we also realized that this was not going to be another placid New York night as in ‘65. We watched as within seconds, the plate glass windows of a fashionable men’s clothing store on the corner of Main & Kissena were shattered and looters were pulling everything from the store. Then, minutes later, the sounds of shattered glass were heard at The Queens Tribune clearly disputed Con Ed’s claim that the large appliance lightning caused the massive 1977 blackout. store across the

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Open Doors:

Groups Band Together To Defend Immigrants BY JOSEPH OROVIC

bridged together various ethno-centric August 5, 1999: Borough Presi- organizations to raise awareness of dent Claire Shulman shot back against immigrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s benefits to the commua Queens-based anti-immigration nity. It also hoped to educate immigroup, objecting to its closed-border- grants about common difficulties they face, and strategies to overcome them. promoting ad campaign. Shulman aside, other local elected ProjectUSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wave of billboards and anti-immigration sentiment officials also fought against sparked a debate over the value of ProjectUSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s message, forming the Queensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; foreign-born citizens, who in Special Committee on the Dignity of many ways have always represented a Immigrants. Spearheaded by now-incarcerated Assemblyman Brian faceless borough. The group, led by Craig Nelson, McLaughlin, the committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call was asserted the consistent waves of new to catalogue and report on systematic immigrants deteriorated Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and societal abuse of immigrants and quality of life, â&#x20AC;&#x153;threatening the foun- recommend remedies to common dation of our countryâ&#x20AC;? and leading to problems. overpopulation. The campaign worked as various immigrantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; groups reported a rash of anti-immigration sentiment spreading throughout the borough. But the billboards also sparked a backlash. ProjectUSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign unified what were splintered ethnic groups. Various organizations banded together through the help of community activists such as Brian Pu-Folkes, who created New Immigration Community The ProjectUSA billboards helped unify the Empowerment. The group diverse immigrant communities.

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From The Streets:

Run-DMC’s Fat Beats Help Shape Hip-Hop Run-DMC was Queens. Plain and simple. From the laceless shell-toes, to the fedoras, to the gold rope chains, they ran rap from their Hollis headquarters. From “Sucker MC’s” to “King of Rock” to “Walk This Way,” they are arguably the most influential group in the long and storied history of hiphop music and culture. And Jason “Jam Master Jay” Mizell was their backbone. He was their maestro. He was their foundation. He has been dead now for nearly eight years. And we still don’t know why. Jam Master Jay, a 37-year-old married father of three, was executed in a recording studio on Merrick Boulevard on Oct. 30, 2002. Though there seems to be a litany of suspects and motives, there have been no arrests. And Jay’s wife, Terri, still has no answers. It’s quite difficult to imagine hiphop without Jam Master Jay. He inspired countless with priceless style, deft cuts and infectious beats. Listen to “Mary, Mary.” Study “Peter Piper.” He made you look at vinyl differently. Now, vinyl is an endangered spe-

cies. The younger generations know about the iPhone and iPods. The kids know about downloading and file sharing. But they probably don’t know too much about Jam Master Jay. They don’t know about the mark he left on

music, or the void he left when he passed. They should, though. Everyone should learn about Jason Mizell, a hero from Queens, New York.

Hip-hop pioneers Run-DMC left a major stamp on music, and rose from the streets of Hollis.

1980: Regina Vogel Regina started with the Trib in 1973 as a typesetter, and still does the Queens Today section for the Tribune. She has also been a NYC high school teacher for the last 30 years. As an English major at York College, the most important piece of information I learned in my education classes was to have a skill other teachers might not possess – drama, journalism, debate, etc. I joined the school newspaper, Pandora’s Box, and met Gary Ackerman and company at the Tribune, where Pandora’s was typeset and designed. Within months, I became a computer typesetter, working on the “new, state of the art” Compugraphic equipment. Upon graduating with absolutely no teaching prospects, I stayed on

at the Tribune as a “mechanical paste-up artist.” Within a year I was Production Manager and later took over the Queens Today section when then-editor Jeff Tarlo left the Tribune. I did some freelance work – as page designer for the Arts Chronicle or news writer for ARMTOC News – in addition to my Tribune responsibilities. When a teaching job became available in 1980, I became a parttime Tribbie and started working at Grover Cleveland High School in Ridgewood. After six months, I was

offered the position of newspaper advisor and high school journalism teacher, which has kept me in the wonderful field of journalism. Almost 30 years have passed and I am now at John Bowne High School in Flushing, president of New York City Scholastic Press Association and a judge for a national scholastic press association. Although I am no longer a full time Tribbie, I continue to contribute articles and, thanks to my beginnings at the Queens Tribune, my interest in journalism has never faded.

All the best on 40 years of outstanding Journalism and Commentary. Congressman

Gregory Meeks Paid for by Meeks for Congress

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 25

6th District


Grand Dame Of Queens:

Boro Prez’ Office Regains Integrity BY BRIAN M. RAFFERTY

Page 26 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Nov. 4, 1986: Acting Borough President Claire Shulman, who was elevated to her rank after embattled Beep Donald Manes stepped down from the role shortly before his suicide, was elected Tuesday to serve a full term as Queens Borough President. With the support of the Democratic Party, Shulman received an overwhelming majority of the votes in Queens, drawing an end to the legacy of corruption that tainted the office and beginning a new chapter at Borough Hall. In the years following her first run, Shulman ruled Queens with an iron will, putting her stamp on a series of development projects, including the new vision for growth in Western Queens, the expansion of medical facilities and the empowerment of community boards. During her tenure, Queens saw 35,000 new public schools seats and vast economic expansion, including the construction of the Citibank building and the expansion of the Queens Center Mall. The development of the Air Train,

the location of a massive Food & Drug Administration headquarters in Southeast Queens and the revitalization of Arverne are a handful of the achievements she helped engineer during her time in office. Term-limited out of her post in 2001, Shulman did not stray far from the public spotlight. Sitting as a major player on many local business and not-for-profit boards, she continued to work with various aspects of the Queens community to help steer its economic, cultural and physical growth. Still heavily invested in the future of Queens, Shulman has most recently taken on a role spearheading the redevelopment of Willets Point. Shulman, a registered nurse by trade, got into civic life as a school PTA volunteer in Flushing. Working to advocate for her school’s students, she drew the attention of Donald Manes, who brought her in to work with the community boards, a role that defined her future. By 1972 she was leading the borough CBs, and by 1980 she had been promoted to Deputy Borough President, a post she held until Manes resigned.

1981: Robert Manas

After serving as managing editor of the Trib, Robert went on to a print trade publication and then served for more than two decades as senior news editor at a specialty newspaper. He is currently an independent writing and editing professional. I joined the Queens Tribune in 1979, fresh out of college, and quickly discovered that community journalism was not that much different than working on a school newspaper. Sure, the community being covered was a lot larger and more diverse, but the rules were the same. We did a decent job in the two-plus years I managed the paper under the late David Oats, redesigning it in 1982 to give it a fresher, news-magazine look. I’m amazed how long some of those changes lasted: The typefaces, the page labels, the masthead (logo to the rest of you) are still present in today’s Trib, although to be honest I don’t remember the slightly crooked ‘i’ in that 28-year-old logo. Go on, look closely. See it? My years at the Tribune went by in a flash, punctuated by all-too-brief journalistic firecrackers and filled in with long runs of snooze-news required to fill the empty spaces between the ads. At least that’s how it seems after 30 years. I remember things only in snippets. – The day I spent in the lobby of what was then called Booth Memorial Hospital awaiting word of the fate of a police officer shot in the line of duty. – Photographing a Jets game at Shea from the field (alongside real sports photographers) so I’d have a

library of photos to use with the weekly Jet scores. – The day I was first on the scene of an oil fire at a suspected toxic dump site in College Point. – Scratching Gary Ackerman’s red, white and blue campaign van. Sorry Gary. – The cable television franchise war – yes, Virginia, there was a time before cable – and the feature story I was assigned to write that painted a small Queens entrepreneur’s cable plan as superior to those of much larger, established cable companies. Look up the career and sad fate of Donald Manes, former Queens Borough President, for the end of that story. Most of all, I remember the fun and satisfaction of helping high school and college students write their first news stories and all the talent, great and small, that passed though the Trib’s doors in those days. Today you’ll find them writing bestsellers, running a business news desk in California, heading an investigative news team in Manhattan and overseeing Long Island’s largest daily newspaper. None of these people got paid for their efforts; they did it for the love of journalism and the desire to improve their craft. My greatest satisfaction came in helping them along the way.


Scandal Rocks The City:

Ex -PVB Head Indicted In Bribery Scandal BY DOMENICK RAFTER

May 8, 1986: The former Director of the Parking Violations Bureau was indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of racketeering, conspiracy and mail fraud. He was accused of taking a bribe to be a partner in a Times Square real-estate firm to influence his decisions on awarding contacts to collect violation fees. The former director, who resigned in January, was just the latest official nabbed in a blossoming scandal striking the city’s Parking Violations Bureau. The scandal began ballooning when former PVB deputy director Geoffrey Lindenauer was arrested in January 1986 and began cooperating with the government and has become the largest scandal to hit the city government in decades. The scandal threatened to engulf Queens native Gov. Mario Cuomo, who was facing re-election in November against Republican Westchester County Executive Andrew O’Rourke. Cuomo was hoping for a landslide re-election to boost prospects of a presidential run in 1988. Though Cuomo was not directly involved, he had connections with individuals who have been indicted or fingered in the scandal. The citywide scandal, termed “City For Sale,” went beyond the PVB. It included contracts to wire the city for

LEGAL NOTICE

term. Although Koch wasn’t personally fingered in any wrongdoing, his mayoralty was tarnished because he was accused of either ignoring or being oblivious to the scandals. Koch ran for a third term in 1989 but was defeated in the Democratic primary by Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins, who narrowly beat the man

who prosecuted many of the “city for sale” convicts; United States Attorney Rudolph Giuliani. Giuliani’s role as prosecutor brought him wider name recognition in the city, and made him a hero to voters tired of cronyism and corruption. Giuliani went on to beat Dinkins in 1993 and serve eight years as mayor.

1982: Mitch Albom A Detroit sports journalist who made an international name for himself with such books as “Tuesdays With Morrie,” Mitch’s first writing gig was right here at the Queens Tribune. I found my career in the garbage. Okay, it wasn’t exactly the garbage, it was the bottom of a shopping cart in a market on Queens Bouelvard. That’s pretty close to the garbage, right? I mean, when people leave stuff in there, they’re not coming back for it. And what they left, that day, was a copy of the Queens Tribune. And being broke at the time, meaning any free reading material was more than welcome, I picked it up and leafed through it. I can’t say I honestly remember the stories in that edition, but they were interesting enough to get me to turn the pages. And then I saw an ad, a small one, a house ad, seeking writers

LEGAL NOTICE cree should not be made in the estate of Diana Dawson a/k/a Diana E. Dawson lately domiciled at 114-08 180 th Street, St. Albans, Queens, NY 11434 admitting to probate a Will dated June 6, 1987, a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Diana Dawson a/k/a Diana E. Dawson deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that [X] Letters Testamentary Issue to: Dolores Samuels Walters FEB 8 2010 (Seal) HON. ROBERT L. NAHMAN Surrogate ALICEMARIE E. RICE Chief Clerk Arnold Simon, Esq. Attorney for Petitioner (516) 495-7373 Telephone Number 88 Froehlich Farm Boulevard, Woodbury, NY 11797 Address of Attorney [Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear, if you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney to appear for you.] ______________________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 60th AVENUE REALTY LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/09/09. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 142-12 60th Avenue.

LEGAL NOTICE Flushing, New York 11355. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ______________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of MOTIMAHAL TRADING LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on 11/13/ 2009. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC 120-06 101 ST AVENUE, S RICHMOND HILL, NY 11419. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ______________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of DEKALB PORTLAND LLC. Articles of Org filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/5/2010. Office location: Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Incorporating Services, Ltd., 99 Washington Ave, Rm 805A, Albany, NY 12260. Purpose: any lawful activities. ______________________________________________________________________ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS INDEX NO.: 30320-09 DATE FILED: 11/12/09 SUMMONS NYCTL 2008-A TRUST AND THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND CUSTODIAN FOR NYCTL 2008-A TRUST, Plaintiffs, -against- VICTOR GASKIN; BRIDGET GASKIN; UNITED STATES OF

who might have some “spare time.” I was not, to be honest, at the time, a writer. I was a musician. Which meant spare time was something I had plenty of. So I called. And I volunteered. And they gave me my first journalistic assignment, a council meeting of some kind, in which parking meters were discussed. I didn’t know a thing about reporting – unless you count having read “All The President’s Men” – so I mimicked what I saw in newspapers: the who, what, when, where and why of, well, parking meters. And when the next edition of the Queens Tribune came out, there was my story, on the bottom of the front page.

LEGAL NOTICE AMERICA; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; CITY OF NEW YORK ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD; “JOHN DOE # 1” through “JOHN DOE #100”, the last 100 names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiffs, the persons or parties intended being the owners, tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, and if any of the aforesaid individual captioned defendants, if any, be dead, their respective heirs-at-law, next of kin, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors, and successors in interest, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by, or through any of the aforesaid individual captioned defendants, if any, if they be dead, whether by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise, including any right, title or interest in and to the real property described in the complaint herein, all of who and whose names and places of residence are unknown to the plaintiffs; Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action, to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with the summons, to serve notice of appearance,

Okay, so it was a slow news week. Okay, so I started in the garbage. Okay, whatever. Seeing that article, with my byline, knocked me over the waterfall and down into the rivers of writing; the simple, earnest joy of moving what you see through your brain and onto paper. I have been here ever since. I have now written books, and movies, and plays, and have gone on to a bigger newspaper. But I still have that first copy of the Tribune. I hope I always will. And whoever left their copy in the shopping cart, I’d like to thank you for my life, even if, technically, you were littering.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

on the plaintiffs’ attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the date of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York), and in case of failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Plaintiffs designate Queens County as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject property. Dated: November 9, 2009 LEVY & LEVY Attorneys for Plaintiffs 12 Tulip Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 487-6655 BY: JOSHUA LEVY, ESQ. File No. 859690 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Lee A. Mayersohn, a Justice of the Supreme Court, Queens County dated Feb. 24, 2010 and filed with the complaint and other papers in the Queens County Clerk’s Office, Jamaica, NY. The object of the action is to foreclose a tax lien and to recover the amount of the tax lien and all of the interest, penalties, additions and expenses to real property k/a Block 11777, Lot 16. Dated Feb. 25, 2010. LEVY & LEVY, Attys. For Pltf. #77410 ______________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of Found In Time LLC. Arts. of Org.

filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/2010. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2611 28 th St., #1, Astoria, NY 11102, Attn: Arthur Vincie, registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. ________________________________________________________________________ VILLA HOMES LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Sec of State of NY on 10/9/09. NY Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/ her to The LLC, 7-34 Leggett Pl., Whitestone, NY 11362. General Purposes. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of Fractal Group Holdings, LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/02/09. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to: United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 27

NOTICE OF FORMATION of Popular Culture Trading, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/05/10. Office Location: Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: THE LLC 38-03 205 Street Bayside, NY 11361. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ______________________________________________________________________ PROBATE CITATION File No. 2006-3479-/ SURROGATE’S COURT – QUEENS COUNTY CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: To the heirs at law, next of kin, and distributees of Diana Dawson a/k/a Diana E. Dawson deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence. Kim Dawson Hall Clarence Dawson Chante Martin A petition having been duly filed by Dolores Samuels Walters, who is domiciled at 2314 Newton Road, Albany, Georgia 31701 YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York, on 8 th day of April, 2010 9:30 A.M. of that day, why a de-

cable television, towing, the Taxi and Limousine Commission and even assortment of judges. The scandals would bring down two borough presidents, leaving one, Stanley Friedman of the Bronx, in jail and leading to the suicide of Queens Borough President Donald Manes. It also paralyzed Mayor Ed Koch’s third


A Rising Star:

Cuomo Emerges On Top,Queens Guy Now Gov. BY KAITLYN KILMETIS Nov. 2, 1982: Jamaica native Mario Cuomo narrowly defeated Republican businessman Louis Lehrman to ascend to the position of New York State Governor, after a neck-and-neck competition was ultimately decided by only a few percentage points. After a childhood in Queens, receiving both a bachelor’s and law degree from St. John’s, Cuomo entered the political arena in the 1970’s after

Page 28 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Mario Cuomo rose to prominence as an attorney, a mayoral candidate and eventually governor.

representing a collection Forest Hills residents who vehemently opposed the development of a public-housing facility in their neighborhood. After defeats in the 1970s for the posts of Lieutenant Governor and Mayor, finally in 1978 Cuomo was elected Lieutenant Governor under Governor Hugh Care y. In 1982, Cuomo, who held a brief stint in professional baseball when he was younger, defeated Ed Koch, his former mayoral rival, in the Democratic primary to be Governor and went on to conquer Lewis Lehrman in the general election. Subsequently, Cuomo was reelected in 1986 and 1990 with recordbreaking margins of victory in each election. During his time in office, Cuomo was an extremely popular leader who created hundreds of thousands of jobs, enacted large-scale economic development initiatives and improved state and city infrastructure. In addition to his strong Italian roots, Cuomo is famed for his staunch opposition to the death penalty, his long-standing pro-choice sentiment and a collection of other liberal-leaning views. He also gained notoriety after years of whispers that he would seek the Democratic Party nomination to run for the U.S. presidency, although ultimately he never chose to do so. In Cuomo’s fourth term run in

1994, the he faced defeat at the hands of Republican George Pataki, in a victory that was part of a larger narrative dubbed as the Republican Revolution. The New York State governorship was one of a long list of formerly Democrat-manned posts that fell to Republican opponents, eventually leading to the GOP gaining control of both the House and the Senate in the mid 1990’s. Since the loss, Cuomo continues to write political books, practice law and speak at engagements across the nation. Although Cuomo has bowed out of

the political spotlight, another Cuomo is currently making waves in New York politics. Mario’s son Andrew is currently the NYS Attorney General and it has been widely speculated he will follow in his father’s footsteps and run for New York State Governor in 2010. Media outlets have reported Andrew Cuomo will announce his candidacy in late March. A recently-released Siena Research Institute survey indicates Cuomo has a nearly 40 point lead over potential opponents Rick Lazio and Steve Levy, so it may not be long before another Governor Cuomo leads the state.

1983: David Keisman David is currently the founder and publisher of the Manhattan Times, the bilingual newspaper of Washington Heights and Inwood. He is also a New York Press Association Foundation board member. It was February 1983 when I officially joined the Tribune family. As the 25-year-old Director of Government Operations to the New York State Senate Minority Leader I was certainly in a job beyond my years. The bigwigs thought I was smart. I knew I was just a political junkie who didn’t know what else to do with my life. I worked for the Legislature and ran political campaigns seven days a week, 24 hours a day, 52 weeks a year. I never complained. I loved it. So when state Sen. Gary Ackerman ran for Congress, in a special election against pollster Doug Schoen for the seat left vacant by passed congressman Ben Rosenthal, Gary’s minority leader Fred Orenstein asked, “What can I do for you?” Ackerman replied, “Give me Keisman for a month to help work on my campaign.” (Okay, yes, he first hit him up for money.) And so it began – in the largest political headquarters known to man, an old furniture showroom next to the Stratton Restaurant on Queens Boulevard – I walked into the world of Gary Ackerman and Mike Schenkler, partners in politics and partners at the Queens Tribune. The first, second, and third publisher were standing in the same room. Life is funny that way. The senator left for Washington and Mike was finally left to run the Queens Tribune largely unencumbered by Gary. I walked into the world of community newspapers. I became the advertising director for what was already the largest community newspaper in Queens. Sounds glamorous. It wasn’t. Our office was located in a small strip mall on Kissena Boulevard. In retrospect it can only be described as a nicotine-filled, smoke-infested dump. It was, though, charming. And out of this dump Mike Schenkler taught me the newspaper business; and for a while we made history in our little world. My timeline at the Tribune is actually a little complicated. I came and went more than once. Two tours of

duty. But so did many people who have worked for Mike. But history we made. We were the first community newspaper in New York City to circulate boroughwide. We were the first newspaper to publish using a four-color format. I sold the ad that paid for that first color front page, Norman Rockwell’s, The Golden Rule. The ad was for a schlock store flea market on Main Street, called Busy Bee. I watched the paper come off press at a vintage, grimy print plant in the New York City meat market at 2 a.m. standing next to Mike Schenkler. I know, some of you have never seen his legs nor believe he has them. Most have only viewed him from behind his desk, sitting there before they arrived and still there when they left at whatever time. Many thought he might be a centaur. The memories and stories could fill volumes. Most are better off told at the bar and left out of print. But what we really showed them was that you could publish a quality community newspaper, advocate politically, maintain your integrity, have an impact on your community and make a handsome profit while laughing your ass off. By the way, Mike Schenkler and I didn’t always laugh. As a matter of fact there where years we didn’t even speak, but age, births, deaths, a heart attack and good fortune have a way of cleaning your glasses and clearing your mind. And so, as the third publisher of the Queens Tribune (1991-1993, said so on my business card), I congratulate Mike Schenkler. If they didn’t make guys like him you, you wouldn’t have anyone to talk about and you wouldn’t have newspapers like the Queens Tribune. I am a beneficiary of his hard work and accomplishments. Hey Mike, on this 40th anniversary of your newspaper you, and all of us who have come, gone, come again and stayed, have a lot to be proud of. Congratulations to you and the staff.


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Crack War Escalates:

Rookie Cop Murdered On Drug Lord’s Order BY KAITLYN KILMETIS

Page 30 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Feb. 26, 1988: Less than a year into the start of his career in the NYPD, Officer Edward Byrne sat in a patrol car in South Jamaica to protect the home of a witness. Suddenly, a man tapped on Byrne’s passenger side window. When Byrne was distracted by the man, another man approached the car at the driver’s side and shot the 22year-old officer five times in the head. The four killers were all apprehended and convicted. The murder was ordered from jail by Queens drug lord Howard “Pappy” Mason. Mason was convicted for ordering the murder of Officer Byrne and sentenced to life in prison. Mason’s partner Lorenzo “Fat Cat” Nichols was also accused of taking part in the crime, although he was never formally charged for Byrne’s murder, he was sent to prison for other charges, including ordering an attack on his parole officer, which resulted in the officer’s death. Byrne’s ghastly murder gained national media coverage, serving as a microcosm for the fierce wars being waged across the nation between public officials and drug dealers. President Ronald Reagan called to offer

the family condolences and George H.W. Bush carried Byrne’s badge during his 1988 presidential campaign. Rather than encouraging fear and chaos, the murder led to an NYPD crackdown on the drug trafficking in the area and the incarceration of a high-ranking leader in the Queens drug trade. Southeast Queens has since cleaned up considerably. Each year officers assemble at the South Jamaica spot where Byrne was killed to remember the fallen officer. In 2008, 20 years after the murder, hundreds of officers gathered to pay their respects. Tributes to Byrne can be found across the city from Edward R. Byrne Avenue to Pol. Officer Edward Byrne Park. Additionally, a major U.S. Department of Justice initiative titled the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program allows states and local governments to fund a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime and to improve the justice system. More than two decades later, Byrne remains a symbol for the price paid to restore order on South Jamaica’s streets and in neighborhoods across the nation.

1984: Gabe Escobar After a career that took him through the Hartford Courant, the Washington Post and the Pew Hispanic Center, Gabe is currently the Metro Desk Editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer.

It was a good job, especially for someone desperate to plant a foot in journalism. The title was News Editor and the offices were on Kissena Boulevard, just two bus rides from my house in Jackson Heights. I should have never gotten it. Like all great tales from Queens, it wasn’t what you knew but who remembered you from PS 69 and IS 145. Howie Goodman knew I had a Master’s in Journalism (he didn’t know it was useless). He also knew Marty Lipp, who, with no experience in journalism and no Master’s, had still been named Managing Editor. Goodman proved true to his name and passed mine along as a job candidate. Lipp, perhaps viewing the Master’s degree with suspicion, gave me a test, which I must have passed because he then gave me the job. Almost exactly 25 years ago to the day, you would have found me sitting by the window, at a steel-gray desk, and working on a blue IBM. Next to me you would see Lipp, his agenda open and our day outlined

in his incredibly microscopic handwriting. The large blue table next to him, a natural barrier between us and the ad people, was where we laid out the paper. Ours was not memorable journalism, or at least not the kind that two and a half decades later survives even in my own mind. But that was neither the aim nor the point. Our journalism was eminently practical and, given how green we were, ambitious. Oddly, given that this was a weekly, we almost always seemed to write on deadline. Ours was a routine defined by rituals. Mondays were generally for reporting, Tuesdays for deadline writing and layout, Wednesdays for opening the mail (and there was lots of it). The proof of our labor was delivered in bundles on Thursday mornings. The end of the week was the beginning of the following week. The Queens Tribune ended up giving me the practical instruction the worthless Master’s never provided, and I have often told people that the weekly in my home borough is where I really went to journalism school.

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...The Harder They Fall:

Manes Celebrates Win, Party Is Short-Lived BY DOMENICK RAFTER Nov. 5, 1985: Promising to focus on better schools and crime reduction in his fifth term, Borough President Donald Manes declared victory last night over Republican challenger Barbara LeGoff, winning a stunning 84 percent of the vote to LeGoff ’s 16 percent. Manes’ victory comes despite a rough year for the borough president and Queens Democratic Party chairman. He was criticized last spring for his support to build a domed football stadium adjacent to Shea Stadium in Flushing Meadows Corona Park in an effort to attract back the NFL after the New York Jets left Shea Stadium to play in New Jersey in 1984. First elected in 1970, Manes rose to be the political boss of Queens Democrats. He often ran unopposed despite the Republican Party still being fairly competitive in Queens County in the 1970s and 1980s. Manes’ wasn’t so lucky in picking winners in elections outside the borough. In 1977, he endorsed Queens native Mario Cuomo for Mayor, but he lost to Ed Koch. Five years later, Manes’ threw his support behind Koch for Governor, but Koch

was defeated in the Democratic primary by Cuomo. Manes strongly supported Brooklyn Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman in her 1980 Senate race that she narrowly lost to Al D’Amato and he campaigned for the losing 1984 national Democratic ticket that included Queens Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro. Manes’ political fortunes took a nosedive almost immediately after his 1985 re-election campaign. A series of scandals quickly caused Manes’ career to unravel. His political associates ended up under investigation for taking bribes, and faced questions over his selection of a company to wire the borough for cable television As the scandals and investigations reached a fevered pitch, a bizarre situation developed. In the early morning hours of Jan 10, 1986, Manes was found in his car on the Grand Central Parkway, his wrists slashed. Although he initially blamed carjackers, he later admitted to trying to kill himself. A month later, Manes resigned as borough president and on March 13, 1986, Manes ended his own life by plunging a knife into his heart in his Jamaica Estates home.

1985: Marty Lipp After serving as editor of the Tribune, Marty left to write for and edit the Staten Island Advance, returned to News Communications to be editor and publisher of Our Town, worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for 10 years and is currently Communications Director for Harlem Children’s Zone, an educational and social services agency. I always think of the mice. that said life was an equation they just When I was managing editor of couldn’t quite get to add up. the Tribune in the 1980s (as a child Once a month or so, Gabriel would prodigy of course), its twinned offices give me the high sign and I’d join him were in a shopping center on Kissena at his desk and we’d watch the delivBoulevard, shoehorned between a pet ery of a big flat box filled with little store and a supermarket. white mice, which were presumably The “newsroom,” which consisted going to be meals for the huge snakes of two desks, was right up against the they kept at the pet shop next door. glass window facing the parking lot Watching the crowd of twitchy mice and myself and Gabriel Escobar, our carried unceremoniously through the city editor, were – to our occasional parking lot, blissfully ignorant to their concern – splayed out in plain view fate, Gabe and I always stopped our like the Christmas displays at Saks. own bustling activities and watched, a For Gabe and I, these were our first small salute to the sniffling mice for jobs in journalism. We were like kids their honorable sacrifice to the food who had been handed the keys to the chain – at least as practiced in pet car, but hadn’t really learned how to shops specializing in exotic reptiles. drive yet. So, of course, we were full The monthly ritual of our dead of the fuel of youthful energy and car- mice walking also served to temper omed out each week to race against our hubris. While we were trying to the big boys and make the paper as convince ourselves that we were the great as our ink-filled dreams. best things to hit journalism since But as busy as we were, we couldn’t Edward R. Murrow, the mice were our help noticing the goings-on just out- regular reminder of our place in the side our oversized window. Mostly it world – while we were combing was the unspectacular stuff of life in Queens to find foodstuffs for our growQueens. The well-fed looking for ing newspaper, the next storefront something to eat. People looking over was just as busy filling their niche back and forth across the row of store- of commerce, turning pink-eyed pufffronts, a pained look on their faces balls into endless lines of snake poo.

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www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 31

Congratulations to the Queens Tribune on 40 years of covering the news of Queens


Meet The Mets:

Amazin’s Win Game Six, Sox Hang Heads In Shame BY BRIAN M. RAFFERTY

Page 32 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Oct. 25, 1986: I sat in the loge level, third base side, under the overhang, practically in fair territory. As the team was introduced the crowd in the field level surged forward, pointing to the sky. I didn’t see the parachutist until he was practically on the ground. It was Game Six. If the Mets lost, the Red Sox would run onto OUR field, breaking the 1918 curse and desecrating our home. As the game wore on, we began to grow concerned that this may actually happen. That perhaps we had used up every come-from-behind win we had left in us. Maybe, just maybe, we would figure out how to snatch defeat back from the jaws of victory as had been our trademark the last two seasons. But this was not to be the case. It was 5-3 Red Sox going into the bottom of the 10th. Wally Backman and Keith Hernandez were quick outs, leaving just Gary Carter to keep the game alive. The scoreboard flashed congratulations to the Red Sox for being World Series Champions. This simply could not be so. I was only 17, and this would have been the most crushing defeat I could ever imagine. Carter wouldn’t let it end. He hit a single which was followed by another single from Kevin Mitchell. When Ray

Knight came up, he hit a two-strike single to center, scoring Carter and moving the tying run to third base. That was enough for the Sox, who pulled Calvin Schiraldi for the veteran Bob Stanley to face Mookie Wilson. On the fifth pitch of the at-bat, with a 2-2 count, Stanley’s pitch went wide, taking Mookie off his feet and sending the ball past Rich Gedman and to the backstop. Mitchell came streaking home to tie it, and Knight advanced to second. The place exploded. The game was ours. The Series was ours. The game may have been tied at the moment, but we just knew. The collective energy of Shea Stadium swelled, knowing fully well what was about to happen. It was going to be great, whatever it was. Stanley threw four more pitches, but Mookie kept alive, swatting off foul after foul. And on the tenth pitch, Mookie hit “a slow roller up the first base line.” Veteran first baseman Bill Buckner trotted forward, put his glove somewhere near the ground and looked up to see where Mookie was. As he looked up, the ball rolled right under his glove. Mookie was safe. Knight ran around from second and jumped onto home plate into a sea of Mets. And again, the place exploded. And I was there.

1986: Tom Zambito Mike Schenkler wanted to know why a Brooklyn boy like me would want to work in Queens. I muttered the first thing that came to mind. I already know Brooklyn. I want to learn about a new place. Truth was, I was a few months out of college, living at home with my parents, and needed a job. What followed were some wild years. At the 106th Precinct in Ozone Park, detectives had taken to interrogating suspects with stun guns. My first byline was a profile of the new commander of the “Stun Gun” Precinct months after he took over. Then, Queens Borough President Donald Manes plunged a steak knife into his chest, exposing a vein of political corruption in New York City that few knew existed. In Howard Beach, a black man named Michael Griffith was hit by a car and killed while running from a mob of white teens. I covered the protest marches that followed, standing beside Al Sharpton as he bit into a slice at New Park Pizza in one of his early forays as an activist. I recall politely being told I would not be allowed in to Griffith’s funeral in East New York. I covered the election of Queens’ first black congressman, Alton Waldon, a brief tenure that followed the death of Joseph Addabbo Sr. I had little experience when I arrived at the Tribune, just a few clips from my college paper. But I learned quickly, writing headlines, assigning stories,

taking pictures. We worked on typewriters out of an office on Kissena Boulevard, next to a pet store where every Wednesday they delivered a fresh batch of live mice for the reptiles, a weekly highlight. I met some special people – Mike, Marty Lipp, Lisa Colangelo – whom I continue to keep up with today. I tested myself every day, trying to compete against the New York dailies, feeling victory when they lifted details from our stories. I’ve written about criminals working in nursing homes, court-appointed attorneys stealing from the elderly, cargo thieves, the Mafia. I’ve traveled to the Mexican border to document a money-laundering trail that begins in New York and New Jersey. After a 22-year hiatus, in September 2009 I returned to covering Queens, at the Supreme Court, most notably covering the trial of embattled Sen. Hiram Monserrate. Very often I hear from college grads that want to break into journalism. Most want to work on a daily newspaper the minute they walk off campus. But I tell them they should call Mike Schenkler, see if he’s got a job for them, learn to do everything. I received a great education at the Queens Tribune, better than any I would have received at a journalism school.


Boro Puppetmaster:

Manton’s Leadership Keeps Boro Powerful BY DOMENICK RAFTER Sept. 25, 1986: U.S. Rep. Tom Manton (D Sunnyside), the first-term congressman who previously represented Sunnyside, Woodside and Maspeth in the city council for 15 years, was selected to be head of the Queens Democratic Party, replacing the late Borough President Donald Manes, who resigned in January and committed suicide in March. Manton soundly defeated Councilman Morton Povman (D-Jamaica Estates) to win the post after securing the support of black Democratic leaders. Manton, a former NYPD officer and IBM marketing executive, rose to power after being elected to the city council in 1969. In 1984, he ran for the seat vacated by Geraldine Ferraro, who was chosen to run for Vice President on a national Democratic ticket with Walter Mondale. Manton defeated three other candidates in the Democratic primary to win with 30 percent of the vote. He faced Republican Serphin Maltese of Glendale, who would later serve in the State Senate, in the general election, winning by a small 53-47 margin. Manton’s elevation to party chairman was seen as an attempt to repair divides within the party and close the door on recent scandals that brought down Manes and shook up the administration of Mayor Ed Koch.

1987: Lisa Colangelo

Manton quickly found his niche as a political boss. In 1989, he endorsed Richard Ravitch for Mayor over incumbent Ed Koch, making Queens the only borough Democratic Party to not endorse either Koch or eventual victor David Dinkins. Manton faced a stronger-than-expected challenge from former Bob Dole staffer Dennis Shea in the 1992 general election, winning by a smaller-thanusual 14-point margin. During the 1990s, Manton oversaw a wide patronage network that often received the ire of Republicans at a time when the GOP was losing prominence in the borough they were once

competitive in. Manton yielded influence even beyond the borough’s borders, playing a key role in the election of Manhattanites Gifford Miller and Christine Quinn as Speakers of the City Council. In 1998, Manton abruptly announced he wouldn’t run for re-election. Manton’s handpicked successor, then-Assemblyman Joe Crowley (D-Woodside), succeeded him without strong opposition. Manton continued to lead the Queens Democratic Party after he left Congress until his death in 2006 at age 73. He was succeeded as party chairman by Crowley.

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www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 33

I interviewed for my job at the Queens Tribune in May 1987, just a few weeks before I graduated from Queens College. I'd like to think I got it based on the fact that I had been editor of the college paper for two years. Or maybe that I had a nice collection of internships under my belt. Or was it my infectious enthusiasm? "You didn't ask about the salary," Tom Zambito, my boss at the Tribune and now my colleague at the Daily News, fessed up long after I was hired. But I think Mike and Tom (a Brooklyn boy) both also liked the idea of hiring a Queens kid for the gig. After all, I had already lived in three different neighborhoods, and attended school and college in the borough. The job was a challenge but it was fun. I worked with Tommy, Marsha Schrager and other young reporters hungry to learn the trade. We regularly beat the dailies on local and citywide stories. The city was still reverberating from the municipal scandals and the suicide of disgraced Borough President Donald Manes. Racial tensions were high - a group of white youths chased a young black man onto the highway in Howard Beach. Every day brought a new challenge. After the Howard Beach verdict was read, I went from courthouse to Cross Bay Boulevard for community reaction only to feel their disdain for the media - first hand. I wrote about a cemetery strike, where caskets were lowered into refrigerated trucks instead of the ground. There was the heartbreaking story of Avery Mendez, the homeless man who died in the cold shortly after talking to us. And there were endless chances to explore local parks, zoos and museums. Here's what I remember about that old Kissena Boulevard office - wood paneling, the clickety-clack of typewriters and visits to the adjacent pet store to stare at blue seahorses. It was grungy, exhausting and a lot of fun. I wouldn't change a thing.


Our National Shame:

Race Eyed As Motive In Howard Beach Attack BY DOMENICK RAFTER Dec 20, 1986: Three black men were became the target of what many are labeling a racial attack on Saturday night in Howard Beach. One man was killed while fleeing and another seriously injured in the attack. The incident began when the three black men, Michael Griffith, 24, Cedric Sandiford, 36, and Timothy Grimes, 20, became stranded after their car broke down in Broad Channel. They made their way up to Howard Beach where they encountered white teenagers in a car on the corner of 157th Avenue and Cross Bay Boulevard. After a verbal altercation that included racial slurs, the three black men entered New Park Pizzeria and were later approached by three of the teens who were in the car, as well as a gang of seven or more friends, who proceeded to chase the three black men north on Cross Bay Boulevard toward the Belt Parkway. The situation escalated and Griffith ran onto the Belt Parkway ramp to escape and was struck and killed by an oncoming car, while Sandiford was caught and brutally beaten. Grimes escaped unharmed. The incident rocked the city and made national news. Mayor Ed Koch condemned the incident and some me-

dia outlets compared it to a lynching. Gov. Mario Cuomo appointed a special prosecutor, Charles Hynes, who has since gone on to be Brooklyn DA, to prosecute the perpetrators. At least 12 teens from Howard Beach and nearby Ozone Park were charged in the incident, with nine being convicted or pleading guilty to charges ranging from second degree manslaughter to second degree rioting. Al Sharpton led protests in the neighborhood in the days and weeks after the incident. The incident also divided the neighborhood, with some accusing the three black men of coming into posh Howard Beach looking to steal cars or break into homes. Others, like Father Kenneth Leona, the then pastor of Our Lady of Grace in Howard Beach, told his congregation the day after the incident that the racism and violence that struck the neighborhood were sins and “all the beautiful Christmas lights in our neighborhood cannot hide that type of darkness.” In the nearly quarter century since the incident, Howard Beach has struggled to shake the reputation that December night created for them. Similar, though less serious, incidents occurred in 2005 and 2007, sparking bad memories for many.

1988: Marsha Schrager A fter the Tribune, Marsha produced Newsweek on, worked as an editor and reporter at the Record Newspaper group for several years, was a reporter at the Staten Island Advance and most recently worked at the Nassau Herald. The days at the Queens Tribune and Mirror were a cherished time in my journalistic career. As a recent college graduate, I was armed with a map of Queens, telephone book to hunt for contacts and a cluttered storefront to work from. Mike Schenkler was at the helm. It was a time when smoking inside an office was commonplace, and pasting up a paper was a literal term. When I began telephones had cords, you checked spelling with a dictionary and photos were developed in a dark room. I remember buying a small electric typewriter for the office because I didn’t want to work on the manual one they gave me. The year was 1986 at the Queens Tribune. There were no computers, cell phones; let alone ones that took pictures, movies or hooked up to the Internet. Everything moved slower. There was no way to e-mail stories or travel down the information super highway. The only highway I traveled was the Long Island Expressway to the office on Kissena Boulevard. Many experienced reporters began at this paper, and bylines around the country belong to those who started in these humble beginnings. Schenkler knew the way to write a story was never through the obvious

angle. His keen judgment guided me to dig deeper, and helped us to continue to gather recognition from Queens residents, the journalistic community and award committees. The Tribune shaped my ability to cover a national story from a local angle. Covering the murder of Michael Griffith in Howard Beach, and the subsequent cries of racism were a maturing experience for me. My initial naïveté of a small-town reporter at a weekly paper grew into a mission for truth. I retraced the steps of the murder, followed up local scuttlebutt, was present when they dug up the sewers searching for an alleged knife and sat in the courtroom when the verdicts were read. It was all very enlightening. This was our backyard, and we covered this story in depth with consideration to our neighbors. We were able to dig deeper and find better sources than some of the high-powered, highly paid journalists of that time. Today, 22 years after my departure from the Tribune, I still am in contact with Mike Schenkler. It wouldn’t surprise me at all if this informed, unpretentious and hard working publisher is still guiding the paper for the next 40 years. Congratulations to all those who have shaped this fixture among the Queens community.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 35


This Trash Stinks!

Large Garbage Barge Denied Entry Into Boro BY CATHERINE MANZIONE

Page 36 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Aug. 24, 1987: What seemed like a never-ending journey for the infamous Mobro 4000 barge holding 3,186 tons of garbage has finally come to an end after six months and 6,000 miles, when it landed in Brooklyn today. After space issues prevented the garbage from being unloaded in the Islip landfill, the barge started making its way to Morehead City, N.C., on March 22, in hopes of dumping the garbage. What seemed like an ordinary process turned into a fiasco when the garbage was denied entry into North Carolina because of improper permit issues and concern that the garbage could contain hazardous waste. The trouble didn’t stop there; the barge and tugboat “Breaking Dawn” were denied entry into a total of six states and two other nations, including Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, Mexico, Belize, and Bahamas. After spending some time floating in the Gulf of Mexico, the Breaking Dawn finally made its way back to the New York harbor on May 16. Although it was back in the harbor, the problem still continued when New York argued that it did not want to take the garbage back and have it dumped

The MOBRO garbage barge sits with nowhere to go. there. More controversy occurred when Queens Borough President Claire Shulman fought to keep the garbage from docking in the harbor. Shulman worried that the barge contained hazardous waste and feared that the waste would be stuck in Long Island City the whole duration of summer. Shuman has also attacked Islip Town Supervisor Frank Jones, arguing that Queens should not be held responsible for garbage that wasn’t ours. After a series of back-and-forth disputes over the course of another month, Shulman was thrilled to hear that City Environmental Commissioner Thomas Jorling would step in and order the garbage to be transported to the incinerator in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn and from there have its ashes moved to Islip municipal landfill in Hauppauge.

1989: Tom Allon Tom was a writer and editor at the West Side Spirit when the Spirit’s parent company, News Communications, purchased the Trib. Tom worked very closely with Mike Schenkler in directing the editorial coverage of News Communications. Tom is now the president and CEO of Manhattan Media, which publishes Our Town, the West Side Spirit and other weekly newspapers. I never figured out what exit to get off the LIE to get to the Queens Tribune office, but I did learn most of what I know about community journalism and New York politics from Mike Schenkler and his colleagues at the Trib. It was 1989 when this Upper West Side kid first ventured to a place just 10 miles from midtown Manhattan (but worlds apart), and New York was still a place that seemed ungovernable. I was editing a relatively new community newspaper, The West Side Spirit, and one day I was informed that we were now part of a public company (News Communications) that had just acquired the largest weekly newspaper in Queens. Thus began a very surreal ride into the rocky waters of New York publishing and the daunting task of growing a newspaper chain in the ultra-competitive metropolitan area. Along the way, I learned more than I ever cared to know about the close connection between politics and publishing. But through it all, we had a lot of fun and managed to produce some great journalism and journalists. Mike Schenkler and I hatched a citywide political gossip page called New York Confidential that broke nu-

merous stories that were picked up by the dailies and TV news on a regular basis. We were the first to report that an ambitious U.S. Attorney named Rudy was responsible for the extradition of Joe Doherty (which Giuliani denied). And today, one of the alumni of NY Confidential is covering City politics for The New York Times. Speaking of former Mayors, we also ran a weekly movie review column by Ed Koch, who never missed a week for more than a decade doing what he often told people was his favorite post-mayoralty job. For most of the 1990s, Mike Schenkler and I, as President and Vice President of News Communications, a perennially money-losing public company, felt like I imagine the captain and first lieutenant of the Titanic did: we were always too busy bailing water and trying to keep the ship afloat to realize that we were in the middle of the ride of our lives. And as a testament to Mike’s tenacity and business smarts, the issue you hold in your hand, the Trib’s 40th Anniversary, is a reminder that good guys do sometimes finish first. Here’s to 40 more years educating and entertaining the fine people of Queens County.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF OBJECT OF ACTION STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF QUEENS ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE INDEX NO.: 27464/09 HSBC MORTGAGE CORPORATION (USA) Plaintiff, vs. LUIS PINEDA, ANGEL PINEDA, CHASE MANHATTAN BANK USA N A, LR CREDIT 10 LLC, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., AS NOMINEE FOR STANLEY CAPITAL MORTGAGE COMPANY, NEW YORK CITY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD, NEW YORK CITY PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU, NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ADJUDICATION BUREAU, Defendant(s). MORTGAGED PREMISES: 105-41 92ND STREET, OZONE PARK, NY 11417 SBL #: BLOCK 9161, LOT 42 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against

you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Queens. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. Dated this 25th day of February, 2010, Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 TO: LUIS PINEDA and ANGEL PINEDA, Defendant(s) In this Action. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. LEE A. MAYERSOHN of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 24th day of February, 2010 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Queens County Clerk, in the City of Jamaica. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by LUIS PINEDA and ANGEL PINEDA dated the 14th day of November, 2007, to secure the sum of $585,000.00, and recorded at Instrument No. 2007000594162 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens, on the 30th day of November, 2007; which mortgage was duly assigned by assignment dated the 7th day of October, 2009, and sent for recording in the Office of the Clerk of Queens County; The property in question is described as follows:

105-41 92ND STREET, OZONE PARK, NY 11417 SEE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION Block 9161 and Lot 42 ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York, known and designated on a certain map or plan of lots entitled, “Map of Lots owned by the Ozone Real Estate and improvement Company, Liberty Heights, Fourth Ward, Borough of Queens, City of New York, surveyed May 27, 1907 by S. H. McLaughlin, Civil Engineer and City Surveyor, and filed in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens, at Jamaica, New York, as Lot Numbers 47 and 48 in Block numbered 22, April 6, 1908, now Register, as Map No. 1010, and more particularly bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the Easterly side of 92nd Street (formerly Bigelow Avenue) distant 95.32 feet Northerly along the same from the corner formed by the intersection of said Easterly side of 92nd Street with the Northerly side of 107th Avenue (formerly Dalrymple Avenue); RUNNING THENCE Easterly at right angles to the Easterly side of 92nd Street, 100.09 feet; THENCE Northerly parallel with the Easterly side of92nd Street, 40.00 feet; THENCE Westerly at

right angles to the Easterly side of 92nd Street, 100.09 feet to the Easterly side of 92nd Street; THENCE Southerly along the Easterly side of92nd Street, 40.00 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING. TOGETHER with an Easement or Right of Way over and upon the most Southerly 5 feet 5 inches of the premises immediately adjoining hereon on the North; SUBJECT to an Easement or Right of Way over and upon the most Northerly 3 feet 10 inches of the premises herein described in favor of the premises immediately adjoining the premises herein described on the North which 9 feet 3 inches shall be used as a driveway and passageway for private automobiles to the garage which are erected in the rear of the respective premises. Premises known as 10S-4192nd Street, Ozone Park, New York HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE NEW YORK STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT WE SEND YOU THIS NOTICE ABOUT THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. IF YOU FAIL TO RESPOND TO THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT IN THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION, YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. PLEASE READ THE

SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT CAREFULLY. YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CONTACT AN ATTORNEY OR YOUR LOCAL LEGAL AID OFFICE TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The state encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877-BANK-NYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the department’s website at WWW.BANKING.STATE.NY.US. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes

the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. § 1303 NOTICE NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: February 25, 2010 Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 The law firm of Steven J. Baum, P.C. and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained by them will be used for that purpose.


Gay Bashing:

Borough Ripped Apart Over Nefarious Attack BY KAITLYN KILMETIS

bat or a lead pipe. Years later, when July 2, 1990: Queens resident Julio apprehended after fleeing abroad, Rivera was viciously murdered on a the killer was sentenced to 22 years Jackson Heights playground in the in prison. Most recently, in October 2009, summer of 1990. The 29-year-old man was stabbed repeatedly with a claw ham- College Point resident Jack Price was mer in a gruesome attack perpetrated brutally beaten by two young men, who allegedly repeated homophobic because of his sexual orientation. Three men were convicted in the slurs throughout the attack. After a brief hospital stay, attack that shook Price recovered the borough and the from a broken jaw, city’s LGBT comseveral b r o ken munity. ribs, two collapsed In the past delungs and a lacercade, it seems history at ed spleen. The has repeated itself on two attackers were more than one occacharged with a hate sion, as other innocrime this January. cent members of the At a solemn LGBT community march in College were attacked due to their sexual orienta- The election of Councilmen Jimmy Point as a show of Van Bramer (l.) and Danny Dromm solidarity for the tion. In 2000, 19-year- reflect a growing acceptance of and borough’s latest vicold Bayside man solidarity behind Queens’ LGBT tim of violence based on his sexual Steen Fenrich’s dis- community. orientation, the membered remains were found in a tub in Alley Pond Park. names Julio Rivera, Steen Fenrich and It is believed his stepfather murdered Edgar Garzon were repeated, as recolhim years earlier due to the fact he lection of their murders remain burned was openly gay. His father committed into the memory of the borough and suicide soon after being questioned by the City’s LGBT community. Although, the mood was somber, authorities. Next, in 2001, Edgar Garzon was attendees noted the great leaps the savagely attacked outside of a gay bar borough’s gay community has made in Jackson Heights. His attacker beat in the past few decades. Hundreds the life out of Garzon with a baseball came out to decry the hate crimes com-

Page 38 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Congratulations to the Queens Tribune on Four decades of outstanding community journalism

Congressman GARY ACKERMAN Paid For By Ackerman For Congress, Bob Barnett, Treasurer

mitted, including a collection of LGBT groups created in the wake of these vicious attacks on the LGBT community. Additionally, the gathering

was led by the borough’s first two openly gay City Council Members Danny Dromm (D-Jackson Heights) and Jimmy Van Bramer (D-Sunnyside).

1990: Thomas McCarthy In retirement, former 1990-92 Tribune editor Tom McCarthy is the correctionhistory.org webmaster. Where are the Tribs of 40 yesteryears? Its first three years as a monthly and 37 years thereafter as a weekly provide a basis for calculating a publishing run of about 1,960 issues (3x12 + 37x52)… and still counting. Are those 1,960 melted away or vaporized a la François Villon’s snows of yesteryear? Having had a hand in about 90+ Trib issues, I rage against their sharing the oblivion to which the 15th Century poet consigned a dozen notable ladies of bygone times with his rhetorical-question refrain. No, the 1,960 issues have not melted away nor turned into vapor. They, or at least their pre-computer iterations, are in bound volumes awaiting the researches of journalists and historians. I know about these hernia-inducing volumes because I had to heft more than a few of them myself while perusing back issues for past stories on subjects I was then currently covering. Now, of course, the Trib archives are digital. I know a smidge about that too. I was among those cave dwellers who took part in the transition from the hole-in-a-wall Kissena Boulevard office (so ill-lit one could barely see the typewriter keys) to the bright and airy Horace Harding Expressway office, where soon emerged PCs – all with keyboards easily visible. More than just preserved on paper or in digital media, the Tribs of 40 yesteryears are woven into the fabric of life in Queens. Allow me to cite a few such threads, which I had the privilege to help weave in the early 1990s and which you can still encounter today if you look close enough. You visit your regular bank and find it has been “rescued” (aka taken over) by another. The Trib of Dec. 1329, 1990, reported an early version of this now all too similar tale. As you turn on your cable TV, your eyes glaze over and cross at the overwhelming galaxy of channels and interactive options. The Trib of Oct. 39, 1991 previewed the beginning of it all in full-page detail. You are troubled by companies going out of business and jobs being lost. The Trib of Nov. 15-21, 1991, gave full page coverage to Stroehmann’s shutdown of the landmark Taystee bread factory near Flushing Meadows Corona Park and the loss of 420 jobs. It came in the wake of thousands laid off at local air-

ports and on the heels of word that Long Island City’s Russell Togs was seeking bankruptcy. You are discouraged that no end appears in sight to the killing of American soldiers in distant lands. The Trib of Feb. 28 – March 6, 1991 began an award-winning series of indepth stories on the first two Queens soldiers killed in Gulf War I and the aftermath of mourning. Your State Senate District has just had a special election. Reapportionment of Queens legislative districts to achieve, among other goals, enhanced minority representation was minutely explored in a series of Trib articles in the early months of 1992. You enjoy the “let’s party” feel of the St. Patrick’s run-up, and the romp on the day itself, but begin to gag at some of stuff trying squeeze by under cover of green. The Trib of March 12-18, 1992 (my last feature piece as associate editor) went in search of being Irish in Queens. The genuine experience was found in a little white frame Woodside house where a nun from Belfast served the Lord by serving her fellow immigrants, helping them cope in their new land. Stories such as these are not vanished from the face of Queens. If you look carefully, you can trace them, like lifelines near the corners of the eyes and mouth of a beloved who has grown old with you. Of course, Villon’s snows of yesteryear imagery addressed the earthly impermanence of the individual, despite beauty or celebrity, as illustrated by the ladies about whom his ironic verses sang. Pray tell me, in what land, where is, his circa 1461 poem began. There followed his litany of fabulous females: Flora, Heloise, Queen Blanche, Joan of Lorraine, et al. But, by contrast, we do know in what land the Tribs – past, present, and future – reside: the Borough and County of Queens, N.Y. Additionally, in a very special yet no less real sense, Queens resides in the Tribs. Its stories, event calendars, editorials, opinion columns, reader forums, and sundry other features help Queens residents discover and rediscover, define and redefine, make and remake their community. More than a mere reflecting mir ror, it is the looking glass through which its people can step to find and create their own wonderland. Here’s to the Tribs of 40 yesteryears... and of 40 tomorrow-years!


Here Comes The Judge:

Brown Takes Helm At DA's Office BY BRIAN M. RAFFERTY

1991: Mickey Z Mickey Z. is probably the only person on the planet to have appeared in both a karate flick with Billy “Tae Bo” Blanks and a political book with Howard Zinn. He is the author of nine books—most recently Self Defense for Radicals and his second novel, Dear Vito; he is a regular writer for Planet Green; he can be found on the Web at MickeyZ.net. Wow...a 40th anniversary... All those years ago, papers like the Queens Tribune were connecting us just fine without tweets, texts, or using “friend” as a verb. The Trib has not only aged gracefully, but

it’s also stayed current and vital. It’s been a long time since I’ve written for the Trib but I remain a proud alumnus of this Queens institution. Happy No. 40, QT.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 39

June 1, 1991: Richard Brown was born in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, but was raised in Cambria Heights. He attended PS 147 and Andrew Jackson High School before shipping off to Hobart College in upstate Geneva, N.Y. He graduated from New York University School of Law in June 1956 and was admitted to the New York State Bar that same year. "My last year in law school I did an internship at the United States Attorney's Office in the Southern District, and I spent virtually every day there after school hours working on cases," Brown recalled. "My sense is that that's when my interest in the justice system peaked." Brown spent nine years in several legal positions for legislative leaders at the New York State Senate and Assembly, and went on to become New York City's Legislative Representative in Albany under DA Richard Brown has been serving Queens Mayor John Lindsay, where he since 1991. managed the City's Albany office and supervised its legislative pro- and directed that a psychiatric examination be had; so that case certainly gram. Lindsay appointed Brown to the stands out." At the end of 1978, Brown once Criminal Court bench in September 1973. He served in Manhattan for less again heeded the call to Albany and than two years before being ap- spent two years as counsel to then-Gov. pointed as Supervising Judge of the Hugh Carey. Brown returned to the Brooklyn Criminal Court. In Janu- Supreme Court bench in 1981, and ary 1976, Brown was designated as in 1982 was designated by Carey as an Acting Justice of the Supreme an Associate Justice of the Appellate Court of the State of New York, and Division, Second Department, where in November 1977 he was elected a he spent the next 10 years. On June 1, 1991, Brown left the Justice of the Supreme Court in judiciary behind and accepted thenQueens. Among the myriad arraignments Gov. Mario Cuomo's appointment as over which Brown presided, he the DA of Queens County, succeedcounted the August 1977 arraignment ing John Santucci who retired from of the "Son of Sam" David Berkowitz the post during his fourth term. Brown was elected to a full four-year term as as one of the more memorable. "The courtroom was just absolutely District Attorney at the general elecpacked," Brown recalled. "You had the tion held in November 1991. "To take over an office like this is parents of some of the victims present. It was a very tense atmosphere. I re- an extraordinary opportunity," Brown manded him without bail, obviously, said.


In The Seat Of Power

Boro's Peter Vallone Sr. Becomes First Speaker BY KAITLYN KILMETIS

Page 40 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ www.queenstribune.com

12 years as representing Queens as a January 8, 1986: Astoria Council- councilman. Vallone served as Speaker of the man Peter Vallone Sr. was appointed the New York City Council's first Speaker. City Council from his appointment The appointment surprised many, who in1986 until 2002. He is applauded for the many lasting impredicted the position pacts he left on the counwould go to Brooklyn cil, namely the revisions Councilman Samuel he helped make to the Horwitz, who Brooklyn City Charter in 1989. and Manhattan Democrats Also, in the meanwere strongly backing. time, Vallone had waged Vallone gained the two unsuccessful candiposition after Manhattan dacies - one for Governor Councilman Robert J. in 1998 and another for Dryfoos defied the Mayor in 2001. Brooklyn and Manhattan C u r rently, Vallone Democrats to whom he teaches, practices law in had pledged his support Astoria and has puband voted in favor of lished his biography Vallone. Dryfoos' last minute vote gave Vallone Peter Vallone Sr. was Learning to Govern: My Life in New York Politics, an 18-to-17 vote edge named Speaker. From Hell Gate to City over Horwitz. The newly-created position seats Hall. The Vallone legacy continues to Vallone second only to the Mayor in impact New York City politics. terms of power in New York City poli- Vallone's son Peter Vallone, Jr. gained tics. The Council Speaker is elected control of his father's City Council seat by the Council members. His or her following Vallone Sr.'s retirement. The Vallones remain a constant fixprimary responsibility is obtaining a consensus on major issues, but in re- ture around Northwest Queens and ality he was able to dictate what legis- Peter Vallone, Jr. is currently serving lation would make it to the floor of his third term in office, despite the vote from the public to install term the City Council. Vallone gained the position after limits - which forced his father out.

1992: Mike Nussbaum A former staffer in the Lindsay administration, Mike joined the Trib in 1990 and has expanded the paperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business reach exponentially. I have been a part of the Queens Tribune in many manifestations. While I have been the Associate Publisher since joining the Tribune in 1990, I have had a long-running relationship that began with Gary in 1972. Like Gary Ackerman and Michael Schenkler, I also left a teaching career (Vietnam did this to us all) in 1971 to become an assistant to then-mayor John Lindsay. As the Queens rep for Forest Hills I was thrust into the Forest Hills CoOp controversy over the development of minority housing in Forest Hills. A young lawyer by the name of Mario Cuomo worked his diplomacy and later moved on to Albany, becoming Governor. I worked with then-mayoral assistant Richard Brown who was appointed by the Mayor to oversee the community issues surrounding this project. Under the auspices of the Urban Action Task Force I met Gary and his crew reporting the daily bouts between community and elected officials. I left government in 1978 and worked with Gary and Michael through the 80s on numerous political campaigns. Multi-Media was a favorite then as it is today for political printing. Whether it be for Presidential campaigns or state efforts, I was in a position to help build the muscle of multi when there were few competitors in our community.

In the late 1980s I was asked by a family friend to seek out a local newspaper that would be for sale to a public company looking beyond Manhattan to expand. Jerry Finkelstein, then Chairman of News Communications, met with Gary and Michael and over a few years and cigars, a deal was hatched to buy the Trib. Michael was the Publisher during a time that I was looking for a place to hang my hat and explore other business ventures. I would stop by the office on Kissena Boulevard in the morning to share coffee and a dozen doughnuts with Mike and the staff. I guess I became a fixture and after a short while Michael asked that I join up and try my hand at publishing. The Tribune has afforded me the luxury to maintain my worldly contacts and exploits over the past 20 years, but most important is the home that the Trib has been for my family as well. My kids have grown up under the umbrella as well as my wife, Dale. I am proud to have been a part of the past 40 years in one way or another. I look towards the future with some hesitation on our industry, but Michael is teaching me the web. I am on Facebook and I will get back to Linkedin if I can remember my password.


.

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice of Qualification of 6615 HOLDINGS, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/04/10. Office location: Queens County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/10/08. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rego Realty LLC, PO Box 748120, Rego Park, NY 11374-8120. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 3/ 15/10, bearing Index Number NC-000160-10/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Khristopher (Middle) Yanliang (Last) Young My present name is (First) Yan (Middle) Liang (Last) Weng aka Yan L. Weng My present address is 84-12 90th Street, Woodhaven, NY 11421 My place of birth is China My date of birth is June 10, 1981 _____________________________________________________________________ Wonder Years Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/3/ 10. Ofc location Queens Cty.

DOCKET NO: NA-13482-3/09 SUMMONS - CHILD ABUSE CASE FAMILY COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF THE QUEENS In the Matter of a Proceeding Under MARIYCHEL AVELINO DESTINY BAUTISTA Article 10 of the Family Court Act DIONISIO BAUTISTA RESPONDENT IN THE NAME OF THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

TO: DIONISIO BAUTISTA

A Petition under Article 10 of the Family Court Act having been filed with this Court, and annexed hereto YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear before this Court at 151-20 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11432 Part 10 On APRIL 13TH, 2010 at 2:15 o-clock in the FORENOON, of that day to answer the petition and to be dealt with in accordance with Article 10 of the FAMILY COURT ACT. ON YOUR FAILURE TO APPEAR as herein directed, a warrant may be issued for your arrest. BY ORDER OF THE COURT HON. JUDGE MARIA ARIAS JUDGE OF THE FAMILY COURT Dated: FEBRUARY 25, 2010 FURTHER NOTICE Family Court Act (statute symbol) 154( c) provides that petitions brought pursuant to Articles, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 of the Family Court Act, in which an order of protection is sought or in which a violation of an order of protection is alleged, may be served outside the State of New York upon a Respondent who is not a resident of domiciliary of the State of New York. If no other grounds for obtaining personal jurisdiction over the respondent is limited to the issue of the request for, or alleged violation of, the order of protection. Where the Respondent has been served with this summons and petition and does not appear, the Family Court may proceed to a hearing with respect to issuance or enforcement of the order of protection.

SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Pauline Sims, 44-35 Colden St #7L, Flushing, NY 11355. Purpose any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________________ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS Index No.: 29962/09 Date of filing: SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS W ELLS F ARGO B ANK, N ATIONAL A SSOCIA TION , AS T RUSTEE UNDER P OOLING AND S ERVICING A GREEMENT DATED AS OF A UGUST 1, 2005 A SSET B ACKED PASS -T HROUGH C ERTIFI C A T E S , S E R I E S 2005-WHQ4, Plaintiff, -against- UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, DISTRIBUTEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF THE LATE JOSEPHINE CHANDLER, IF THEY BE LIVING OR DEAD, THEIR SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, DISTRIBUTEES AND SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST, ALL OF WHOM AND WHOSE NAMES AND PLACES OF RESIDENCE ARE UNKNOWN TO PLAINTIFF if living, or if either or all be dead, their wives, husbands, heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, DISTRIBUTEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF THE LATE JOSEPHINE CHANDLER, IF THEY BE LIVING OR DEAD, THEIR SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, DISTRIBUTEES AND SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST, ALL OF WHOM AND WHOSE NAMES AND PLACES OF RESIDENCE ARE UNKNOWN TO PLAINTIFF by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise, of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and the respective husbands, wives, widow or widowers of them, if any, all of whose names are unknown to plaintiff; NEW YORK CITY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD; NEW YORK CITY PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU; NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ADJUDICATION BUREAU; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE;; STATE OF NEW YORK; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; “JOHN DOES” and “JANE DOES”, said names being fictitious, parties intended being possible tenants or occupants of premises, and corporations, other entities or persons who claim, or may claim, a lien against the premises, Defendants. TO THE ABOVENAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a Notice of Appearance on the Plaintiff’s attorney(s) within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, where service is made by delivery upon you personally within the State, or within thirty (30) days after comple-

LEGAL NOTICE tion of service where service is made in any other manner, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. YOU ARE HEREBY PUT ON NOTICE THAT WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Honorable Diccia T. Pineda-Kirwan of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed on February 15, 2010, and filed with supporting papers in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens, State of New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by JOSEPHINE CHANDLER GREGORY CHAVOUS to AMERICAN DREAM MORTGAGE BANKERS, INC. in the principal amount of $231,400.00, which mortgage was recorded in Queens County, State of New York, on July 6, 2005, in CRFN: 2005000379038 which mortgage was assigned to ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC by assignment dated June 1, 2005 and recorded in CRFN: 2005000379039 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens on July 6, 2005. Thereafter said mortgage was assigned to the Plaintiff by assignment of mortgage dated October 28, 2009. Said premises being known as and by 168-44 119TH AVE, JAMAICA, NY 11434. Date: January 25, 2010 Batavia, New York Virginia C. Grapensteter, Esq. ROSICKI, ROSICKI & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff Batavia Office 26 Harvester Avenue Batavia, NY 14020 585.815.0288 Help For Homeowners In Foreclosure New York State Law requires that we send you this notice about the foreclosure process. Please read it carefully. Mortgage foreclosure is a complex process. Some people may approach you about “saving” your home. You should be extremely careful about any such promises. The State encourages you to

LEGAL NOTICE become informed about your options in foreclosure. There are government agencies, legal aid entities and other non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about foreclosure while you are working with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877-BANKNYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the Department’s website at www.banking.state.ny.us. The State does not guarantee the advice of these agencies. _____________________________________________________________________ 4311 23 AVE. LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Sec of State of NY on 1/5/10. NY Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Giulio Sottovia, 251-45 Van Zandt, Little Neck, NY 11362. General Purposes. _____________________________________________________________________ SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF OBJECT OF ACTION STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF QUEENS ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE INDEX NO.: 23827/09 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MAHITIMA BAA, ALBERT KELLY, JANE NJUGUNA Defendant(s). MORTGAGED PREMISES: 22-19 NAMEOKE AVENUE, FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11691 SBL #: BLOCK: 15658 LOT: 25, FORMERLY PART OF, 24 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Queens. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. Dated this 9th day of March, 2010, Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 TO: MAHITIMA BAA, ALBERT KELLY, and JANE NJUGUNA, Defendant(s) In this Action. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. LEE A. MAYERSOHN of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 9 th day of March, 2010 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Queens County Clerk, in the City of Jamaica. The object of this

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action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by MAHITIMA BAA dated the 15th day of July, 2008, to secure the sum of $464,000.00, and recorded at Instrument No. 2008000315624 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens, on the 7th day of August, 2008; which mortgage was duly assigned by assignment dated the 31st day of August, 2009, and sent for recording in the Office of the Clerk of Queens County; The property in question is described as follows: 22-19 NAMEOKE AVENUE, FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11691 SEE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION Block 15658 and Lot 25 formerly p/o 24 ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York, known as Lot 25 in Block 15658 (formerly known as part of Lot 24 in Block 15658) on the Queens County Land and Tax Map, and being bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at the corner formed by the intersection of the Southerly side of Nameoke Avenue and the Easterly side of Pinson Street, distant 45.00 feet Easterly along the Southerly side of Nameoke Avenue to the true point of beginning; RUNNING THENCE along the Southerly side of Nameoke Avenue, distant 35.00 feet; THENCE Southerly and part of the distance through a party wall and at right angles to the last mentioned course, a distance of 50.00 feet; THENCE Westerly and at right angles to the last mentioned course, a distance of 35.00 feet; THENCE Northerly and part of the distance through a party wall and at right angles to the last mentioned course, a distance of 50.00 feet to the Southerly side of Nameoke Avenue and the point or place of BEGINNING. Premises known as 22-19 Nameoke Avenue, Far Rockaway, New York HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE NEW YORK STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT WE SEND YOU THIS NOTICE ABOUT THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. IF YOU FAIL TO RESPOND TO THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT IN THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION, YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. PLEASE READ THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT CAREFULLY. YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CONTACT AN ATTORNEY OR YOUR LOCAL LEGAL AID OFFICE TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The state encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies

and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877BANK-NYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the department’s website at WWW.BANKING.STATE.NY.US. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. § 1303 NOTICE NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: March 9, 2010 Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 The law firm of Steven J. Baum, P.C. and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained by them will be used for that purpose. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 3/ 15/10, bearing Index Number NC-000146-10/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Oluseyi (Middle) Comfort (Last) Abatan My present name is (First) Oluseyi (Middle) Comfort (Last) Olowolabi aka Oluseyi Olowolabi My present address is 2929 Beach Channel Drive, Far Rockaway, NY 11691 My place of birth is Lagos, Nigeria My date of birth is July 06, 1979

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 41

NOTICE: PLACEMENT OF YOUR CHILD IN FOSTER CARE MAY RESULT IN LOSS OF YOUR RIGHTS TO YOUR CHILD. IF YOUR CHILD STAYS IN FOSTER CARE FOR 15 OF THE MOST RECENT 22 MONTHS, THE AGENCY MAY BE REQUIRED BY LAW TO FILE A PETITION TO TERMINATE YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS AND TO COMMIT GUARDIANSHIP AND CUSTODY OF YOUR CHILD TO THE AGENCY FOR THE PURPOSES OF ADOPTION. ALSO, THE AGENCY MAY FILE BEFORE THE END OF THE 15-MONTH PERIOD, IF SEVERE OR REPEATED CHILD ABUSE IS PROVEN BY CLEAR AND CONVINCING EVIDENCE, THIS FINDING MAY CONSTITUTE THE BASIS TO TERMINATE YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS AND TO COMMIT GUARDIANSHIP AND CUSTODY OF YOUR CHILD TO THE AGENCY FOR THE PURPOSES OF ADOPTION.

LEGAL NOTICE


Border Wars:

Glorious Decay:

Once A Flushing Jewel, Golden Venture Crash RKO Rots At Main St. Exposes Illegal Aliens BY JOSEPH OROVIC Sept. 1, 1986: The RKO Keith's Theater in Flushing was shuttered by developer Tommy Huang, a year short of the 60th anniversary of its opening. The theater had remained open to the public, enjoying historic designation by the National Register of Historic Places, as well as landmark status from the City. It had been home to numerous vaudeville acts and a cultural hub in the borough for decades.

The landmark RKO Keith’s Theater in Flushing, has suffered nearly a quarter century of neglect.

Huang, one in a string of developers playing hot potato with the Keith's, introduced plans to create a mega mall on the site, causing a lasting furor over the state and treatment of the theater ever since. Ignoring community outcry, construction crews quickly stripped away the historic lobby to make way for the new development. What was once dubbed the "Jewel of the Flushing Community" had quickly fallen into complete disrepair. Within a decade, Huang's company had filed for bankruptcy, but his legacy of ownership had quite literally seeped into the floors. A State investigation found hundreds of gallons of heating oil had been knowingly spilled onto the basement floor, after Huang assured the Fire Dept. the old boilers had been properly emptied. The property changed hands in 2002, when Brooklyn developer Boymelgreen took over. The company struggled matching its ambitious plans to the community's desires. Along the way, two grassroots groups formed to guide and battle out-of-character development ideas, as well as malfeasance on the part of developers. After years of revised plans and stuttering starts, Boymelgreen reportedly handed over the theater to Venator Capital last year. The company's principal Sam Suzuki has yet to announce his plans for the site.

BY KAITLYN KILMETIS

the stowaways were granted asylum, minors were released and a large portion of the survivors were deported. For some survivors, the case dragged on for years. Finally, in 1997 the last 52 survivors were released by President Bill Clinton. The man who orchestrated the Golden Venture trip was a Chinese gangster named Ah Kay. Due to his cooperation, he served a relatively light sentence. Also, his accomplice Cheng Chui Ping was convicted for trafficking illegal immigrants and money laundering and received 35 years in federal prison. The discovery of the Golden Venture served to confirm the fact that hordes of illegal immigrants were infiltrating New York City in any and every way possible. A d d i t i o n a l l y, it shed light on the human traff i c k i n g industry across the world. The story also gave names and faces to the victims of the unimaginable conditions to which illegal immigrants, regarded merely as human c a rgo, are sub10 people, immigrants looking for a new home in the U.S., jected to on their died when the ship Golden Venture struck a sandbar off journeys to the United States. Rockaway Beach in 1993.

June 6, 1993: At 2 a.m., after an extensive journey - from Thailand to Kenya and around the Cape of Good Hope - the Golden Venture, a ship concealing a massive secret, hit aground at Rockaway Beach. The ship's crew, smuggling 286 illegal immigrants from China, forged a mutiny; in their attempt to flee the ship, 10 people drowned. After the discovery, the ship's passengers recounted the harrowing tale of their trip around the world. The survivors were taken into custody by the Immigration and Naturalization Service and held in prisons throughout the U.S. while applying for political asylum. In the end, around 10 percent of

1993: Barbara Arnstein 1994: Marcia Gelbart

Page 42 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Barbara is a former staffer and current contributor to the Queens Tribune, and is also a published author and respected poet. The main character of my recent, popular short story "A Feast to See and Hear" (in "Amazon Shorts" at Amazon.com) is a restaurant reviewer. Every one of the many restaurant reviews I wrote for the Queens Tribune helped inspire the story's creation, as they led me on a very educational tour of the multi-faceted world of Queens cuisine. My other, also popular "Amazon Shorts" story, "You May Grow Up To Be a Fish," is about a reporter. All the articles I did and the people I interviewed for the Queens Tribune helped inspire that one. The interviewing skills the Tribune helped me develop have boosted my writing career in all kinds of ways. My career has involved writing up a war hero, interviewing cast members of "The Simpsons," internationally acclaimed authors, and artists and writers of "Spider-Man" for national magazines. My newspaper interview subjects have included chefs, choreographers and clowns, doctors, drummers and dog-trainers. I had my own humor column in the na-

tional magazine Gallery, and wrote the "On The Street" section of Newsday. My published work includes poetry, and I bring a poetic outlook to my articles whenever possible. Happily I was able to include some in a recent play review for the Tribune, in this rhythmic excerpt describing the plot of Neil Simon's "Rumors": "Disaster follows hilarious disaster, as platters clatter, crystal crashes, and relationships fracture…" In my recent article describing some exhibits at the science museum in Flushing, Queens, I wrote: "Walk away from a wall while your shadow stays. Try to touch metal and your fingers meet air..." My Queens County Farm Museum article begins "Everything you could want from a farm is there. Ducks? Definitely. Goats? Got 'em? Sheep? Sure. Cows? Of course… Unlike the apples you see in the supermarkets, theirs still have trees attached to them." My husband and I and our two cats live in a beautiful neighborhood in Queens, full of wonderful people.

Marcia left the Tribune to work for The Hill, in Washington, D.C. and later the Palm Beach Post. She is now a staff writer at the Philadelphia Inquirer. In the spring of 1993, I tried to do what my graduate school professors advised: Apply to a small, rural daily newspaper where you can learn journalism basics - from covering the police beat to sitting through lengthy zoning board meetings and determining what's news. But with a tight job market, I wound up instead at the Queens Tribune, a weekly newspaper five minutes from where I grew up. Here, I learned about those journalism basics, in addition to understanding and appreciating more about the community in which I was raised. As a reporter and then editor at the Tribune, I got to come up with story ideas, work with other young, ambitious reporters, and meet community leaders. Along the way, I took a particular interest in our public schools and education system, covering the controversy at the time over Rainbow Curriculum. With citywide opposition spearheaded by School District 24, I spent considerable time

getting to know civic leaders from a part of Queens that seemed very different than my own. Lesson learned: I didn't have to go to a rural town to learn about diversity. Growing up in our own Queens neighborhoods, we create boundaries that are too often broken only to visit Manhattan or Long Island. There's a whole world in our own borough that is a city unto itself. I've learned that and never forgotten. After one year at the Tribune, I accepted another newspaper job with the same publishing company. That job took me on an unexpected threeyear detour to Washington, and exposure to a political world that I'd never dreamed of being that close to, so early in my career. Second lesson learned: Don't be afraid to just let life happen. It is anybody's guess as to where I would have wound up if I had not had my start at the Tribune - but I have no regrets that I did.


Falling From The Sky:

265 Killed As Jet Crashes Into Rockaways BY DOMENICK RAFTER

Nov 12, 2001: A quiet oceanfront neighborhood turned into a nightmare on Monday morning after a fullyloaded jetliner fell from the clear blue sky, slammed into Newport Avenue, destroying at least three homes and killing five people in the neighborhood as well as all 260 passengers and crew on board the plane. The jet crashed only minutes after it took off from John F. Kennedy International Airport bound for Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. The crash is the second worst accidental air disaster in U.S. history, after the May, 1979 crash of an American Airlines jumbo jet at Chicago. Flight 587 was not the first air disaster to strike Queens, home to two major airports. On June 24, 1975, in the middle of an early summer thunderstorm, Eastern Airlines Flight 66, a Boeing 727 on final approach to JFK from New Orleans, got caught in a downburst and crashed into Rockaway Boulevard in Rosedale, just short of the runway, killing 112 people. The crash scattered debris and bodies on the road and in the marshland surrounding it. Only 12 people survived the crash. Among those killed in the crash was Wendell Ladner, who played for the New York Nets. An epic tragedy was averted on July 30, 1992, when TWA Flight 843, a

Lockheed L1011 jet leaving JFK for San Francisco, aborted takeoff, skidded off the runway and burned. All 292 on board people miraculously escaped with their lives. Conspiracy theories still float around the crash of TWA Flight 800 off the Coast of Suffolk County on July 17, 1996. The Boeing 747, which took off from JFK bound for Paris and

Rome, exploded in mid-air and crashed into the 10 ten miles from Smith Point Park, killing 230 people. LaGuardia was the site of two fatal air disasters in three years. The first, USAir Flight 5050, a Charlotte, N.C.bound Boeing 737 skidded off the runway into Bowery Bay on Sept 20, 1989, due to pilot error, killing two people. The more serious crash of USAir Flight

405 on an icy March 22, 1992, killed 27 people after cartwheeling into Flushing Bay on takeoff from LaGuardia bound for Cleveland. Flight 405 was ruled to have crashed due to icing on its wings. These two incidents led to questions over whether or not the airport’s runways were adequate enough to handle contemporary jetliners.

1995: Sarina Roffe

Sarina served for nine years as the founder and director of the Sephardic Heritage Project and most recently served as Chief Operating Officer for C & A Marketing. My time with the Trib was exciting and always filled with a sense that the borough’s politics were over my head. Yet, my job there launched me on a career path where politics is deeply entrenched in everything I do. When I joined the Queens Tribune as Managing Editor, I was in the initial years of a career change. I was an idealistic reporter with good investigative skills and a track record as an award winning journalist. I had a good community newspaper background but felt overwhelmed with the learning curve of the Queens beat. I had moved back to New York only a year before with three children, and New York politics was new to me,

much less Queens. Yet I felt invigorated when I met with people like Eliot Spitzer, who sought me out in his first unsuccessful bid for Attorney General, and then-Police Commissioner Bill Bratton, who arrived at the Trib offices with a security detail. I still have a photo of then-Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan and myself hanging proudly in my office. I think my biggest challenges at the Trib were keeping up with Mike Schenkler’s political savvy, writing editorials and coming up with new and innovative cover designs – tasks I never really mastered. We had great reporters and I hated having to cut their excellent cutting-edge

stories to fit the available editorial space. We covered everything from Queens cemeteries and Har r y Houdini, to the history of street names and crime stories. After leaving the Trib, I began a new adventure, switching to the other side of the editorial desk to work in public relations for then-Mayor Rudy Giuliani. I became extremely active in Democratic Party politics, both in Brooklyn and New York State. I love the feeling I have when I walk the halls of Congress and interact each day with those who collectively hold the nation’s power in the palm of their hands. And much of it started at the Trib.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 43


Returning To The Pulpit:

1996: Matt Higgins Jamaica Congressman Leaves House For Church BY DOMENICK RAFTER Aug 1, 1997: U.S. Rep. Floyd Flake (D-Jamaica) announced his resignation from Congress today beginning a scramble for the seat he struggled to win in a special election 11 years ago. Flake said that he would leave Congress some time before the end of the year to focus on his ministry duties at Allen AME Church. Gov. George Pataki will call a special election to fill Flake’s seat when his resignation becomes official and at least four names are being mentioned as a potential replacement including Assemblyman Gregory Meeks, Assemblywoman Barbara Clark, City Councilman Archie Spigner and State Senator Alton Waldon Jr. who briefly held the seat in 1986. Flake and Walton jockeyed in 1986 to be the first African-American elected to Congress from Queens. The sixth congressional district became open when longtime Democratic congressman Joseph P. Addabbo (D-Ozone Park) died of cancer on April 10, 1986. Walton, then a state Assemblyman, received the Democratic nomination for the election that was held on June 10, 1986. Waldon faced off against Flake, who ran as an Independent and three other nominees including former State Senator Andrew Jenkins, whom Walton replaced in Albany. Walton barely beat Flake, winning

the election by 278 votes. Walton’s congressional career would not last long; Flake immediately announced a challenge to Walton in the September Democratic primary and ousted him by a seven-point margin. Flake defeated former NYPD officer and GOP candidate Richard “Bo” Dietl of Ozone Park in the general election and served five terms in Congress. In Congress, Flake often irked liberal Democrats by supporting conservative Republicans on some pieces of legislation, including on social issues like abortion. Flake had a history of endorsing Republican candidates for office, including Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Gov. George Pataki. In 1990, Flake and his wife Elaine were indicted on alleged fraud and embezzlement charges, but a judge dismissed much of the prosecutor’s case, forcing the dropping of all charges. Since his resignation from Congress, Flake became involved in community development in Southeast Queens and mentoring of prominent local Democrats like former State Senate Majority Leader Malcolm Smith and U.S. Rep. Gregory Meeks. In 2010, his political stepping away from Aqueduct Entertainment Group’s bid to develop a “racino” at Aqueduct Racetrack has been linked to the eventual dismissal of the bid.

Matt, after starting the Tribune’s Action Desk with Mike Schenkler, went on to work for Mayor Rudy Giuliani as his press secretary, became Chief Operating Officer for the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation and is currently an executive vice president with the New York Jets. Mike Schenkler was clearly unimpressed. He tugged on his salt-and-pepper beard for a good while before returning to his favorite activity – taking a scalpel to a cub reporter’s fresh copy. “Okay, kid, just don’t screw this up.” And so began my tenure as a 20year old reporter for the Queens Tribune. Schenkler gave me a shot spearheading his new baby in 1996, a column called the Action Desk that would advocate on behalf of Tribune readers. I didn’t know the first thing about writing, but he was willing to let me fake it, so long as I could solve a problem along the way. The hours were grueling. In the morning, I worked at Community Board 8, in the afternoon I headed over to the Tribune, and then off to night classes at Queens College. David Oats was the editor back in those days, a genius who would begin every conversation the same way: “Haaaaay.” Dave’s infectious smile and wanton disregard for deadlines inspired and corrupted the newsroom. Sometimes we sat at a computer for hours to pen a series of articles, and with each installment, we rotated our names in the byline, “just like Woodward and

Bernstein used to do.” Well that’s what Dave would say, and when you’re 20, it’s easy to believe. We jetted around the borough in my ’86 Maxima to see the Action Desk problems firsthand. Arverne. South Jamaica. Maspeth. Bayside. There were so many problems I still can’t let them go. Gus Barry from Hamilton Beach who wanted to live in peace without a steel bridge running through his backyard. The Tribune won the New York State award for community journalism in the first year of the Action Desk. We didn’t solve every problem of course – there are limits to what a self-righteous newspaper can accomplish. But when we fell short, at least we offered an ear when no one else would listen. I’m okay with how life turned out since leaving the Trib. I went on to become Mayor Giuliani’s press secretary, I finished up law school at night, and I even married a wonderful woman, Michele. But the greatest professional pride in my life remains the Action Desk, and the break I was given at the Tribune. Now I just wish Schenkler would stop calling me “kid.”

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LEGAL NOTICE

Brooklyn 92 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/28/10. Ofc location Queens Cty. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 1692 Gates Ave, Ridgewood, NY 11385. Purpose any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________________ XYZ VENTURES, L.L.C. Art. of Org Filed Sec. of State NY 10/29/09 Off. Loc.: Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail a copy of process to: THE LLC c/o XYZ VENTURES, LLC, 10906 Westside Avenue, NY, NY 11368. Purpose: Any Lawful act. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that a license, serial number 1238068 for an “Restaurant Wine License” has been applied for by the undersigned to serve Liquor at retail in the restaurant under the Alcohol Beverage Control Law at H T Café Ltd DBA Eat&Go Istanbul, located at JFK Terminal One Building 55, Jamaica, NY 11430 for on premises consumption _____________________________________________________________________ HL PROPERTIES 92299H, LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Sec of State of NY on 12/22/09. NY Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process

against the LLC served upon him/her to Hsiang-Jui Hsu, 138-26 62 nd Ave., Flushing, NY 11367. General Purposes. ______________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of Lowery Street Media, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on 12/08/ 2009. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC P.O. Box 4685 Sunnyside, NY 11104. Purpose: any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of Dreygo 160 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/ 14/10. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Dreygo Development LLC, 34-13 38th St., Long Island City, NY 11101. Purpose: any lawful activities. ______________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of D’Arienzo Family LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/ 17/2009 Office location: County of Queens. The street address is: 70-04 Kessel Street, Forest Hills, NY 11375. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: The LLC,

70-04 Kessel Street, Forest Hills, NY 11375 Purpose: Any lawful act. _____________________________________________________________________ Action for divorce Jae Hoon Kwon aka James Jae Kwon v. Kyoung Sook Lee You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or to serve a notice of appearance on plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the publication and in case of your failure to answer appear, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the notice set forth below in the complaint. The object of this action is to obtain a judgement of divorce dissolving the marriage between the parties on the grounds that are in accordance with Sub (2) of the Sec 170 of the Domestic Relations law. Hong Kyung Choi, Esq. Attorney for plaintiff 141-25 Northern Blvd. #A30, Flushing, NY 11354. ______________________________________________________________________ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS CITIBANK, N.A., Plaintiff, against WILHELMINA MITCHELL, WILLIAM A. MITCHELL, RONALD L. MITCHELL, NEW YORK CITY PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU, NEW YORK CITY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD, NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ADJUDICATION BUREAU, CRIMINAL COURT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, QUEENS SU-

PREME COURT, CAVALRY PORTFOLIO SERVICES, LLC AS ASSIGNEE OF CAVALRY SPV I, LLC, AS ASSIGNEE OF PROVIDIAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, CEASAR M. MITCHELL, A/K/A CESAR MITCHELL, if he be living and if he be dead, the respective heirs-at-law, next-of-kin, distributes, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors and successors in interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said defendant who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or inheritance, lien or otherwise any right, title or interest in or to the real property described in the complaint, Index No. 12184/09 SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS WITH NOTICE Defendants To the above-named defendants: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the amended complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the amended complaint is not served with this supplemental summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the plaintiff’s attorneys within 20 days after the service of this supplemental summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the

State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. To: CEASAR M. MITCHELL, A/K/A CESAR MITCHELL NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The foregoing supplemental summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon or ab le A LLA N B . WEISS, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, Queens County, dated the 10th day of Novmeber, 2009 and duly entered in the office of the Clerk of the County of Queens, State of New York. NOTICE OF NA-

TURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT The object of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure $50,000.00 and interest, recorded in the Office of the City Register of Queens County on May 1, 2001 in Reel 5859, Page 2422, covering premises known as 19439 113th Road, St. Albans, County of Queens, City and State of New York Premises lying and being in the Borough Of Queens, being at a point on the northerly side of 113th Road (formerly Haydon Street), 390 feet easterly from the corner formed by the intersection of the northerly side of 113th Road with the easterly side of 194th Street (formerly Kenmore); being a plot 100 feet by 30 feet by 100 feet by 30 feet. Block 10989, Lot 113 Dated: Rego Park, New York December 30, 2009 SWEENEY, GALLO, REICH & BOLZ, LLP. By: Rosemarie A. Klie, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 95-25 Queens Boulevard 11th Floor Rego Park, New York 11374 (718) 459-2634 _____________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of L E Malone Consulting, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/1/ 2006. Office location: Queens Co. SSNY design. As agent of LLC upon whom process against LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 125-28 Queens Blvd, Ste 701, Kew Gardens, NY 11415. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 45

LEGAL NOTICE


Choking It Down:

Exclusive Tribune Story Exposes Terrace Asbestos BY KAITLYN KILMETIS

Page 46 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

In the initial expose, Terrace on the Jan. 16, 1997: The borough’s famed Park and Parks Department officials catering facility Terrace on the Park denied the prior knowledge of the may be treating its customers to far problem and assured reporters no asmore than a breathtaking view of the bestos inspections had ever taken place New York City skyline. In an exclusive at the building; although anonymous scoop the Queens Tribune uncovered sources disputed this claim. In the days following the article’s evidence that the Corona facility is release, the Parks Departladen with asbestos. ment decided to complete Asbestos is a substance an emergency survey of the widely-used before the facility. 1970s for a number of The next week, Tribune housing needs. It was not reporters produced photountil the 1970s that health graphic proof of the extenofficials established a consive asbestos problem. The nection between the matesame week, the Parks Derial and respiratory infections, as well as cases of The Queens Tribune partment shut down a lung cancer, rectal cancer, broke the story about kitchen in the catering hall intestinal cancer and stom- dangerous asbestos in so the poisonous substance Terrace On The Park could be removed. ach cancer. The Tribune’s article A source familiar with catering hall in 1997. the banquet hall said the Parks Depart- prompted a full clean-up of the toxic ment has been aware that the facility is mess. The controversy also led to the “crawling” with asbestos. He also added concessionaire Continental Hosts, that staff is instructed to wear protect- who ran the facility since 1967, to ing clothing and masks due to the relinquish their control of the facility. known asbestos risk. Nowadays, Terrace on the Park is The source also confirmed that most of the asbestos was the sprayed- under new management and the asbeson variation – one of the most dan- tos problem has been eliminated; the gerous forms of the substance – and Flushing-Meadows Park facility rethat a majority of the asbestos is found mains one of the borough’s most popular event destinations. on the ceiling of the kitchen.

1997: Jeremy Olshan Jeremy served as a reporter and managing editor at the Trib, and has been published by most of the city’s dailies. He is currently a reporter at the New York Post. The week begins on Thursday. Bundles of the new issue sit in the parking lot anxious to be unleashed upon the borough. A rare calm and momentary satisfaction fill the office until the starting gun is fired in the form of two words blared over the intercom: “Coffee Truck!” Incomprehensible reprimands explode from the corner office. Somebody in classifieds gets fired. Someone in as sales gets hired. We page through the paper trying not to spot the inevitable typos: “Great story on the borough president,” I say. “But for future reference, it’s Claire Shulman, not Tiger Schulmann.” A week of work is then discarded never to been seen again until this issue is bound in a series of black tomes that line the bookcase. Schenkler beckons. By the time I escape his office, it’s already Friday afternoon and we still don’t have any clue what next week’s front page will be. I start to stress a little: I’m 24 years old. I’m the editor of a weekly newspaper, and I barely know what I’m doing. But Queens is the nexus of the universe, and by Monday there is no

shortage of tales to tell: Grandma Selma Moses gets searched at the movies for “outside candy.” The Postal Service threatens to pull advertising from the paper if I continue our crusade to restore the names of Queens neighborhoods to our addresses. There’s a pothole on Francis Lewis Boulevard the size of a lunar crater. Somebody stole Helen Mitro’s hairbrush. The Post and Daily News will steal these stories, without giving us credit, but there’s no better form of flattery. Tuesday we start putting down the pages and I try not to be overwhelmed by both the editorial and managerial frustrations: Where’s the Action Desk? That restaurant review is too short. She’s a fine reporter, but you have to talk to her about personal hygiene. Wednesday is deadline night. We still need another story for Page 3. That photo is awful. We needed that six hours ago, why are you still on the phone? Redo the front pageGary’s boutonniere should be six times this size. We finish by 6 or 7- occasionally 10 or 11. Nice work. So what do you have for next week?


Where Do You Live?:

Queens Fights To Retain Its Zip Code Identities BY CATHERINE MANZIONE

Page 48 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

August 1998: The Queens community was outraged when the mailing system eliminated specific neighborhoods and began identifying each zip code with one broad swath of the borough. The U.S. Postal Service decided to cluster individual areas into one of three large chunks – Flushing, Jamaica or Long Island City – based on the first three numbers of the zip code. All zip codes beginning in 113 belonged to Flushing, the 114 zip code was designated as Jamaica, and 111 became Long Island City. This caused an uproar in Queens’ communities, where many people felt as if they were stripped of their neighborhood identity. “All my life I have lived in Woodside” said Dorothea Osborne. “Now I am constantly telling people on the phone that, ‘I am not a Flushingite.’” Bayside residents threatened to ignore letters or advertisements that do

not contain their correct neighborhood’s name. Residents weren’t the only ones complaining, as elected Queens officials also felt the change was completely unnecessary, especially if the old way has been working for years now. “ The Post Office has stripped us of our communities,” said then-Assemblyman Mark Weprin. “We are very pleased with all the support we have received, but all the support in the world isn’t worth anything if we can’t get the Post Office to change their procedures.” The new system was suppose to make the mailing system flow easier and have mail reach people quicker, but only caused more confusion and mix ups with the mail. People were receiving each other’s mail and nothing was being delivered on time. The Tribune waged a fight against the Postal Service’s changes for about a year, until the system was dropped in August 1998.

1998: Liz Goff

Liz is a veteran news reporter who currently writes for the Queens Gazette. How do you cram almost 17 years the first female reporter to tackle the of your life into a quarter page of task. It was a labor of love that took words? me to some of the most dramatic It’s a daunting task that Michael crime scenes in Queens’ history. Schenkler has assigned me. But as Craig Schiffer spent his nights usual, what Mike wants Mike gets. So thinking of ways to aggravate me. here goes: And he spent his days doing it, since We were a team. Tom McCarthy, I was the first “chick” to share the Michael VonDer Lieth, Craig newsroom with these three amigos. Schiffer and yours truly; we made up At the helm was David Oats. the Tribune editorial department in David’s knowledge of Queens and his the early 1990s, racing from one as- ability to remember events and signment to another covering every people added a flavor to the Tribune corner of Queens to fill the award- newsroom that won awards. winning pages of the Tribune. David Oats was a great educator, Tom McCarthy, the patriarch of easily sharing his knowledge of the editorial staff, filled pages of the Queens with his reporters. With his paper with politics and coverage of passing two years ago, the borough social issues as only Tom could. lost a gem in its crown. A crusty newshound with a heart I remember the day I picked up a of honey, Tom climbed through a copy of the Tribune and discovered fence at JFK Airport to expose breaks that Mike Schenkler had included in security, he made us laugh with my byline in his weekly column. I his “truth about Santa” story and he remember I thought my head would let me tag along to an Astoria cam- explode – it was that exciting and it paign rally for Michael Dukakis – meant that much to me. and, to my great delight, he included Many people share in the success my name on his byline. of the Queens Tribune but none so Tom, that byline was one of the true much as Michael Schenkler, who unmilestones in my life as a reporter. derstands the people of Queens, the Michael VonDer Lieth covered issues that matter most to them and crime. He also took a mean fire the way the world is impacted by this photo, often climbing buildings to borough. snare the most spectacular “smoke Thanks, Michael, for giving me and flame” photos in Tribune history. the opportunity to share almost 17 When Michael left the paper in years of my life with the Queens Tri1992, I inherited the police beat – bune.


Making Our Skin Crawl:

New West Nile Virus Takes Lives In Queens BY CATHERINE MANZIONE Sept. 28, 1999: There have been a total 37 confirmed cases of West Nile after the first outbreak in the country occurred Aug. 23 when two patients were admitted to a Flushing hospital in Queens after complaints of fever, confusion, and weakness. Dr. James Rahal, Director of Infectious Disease at New York Hospital Queens then reported both cases to the New York City Department of Health who then began to look into the virus. With the virus spreading rapidly in the last month, Queens’ residents have been living in fear. Although surrounding areas like Nassau and Westchester have also had confirmed cases, Queens

West Nile Virus was known to be carried by mosquitos, which breed in stagnant water.

seems to be where the majority of the confirmed cases are. As of today, 37 cases and four deaths have been reported from West Nile in New York City. Of the four deaths, all have occurred among people age 68 years and older. People can contract the virus when a mosquito infected with West Nile has bitten a person. Birds infected with the virus would then carry it from one mosquito pool to another, spreading the disease until they die. Most patients with the virus have been over the age of 50, who have spent a lot of time outside, but the virus can be given to anyone of any age. Though its has been more than a decade since the first West Nile outbreak in Queens, eevery year there are areas of the borough sprayed to help fight the virus. People are told to take precaution from the virus by applying mosquito repellant, wearing long sleeve shirts, long pants, and staying indoors during the early evening hours. People should also get rid of any excess water in flower pots, trash cans, buckets, swimming pool covers, and pets water bowls. These precautions can prevent the attraction from mosquitoes outdoors and prevent them from laying eggs in wet areas.

1999: Marcia Comrie Marcia is a freelance writer, blogger, faculty advisor to York College’s Pandora’s Box and associate publisher of the PRESS of Southeast Queens. My time wasn’t so much with the percolating in your throat. Queens Tribune as it was at the Queens The first few times I heard him I Tribune. was simply stunned. His vice president, I was brought on board to help Michael Nussbaum, had come in that birth the mighty Queens Tribune’s lat- morning and said he wasn’t feeling so est baby, the PRESS of Southeast well. “Without missing a beat, Mike Queens. It was decided that this new- responded, “Must’ve been the sex we est offspring wouldn’t be given the had last night.” Nussbaum, obviously ubiquitous mother paper’s name with used to Schenkler’s way with a quip, a regional designation such as simply responded, “Must’ve been.” “south.” It would have its own name I soon got used to Mike’s ways and and separate identity and I became would simply give him dirty looks to the face of that paper. show my disapproval as I tried not to From the very beginning I realized laugh. But I realized almost immedithat Mike Schenkler, my publisher, ately that my dirty looks tickled him was a special kind of guy, but not in even more, so I resorted to simply all the ways one would think. Yes, he ignoring him. has a heart of gold and is one of the But that didn’t work for long eismartest people I know. And had he ther. I soon started laughing at his not made it as a public school teacher shenanigans – no more of which I and publisher, he could well have dare repeat here! But the important toured the world as a comedian, but thing is that he’s right about making more in the George Carlin mold than us laugh at people’s foibles and laugh Alan King. even harder still at our own. Mike is distinctive in another way, It loosened me up and made me too, though. He comes from the old enjoy my workday a lot more. And it school in that he dispenses with made me a more interesting writer. today’s restrictive politically correct But he’s more than that too. I have protocol, which he considers stifling enjoyed his political analyses both in to creativity. He believes in saying the newsroom and in his weekly colwhat he believes and in the way he umn. Nobody has a better grasp of thinks it; but not in a way that is the issues than Mike does and no one meant to hurt. Just in a way that explains it better to the young reportspeaks the truth and makes you blush ers still in college or fresh out. as you struggle against the laughter Happy 40th, Queens Tribune!

Wishing All Our Customers A Happy & Healthy Passover

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www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 49

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Wendy’s Massacre:

Workers Slaughtered In Flushing Execution BY MICHAEL CUSENZA May 24, 2000: John Taylor and Craig Godineaux entered the Wendy’s on Main Street, Flushing looking to rob it and leave no witnesses. The duo

Page 50 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

John Taylor was sentenced to death for his role in the massacre, but his death sentence was overturned in 2004. He is now serving three life sentences.

bound and gagged the restaurant’s seven employees, bagged their heads and shot each one execution style, then made off with $3,200. In the seven years following that fateful night in May of 2000, DA Richard Brown wrangled with one of the most haunting and legally contentious cases of his career, setting a standard for death-penalty cases in the process. “I was in the basement of the Wendy’s restaurant that night,” Brown said. “It was a night that I shall never forget. That which took place was among the most brutal and horrific crimes that I – indeed, this entire City – had ever seen.” Godineaux pleaded guilty to several counts of first-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison the following January. It was determined he was mildly-retarded, which kept him off of death row. Taylor, however, was given the death sentence in November of 2002. It had been almost four decades since the state last executed a person, and a 1995 law reinstated the death penalty. The State Court of Appeals deemed the law unconstitutional in the People v. Stephen LaValle, in June 2004.

The Court vacated LaValle’s death sentence due to a constitutional defect in the statute’s deadlock jury instructions – thereby invalidating the entire sentencing portion of the State’s capital punishment statute. The overruling of the decision threw Taylor’s sentence – at the time the last man left on death row – into turmoil. The Capital Defender Office, which filed an appeal on Taylor’s behalf, cited that the LaValle ruling must apply to Craig Godineaux escaped a death sentence afall prior cases as well, and the ter a court determined him to be mildy-retarded defendant’s sentence should and is currently serving five life sentences. be changed to life without parole. The Court agreed, and vacated the decision … it was a decision that Taylor’s sentence with a 4-3 ruling. He I – as an officer of the court sworn to was ultimately resentenced to three uphold the law – was required to folconsecutive life terms, a bitter pill for low,” Brown said. “I had promised the Brown to swallow. families – and the surviving victims, Still, the ever-compassionate as well – when we first met that I Brown centered his thoughts around would see this case through to its conthe victims’ families. clusion and that in doing so we would “I told them that while I under- follow the law – and that is what we stood the depth of their feelings about have done.”

2000: Tamara Hartman Tamara served as managing editor of the Tribune from 1999-2003 and as executive editor of the PRESS of Southeast Queens from its birth in 2000 until 2003. She is currently enjoying freelance adventures in life and writing. The older I get, the greater appreciation I have for the things that stay true in life - spring does come again. Tax day will make me uneasy even if everything is filed and paid. Queens is a vibrant and beautiful borough filled with millions of stories worthy of telling. And the Queens Tribune is standing guard of the journalistic traditions I hold dear, reporting the borough's news with the diligence and honesty it deserves. Before Tribune Publisher Mike Schenkler would seriously consider hiring me back in 1999, we met for lunch and over a civilized plate of pasta, politely traded Queens pedigrees, enjoyed a little chatter about the state of the borough, and then took our corners, held the ropes and prepared for a fight. He wanted me to explain my vision for the future of the newspaper. That's when I relaxed. That answer was easy. I pulled out a yellowing piece of newspaper I had clipped when I was in high school, many moons ago. It was a column called QUIPS (Queens In Politics) that I had saved for its unique creativity in both revering and poking fun at my beloved profession. It was a column written by Mike Schenkler in the Queens Tribune. In this particular QUIPS, Mike instructed readers in the jargon of journalism, including: "By-line: The name of the reporter responsible for the mistakes; Obit: A comprehensive story of a person's life that you didn't print in time." As I explained my vision for the Tribune, it included taking up the task of telling Queens news like the newspaper my mother wrote for did - the daily Long Island Press. And I

felt it had to have a space for regular, intelligent commentary to dig into the political scene and the challenges of life. If he hired me, Mike would have to once again take up writing a weekly column. He did, and Not 4 Publication was born. During my four-year watch as Managing Editor, the Tribune covered an amazing wealth of stories the West Nile Virus, the Wendy's killings, Sept. 11th, the Power Plant battle, toxic waste in Southeast Queens, School Board 29's computer scandal, Fort Totten's turnover and the blackout are just a few. And we added a strong human voice to the paper through Not4Pub. Whether he was telling stories of his daughter's reaction to life and terrorism or shouting about term limits, Mike has used this space to educate, enlighten, and shake things up. But as the Trib celebrates its 40th year, I also want to add a note of praise for the people of the Trib - the Tribbies, as we call them. The talent that gravitates to, educates, reports, types out, lays out, proofreads, designs, and touches with care and concern each page of this paper every week is simply outstanding. So much has changed in the world of journalism in the 20 years since I started my career. World events now travel at the speed of the Internet and too many newspapers flounder in its wake … slowly sinking and dragging high standards in journalism down with them. It is comforting to know that one of those true things in life is that there is a Queens Tribune hard at work for its readers, and there are Tribbies who still believe in the news.


The Long Walk Home:

Our Nation Is Attacked By Foreign Terrorists BY KAITLYN KILMETIS

fear thickened the air. By the end of the day, it was clear Sept. 11, 2001: On a sunny September morning, the busy routine four planes were hijacked by a team took place as usual - commuters o f 1 9 t e r r o r i s t s - t w o o f w h i c h quickly dashed to their buildings, crashed into the World Trade Cenchildren began their day with the ring ter, one of which flew into the Penof a school bell and employees rode tagon near Washington, D.C. and their elevators up to their office's floor the last, which crashed into a field in Pennsylvania after - until the moment passengers and flight when the city, and life crew fought to regain as we knew it, control of the airscreeched to a sudden craft. halt. Months later, it At 8:46 a.m., a would be calculated Boeing 767 crashed that in total 2,973 lives into the North Tower of were lost as a result of the World Trade Centhe attack. The single ter at roughly 460 miles greatest loss of per hour. As the nation firefighters was from a tuned in to witness New York City Fire Dewhat was originally perpartment was in ceived to be an acciMaspeth. The dent, at 9:03 a.m., another plane collided The Maspeth home of HazMat Maspeth Fi rehouse, with the World Trade I and Squad 288 was dealt the home to the FDNY's Center, this time into heaviest blow of any firehouse HAZ MAT Co. 1 and Squad 288, lost a total the South Tower, right on Sept. 11. of 19 men on Sept. 11. before the country's Across the borough, families and eyes. The nation was under attack. As debris-covered Queens resi- friends of victims struggled with their dents made the long trek home from losses. For months, a period of naManhattan, largely on foot over the tional mourning took place as newsQueensborough Bridge, the throngs papers and television broadcasts reof people attempted to grasp what had played images of the attack on loop. just occurred as ash rained down from Americans remained alert and fearful above and the smell of the fire and that another attacks was in the works.

In retaliation, the United Stated launched the War on Terrorism; invading Afghanistan in search of the Taliban, the group held responsible for harboring Islamic extremists responsible for the terrorist attack. Nearly nine years later, the country remains heavily entrenched in a war in the Middle East, primarily based in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Pentagon was repaired within a year of the attack but construction at the World Trade Center site has lagged on due to economic hurdles. The new WTC plan includes five new skyscrapers, a national September 11 Memorial

& Museum, a World Trade Center Transportation Hub, a Retail Complex and a Performing Arts Center. It is unclear when the project will be finished but it seems nearly impossible the City will meet its Sept. 11, 2011 deadline. Much like the attack at Pearl Harbor and the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the September 11 attack remain a defining moment in the American consciousness. Not yet a decade from when the attack occurred, images of the planes hitting the building, stories of heroism and tales of sorrow remain deeply engrained in the heart of the borough and the nation alike.

2001: Dominic Nunziato In late 2000, a budding sports cartoonist from Rego Park named Dominic Nunziato sent the Tribune a humorous cartoon depicting Olympian Michael Johnson setting a world record for being able to cross Queens Boulevard before the light changed. He has been a weekly contributor to QConfidential and Not 4 Publication ever since. His work can be found online at www.spoil-sports.com.

My first official cartoon ran in the Trib the weekend the Giants were in the Super Bowl in 2001. The 2010 Super Bowl just passed, so I'm beginning my 10th year with the Trib. After all this time I still look forward to opening the Trib on Thurs-

days and seeing my cartoons in print. Congratulations, Mike, and thanks for making my dream come true. P.S. I'll probably never leave the Trib because my daughters would kill me if they couldn't go to your awesome annual holiday party!

www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 51


Art Explosion:

MoMA’s Move To Boro Was Exciting, But Brief CATHERINE MANZIONE June 29, 2002: The world-renowned Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) moved all of its exhibitions into Queens until 2005 as its 53rd Street building in Manhattan is renovated. Dubbed MoMA QNS, the Long Island City site will be a multi-use facility housed in a redesigned building that was once part of the Swingline staple factory. MoMA QNS will serve as the base of the Museum’s exhibition program and operations until the museum moves back to Manhattan and will provide MoMA with 160,000 square feet of new space for exhibition galleries, study centers, workshops, storage, offices, and a café/bookstore. The deal was first discussed in 1998 when MoMA announced its 75th anniversary, $650 million expansion plan. At the time, MoMA was considering using the site simply as storage space. NYC allocated $65 million, more than $22 million of which came from the City’s Cultural Affairs Budget, leaving a major deficit for the local arts groups that typically rely on that funding. Queens Borough President Claire Shulman made it clear that although she supports the new project, she is a little

Art lovers check out the works on display at MoMA QNS. taken back with just how much of a donation the city had decided to pony up. “It is discouraging that the city has pledged to fund approximately 10 percent of the museum’s expansion plan,” said Shulman, “while calling for dramatic cuts in Queens’ cultural programs and institutions.” Councilman Walter McCaffrey cited the dormant MoMA Queens space ad “MoMA in a Coma.” After negotiations with the City, MoMA opened up a portion of the building as exhibition space, but when MoMA reopened in Midtown, all of the exhibitions went back with it, leaving Queens just a memory of the MoMA that had once been.

2002: Shams Tarek After leaving the Tribune, Shams has held a series of press positions for members of the City Council and State Senate, and has worked behind the scenes in a number of political ventures. The captain of this swift boat, Michael Schenkler, has asked this unapolagetic veteran to say a few words about how serving here has affected his life. My 18-month tour at the Tribune hasn’t provoked any partisan attacks by conservative political groups, put my integrity in question by bloggers or caused my bid to become U.S. President in 2004 to fail (it failed for other reasons, thank you). But being a Tribbie did lay some important foundations for a later journey to the ‘other side’ that would immediately prove symbiotic: handling press for some of the very public figures often covered in these pages. I was hired in the summer of 2002 by Tribune Managing Editor Tamara Hartman and PRESS of Southeast Queens Managing Editor Stephen McGuire – both working elsewhere now – to be the primary reporter for the PRESS, which is basically like the Tribune but the beat is mainly Southeast Queens and you get to write about a lot of church events and jerk chicken. Being a general assignment reporter made the job delightfully unpredictable and exciting. I walked the projects and talked to hustlers, then worked the boardrooms and pressed

directors. I reviewed restaurants and concerts, books and plays. I followed the trail of murderers and robbers, mosquitoes and floods. I chronicled events large and small, public and private. Thanks to the Trib, I know the meaning of the foreign-language phrase: “Before a 501(c)3 can build a Pre-K facility it may have to respond to an RFP by the DOE and file a ULURP application with the DCP.” I also learned a little of what it’s like to be on public assistance with no health insurance, no food to eat and no place to sleep. And as a past reporter myself, I know a lot about what my colleagues in the whole news game go through as they live the daily cycle of assignment: coffee-report-cigarette-typecoffee-deadline-cigarette-file-beer-realize you missed something-whiskey (note to reader: the various drugs so affectionately described here are hypothetical examples and in no way represent my, or any other particular individual’s habits, that I can clearly recollect). Mike, I don’t know what kind of diet you’re on, or what you’re feeding the Trib, but you both look great for 40. Keep up the great work.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 53


Fly Our Friendly Skies:

JFK To Serve As Hub For Boro-Based Airline BY DOMENICK RAFTER

domestic routes to LaGuardia during the last decade and become a mainly international arrival and departure point. JetBlue took to the air five months later on Feb 11, 2000 with its first flight leaving JFK for Fort Lauderdale, Fla. In 2003, JetBlue moved its headquarters into the Forest Hills Tower at 118-29 Queens Blvd., the large beige office tower that sits across the Jackie Robinson Parkway from Queens Borough Hall on the corner of Queens Boulevard and near the busy Kew Gardens interchange Known for being one of the first airlines to offer personal television service in every seat, JetBlue was one of the only airlines to prosper after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. JetBlue grew rapidly in its first decade, opening a second hub in Long Beach, Calif. in 2001 and later establishing secondary hubs in Boston, Orlando and Fort Lauderdale as they expanded their Caribbean operations. As JetBlue grew, it became one of Queens’ largest employers. In 2004, JetBlue began service to LaGuardia Airport and added Newark AirJet Blue cuts the ribbon at its terminal at JFK in port in 2005, Stewart Airport 2005. in the Hudson Valley in 2006

Tribune photo by Ira Cohen

Sept 20, 1999: Though he’s from Utah, airline entrepreneur David Needleman has eyed JFK Airport as the hub for his new airline venture called JetBlue. Now the US Dept. of Transportation has given JetBlue an unprecedented approval of 75 daily takeoffs and landings at JFK, effectively making it the airline’s hub, not far from the company’s headquarters in Forest Hills. JetBlue will be the first major airline to be based in the New York area since TWA left Westchester County for St. Louis in 1992. JetBlue’s decision will bring more domestic service out of JFK, which has ceded much of its

Page 54 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

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LEGAL NOTICE

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF OBJECT OF ACTION STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF QUEENS ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE INDEX NO.: 22161/09 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. KENIA ALMONTE, MELVIN COLON, Defendant(s). MORTGAGED PREMISES: 173-26 105TH AVENUE, JAMAICA, NY 11433 SBL #: BLOCK 10235 LOT 315 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Queens. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. Dated this 8th day of March, 2010,

LEGAL NOTICE Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 TO: KENIA ALMONTE, Defendant(s) In this Action. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. DUANE A. HART of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 18th day of February, 2010 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Queens County Clerk, in the City of Jamaica. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by KENIA ALMONTE and MELVIN COLON dated the 15th day of April, 2004, to secure the sum of$317,695.00, and recorded at Instrument No. 2004000574346 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens, on the 15th day of September, 2004; The property in question is described as follows: 173-26 105TH AVENUE, JAMAICA, NY 11433 SEE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION Block 10235 and Lot 315 ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York, bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the Southerly side of 1 05th Avenue (Sidney Avenue) distant 495

LEGAL NOTICE feet Westerly from the corner formed by the intersection of the Southerly side of 1 05th Avenue with the Westerly side of 177th Street (Haldimand Street) as said avenue and street are laid out on a certain map entitled, “Hillside Gardens, Jamaica, Fourth Ward, Borough of Queens, New York City” Erladeen and Crowell, Civil Engineers and City Surveyors, March 1919 and filed in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens on August 19, 1919 as Map Number 3740 and from said point of beginning; RUNNING THENCE Southerly parallel with 171h Street, 100 feet; THENCE Westerly parallel with 105th Avenue, 25 feet; THENCE Northerly parallel with 1 77th Street and part of the distance through a party wall, 100 feet to the Southerly side of 1 05th Avenue; THENCE Easterly along said side of 105th Avenue, 25 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING. Premises known as 173-26105th Avenue, Jamaica, New York HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE NEW YORK STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT WE SEND YOU THIS NOTICE ABOUT THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. IF YOU FAIL TO RESPOND TO THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT IN THIS

and Westchester County Airport near White Plains in 2007. The airline suffered a black eye when on Feb 14, 2007 a JFK to Cancun flight was held on the tarmac at JFK for over nine hours during a snowstorm. It took four days for JetBlue to return to normal service and the incident led to the company establishing the first “Passenger Bill of Rights” for customers, an idea that found its way to the halls

of both the state legislature and Congress. In 2009, JetBlue announced it was considering moving its corporate headquarters – and 800 jobs – out of Forest Hills to Orlando, after their lease expires in their current office space in 2012. However in March 2010, the airline announced it would stay in Queens, moving its administrative offices instead to Long Island City.

2003: Steve McGuire Steve worked with the Tribune from 1999 to 2004, and went on to a specialty trade paper, Medical Marketing & Media, from which he landed the role of Communications Manager for drug giant Pfizer. The story of the Tribune is the story of Queens. This newspaper embodies the hopes and dreams of its readers and keeps them informed about their community in a way no other publication in Queens (or the entire City) can. In its 40 years, the Trib has been a teacher, a voice, and an instrument of change for the residents of Queens, whether they have lived here all their lives or just arrived at Kennedy Airport. Its investigative pieces, special is-

LEGAL NOTICE FORECLOSURE ACTION, YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. PLEASE READ THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT CAREFULLY. YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CONTACT AN ATTORNEY OR YOUR LOCAL LEGAL AID OFFICE TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The state encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877BANK-NYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the department’s website at WWW.BANKING.STATE.NY.US. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires any-

sues and coverage of politics has informed, enlightened, entertained and been an advocate for the betterment of the borough. I couldn’t imagine a Queens without the Tribune. It would be like Shea Stadium without the Mets, 108th Street without the Lemon Ice King, or the L.I.E. without traffic. The Trib is where I got my start and I will always consider it home. Join me in wishing the Tribune a happy 40th and continued success for a long time to come.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

one offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. § 1303 NOTICE NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: March 8, 2010 Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 The law firm of Steven J. Baum, P.C. and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any

information obtained by them will be used for that purpose. _____________________________________________________________________ MQUEST TAX & ACCOUNTING, LLC, Articles of Org. filed N.Y. Sec. of State (SSNY) 29th day of January 2010.Office in Queens Co. at 65-15 2 4 2 nd S t r e e t , S u i t e 2 F , Douglaston, New York 11362. SSNY desig. agt. upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 65-15 242 nd Street, Suite 2F, Douglaston, New York 11362. Reg. Agt. Upon whom process may be served: Spiegel & Utrera, P.A., P.C. 1 Maiden Lane, NYC 10038 1 800 576-1100. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice of Qualification of EMPIRE GRILL DISTRIBUTING LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/ 02/10. Office location: Queens County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/26/ 10. Princ. office of LLC: 20-11 Francis Lewis Blvd., Whitestone, NY 11357. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity.


Taking Cautious Steps:

Boulevard Of Death Sees Big Improvements BY JOSEPH OROVIC Nov. 30, 1995: The City initiated a Hazard Elimination Engineering Program to analyze and mitigate pe-

destrian deaths on Queens Boulevard. The major traffic artery had become so notorious for claiming lives,

killing 35 pedestrians in three years, it was dubbed the “Boulevard of Death” by local headlines. The plan’s main strategy called for the use of red light cameras to deter speeding motorists from crossing intersections at the worst possible moment. The plan also added a threefoot metal fence to the middle of the boulevard, and performed engineering studies that would increase safety at the borough’s most dangerous intersections. In the time since, Queens Boulevard has yet to lose its stigma as one of the City’s biggest pedestrian killers, though numbers can attest to its increased safety. While the three-year mid-90s stretch saw 35 pedestrians killed, only five died between 2005 and 2007. Cars have become faster, and the streets are more crowded from an

increase in commercial and residential development. But increased traffic enforcement, red light cameras, and a barrier stretching along nearly the entire boulevard have helped lower the number of fatalities. And there are, of course, the everpresent large yellow signs, offering a grizzly reminder: “A pedestrian was killed crossing here. Be alert. Cross with care.” A new set of roaming targets have recently begun using the boulevard: cyclists. With increased eco-awareness and high gas prices, more New Yorkers are using their bikes to get around. And what better thoroughfare than Queens Boulevard, which slices across the borough near its center? Efforts to implement bike lanes to increase safety, however, have failed.

2004: Angela Montefinise

Page 56 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

In the 1990’s, Queens Boulevard received the notorious nickname of “Boulevard of Death” because of the number of pedestrians killed while crossing the busy 12-lane thoroughfare.

Angela left the Trib to work as a reporter at the New York Post, and recently accepted a position to manage public relations for the New York Public Library. There are some lessons you just don’t forget. At the Queens Tribune, the newspaper where I began my journalism journey back in 2001, I learned many that stuck with me. Never leave a community board meeting early, for example. Never take any “fact” at face value. Public documents are your friends. Bring the boss Starbucks and he’ll be happy all day. Yes, in my five years at the Trib, I learned plenty. But one lesson in particular will always stand out. It had been a particularly tough week. Late nights. Lots of breaking news. I had written a slew of stories and had edited what felt like hundreds of others. I must have looked tired, because at around 8 p.m. on deadline night, the publisher Mike Schenkler actually walked over and asked, “Long week, kid?” I told him yes, lots of news changing at the last minute, lots of long hours and tireless digging. Nothing seemed to come easy. He just sort of smiled his all-knowing Mike Schenkler smile and responded, “Those are the best weeks. The harder it is, the more it matters to people. And that’s really why we’re doing this. So the week was hard?” He stopped and grinned. “Good.” I’ll never forget that moment, because in one sentence Mike captured what the Queens Tribune is all about – digging as hard as possible, refusing to take no for an answer and fighting harder than anyone thought possible to uncover the stories that are important to the people of the borough I grew up in. Whether it’s a political scandal, a hard look at education policies, a

pothole that just can’t get fixed or a developer looking to pull a fast one on an unsuspecting neighborhood, the Trib is there, covering the news from all angles thoroughly and completely. Every story is important. No news is too big, no news is too small. No issue is too difficult to tackle. The Trib has long been a paper for the people – advocating for them while informing and entertaining them. And the best part is, the Trib isn’t doing it to brag about itself or win awards. It’s doing it solely to be a voice of truth for the people of Queens. And that resonates with every employee who has ever had the pleasure of working there. I consider myself unspeakably lucky to have learned my craft at the Tribune. The selfless work ethic I learned on the Horace Harding Expressway stuck with me when I became editor of the Trib, when I became an investigative journalist at the New York Post, and now at my current job as public relations manager at the New York Public Library. Always work hard for the good of the people, no matter how hard. That’s what the Trib was founded on 40 years ago, and that’s what it still preaches today. The borough is better off for the good work it does. And I’m much better off for having worked there. Happy anniversary, Queens Tribune! Thank you for taking a chance on me almost a decade ago! Keep up the good work, and here’s to a future filled with really, really hard weeks.


Preserving Character:

To R2 or Not To R2 Becomes Boro Question BY JOSEPH OROVIC June 16, 2004: Mayor Mike Bloomberg set zoning reform in motion with a surprise announcement on the steps of Borough Hall. “The longer we go without zoning review,” he said, “the harder it is to stop a process of neighborhood character change that nobody wants.” A slew of out-of-character development was flooding the residential areas of the borough, with Queens’ suburban neighborhoods watching McMansions explode across their area. The answer was a new R2A designation, which sought to keep smaller residential areas free of multi-story behemoths. Bayside stood as the battleground for the new R2A zoning, as its Councilman Tony Avella (D-Bayside) spearheaded

The construction of out-of-character homes led to an urgent call for massive rezoning.

the reform from his Zoning Subcommittee chair. The designation faced initial doubts by residents and Community Board 11. Their objections, at best, would be mitigated to an advisory role. The new designation was ultimately approved, and set off a slew of rezonings. In just over a year after Bloomberg’s announced support of re-

zoning, five neighborhoods - Bayside, Springfield Gardens, Kissena Park, Cambria Heights and East Flushing all fell under the auspices of the new designation. But the timing of Bloomberg’s announcement called into question his sincerity. A large block of voters would be pleased by a Mayor actively seek-

ing to address their issues. But many, like the Queens Civic Congress, fought for follow-through on the administration’s part. The rezoning itself proved somewhat effective in stymieing overdevelopment, though variances and enforcement continue to be common complaints.

2005: Aaron Rutkoff After a two-year stint at the Tribune, Aaron left to be come an online editor for the Wall Street Journal, a post he has held for the last five years. As the untested, know-nothing reporter I was when I began here, I made more than my share of mistakes. I was the sort of rookie reporter (from suburban Chicago, no less!) whose profound lack of experience and practical knowledge would be hard to top. Before I met Mike Schenkler at his office for a job interview, I had only set foot in Queens to board airplanes. I might slip in a kind word or two about Schenkler and the scrappy, vibrant, hardnosed news operation he has sustained for three decades with a rotating menagerie of weird newsroom creatures and oddball rookies like me.

Of course, there were many days when Schenkler played grand inquisitor or unflappable skeptic - a role he clearly loves - peppering me with pointed questions at high volume to expose the shortcomings of my work. And on those days, if I had the energy to do more than mutter afterwards, I probably didn't say too many nice things about the man. But there is a method to the madness at the Queens Tribune, a system that makes the newspaper and those who work for it so strong. To enter the labyrinth of Queens and learn as you go, to deal with Mike Schenkler every day and write a story that survives his scrutiny, to face and eventu-

ally meet the high demands of this job - these are the geologic pressures that create a dynamic newspaper and transform know-nothing turds like me into journalistic diamonds. Well, maybe not diamonds maybe some sort of semi-precious gem. But you get the idea: rookie reporters here start out as costume jewelry - real fakes, like I was - and end up becoming the genuine article. I am sure life at the Trib has carried on without me and things have been much the same after I left. I know this, though: I'll never be the same after working here. Thanks for taking a risk on a rookie like me.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 57


Page 58 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS Index No.: 23064/09 Date Summons Filed: 08/26/2009 Plaintiff designates Queens County as the place of trial The basis of venue is: CPLR section 509 AMENDED SUMMONS WITH NOTICE plaintiff resides at: 621 53 rd Street Brooklyn, NY 11220-2811 Guiling Chen Plaintiff, against- Jiazheng Chen Defendant. ACTION FOR A DIVORCE To the above named Defendant YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney(s) within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the notice set forth below. Dated: December 4, 2009 American Law Groups, PLLC Attorney(s) for Plaintiff Zhijun Liu, Esq. Address: 13617 39 th Avenue, Suite 3G Flushing, NY 11354 Phone NO.: (718) 395-8899 NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds: **DRL ‘170 subd. (4)- Abandonment The relief sought is a judgment of absolute divorce in favor of the Plaintiff dissolving the marriage between the parties in this action. The nature of any ancillary or additional relief demanded is: 1. The Plaintiff has full custody of the infant issue, Jodie Chen (born on June 17, 2007, of the marriage. 2. The Defendant shall pay basic child support. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 2/ 3/09, bearing Index Number NC-001237-10/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Ericca (Middle) Tatiana (Last) Johnson My present name is (First) Ericca (Middle) Tatiana (Last) Ingraham aka Ericca Tatiana Johnson, aka Ericca Johnson My present address is 111-15 200 th Street, Saint Albans, NY 11412 My place of birth is Brooklyn, NY My date of birth is May 29, 1987 _____________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of SINGINGROOSTER, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on January 4, 2010. Office located in Albany. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process served against SINGINGROOSTER, LLC 4108 Greenpoint Ave. Sunnyside, NY 11104. Purpose: Restaurant _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 3/ 10/10, bearing Index Num-

ber NC-000131-10/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Amel (Last) Chader My present name is (First) Amel (Last) Cherifati My present address is 105-15 101st Road, Ozone Park, NY 11416 My place of birth is Algeria My date of birth is March 18, 1971 _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 11/ 24/09, bearing Index Number NC-001093-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Manveer (Last) Singh My present name is (First) Shivdeep (Last) Singh My present address is 76-27 85 th Road, Woodhaven, NY 11421 My place of birth is India My date of birth is 6/10/1990 _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 3/ 4/10, bearing Index Number NC-000083-10/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Wenqi (Middle) Annie (Last) Ouyang My present name is (First) Feiyang (Last) Zang My present address is 80-09 35 th Avenue, Apt # D-10, Jackson Heights, NY 11372 My place of birth is China My date of birth is October 23, 1991 _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 3/ 16/10, bearing Index Number NC-000144-10/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) George (Middle) Chaim (Last) Chaimov My present name is (First) George (Last) Chaimov My present address is 150-56 77th Road, Flushing, NY 11367 My place of birth is Russia My date of birth is February 02, 1973 _____________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of Queens 111-02 LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/06/2010. Office location: Queens County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 111-02 Northern Blvd., Flushing, NY 11368. Purpose: any lawful activity. _____________________________________________________________________

practice the profession of physical therapy. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of IRD3 LLC, a domestic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 02/18/2010. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 103-11 120 Street, Richmond Hill, NY 11419. Reg Agent: Kissoonlall Ramkaran, 103-11 120 Street, Richmond Hill, NY 11419. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. _____________________________________________________________________ SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF OBJECT OF ACTION STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF QUEENS ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE INDEX NO.: 32284/09 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC. Plaintiff, vs. S U R E N D R A N KANAGALINGAM, JESILDA K A N A G A L I N G A M , Defendant(s). MORTGAGED PREMISES: 3105 74TH STREET, EAST ELMHURST, NY 11370 SBL #: BLOCK 1145 - LOT 29 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Queens. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. Dated this 11th day of March, 2010, Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 TO: SURENDRAN KANAGALINGAM and JESILDA KANAGALINGAM, Defendant(s) In this Action. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. JOSEPH G. GOLIA of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 5th day of March, 2010 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Queens County Clerk, in the City of Jamaica. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by S U R E N D R A N KANAGALINGAM and JESILDA KANAGALINGAM dated the 4th day of April, 1995, to secure the sum of $178,000.00, and recorded at Liber 4111 of Mortgages at Page 2426 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens, on the 24th day of April, 1995; which mortgage

was duly assigned by assignment dated the 27th day of December, 2001, and recorded on the 6th day of June, 2002, in the Office of the Clerk of Queens County at Liber 6415, Page 1160; the plaintiff is also holder of a mortgage in the amount of $112,972.51 executed by S U R E N D R A N KANAGALINGAM and JESILDA KANAGALINGAM which mortgage was recorded June 6, 2002, Book/ Page: 6415/1164, County (or City Register of): Queens; the mortgage was subsequently modified or consolidated with the mortgage referred to in Book/Page: 411112426 by a Consolidation, Extension and Modification Agreement executed by SURENDRAN KANAGALINGAM and JESILDA KANAGALINGAM on the 6th day of June, 2002 in Book/Page: 6415/1177 to form a single lien in the amount of $277,000.00; the plaintiff is also holder of a mortgage in the amount of $9,019.22 executed by S U R E N D R A N KANAGALINGAM and JESILDA KANAGALINGAM which mortgage was recorded January 4, 2006, Instrument Number: 2006000003395, County (or City Register of): Queens; the mortgage was subsequently modified or consolidated with the mortgages referred to in Book/Page: 6415/1177 by a Consolidation, Extension and Modification Agreement executed by SURENDRAN KANAGALINGAM and JESILDA KANAGALINGAM on the 4th day of January, 2006 under Instrument Number: 2006000003396 to form a single lien in the amount of $274,600.00. The property in question is described as follows: 3105 74TH STREET, EAST ELMHURST, NY 11370 SEE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION Block 1145 and Lot 29 ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough of Queens, County of Queens~ City and State of New York, bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the Easterly side of 74th Street distant 421 feet Northerly from the corner formed by the intersection of the Easterly side of 74th Street with the Northerly side of 32nd Avenue as said Street and Avenue are shown on the Final Topographical Map of the City of New York for Borough of Queens; RUNNING THENCE Easterly parallel with 32nd A venue and part of the distance through a party wall, 100 feet; THENCE Northerly parallel with 74th Street 22 feet; THENCE Westerly again parallel with 32nd Avenue and part of the distance through a party wall, 100 feet to the Easterly side of 74th Street; THENCE Southerly along the Easterly of 74th Street 22 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING. Premises known as 3105 74th Street, East Elmhurst, New York HELP FOR

HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE NEW YORK STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT WE SEND YOU THIS NOTICE ABOUT THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. IF YOU FAIL TO RESPOND TO THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT IN THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION, YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. PLEASE READ THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT CAREFULLY. YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CONTACT AN ATTORNEY OR YOUR LOCAL LEGAL AID OFFICE TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The state encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the tollfree helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877-BANKNYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the department’s website at WWW.BANKING.STATE.NY.US. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. § 1303 NOTICE NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: March 11, 2010 Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 The law firm of

Steven J. Baum, P.C. and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained by them will be used for that purpose. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of New York Strategies, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/1/ 2010 Office location, County of Queens. The street address is: 174-15 Horace Harding Expwy; Fresh Meadows, NY 11365. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: The LLC, 174-15, Horace Harding Expwy, Fresh Meadows, NY 11365 Purpose: Any lawful act. _____________________________________________________________________ Name: ZEIF HOLDINGS, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. Of State of NY 02/12/10. Off. Loc.: Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to THE LLC, 223-39 5 6 th S t r e e t , B a y s i d e , N Y 11364. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on the 4th day of March, 2010, bearing Index Number 87/ 2010, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, N.Y. 11435-3710 in room 357 grants me the right to Assume the name of: Apple (First) Mahmud (middle) Khan (last) My present name is: Mohammad Apple Mahmud Khan My present address is: 194-10 Hollis Ave St. Albans, N.Y. 11412 My place of birth is Bangladesh My date of birth is August 22, 1978 _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 1/ 26/10, bearing Index Number NC-001197-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Hanseul (Middle) Susan (Last) ChaeSchmocker My present name is (First) Han Sul (Last) Choi aka Hanseul Susan Choi My present address is 198-23 32nd Avenue, Flushing, NY 11358 My place of birth is Seoul, Korea My date of birth is May 03, 1973 _____________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 3/ 10/10, bearing Index Number NC-000132-10/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Anjika (Last) Friedman-Jha My present name is (First) Anjali (Last) Friedman-Jha (infant) My present address is 64-33 211th Street, Oakland Gardens, NY 11364 My place of birth is NewYork NY My date of birth is April 09, 2002

Notice of Formation of Arista Physical Therapy Wellness PLLC, a professional service limited liability company (PLLC). Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/3/10. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 30-16 30 th Drive, Astoria, NY 11102. Purpose:


Downfall Of A Leader:

FBI Raids Brian McLaughlin’s Offices BY DOMENICK RAFTER

bor Council proved to be a temporary March 2, 2006: Federal officials black eye for the borough’s Democrats raided the Flushing office of Assem- and labor supporters. McLaughlin reblyman Brian McLaughlin (D-Flush- signed as President of the Central Laing) and the Manhattan offices of the bor County in October 2006 and left Central Labor Council, New York the State Assembly seat he had held City’s arm of the AFL-CIO of which for nearly 14 years a few months later. McLaughlin’s overwhelmingly McLaughlin serves as President. Democratic district that McLaughlin’s office, on stretches from Whitestone to Depot Road across from the Richmond Hill was never reBroadway LIRR station was ally in jeopardy of being lost raided early in the morning to the Republicans. His sucon March 2 in an apparent cessor, Rory Lancman, won investigation into both the primary and general McLaughlin’s involvement in elections by astronomical rigging the bidding process margins despite Republicans for the City’s electrical contrying to tie him to tracts. McLaughlin held a McLaughlin. McLaughlin leadership position in Local Brian had previously run unop3, the International BrotherMcLaughlin posed in five of his seven hood of Electrical Workers, campaigns. which dealt mostly with streetMcLaughlin later pleaded guilty lighting, a position McLaughlin is accused of using to deliver lucrative con- and was sentenced to 10 years in tracts to his favored companies. prison in May, 2009. He proved to McLaughlin announced he would not be important to snagging other corseek another term in November just a r u p t o f f i c i a l s i n t h e b o r o u g h . McLaughlin was named as a secret few weeks ago. McLaughlin didn’t face charges witness in federal probe into influuntil months later, but his powerful ence-peddling by Assemblyman Anposition within the county Democratic thony Seminerio (D-Richmond Hill) Party and as head of the Central La- that forced him out of office in 2009.

2006: Azi Paybarah After leaving the Trib and stints at the New York Press and the New York Sun, Azi has settled in to be one of the most prolific political bloggers in New York at the Observer’s Politicker. One of the first things I was told about contributing something for the 40th Anniversary for the Queens Tribune is that I’ve missed my deadline. Perfect. When I first walked into the Tribune’s office in 2003, I interrupted the editor who asked me why I thought I wanted to be a reporter. “I KNOW I want to be a reporter,” I informed her, and then let her finish her question. She then walked me into Michael Schenkler’s large corner office. I hadn’t read the paper before the interview, but did glance at one of his columns which spoke about this friendship and support for Gary Ackerman. Only later was I to realize how often that sentiment ran in his weekly columns. I was walked over to a desk and told I had 10 minutes to write a story based off a press release from the mayor’s office. It was about cleaning up Queens Plaza. I was nervous, wrote a sentence, erased a sentence, and did that for about eight minutes. Schenkler walked by my desk, unplugged my computer monitor and walked away. What a test! I plugged it back in, ignored the polite introduction from another reporter sitting next to me who didn’t know I was auditioning for my dream job and nearly decked the assistant editor who

walked over to me, introduced himself and told me my time was up. I carried my computer disk (no emailing this stuff) to that first editor, and told her not to bother reading it, since I only wrote one sentence. She said, to my surprise, I had passed the first part of the test: hand in whatever you have ON TIME. Your editor can work with it if you have time. I went home knowing I’d failed and starting drinking and plotting my way to journalism school. Before crying myself to sleep, I got a phone call from someone at the newspaper. Could I start tomorrow? I did, and rarely missed a day in my three years there. I didn’t always agree with Schenkler on his news judgment and editorials. He hated some of the stories I wrote. I hated how much I got paid. But I got in early and stayed late and tried learning how not to mess up as much as the week before. Only after working at an alt-weekly (New York Press), a daily (The New York Sun) and a niche on-line weekly-hybrid (New York Obser ver and The Politicker) did I realize that I learned how to do all those different kinds of writing at the Trib. I still haven’t forgiven Schenkler for being more right than me.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 59


A New City Grows:

Willets Point Makeover Finally Gets Approval BY JOSEPH OROVIC Nov. 13, 2008: The Willets Point Redevelopment Plan gained the approval of a former opponent, allowing it to pass the City Council and setting into motion a controversial makeover of the Iron Tr i angle. The thumbs-up from City Councilman Hiram A rendering of a reborn Willets Point across from the new Monserrate (D-Co- Citi Field. rona) opened the door to a full City take- of local business owners, who said over of the land, whether it be through the approval process overlooked negotiated acquisition with private own- their companies and workers. Many ers, or eminent domain. f a c e d re l o c a t i o n d e a l s t h e y s a i d Willets Point had been the focus h u r t b u s i n e s s , a s t h e c l u s t e r o f of numerous revitalization rumors shops fed off the sharing of cusuntil Mayor Mike Bloomberg had tomers. eyed the area soon into his tenure. The plan also attempted to retrain The City substantiated a need to re- a workforce of auto techs via a joint v i t a l i z e t h e a r e a b y d e e m i n g i t venture with LaGuardia Community “blighted,” conditions opponents of College, with mixed results. the plan said were the local But it was the City’s potential use government’s own doing. of eminent domain to overtake the The redevelopment calls for a mix land of “stalwart” landowners that of residential, commercial and educa- promised a lengthy legal battle. tional uses, as well as park space. The Still, the EDC has started prelimiEconomic Development Corporation nary infrastructural work on the redeestimates it will inject $25 billion over velopment plan and maintains it is its first 30 years. actively negotiating with the Iron The City’s plan stuck in the craw Triangle’s business owners.

2007: Ellen Thompson

Page 60 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

Ellen served as an editor at the Long-Islander Newspapers and then attended Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism for a master’s degree in magazine editing. She is now a contributing writer for culture and lifestyle magazines including Inked, NYLON and NYLON Guys. I’ll never forget Mrs. Gomez’s scent. It was while I was covering the crime beat that I met Gomez. My editor at the time, Brian Rafferty, had assigned me to create a series on soldiers who had been killed in Iraq. Each time a report came in from the Department of Defense that a Queens soldier had been killed, I would pin down their family’s address and head out. Looking back, I’m not sure what got me to my feet, except for the slim chance that I’d be able to shine a light on what the war was doing to our neighbors and possibly bring a sense of closure to those families affected. I showed up at Gomez’s house in Corona not sure if I would make it through the front door. One: I was always nervous when I approached the homes of fallen soldiers, and Gomez had just lost her 23-year-old son, Jose. Two: there were already a team of reporters beating down the door. But once inside, I made my way

to the weeping mother. Her English was not as strong as she would have liked it to be so she had another relative translate for her. At this point, I learned that Gomez, who worked long hours in a perfume factory to support her family, had not known her son was on a tour. She believed he was in Texas receiving training and schooling, at least that is what he would tell her. While the other reporters in her cramped home were surrounding a photo of Jose and talking to other relatives, Gomez led me towards her son’s bedroom. She explained how everything was kept exactly how Jose had left it and wanted it upon his return. The tears welled in her eyes as she pointed out each prized possession. And then she turned and hugged me; her face nestled on my shoulder, tears seeping into my jacket. In an attempt to gain my composure I took a deep breath. I knew I was there for a person in need.


www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 61


Citywide Asian Voice:

Liu Wins, Crossing Another Hurdle BY JOSEPH OROVIC

Nov. 3, 2009: John Liu became the first Asian-American to hold citywide office when he defeated sparse Republican opposition in the race to be the City Comptroller. The victory added to a list of firsts that included being the first Asian American elected to any City office. After first winning a seat on the City Council in 2001, Liu held office for two terms, serving as Chairman of the Transportation Committee and overseeing a bevy of changes big and small in his district of Flushing. Among the largest changes was the creation of Flushing’s Business Improvement District, a much sought-after concept to help the neighborhood’s businesses grow and collaborate. Liu used his position on the Transportation Committee to also work with the Dept. of Transportation in an effort to mitigate Downtown Flushing’s traffic nightmares. The plan recently fell through, as it was scrapped by the DOT. Liu’s election opened the floodgates to a host of Asian-American citizens both running and holding seats within the district. Both Ellen Young and Grace Meng followed Liu’s election to the Assembly seat that mirrors his district (albeit they followed Jimmy

Meng as the first Asian Americans to hold state office). Pharmaceutical magnate Peter Koo eventually took Liu’s seat. After deciding to forgo the third term the Council offered itself, public debate opened over which Citywide

seat Liu would fill – Public Advocate or Comptroller. The former actuary chose the latter. In a Democratic primary that featured three members of the Council’s Queens delegation – David Weprin, Melinda K atz and Liu – the race

came down to a runoff between Flushing’s councilman and Brooklyn’s David Yassky. Liu pulled through a run-off victory and cruised to an easy Election Day win, beginning tenure as Comptroller still in its infancy today.

2 0 0 8 : J uliet W er ner Werner went from the Tribune to Politicker.com, the New York Observer’s politics Web site. She has been a researcher for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart since May. As a reporter at the Queens Tri bune I was privy to a fair number of interviews. At a certain point, I realized that Brian Rafferty was greeting every candidate with the same standard question: “You find us okay?” I came to suspect that it was Brian’s way of simultaneously offering a pleasantry and gauging a person’s sense of direction. I don’t know what I expected my first day at the Tri bune to be like, but I don’t think I expected to be sent out on a story as soon as I set foot in the door. A Brooklyn resident, I was completely new to the borough. And so when Brian told me he had a story

for me, my first thought was – how will I find it? I still remember my relief when he led me to the back of the office and pointed through the venetian blinds to show me where I was headed: Francis Lewis High School, visible just beyond the Tri bune parking lot. Out on assignment, covering the JROTC reviewing ceremony, I met John Liu, then a Flushing councilman, now the City Comptroller. As I wandered the sports field in the hot June sun, shaking hands and taking notes, I honed in on the story I wanted to tell. It wasn’t just about this thriving subculture and

its award-winning drill team; it was about a graduating senior en route to West Point and his mother who was experiencing a mixture of pride and nervousness. As a reporter you don’t always know immediately where you re going the instant you start. While at the Tri bune, I learned the value of plowing ahead. In the process, I filled notebooks, I filled gas tanks, I learned the difference between the Grand Central and Jackie Robinson Parkways. And it was fun. Happy 40th.

www.queenstribune.com • March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 63


Outbreak Epicenter:

Swine Flu Panics Borough’s Families BY JOSEPH OROVIC May 15, 2009: Swine flu claimed its first victim within Queens’ borders. Assistant Principal Mitchell Weiner of IS 238 in Hollis died of the disease just as it temporarily paralyzed large chunks of the borough’s educational system. The virus left the City’s healthcare providers scrambling to buffer what could’ve been a major outbreak of the

then-largely-unknown virus. An onslaught of swine flu cases began popping up around Queens, which had become the outbreak’s epicenter. St. Francis Preparatory School drew widespread attention, as hundreds of students had been reported to have flulike symptoms. PS 177 followed suit as 40 teachers and 80 students called in sick in a single day.

2009: Peter Sloggatt Peter Sloggatt is Associate Publisher of Queens Tribune’s sister group, Long Islander Newspapers in Huntington, NY, publishers of: The Long Islander, The Record, Northport Journal and Half Hollow Hills Newspaper; as well as publications for the legal industry: Queens Bar Bulletin, Brooklyn Barrister, New York County Lawyer, Attorney of Nassau County and Suffolk Lawyer.

Page 64 Tribune March 25-31, 2010 • www.queenstribune.com

I suspect that the majority of those sharing memories for this special anniversary edition are recalling their earliest days in journalism. Not me. I came to the Tribune a seasoned oldtimer. Actually, it was more like I transitioned in, having been “acquired” in 2006 when the Tribune’s parent company purchased a Huntington, L.I.-based chain of weeklies whose flagship paper, The Long-Islander, was started by Walt Whitman in 1838. My career with The Long-Islander went back 20-plus years, a figure I’ve

been throwing out there for so many years it must be nearing 30 by now. When the papers’ acquisition was still in the negotiation stage, I met publisher Mike Schenkler for lunch and showed him around downtown Huntington. A gem of a village on Long Island’s North Shore, Huntington is the capital of the Island’s cultural scene, with a vibrant downtown filled with shops, restaurants, and, well… more restaurants. Mike had been looking to expand the Tribune’s operations; The Long Is-

The Mayor’s response garnered criticism. He encouraged New Yorkers to continue with their daily lives and to stay home only if they felt the bug coming on. Eventually, the City improved its methods, offering flu shots to all City school children in following academic year. The City’s Dept. of Health estimated 750,000 to 1,000,000 residents

came down with the flu that spring. The outbreak also outlined the borough health system’s inability to handle major events. Hospitals were flooded with angst-ridden patients, wondering if they were infected. It also underscored “safety net” Jamaica Hospital’s viability in such a situation, in a borough that had three major hospitals close in the prior nine months.

lander was on the market. Its long history and the Walt Whitman legacy caught his eye, but I suspect it was those first visits to downtown Huntington that sealed the deal. Huntington is a place where you can’t walk the streets without seeing someone you know. You can’t help but love the charming shops, the small-town atmosphere, and, oh, all those restaurants. We had our roles, Mike and I. Mine was closer to the one Walt Whitman played in 1839 when he would gather the news, write the stories, compose the type and strike copies one sheet at a time on a hand press. But Walt Whitman hardly considered himself old-fashioned. He was a trend-setter who challenged convention. He was an innovator. And it was that side of Walt Whitman that Michael brought to our relationship. He introduced our black and white weeklies to the world of color with the launch of a

themed, monthly news magazine, Long Islander LIfe. Today we print in color every week. And realizing that Huntington is clearly a town of foodies, he pushed us to launch the Foodie section, featuring news and reviews we now call the dining capital of Long Island. If Walt Whitman were alive today he surely would be Twittering and keeping friends up to date through Facebook. Indeed, social media was a big part of another Long Islander project, DineHuntington Restaurant Week which was launched to rave reviews last October. Walt Whitman’s distinct personality traits have found a balance in the newspaper he founded 172 years ago. It’s not unlike the balance that exists between a group of suburban weeklies and the largest circulation weekly in the most diverse and vibrant borough in New York City.


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www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ March 25-31, 2010 Tribune Page 77

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Queens Tribune Epaper  

Queens Tribune March 25, Issue

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