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FRI 15 JUNE 2018

Media report

ARROW POINTS UP FOR REGION Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD, General News, Bettina Warburton

15 Jun 2018

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Honouring city's PNG links Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD, General News, Tony Raggatt

15 Jun 2018

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SHOPPING CENTRES TO LIFT RETAIL BONANZA Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News, Alister Thomson And Phil Bartsch

15 Jun 2018

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Jones courts 'wreck' talks Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News, Kirstin Payne

15 Jun 2018

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COPYRIGHT This report and its contents are for the internal research use of Mediaportal subscribers only and must not be provided to any third party by any means for any purpose without the express permission of Isentia and/or the relevant copyright owner. For more information contact copyright@isentia.com DISCLAIMER Isentia makes no representations and, to the extent permitted by law, excludes all warranties in relation to the information contained in the report and is not liable for any losses, costs or expenses, resulting from any use or misuse of the report.


Rich Lister backs $165m airport expansion Australian Financial Review, Australia, General News, Simon Evans

15 Jun 2018

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Report warns of emissions handball Australian Financial Review, Australia, General News, Ben Potter

15 Jun 2018

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Melbourne called on to help vacant Launceston tower The Australian, Australia, Aviation, Matthew Denholm

15 Jun 2018

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Antarctic flights frozen out of plans The Australian, Australia, Aviation, Matthew Denholm

15 Jun 2018

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Turbulence nothing to fear if passengers wear their seatbelts The Australian, Australia, General News, Richard Tobiano

15 Jun 2018

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Qantas hails safety in jet wake drama The Australian, Australia, General News, Andrew Burrell

15 Jun 2018

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Channelling a supercomputer The Australian, Australia, Special Report, Andrew Kidd Fraser

15 Jun 2018

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Disposal of risky fire foam quickens The Australian, Australia, Special Report, Chris Ray

15 Jun 2018

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Change at the top for Jemena Northern Territory News, Darwin, General News, Ashley Manicaros

15 Jun 2018

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Dealer's rough landing Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD, General News, Victoria Nugent

15 Jun 2018

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AIRPORT LEASING TAKES FLIGHT Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News

15 Jun 2018

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Mayor right to push projects that nurture tourist industry Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, Letters

15 Jun 2018

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Audience 21,468 CIRCULATION

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Clive Palmer has flown to the Townsville Airport on a private plane. He came in the North ... 4TO FM, Townsville, 06:00 Local News, Newsreader

14 Jun 2018 6:04 AM

Duration: 0 min 16 secs • ASR AUD 40 • QLD • Australia • Report Builder • ID: X00074976662 Clive Palmer has flown to the Townsville Airport on a private plane. He came in the North just days after announcing his controversial to open a refinery at Yabulu. He had meetings and dinner on The Strand last night. Audience N/A All, N/A MALE 16+, N/A FEMALE 16+

Aircraft engine maker cuts jobs The Australian, Australia, Business News, Robert Wall

15 Jun 2018

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ATSB vow to speed up probes The Australian, Australia, Aviation, Annabel Hepworth Page 28 • 430 words • ASR AUD 4,304 • Photo: No • Type: News Item • Size: 213.00 cm² • National • Australia • Airline/Aviation Industry News Press • ID: 969331715 View original - Full text: 430 word(s), ~1 min

Audience 94,448 CIRCULATION

COPYRIGHT This report and its contents are for the internal research use of Mediaportal subscribers only and must not be provided to any third party by any means for any purpose without the express permission of Isentia and/or the relevant copyright owner. For more information contact copyright@isentia.com DISCLAIMER Isentia makes no representations and, to the extent permitted by law, excludes all warranties in relation to the information contained in the report and is not liable for any losses, costs or expenses, resulting from any use or misuse of the report.

15 Jun 2018


15 Jun 2018 Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD Author: Bettina Warburton • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 16,484 • Page: 5 • Printed Size: 242.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,469 • Words: 392 • Item ID: 969544316

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ARROW POINTS UP FOR REGION BETTINA WARBURTON bettina.warburton@news.com.au

TOWNSVILLE’S economic performance has hit a five-year high, according to data compiled by a local economist. Colin Dwyer, of DS Economics, said Townsville’s economy was improving, evidenced by improving workforce, unemployment and participation trends, improved confidence, better residential vacancy rates and a better major projects construction pipeline. “While Townsville is not in an economic Goldilocks zone yet, improving business confidence, a robust pipeline of jobcreating projects and good performances in key areas such as the port, health, construction project, mining and defence also support the trend of an improving Townsville economy,” he said. “Townsville Business Confidence experienced a positive rebound in the latest PVW business confidence report.”

The PVW business confidence index rebounded strongly in the June 2018 quarter. After the March 2017 quarter result, the June 2018 quarter result is the second highest level of confidence in the past 11 years. “The most recent result is fragile and there’s more work needed to see enduring positive business confidence,” Mr Dwyer said. “This is positive but there’s still work to do to achieve enduring and comprehensive positive results, cautious confidence is better than depressed pessimism we experienced from 2013 to 2016.” Mr Dwyer said in February this year Townsville had the equal fastest annual growing job numbers in the country and the fastest decline in unemployment – although off a high base. “Construction projects, health and finance sectors are creating current and future jobs,” he said. Mr Dwyer said the residential vacancy rate had improved substantially and well located quality commercial office

space was in higher demand. “While the Townsville economy is not yet in a healthy position it’s trending towards a better zone,” he said. “It’s not just my research that identifies this improved performance over the past year, and likely better future performance, there are multiple organisations that support a better economic horizon for Townsville. “A meta-analysis of construction and mining reports conducted by DS Economics found six construction and mining reports that identified North Queensland as a current and future hotspot for construction and mining projects.” Mr Dwyer said these reports included research from Deloitte Access Economics, Newport Consulting, Townsville Enterprise, CSQ, Queensland Major Contractors Association, Infrastructure Queensland, BIS Oxford Economics and Townsville based DS Economics. “They all indicated North Queensland is experiencing its strongest growth in major construction activity compared to the past five years,” he said.


15 Jun 2018 Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD Author: Tony Raggatt • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 16,484 • Page: 3 • Printed Size: 322.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,954 • Words: 233 • Item ID: 969542692

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Honouring city’s PNG links TONY RAGGATT THE special links developed between Townsville and Papua New Guinea will be celebrated today in events coinciding with the visit of PNG Deputy Prime Minister Charles Abel. Mr Abel will attend the YWAM Medical Ships annual fundraising breakfast at its Townsville campus where activities will include performances by YWAM’s Performing Arts Celebration group. More than 700 people will attend the breakfast where federal Minister for Regional Development, Territories and Local Government John McVeigh will represent Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. Other dignitaries include PNG Minister for Health

Sir Puka Temu and YWAM Medical Ships PNG Patron and former PNG prime minister Sir Rabbie Namaliu. In other events, the Australia Papua New Guinea Business Council will hold a lunch at the Banquet Centre at the Brewery and Townsville Enterprise will hold an emerging leaders event to discuss cultural and business ties. YWAM Medical Ships managing director Ken Mulligan said YWAM had come a long way from its beginning in a small house in West End 26 years ago to providing medical services via its medical ship in PNG. “This growth really represents greater outcomes for the community,” Mr Mulligan said. “We would not be where we are today without the support of so many from the Townsville community. “

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15 Jun 2018 Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD Author: Tony Raggatt • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 16,484 • Page: 3 • Printed Size: 322.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,954 • Words: 233 • Item ID: 969542692

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CELEBRATION: Performing Arts Celebration group members Darren Raimo, Fane Vatanitawake and Daure Moses will perform at today’s YWAM Breakfast By The Sea. Picture: SHAE BEPLATE

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15 Jun 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Alister Thomson And Phil Bartsch • Section: General News Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 57 Printed Size: 464.00cm² • Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 2,960 Words: 447 • Item ID: 969496958 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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SHOPPING CENTRES TO LIFT RETAIL BONANZA

The strong run of retail property transactions on the Gold Coast looks set to continue with Surfers Paradise and Coolangatta sales close to locked in ALISTER THOMSON AND PHIL BARTSCH TWO big-ticket shopping centres are tipped to sell before the end of the financial year – ending a year-long run of strong investment activity in the Gold Coast retail sector. Sources said Soul Boardwalk on the Surfers Paradise beachfront may sell for between $75-$80 million before the end of the month, while agents working on a deal for The Strand at Coolangatta are also reportedly close to getting it over the finish line. It comes as research by Colliers International indicates the value of retail property sales this year may surpass the $300 million in assets sold on the Glitter Strip in 2017. In addition to The Strand and Soul, a number of shopping centres across the Gold Coast are currently on the market. The well-established Metro Market at Biggera Waters is being sold by owner Intrasia Oxley, which picked it up for $23.05 million in 2015. Investors are also showing a keen interest in the Miami One Shopping Centre, which is owned by Ham Bros, linked to Brisbane investor Justin Ham, who bought the asset for $14.1 million in 2012. The up-market Capri on Via Roma shopping centre is also for sale. Capri on Via Roma was the brainchild of Sydney developer Simon Harvey and is a high-end waterfront shopping precinct with a fresh-produce market hall and more than 50 retail outlets. Created at a cost of $50 million, it comprises three, three-level buildings and required redevelopment of the 1960s Capri Commercial Centre, built by renowned mayor Bruce Small, and the creation of additional facilities.

Mr Harvey bought the property from the Small family for $20 million in 2006 and the centre was completed in October, 2014. It is being marketed by Stonebridge Property Group, the same agency that is handling the campaign for The Strand. Colliers’ retail investment services national director Stewart Gilchrist said there were four factors boosting the Gold Coast economy and driving demand for retail property – significant investment infrastructure projects; improved tourism numbers; strong migration and population growth; and strong employment growth. “New planned residential estates, particularly along the northern Gold Coast corridor, will result in future demand for small neighbourhood and convenience centres to service the growing local catchment area,” Mr Gilchrist said. “Major multimillion-dollar refurbishments to major town centres such as Robina, Pacific Fair, and Chevron Renaissance is testament to owners’ optimistic outlook for the retail sector on the Gold Coast.”


15 Jun 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Alister Thomson And Phil Bartsch • Section: General News Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 57 Printed Size: 464.00cm² • Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 2,960 Words: 447 • Item ID: 969496958 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Negotiations on the sale of The Strand at Coolangatta are expected to wrap up before the end of the financial year.

Picture: SUPPLIED


15 Jun 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Kirstin Payne • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 11 • Printed Size: 323.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 2,060 • Words: 319 • Item ID: 969491778

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Jones courts ‘wreck’ talks

KIRSTIN PAYNE

kirsten.payne@news.com.au

STATE Tourism Minister Kate Jones says she has the money for a dive site on the Gold Coast, but the onus is on federal MP Stuart Robert to deliver it for $10 million. While no specific money was allocted for a dive wreck in the $46 million Regional Tourism Infrastructure fund in Tuesday’s State Budget, Ms Jones said: “We have the funds there, but we need to know how much this will cost. Let’s be frank, it is a Federal Government asset.” The Bulletin this month revealed the State Government had withdrawn its in-

terest from bidding for three possible frigates to sink on the Gold Coast. Ms Jones said obtaining the HMAS Darwin would have cost $30 million. Mr Robert, the Member for Fadden, said the figure was “absolute crap” and could be done for $10 million. Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate then called on the State Government to cover just $8 million of total cost. “My position is, I am all for a dive site and this is what the Tourism Infrastructure Fund was established for, but I have not been contacted by Stuart Robert on the proposal that he said would cost $10 million,” Ms Jones said.

“I am yet to even have a conversation with the man.” Ms Jones said yesterday she could not detail the funds for the site specifically in the 2018-19 Budget as the price of the purchase had not been established, nor had she seen a case study. The Minister said in previous dive site bids, the Federal members worked hard to convince the State Government to release the vessels for a bargain price. “I am more than happy to hear from the Federal Gold Coast MPs like Minister Ciobo and Stuart Robert to hear how much the Federal Government can provide it for,” she said.

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15 Jun 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Kirstin Payne • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 11 • Printed Size: 323.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 2,060 • Words: 319 • Item ID: 969491778

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Tourism Industry Development Minister Kate Jones is all ears for a Gold Coast dive wreck.

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15 Jun 2018 Australian Financial Review, Australia Author: Simon Evans • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 44,635 • Page: 11 • Printed Size: 145.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 2,933 • Words: 364 Item ID: 969406471 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Rich Lister backs $165m airport expansion Simon Evans Big superannuation funds including UniSuper and Statewide Super, together with Financial Review Rich Lister Stan Perron, are backing a $165 million expansion of Adelaide Airport's main terminal. The project involves the relocation of the Virgin Australia lounge, an 80 per cent expansion of the retail footprint and new facilities for international arrivals and departures. ASX-listed Watpac has won the construction contract for the project, which is earmarked to be finished in 2021. Adelaide Airport managing director Mark Young said on Thurs-

day that robust growth in passenger numbers since the airport was upgraded in 2005 had prompted the expansion. International passenger numbers had almost tripled since 2005 and total passenger numbers had risen by close to 50 per cent since that time. Qatar Airways, which began international flights into Adelaide in mid-2016, and China Southern Airlines, which started flights from China in late 2016, are among the international airlines which have helped lift the passenger numbers. He said there was still enough gate capacity to meet forecast growth in the number of flights, but the airport was bump-

ing up against capacity within the terminal. Adelaide Airport was acquired by a consortium of long-term investors in 1998. UniSuper holds a 49 per cent stake, Statewide Super owns 19.5 per cent, Colonial First State has 15.3 per cent and Industry Funds Management controls a 12.8 per cent stake. Perron Investments, the commercial property and investment operations of Western Australian businessman Stan Perron and his family, own a 3.4 per cent stake. Mr Perron is listed at No. 15 in the latest Financial Review Rich List, with an estimated personal wealth of $3.99 billion.

The announcement of the $165 million expansion comes as construction of a $50 million 165-room Atura hotel on the airport grounds nears completion. The hotel, operated by ASX-listed Event Hospitality and Entertainment, is due to open in September. Adelaide Airport chairman Rob Chapman said having a stable ownership structure with investors with very long-term horizons was a big positive. "Having a stable shareholder base that has a long-term vision of the asset is a significant benefit They can look forward and peer over the horizon," Mr Chapman said after the plans were unveiled.


15 Jun 2018 Australian Financial Review, Australia Author: Ben Potter • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 44,635 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 396.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,010 • Words: 754 Item ID: 969402819 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Report warns of emissions handball Ben Potter The Turnbull government's low-ball carbon reduction target for the electricity sector will force huge emissions cuts on manufacturers, farmers, truckers and airlines to make up the shortfall, and; fuel, food and plane tickets will cost more, a report says. The report by Environment Victoria says manufacturers, farmers, truckers and airlines will have to reduce their aggregate carbon dioxide emissions by 700 million to 900 million tonnes in the latter five to seven years of the decade to 2030 if the government doesn't set a bigger target for the electricity sector. "In sectors where emissions are growing fastest, this will be a particular challenge," Environment Victoria climate and energy adviser Erwin Jackson said. 'This includes trucking, domestic aviation, coal and gas mining, fertiliser manufacturing and the grazing industries. Failing to unlock cheap renewable energy options just means moreexpensive fuel bills, plane tickets and food." The report says the electricity sector can cut its emissions faster and more cheaply than manufacturing, fanning and transport, and "there is currently no plan to achieve meaningful emissions cuts in any of these sectors". To illustrate the scale of the challenge, 700 million to 900 million tonnes is two to three times the combined annual emissions for these industries. It shows how the government's policy of asking the power sector to contribute only its pro-rata share to Australia's Paris commitment to reduce its CO2 equivalent emissions 26 per cent from 2005 levels - and leaving action on the other sectors for later consideration - is only part of the story about the pressure the nation will face to cut emissions in the 2020s. Delaying action - as some backbenchers have urged - only makes firms' predicament worse by exposing them to steeper emissions cuts later because the emissions cuts pledged under Tony Abbott's prime ministership at Paris in 2015 are cumulative meaning an aggregate "carbon budget"

must be met - rather than a simple endpoint target For example, if the government were to delay more-decisive action to accelerate emissions reduction targets for the power sector by five years, the task for manufacturing, farming and transport increases to 900 million tonnes of emissions reductions. That means those sectors would have to cut their emissions about 15 per cent a year from 2025 to 2030 - or halve them during the five years, the report, Ensuring the National Energy Guarantee can unlock renewable energy ambition, says. Earlier action would halve the required rate of emissions cuts but during seven to eight years. "If emissions reductions are delayed or 'back ended' under a 'go slow" approach, then more disruptive action will be required later. If the target is initially less ambitious than a linear reduction from 2020, then other sectors will need to do more to meet Australia's overall national target, making achievement of our national target more difficult and expensive," it says. Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg defended the government's emissions target in April, saying the sharp improvement in Australia's emissions trajectory towards the 2020 goal of a 5 per cent cut showed how time and technology can improve the carbon outlook for the nation. The government hasn't issued modelling of the carbon trajectory, but the carbon budget approach is standard practice dating back to the Howard government Using past practice as a guide, Environment Victoria's Mr Jackson estimated Australia's carbon budget at 4800MT of CO2-equivalent gases from 2021 to 2030. This is similar to the government's official carbon budget estimate of 4788MT in Australia's emissions projections 2017, an annual publication of the Department of the Environment and Energy. On projections with a 26 per cent emissions cut target the electricity sector will consume a third of the carbon budget - equivalent to its present share of emission - even though it has easier and cheaper ways to cut emissions. The report says it would be less dis-

ruptive to embrace a more ambitious target up front - Labor will set a target of 45 per cent emissions cuts by 2030 if it wins the next election - and allow the target to be changed at three years' notice rather than five years as the government proposes. Assistance to energy-intensive tradeexposed firms should also be reduced over time so that they do their bit and made transparent and subjected to cost-benefit analysis for the rest of the community.


15 Jun 2018 Australian Financial Review, Australia Author: Ben Potter • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 44,635 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 396.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,010 • Words: 754 Item ID: 969402819 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Manufacturers, farmers, truckers pay for overshoot Impact of a five-year delay in reducing the electricity sectors emissions (million tonnes of CO2e)

Implications of different notice periods to change emissions target (million tonnes of CO2e) ; 200

• Emissions overshoot •Other sectors S Electricity sector'" 26% carbon budget 7.0

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SOURCE: ENVIRONMENT VICTORIA


15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Matthew Denholm • Section: Aviation • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 28 • Printed Size: 164.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,314 • Words: 437 Item ID: 969331743 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Melbourne called on to help vacant Launceston tower Launceston air traffic control tower was recently unmanned for four hours during the busy morning period, forcing contingency arrangements to be adopted, after a controller called in sick. Airservices Australia confirmed the incident on April 29 left the tower vacant from 5.50am to 9.50am, a time when most of the main passenger jet morning arrivals and departures occur. Radar controllers based in Melbourne had to provide a covering service for Launceston usually only applied during the quiet overnight period. Some controllers feel it is inappropriate for Melbourne to provide this cover during busy day periods because its service does not generally extend below about 7000 feet and cannot “see” planes at all below about 1500 feet. Civil Air, the air traffic controller’s union, said the morning closure of the tower

would have required a temporary reclassification of the airspace, with greater inherent risks. “It’s not a good thing and it would have been reviewed by Airservices,” said Civil Air president and controller Tom McRobert. “It’s a contingency measure, a last resort. “The last thing you want to be doing is changing airspace and reclassifying it. It puts a lot of things at risk for the pilots and the controllers because they are doing something that’s not normal.” Normally Launceston air traffic control tower is manned from 5.50am — in time for the major passenger jet morning arrivals and departures — until 10.10pm. Between 10.10pm and 5.50am there is little air traffic and a Melbourne-based en route radar controller takes over responsibility for managing Tasmanian airspace. Airservices insisted the contingency adopted on April 29, of maintaining the night-time service through a Melbourne-based controller until another tower controller

could start at 9.50am, was safe. “On 29 April in Launceston … the air traffic controller rostered to open the air traffic control tower at 5.30am called in sick shortly before the shift commenced,” said an Airservices spokeswoman. “The tower remained closed until an alternative staff member was available from 9.50am. During that time, services continued to be safely provided from Melbourne Centre, in the same way they are when the tower is closed (overnight). There was no breach of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority regulations.” Mr McRobert said the morning tower closure would have required pilots of planes arriving and departing around the same time to talk to each other to ensure they were adequately separated. “The very last bit in what’s called the circuit at Launceston, if there were two aircraft — (coming) in and out — they would have had to have discussed which runway who is going to, which taxiways, and so on,” he said. MATTHEW DENHOLM


15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Matthew Denholm • Section: Aviation • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 28 • Printed Size: 399.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,063 • Words: 603 Item ID: 969331741 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Antarctic flights frozen out of plans MATTHEW DENHOLM

TASMANIA CORRESPONDENT

Airservices failed to cater for Antarctic flights when it introduced new flight paths for Hobart Airport, forcing aircraft to waste time and fuel needlessly flying well north of the city. The airspace regulator’s failure to provide for aircraft arriving from or departing for Hobart’s south when new flight paths were introduced in September last year created headaches for Antarctic Airbus A319 operator Skytraders. Company executive director Terry Vickers said the initial decision to force departing and arriving Antarctic flights to head well north of Hobart to comply with new fixed flight paths wasted time and fuel. “It’s just crazy stuff — it adds 10 to 15 minutes to a flight — $3000 to $4000,” Mr Vickers said. “There was never any real logic to it. “We had to go up to the north just to come back to the airport, even though we could do a visual approach coming from the south and not have to worry about any of the flight paths.” Airservices initially failed to make provision for the Antarctic flights — used to ferry supplies and personnel to and from Australia’s Wilkins ice runway, near Casey Station — despite the service operating for more than a decade. Mr Vickers said after discussions with Airservices, a meeting had been held and alternatives agreed, and he did not expect any further problems ahead of the next Antarctic flight season. Airservices confirmed “alternative options” were now available for Antarctic flights, which are expected to increase with plans for a new paved runway near Davis Station and interest from tourist flight operators. However, the initial failure to consider the issue is seen by critics as further evidence of bungled

implementation of the controversial flight paths. The Weekend Australian recently revealed a dramatic spike in safety breaches in the skies north of Hobart directly linked to the new flight paths, known as Standard Instrument Departure and Standard Arrival Route. This included at least two “loss of separation” incidents, in which Airbus A320 and A321 passenger jets came closer to one another than permitted under safety rules, typically 305m. An Airservices map shows these incidents are focused on an area where the SID and STAR intersect near Richmond, north of Hobart. Airservices says the new standardised flight paths improve safety and efficiency, but in an internal report it conceded these benefits had been undermined by implementation failings. Virgin pilots were the latest to call for changes to the Hobart flight paths. The Virgin Independent Pilots Association said making better use of radar-type surveillance to guide planes to low levels at Hobart airport would address many of the concerns. “Specifically (it would allow), increased flexibility for air traffic controllers and the ability to provide more direct routing away from noise-sensitive neighbourhoods in periods of favourable weather,” VIPA said in a statement. The new flight paths, currently under review, have outraged residents of once-quiet rural towns suddenly bearing the brunt of aircraft noise from 60 flights a day. Airlines have complained about the extra fuel required, while internal reports reveal some aircraft lack the equipment or speed required to comply with the new flight paths. Airservices has promised to consider changes to provide “short term” noise relief to impacted communities, such as Dunal-

ley, Murdunna and Boomer Bay. Residents questioned why their rural lifestyles had been shattered for what appeared to be a less safe and less efficient system. “We want to regain our peace and quiet — that’s why we live here,” said Murdunna resident Rachel Dean.


15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Matthew Denholm • Section: Aviation • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 28 • Printed Size: 399.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,063 • Words: 603 Item ID: 969331741 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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MATTHEW DENHOLM

An Airbus A319, at Wilkins ice runway, faced a fuel-burning detour when returning to Hobart from the frozen continent


15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Richard Tobiano • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 3 • Printed Size: 170.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,435 • Words: 446 Item ID: 969330937 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Turbulence nothing to fear if passengers wear their seatbelts RICHARD TOBIANO QANTAS CHIEF PILOT

Recent reports on QF94 show that turbulence is probably one of the most misunderstood elements of flying. For pilots, it’s an everyday part of our job and nothing to fear. Aircraft are engineered to deal with levels of turbulence well beyond anything they would realistically encounter. But we’re conscious that turbulence can put passengers on edge — especially if it’s a sudden jolt. And because it is misunderstood, those jolts can be wrongly perceived as a “plunge” or “massive drop”. It helps to understand why turbulence happens. Some causes are sudden changes in wind direction and speed, particularly as aircraft climb to their cruising altitude; turbulence associated with large, dense clouds; and wake turbulence, which QF94 experienced this week over the Pacific Ocean. Large jet aircraft (like the A380 or 747) disturb the air behind them, similar to the wash from a boat. It’s uncommon but that disturbed air can cause bumps for nearby aircraft, even if they are a significant distance away. QF94 was about 37km behind and 1000 feet below the other Qantas A380 when it encountered some disturbed air. The two aircraft were well aware of each other, but wake turbulence can be hard to predict and often arrives as a sudden jolt when you’re flying smoothly. The turbulence lasted for about 10 seconds and caused

the nose of the aircraft to pitch up slightly. The “plunge” that a few passengers have described was actually the A380 immediately returning itself to a steady state. Aircraft are designed to fly level and if turbulence disturbs that, the aircraft will adjust — including going back to the right altitude. QF94 performed exactly as it was supposed to in this scenario and so did its highly trained crew. The total movement in pitch was about three degrees. The captain knew how this would have felt to passengers, so made an announcement to explain what happened and why it wasn’t cause for concern. The rest of the flight was uneventful. Serious aviation incidents need to be reported to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau within 24 hours. Nonserious events like QF94 need to be reported within 72 hours and Qantas did that — one of hundreds of reports we and other airlines make each year that help make our aviation sector one of the world’s safest. A lot of effort goes into avoiding turbulence. Detailed weather reports, state-of-the-art weather radars, talking to other pilots flying along the same corridors and spacing between aircraft all help to smooth things out. Turbulence can be unexpected and uncomfortable, but provided you have your seatbelt on whenever you’re seated, it’s not something to fear.

Captain Richard Tobiano regularly flies the A380.

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15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Andrew Burrell • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 3 • Printed Size: 288.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 5,820 • Words: 516 Item ID: 969330935 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Qantas hails safety in jet wake drama ANDREW BURRELL

Qantas has strongly rejected suggestions that one of its A380 jets nosedived during a mid-air incident this week despite terrified passengers reporting they experienced a 10-second free-fall that felt like being on a rollercoaster. The Australian revealed yesterday that the scare above the Pacific Ocean, about two hours into a QF94 flight from Los Angeles to Melbourne, is believed to have been caused by “wake turbulence” generated by another A380. The second jet, QF12, was flying from Los Angeles to Sydney and took off two minutes before QF94 It is the latest in a string of midair scares potentially linked to the wake turbulence of the giant A380s. Qantas said yesterday that QF94 was about 37km behind and 1000 feet below QF12 when it encountered disturbed air. “It may have felt bumpy for the passengers, but the data shows the total up-and-down aircraft nose movement was three degrees,” chief pilot Richard Tobiano said. “The reports of a nosedive or a plunge are wrong.” Former commercial airline pilot Byron Bailey questioned why the pilot of QF94 was only 1000 feet below the other A380 and called for better aircraft separation standards. “One thousand feet is asking for trouble,” he said yesterday. But Qantas said the 1000-foot limitation reflected a global air traffic control standard for aircraft flying in the same direction and in the same corridor. “It’s not a decision made by (Qantas),” a spokesman said. “These are the rules that air traffic controllers manage to and apply to all airlines.” The spokesman said the two aircraft were significantly in excess of the required standard because they were also 37km apart.

The editor-in-chief of the Airline Ratings website, Geoffrey Thomas, described it as a “freak event” that was likely caused by “very still air”. Among the passengers on QF94 was Nine Network presenter Eddie McGuire, who said yesterday the drop seemed to last about 10 seconds. “For about 10 seconds there was a drop, it did have that feel of, you know, when you just go over the top of the rollercoaster, you just get a little bit of that feeling,” McGuire told the Today show. “It just had that uneasy feeling as it pitched forward and to the side,” he said. “The most reassuring part about the whole thing was the Qantas pilot came on immediately and said we’ve gone up the back of the turbulence of the Sydney plane that had been ahead of us.” Fellow QF94 passenger Janelle Wilson said the plane entered a “free-fall nosedive … a direct decline towards the ocean” for about 10 seconds. “We were all lifted from our seats immediately and we were in a free-fall. It was an absolute sense of losing your stomach,’’ she said. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau said Qantas had reported the occurrence. “The operator submitted a notification this morning, which is within the required 72-hour time frame for routinely reportable matters,” it said. “The information contained in the notification has been reviewed and the ATSB has determined that it will not be investigating.” AVIATION P28

Wake turbulence suspected in Qantas jet’s sudden dive EXCLUSIVE MATTHEW DENHOLM

A “terrifying” mid-air incident involving two Qantas A380 jets

A380, QF12, which was flying from Los Angeles to Sydney and took off two minutes before QF94. Qantas did not report the incident to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, but after questions from The Australian the safety

hours after we left LA and all of a sudden the plane went through a violent turbulence and then completely up-ended and we were nosediving,” Ms Wilson told The Australian yesterday. “We were all lifted from our

hands and just waited but thought with absolute certainty that we were going to crash. It was terrifying.” Flight track details show QF12 took off from Los Angeles at 11 27pm Sunday night (US time) 57

linked to the wake turbulence of the giant A380s. Aviation consultant and experienced pilot Byron Bailey last night called for a review of standards that are meant to safely separate A380s from other aircraft

How The Australian broke the story yesterday

mine whether any further action is required.” Qantas suggested there had been no breach of separation standards, as the two A380 aircraft were understood to be apart by 20 nautical miles and 1000 feet in


15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Andrew Kidd Fraser • Section: Special Report • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 4 • Printed Size: 588.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 11,883 • Words: 842 Item ID: 967481488 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Channelling a supercomputer A series of sensors placed along the major shipping channel out of the Port of Brisbane is giving pilots and port operators more knowledge about shipping conditions, which means less dredging despite an increase in the size of ships visiting. The ships’ passage to the Port of Brisbane is 90 kilometres long, running from Caloundra on the Sunshine Coast through Moreton Bay to the Port of Brisbane. This is unlike the Sydney Harbour, which is a deepwater port and requires almost no dredging or maintenance as ships sail right through Sydney Heads and up the harbour with no risk of scraping the bottom, The Brisbane passage zigs and zags through Moreton Bay to avoid shallow water and ships need to keep to a narrow route to get them to the port, at the mouth of the Brisbane River and right beside Brisbane Airport. The tightness of this route is proving a big challenge as the size of the ships plying international routes increases. Most of the ships visiting Brisbane Port are “Panamax” size or about 4500 TEUs (containers of 20-foot equivalent size, or 6.1 metres, per unit), but in recent years there has been the emergence in the northern hemisphere of the “post-Panamax” vessel which can have as many as 20,000 TEUs. This increase in size means a deeper draft on the ships as they lie in the water, and in most ports around the world, the general response to the problem is to dredge the shipping channel deeper. A full dredging program at the Port of Brisbane would cost about $100 million, but such a program could also risk community opposition and potential damage to the environment. Consequently, at Brisbane, instead of undertaking an expensive dredging program, the emphasis

mation about conditions in the shipping channel so that it is run more efficiently. The sensors in Moreton Bay, either on fixed posts or more often, wave buoys which move up and down with the tide, measure elements such as wind speed, tidal level, waves and currents. This information is fed into a supercomputer based in Canberra which makes literally millions of calculations a second based on elements such as channel depth, weather conditions and the size and configuration of a vessel, to give the most accurate and safe sailing windows for larger ships. In the case of Brisbane, if there is a cyclone in the north of Queensland, as happens, then tides and winds are affected south to Brisbane. Consequently the scope for variation in conditions is higher in Brisbane than other major Australian ports. Yet since the system, the formal title of which is the Nonlinear Channel Optimisation Simulator system, or NCOS Online, was introduced in August last year, Brisbane has hosted more large ships with less risk. Under the “under-the-keel” system used in most ports, harbour masters are loath to allow ships into port with a draft of more than 13m into port. But at Brisbane, armed with the information from the “smart” shipping channel interpreted by the computer, the number of deep-drafted bulk carriers above 14m calling at the port has tripled, and deep-draft containers ships above 13m has more than doubled. Since NCOS Online was introduced, Brisbane has also hosted a 9500 TEU vessel, the Susan Maersk. Port of Brisbane chief executive Roy Cummins says the system has been a “game-changer” for the port, as it increased the port’s capacity to handle larger ships without compromising safety. “No longer do we assess weath-

has been on getting more infor-

er conditions and ship movements

ANDREW KIDD FRASER

in isolation,’’ Cummins says. “By modelling both of them together, and specifically how ships move when impacted by weather conditions, we can increase a ship’s port entry window, delivering our customers flexibility and value. “This is a competitive advantage for us because it means bigger and deeper vessels can visit, but it’s also an environmental advantage because it means we don’t have to immediately dredge our channel deeper,” he says. “Innovation can be a buzzword, but to us it’s simple. We want to drive increased value to our customers, and this project delivers that in spades.” Port officials say the system also provides a better platform for communication between ships, the port, and other stakeholders, and this in turn will assist with overall management and better identify bottlenecks and potential capacity restraints. While the system benefits Brisbane, it also helps Sydney and Melbourne as many ships coming to Australia do an “eastcoast run”, and call at all three ports. “The Port of Brisbane is determined to never be the limiting factor for shipping on Australia’s east coast, and NCOS Online helps us achieve that,” Cummins says. The system has been recognised with the port industry, having recently won the Smart Infrastructure Project Award at the Infrastructure Partnerships Australia’s 2018 National Infrastructure Awards, while last year it received the Innovative Support Services award at the Dredging and Port Construction Innovation Awards, held in London.


15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Andrew Kidd Fraser • Section: Special Report • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 4 • Printed Size: 588.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 11,883 • Words: 842 Item ID: 967481488 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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PETER WALLIS

Port of Brisbane chief executive Roy Cummins, above, says bigger and deeper ships can now visit the Queensland capital


15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Chris Ray • Section: Special Report • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 8 • Printed Size: 226.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 4,567 • Words: 612 Item ID: 967479691 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Disposal of risky fire foam quickens CHRIS RAY

Ports are moving to dispose of firefighting foam containing the suspected carcinogen PFOS in advance of a federal government decision on when and how to phase it out. Ports in Queensland and South Australia have disposed of all foams containing PFOS and an associated compound, PFOA, or are doing so, in line with state phase-outs that started in 2016, Ports Australia says. In other states, the ports of Newcastle, Fremantle and Esperance have “moved towards world-leading practices” and no longer hold or use foams containing PFOS and PFOA, according to the peak body. Ports continue to hold about 70,000 to 80,000 litres of such foam excluding any stocks remaining in Queensland and South Australia, it says. In a submission to the federal Department of Environment and Energy, Ports Australia urges the Australian government to ratify the Stockholm Convention amendment on PFOS and cease all non-essential uses. “This action cannot come soon enough given the significant health and environmental impacts related to the use of firefighting foam that have been brought to light,” it says. The submission is in response to the department’s regulation impact statement canvassing industry views on a national phaseout of PFOS, which would follow Australia’s ratification of the amendment. PFOS and PFOA belong to a group of widespread and increasingly problematic chemicals known as per- and poly-fluoroal-

kyl substances, or PFAS, used in common household products such as non-stick cookware, food packaging and some types of firefighting foam. Evidence increasingly links PFAS compounds with cancers, liver and thyroid disease, immune suppression, reduced birth weight, higher cholesterol and other conditions. Health experts including the Royal Australasian College of Physicians have slammed Australia’s failure to join 171 other countries in ratifying the listing of PFOS on the Stockholm Convention in 2009. The Ports Australia submission notes the department’s view that evidence is still evolving regarding environmental and health impacts but adds there is “significant and clear evidence on the devastating impact to animals … given that this evidence includes impact on marine life, which potentially is being consumed by humans, there is significant need for action”. It also notes “high-profile anecdotal evidence on the impact on human health” stemming from PFAS contamination of residential land around defence airports at Williamtown in NSW and Oakey in Queensland. Ports Australia policy director Ashween Sinha says Queensland’s July 2016 decision to become the first state to phase out firefighting foams containing PFAS prompted ports in all states to start eliminating their own stocks. “The commonwealth could have looked at this a little earlier, there’s no doubt about it,” Sinha says. He says destruction of PFOS foam is being held up because

only one incinerator in Queensland is certified to dispose of it. “A lot of people are waiting in line to get rid of this product and the cost of moving it to Queensland for incineration is very high.” The Ports Australia submission calls on the federal government to subsidise use of the incinerator to lower the risk of foam being accidentally discharged during long storage. PFAS contamination of water and soil in and around port facilities may prove to be a far bigger problem than disposal of stocks. The Port of Townsville reported it found “elevated” PFAS levels in groundwater in May and said it was testing the bores of nearby residents. Chief executive Ranee Crosby says the port is keeping residents “closely informed” but did not respond to questions about the level of contamination and homes being tested. Gladstone Ports Corporation also says it found “elevated” concentrations of PFAS in groundwater at Gladstone’s Port Central and the Port of Bundaberg while contamination at its third port, Rockhampton, does not exceed “national guidelines”.


15 Jun 2018 Northern Territory News, Darwin Author: Ashley Manicaros • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Capital City Daily • Audience : 11,279 • Page: 18 Printed Size: 106.00cm² • Market: NT • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 599 • Words: 190 Item ID: 969373268 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Change at the top for Jemena ASHLEY MANICAROS THE managing director of Jemena, constructors of the 622km Northern Gas Pipeline between Tennant Creek and Mt Isa, has announced his retirement. Paul Adams was pivotal in securing Jemena’s bid to build the $800 million pipeline connecting Northern Territory gas to the eastern seaboard. The pipeline is expected to be completed at the end of this year. His departure ends a 10year stint in the role. Mr Adams will continue as managing director of Jemena until mid-October. He will stay

Paul Adams

on as a strategic adviser to assist former Horizon Power chief executive in Western Australia Frank Tudor transition into the role. SGSPAA chairman, Ruan Qiantu, said

Mr Adams had ensured Jemena was well positioned moving forward in the energy sector. “Paul is an extraordinary, thoughtful, and passionate leader whose contribution as Jemena’s founding MD has been pivotal in ensuring the organisation has effectively navigated an extremely challenging period of change across the energy sector,” Mr Ruan said. “As a result of Paul’s efforts, Jemena is extremely well placed to contribute to Australia’s energy future. “We are excited to appoint Frank as the new managing director of Jemena.”


15 Jun 2018 Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD Author: Victoria Nugent • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 16,484 • Page: 7 • Printed Size: 251.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,523 • Words: 379 • Item ID: 969542670

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Dealer’s rough landing VICTORIA NUGENT victoria.nugent@news.com.au

A FATHER of three who flew drugs from Sydney to Townsville was caught after police received a tip-off he would be arriving at the Townsville Airport, a court has heard. Paul Jacob Feltham De Jong, 33, faced Townsville District Court yesterday to be sentenced for trafficking dangerous drugs, possessing more than 2g of methylamphetamine and possessing a mobile phone used in connection with a crime. Crown prosecutor Andrew Walklate said De Jong was arrested at Townsville Airport on August 20, 2017 after police received intelligence that he would arrive on a flight from Sydney. “He attempted futilely to run from the police and when he was taken to the secure room to be searched he removed some tissue paper … that tissue paper contained a clip seal plastic bag with some 19.703g of pure weight meth,” he said. “It was 75 per cent pure.”

Mr Walklate said the drugs had a wholesale price of between $7000 to $10,000, but if sold in point, or 0.1g amounts, they could be worth up to $27,000. The court heard a diary found on De Jong by police revealed movements totalling $40,600 in cash and 17.5g of meth over a 19-day period. Mr Walklate told the court that four weeks before the trafficking period De Jong had been released on parole in New South Wales for serious drug offending. Defence barrister Claire Grant told the court De Jong, who grew up in Townsville, began using methylamphetamine in 2015 after experiencing a traumatic family situation. “He instructs that he began drinking alcohol heavily … one thing led to another and he found himself battling with the use of methylamphetamine,” she said. “First, it was social use and then like many he became addicted to the substance.” De Jong should be sentenced to four years’ jail, but Justice David North imposed a fiveyear sentence. The court heard De Jong

had already served 298 days in pre-sentence custody. Justice David North said by committing the offence while on parole De Jong suggested he had “scant if any regard for the law and requirements of the law”. De Jong will be eligible for parole on February 20, 2019, after he has served 18 months in custody.

Paul Jacob Feltham De Jong.


15 Jun 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Section: General News • Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional Audience : 21,468 • Page: 57 • Printed Size: 67.00cm² • Market: QLD Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 427 • Words: 166 • Item ID: 969496919

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AIRPORT LEASING TAKES FLIGHT THE ability to move from desk to plane in 30 minutes has enticed tech entrepreneur Mark Winter to move his expanding business to Gold Coast Airport’s commercial precinct. Mr Winter, who heads up technology distribution and training company inTechnology Distribution, has taken a five-year lease on a 309sq m space in Airport Central. The deal was struck by Brad Duncalfe, of Ray White Commercial Burleigh Heads. Mr Winter said his clients could comfortably travel up from Sydney or Melbourne for a business meeting and be on-site at inTechnology a few minutes later, with no car ride needed. “We’re a global technology distributor, so our clients and staff are frequent travellers,” Mr Winter said. “From that perspective the airport location was a no-brainer.” InTechnology’s 15-strong team is set to more than double in the next 12 months, prompting the move from the company’s current 130sq m warehouse and office space in Currumbin’s industrial estate. Leasing rates at Airport Central range from $335sq m to $400sq m.

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15 Jun 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Section: Letters • Article type : Letter • Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 Page: 32 • Printed Size: 272.00cm² • Market: QLD • Country: Australia ASR: AUD 1,735 • Words: 650 • Item ID: 969493901

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Mayor right to push projects that nurture tourist industry JUST when some people in our community were, for some reason, wondering why we’d elected Tom Tate as our Mayor he has written a column in the Gold Coast Bulletin and reminded us all why 73% of voters elected him (‘We can’t let the NIMBYs set the tone’, GCB. 13/5/18). He’s probably just lost a few votes with environmentalists and retirees but at least we know where he stands! Sure Tom has gotten a few minor things wrong along the way but his vision and direction is very much on the right track. We’ve had a mix of good, bad and apathetic leaders over the decades I have lived on the Gold Coast but Tom is easily the best Mayor we have had in the last 30 years or so. We have a diversity of industry and commerce in our City but let’s not forget that our cornerstone has always been and remains tourism. We have brilliant beaches and waterways as well as world heritage listed rainforests, theme parks, top notch shopping centres first class restaurants and nightclubs. We will always be a tourist mecca but we need to nurture and develop our tourist industry. A cruise ship terminal (accessed without entering the Seaway) is a no-brainer. We want thousands of tourists hopping off cruise ships every week spending money here ..... and who wants to cruise into the Bris-Vegas river with scenic views of old wharves and industrial buildings en route to wonderful attractions (like .... um..... err..... the Story Bridge and Mt Cootha?) when the Gold Coast is so close anyway! A hinterland cableway should get a quick nod of approval too. Anyone who’s been on the Skyrail in Cairns would know it has negli-

gible impact on the environment, attracts a lot of customers and educates a lot of urbanites about the environment. Another casino? Absolutely! Bring it on – but not on The Spit or in sleepy Southport please! It needs the right location. Why reinvent the wheel? Around the world casinos work better clustered together like in Macau and Las Vegas. Let’s put it anywhere between Cavill Ave and Hooker Blvde. Why stop at two casinos though? Light and heavy rail linked to the airport is similarly a must but let’s not forget the road network either. The continued upgrading of the M1 and the construction of a new M2 is essential. The recent “band aid” upgrading of Bundall and Bermuda Roads was of some help but it’s high time we blew the dust of the plans for the long mooted additional bridge crossings over the Nerang River through Sorrento and Benowa. All of this development needs to be undertaken with appropriate sensitivity and concern for all residents and our environment. We understand the surfing community want minimal disruption to their surfing breaks and that environmentalists play an important role too. We need jobs, industry and prosperity though. We want jobs and I want my kids to have jobs and careers on the Gold Coast and we need sustainable development and new attractions to facilitate this. All these competing interests need to be balanced but in the end we need leaders with vision and commitment for our city who are prepared to actually make decisions and move forward. After all that is why we have a Council.

Tom Tate and his more enlightened members of the Council have that. To our avid environmentalists and retirees who don’t want to see anything change remember that you have options. If you want to live a in a region where nothing gets done because of vocal minority interests and warring Councillors and where infrastructure, services and development do not even remotely keep pace with demand you need only move just south of the border and pretend it’s still 1972. (Careful though as you can’t even get public hospitals built down there without protests!) TONY LENAN, CLEAR ISLAND WATERS


15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Robert Wall • Section: Business News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 30 • Printed Size: 123.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 2,486 • Words: 313 Item ID: 969345046 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Aircraft engine maker cuts jobs ROBERT WALL AVIATION

British aircraft engine maker Rolls-Royce Holdings, facing investor pressure to boost competitiveness, said it would shed 4600 jobs even as it grapples with mounting problems with an engine powering Boeing 787 Dreamliners. The cuts announced last night, which represent 8.4 per cent of the company’s 55,000 workforce, will be implemented over the next 24 months, the company said. The job cuts are Rolls-Royce’s largest since October 2001 when the company shed 5000 jobs in response to a downturn in the global economy after the September 2001 terrorist attacks in the US The move is the latest by chief executive Warren East to improve profitability at RollsRoyce, which lags its US rivals such as General Electric. The effort has been beset by setbacks, including faster wear-and-tear on components used on different engine models, including those used on some Dreamliner longhaul jets and others powering Airbus SE A380 superjumbos. Rolls-Royce said it would incur £500 million ($880m) in costs associated with the staff reductions through 2020. Annual savings by the end of the program should reach £400m, it said. Rolls-Royce, no longer affiliated with the luxury car maker, has previously announced thousands of job cuts and reduced its dividend after profit slumped. US activist investor ValueAct Capital Management became its largest shareholder in 2015 and a representative joined the board in 2016. An agreement with the

company to refrain from openly criticising Rolls-Royce’s strategy expired this year. Rolls-Royce has said it is prepared to sell its marine unit, which has been struggling, and earlier this month completed the sale of its fuel injector business to Woodward. Activist investors have already driven big changes at US industrial giants such as GE, where Trian Fund Management has pushed for a revamp of operations. Last year, Honeywell International said it would spin off its home and transportation businesses, winning over activist investor Third Point. DOW JONES NEWSWIRES

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15 Jun 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Annabel Hepworth • Section: Aviation • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 28 • Printed Size: 213.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 4,304 • Words: 430 Item ID: 969331715 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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ATSB vow to speed up probes EXCLUSIVE ANNABEL HEPWORTH AVIATION EDITOR

The nation’s air investigator says it expects to finish its complex investigations in a “timelier manner” after a program aimed at clearing a backlog of reports. The latest figures show the Australian Transport Safety Bureau expects to publish 30 per cent of complex investigations within 12 months in 2017-18, against a target of 90 per cent. ATSB chief commissioner Greg Hood said the ATSB was finishing complex investigations in an average of 16 months but was “actively working” to improve the timeliness. The “Back on Track” program, aimed at clearing a backlog of reports, had been “productive”. Some 30 investigations that were behind time were now finished, while a further five to eight were expected to be done by the end of the financial year. “Back on Track has required a diversion of significant resources away from our business as usual operations and therefore the percentage of complex investigation reports that have been completed remains around 30 per cent for this 2017-18,” Mr Hood said. “I remain confident that when the Back on Track program is completed and these diverted resources return to business as usual operations, the ATSB will be positioned to complete its investigation reports in a timelier

manner.” Mr Hood also pointed to other measures aimed at getting investigations completed more promptly, including moves to hire more transport safety investigators and be more selective in what it investigates. While the headcount had gone down by about 25 per cent since the ATSB became an independent statutory body in July 2009, a recent budget boost had enabled an extra 17 transport safety investigators to be recruited. “These investigators are currently being trained and a number have already had the opportunity to deploy to accident sites,” Mr Hood said. “The process of establishing investigator competencies generally takes 18 months to complete, so we anticipate that we will begin to see the benefits of these additional resources in the next financial year results.” As well, the ATSB would use its database to pinpoint cases with “the greatest potential for improving transport safety”. The ATSB had started 120 investigations this financial year, compared with 162 investigations in 2016-17. “There are diminished safety benefits from investigating occurrences where there are obvious contributing factors, such as unauthorised low-level flying or flying visually into poor weather. Instead, we are refocusing our efforts on educating pilots on the dangers of high-risk activity. We are also placing emphasis on addressing accidents and incidents

that recur through safety education.”

There are diminished safety benefits from investigating occurrences where there are obvious contributing factors. GREG HOOD, ATSB

15june2018  
15june2018