Issuu on Google+


' ,

CHILDREN'S BOOK COLLECTION LIBRARY OF THE

%


" Jack

made many

strokes at the Giant, but could not reach his body

on account of his great height." Jack the Giant Killer.


FAVOURITE

FAIRY TALES.

Illustrations.

EDINBURGH: GALL &

INGLIS, 6

LONDON

s

GEORGE STREET.

HOUL0IQK *

W RIG HT.


CONTENTS.

All BABA,

....

OR TBB FOHTY THIEfBt.

TUB BABES IK THI WOOD COOXBBBLLA, Oft THE LTTTLE GLAB34UFPBB, JACK AND TUB BEAK-STALK, . . . J AC*

THE GIANT KILLER, iir.n KIM s;ii>"r>,

.

.

.

a

40

.

78

.

w

LITTLE

PUHBDIBOOm

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Hi

BOBQT HOOD,

THE

THRa

1M

BEARS,

TOM THUMB. Wmi'imUTUM AXD

J04

.

.

HP CAt.

.

.

X

......

>

1


ALI BABA; 01.

THE FORTY THIEVER IK a town of Persia there lired two brothers, the sons of a poor

man

;

the one

Oassim and the other All Bab*

was named Cassim, the

elder,

married a wife with a considerable for-

tune,

and

lived

at his ease, in a

house, with plenty of servants

;

handsome

but the wife of

All Baba being as poor as himself, they dwelt in

a mean cottage in the suburbs of the

and he maintained in the city

his family

by

selling

city.

wood

which he had cut in a neighbouring

|0 One

day,

when Ali Baba was

in the forest,

and preparing to load his asses with the wood he had cot, he saw a troop of horsemen approaching him.

who

He had

often heard of robbers

infested that forest, and, in a great fright,


FAVOUKITE FAIEY TALES.

4

he hastily climbed a thick

tree,

near the foot

of a large rock, and hid himself

among

the

branches.

The horsemen soon galloped up where they could see

dismounted.

all

to the rock,

All Baba,

who

that passed without being seen,

all

counted forty of them, and he could not doubt

but

they were

countenances.

thieves by their ill-looking Each took a loaded portmanteau

from his horse and went towards the rock,

when he who seemed

to

be their captain

said,

"Open, Sesame!" and immediately a door opened in the rock in,

;

then

all

and the door shut of

the robbers passed

itself.

In a short

time the door --opened again, and the forty robbers came out, followed by their captain,

who

" said,

Shut, Sesame

instantly closed

;

and the

" !

when

troop,

horses, were presently out of

the door

mounting

their

sight.

All Baba remained in the tree a considerable time,

turn,

and seeing that the robbers did not rehe ventured down, and cautiously ap-

proaching the rock,

" said,

Open, Sesame

" /

Immediately the door flew open and Ali Baba


l

iriHM

arm.

my Btf*.


ALI BABA

OR,

;

THE FOBTY THUVE&

5

beheld with astonishment a spacious cavcm, very light, and

filled

Mlver coin,

with

all sorts

of provisions,

and heaps of gold and which these robbers had taken from

merchandise, rich

merchants and

stuffs,

Ali Baba then went

travellers.

and having brought them the rock, went into the cave, and took as

in search of his asses,

to

many bags of gold

coin as they could cany,

on their backs, covering them carefully with loose fagots,

forgetting to say, "Shut,

and afterwards (not

Sesame/") he drove

the asses back to the city as fast as he could.

When

he got home, he unloaded them in the

stable

belonging to

his

cottage,

and carry-

ing the bags into the house, he spread the gold coin upon the floor before his ifttmhfrnil wife, to

whom

he related his adventure.

His wife was delighted with possessing much money, and wanted to count it; bu: would take up too much time, she measure it, and running to the house of Ali Baba's brother, she asked them to ig it

resolved

to

lend her a

frnftll

measure.

Gascon's wife was very proud and envious.


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

6 "

"

I wonder," said she to herself,

what

sort of

grain such poor people can have to measure

but I

am

;

determined I will find out what they So, before she gave the measure,

are doing."

she artfully rubbed the bottom of

it

with some

suet.

Away ran Ali Baba's wife and having measured the money, and helped her husband :

bury it in the yard, she carried back the measure to her brother-in-law's house, without to

noticing that a piece of gold was left sticking to the

"

bottom of

it.

Fine doings, indeed

" !

cried Cassim's wife

examining the measure "your brother there, who pretends to be so

to her husband, after

very poor,

is

richer than

;

are, for

you

not count his money, but measures

he does

it/'

Cassim, hearing these words, and seeing the piece of gold

the bottom as

his

wife,

which had been

of the measure,

and, hastening

left

sticking to

grew as envious to

his

brother,

threatened to inform the Cadi of his wealth, if

by

he did not confess to him it.

how he had come

Ali Baba, without the least hesitation,


ALI BABA told

;

OB,

THE FORTY THJKVES.

him of his adventure

ID the forest,

7

and the

secret of the cave, and offered him half his

treasure

but the envious Cassim disdained so

;

poor a sum, resolving to take

more than

that,

home

fifty

times

out of the robbers' cave.

Accordingly, he rose early the next morning,

and

ave with ten mules loaded

set out for the

He

with great chests.

enough by said into

found the rock easily

Ali Baba's description

;

and having

"Open, Sesame/" he gained admission the cave, where he found far more treasure

than he even had expected to behold from his brother's account of it to

He

immediately began

gather bags of gold and pieces of rich

brocades, all which

he piled near the door;

but after he had gathered as

more than

his ten

much

or even

mules could possibly carry,

and wanted to get out

to

load

them, the

thoughts of his wonderful riches had

made

magic word which caused the door to open. In vain he tried Bam*, Fame, Lame, Tetame, and a thousand

him

entirely

forget

the

others;

the door remained as immovable as

the rock

itself,

notwithstanding Cassim locked


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

8

and screamed fatigue

and

he was ready to drop with

till

He

fear.

soon after heard the

which he rightly concluded to be the robbers returned, and he sound of horses'

trembled

lest

feet,

he should

now

fall

a victim to

his thirst for riches.

He

resolved, however, to

make one

effort to

escape; and when he heard the word "Sesame" pronounced, and saw the door open, he sprang out,

but was instantly put to death by the

swords of the robbers.

The

thieves

now

held a council

on

this

wonderful event, but not one of them could

by what means Cassim had got They saw the heaps of gold and other treasures he had piled ready to take

possibly guess

into the cave.

away, but they did not miss what Ali Baba

had secured

before.

At

length they agreed to

cut Cassim's body into quarters, and hang the pieces within the cave, that to

it

might be

attempts

;

terrified

any one

compg

from making further

they also determined not to return

themselves for some time to the cave, for fear of being watched and discovered.


ALI BABA

When

;

THE FORTY THIEVES.

OB,

9

Cassim's will saw night come on, and

her husband not returned, she became greatly terrified

listening

went

She for

sat

his

to tell Ali

up

all

footsteps,

night

and

Baba of her

at

anxiously

daybreak

Cassim

fears.

had not informed him of his design to visit the cave; but Aii Baba now hearing of his journey thither, did not wait to be desired to

go in search of him.

He delay.

drove his asses to the forest without

When

he came to the rock, he was

alarmed to see the marks of blood

;

and on

entering the cave he found the body of hi*

unfortunate brother cut to pieces, and hung up

within the door.

It

was now too

late to sav<

him, but be lost no time in taking down ihe

and putting them upon one of his and covering them with some fagots,

quarters, asses,

he returned to the

The door of

by Morgiana, an slave,

city.

his brother's house intelligent,

was opened

faithful

female

who, Ali Baba knew, was worthy to

trusted with the secret

the body to Morgiana,

fee

He therefore delivered to whom he related the


FAVOUKITE FAIRY TALES.

10

had

wonderful events which

ended in her

master's death, and went himself to impart the

The poor

sad tidings to the wife of Cassim.

woman was

deeply

and reproached and envy curiosity, as

afflicted,

herself with her foolish

being the cause of her husband's death

but

;

Ali Baba having convinced her of the necessity of being very discreet, she checked her lamen-

and resolved

tations,

the

to leave every thing to

management of Morgiana,

Morgiana having

carefully

washed the body,

hastened to an apothecary's, and asked for

some

particular

it

medicine, saying

her master Cassim,

was

for

who was dangerously

ill.

She took care to spread the report of Cassim's illness

through

the

and

neighbourhood;

as

Ali Baba and his wife were seen going daily to the

house of their brother, in great

the neighbours shortly, that

Cassim had died of his disorder.

The next

difficulty

was

buried without discovery

;

to

get

early

the

morning,

the

body

but Morgiana was

ready to contrive a plan for that in

affliction,

were not surprised to hear,

she

also.

dressed

Very herself,


AU

BABA

;

OB,

patting on a thick

THE FOBTY THIEVES. veil,

1 1

and went to a

dis-

tant part of the city, where she found a poor

She put a

cobbler just opening his stall piece of gold into his hand,

have another,

if

and said he should

he would suffer himself to

be blindfolded and go with the cobbler, hesitated at

her.

first

to

Mustapha, comply with

strange request, but the gold

this

him, and he consented

;

tempted

when Morgiana,

fully covering his eyes, so that

him

see a step of the way, led

care-

he could not to Cassim's

and taking him to the room where the body was lying, removed the bandage from his eyes, and bade him sew the mangled limbs bouse,

together.

Mustapha, although much astonished, obeyed her order ; and, having received two pieces of gold,

his

was

own

led blindfold the

same way back

to

stall

Morgiana thai CPfimi the body with a winding-sheet, and sent for the undertaker to

make

preparations

for

the

funeral

These

being completed, Cassim was buried with due solemnity the same day.

all


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

12

Very soon

afterwards,

AH

Baba removed

few goods, and all the gold coin that he had brought from the cavern, to the house of

his

his deceased brother, of

sion

;

and

which he took posses-

widow

Cassim's

received

every

kind attention, both from Ali Baba and his wife.

After an interval of some months, the troop of robbers again visited their retreat in the

They advanced with unusual caution

forest.

and

curiosity,

to find,

and were completely astonished

on entering the

cave, that the

had been taken away, whilst everything remained in the usual

order.

covered," said the captain,

and

else

are dis-

shall certainly

we do not adopt speedy measures prevent our ruin. Which of you, my brave

be undone to

"

"We

body

if

comrades, will undertake to find out the villain

who

is

One and

in possession of our secret

" ?

of the boldest of the troop advanced,

offered himself;

following

he was accepted on the

conditions, namely, that if he suc-

ceeded in his enterprise, he was to be made

second in

command

of the troop

;

but that

if


ALI BABA he brought

;

OB THE FORTY THIEVES.

(also

intelligence,

13

he was imme-

diately to be pot to death.

This bold robber readily agreed to the con-

and having disguised

ditions,

Haded

Mnstapha

in his stall,

any shop

I

stall;

am

I

work by

sir,"

"you

who

should think you,

Indeed,

the

old

cobbler

which was always open

friend," said the robber, as-

he came up to the

scarcely see to *

pro

in the town.

"Good-morrow,

I

himself,

arrived there shortly

and found

after daybreak,

before

He

to the city.

rise betimes:'

are so old, could

this light?"

replied the cobbler,

do not want

for

"

old as

good eyedglU, aa you

must needs believe, when I tell you that I sewed a dead body together the other day, where I bad not so good a light as I have now."

*A "

dead body!"

you mean,

*~a*~A

I suppose, that

winding-sheet for a dead body ?

"No tell

you

the

robber;

you sewed up the "

replied MTttapha; "I sewed the four quarters of a man

such thing/' I

together."

The robber was overjoyed

at hearing this

;


FAVOUEITE FAIEY TALES.

14

he was convinced that he had luckily met

man who

with the very

could give him the

information he was in search

He

of.

did not

wish, however, to appear eager to learn the

He

cobbler.

ha

" !

he

lest

particulars,

should

alarm

the "

therefore began to laugh.

said he,

" I find, good

Mr

you perceive I am a stranger wish to make

me

old

Ha

!

Cobbler, that here,

and you

believe that the people of

your city do impossible things." " I '*

tell

you," said Mustapha, very angrily,

I sewed* a dead body together with

my own

hands."

"Well, since tell

me

also

ful business

it

is

so,

I

suppose you can

where you performed

this

wonder-

" ?

Mustapha then

related every particular of

his being led blindfold to the house, &c. " Well, friend," said the robber,

my

"

'tis

a fine story, I confess, but not very easy to believe

;

shewing

however,

me

if

you

will convince

the house you talk

of,

me by

I will give

you four pieces of gold to make amends

my

unbelief"

for


ALI BABA

The rid,

OB THB FOBTY THIEVES.

;

15

cobbler, after considering a little while,

"I think thai

if

you were

to blindfold

me, I could remember every turning

bat with

my

eyes open I

am

we made,

sure I should

never find it*

Accordingly the robber covered Mustapha's eyes with

his handkerchief,

folded the cobbler led

and thus blind-

him through most of

the principal streets of the city, Cassim'fl

"Here

it

door, is

when I

he

went no

till

he reached

stopped and farther

said,

than this

The robber immediately marked the door with a piece of chalk, and giving Mustapha his four pieces of gold, he dismissed him.

Shortly after the thief and the cobbler had

gone away from the door, Morgiana, coming home from market, noticed the little mark of white chalk on the door, and suspecting something was wrong, went directly for a piece

of chalk, and aide in

and

five

exactly the

marked

four

doors

on

one

on the other of her nnslstX

same manner, without saying

a word to any one.


FAVOTJEITE FAIEY TALES.

16

The robber meantime had and boasted greatly of his tain and comrades praised being

all

rejoined his troop, success.

His capand

his diligence

;

well armed, they at once agreed to

proceed to the town

in

different

disguises,

and in separate parties of three and four. It was also arranged by them that they were

meet in the market-place at the dusk of evening, and that the captain and the robber

to

who had there

discovered the to find out to

first,

Accordingly,

house were to go

whom

at the appointed

robbers went to

had been marked

the

street

it

belonged.

hour the two

where the door

and having a lantern with them, they began to examine the doors, but found to their confusion and astonishment that

ten

;

doors were

The robber who was

marked

exactly

alike.

the captain's guide

was

confounded, and could not say one word in

and so the party explanation of this mystery had to return to the forest in disappoint;

ment, which when they had reached, the guide

was instantly put companions.

to

death by his enraged


AU

BABA

;

OB,

TEX FORTY THIEYE&

Another of the troop now for the errand,

the

upon

He

former.

at

offered

17

himself

same conditions as

the

once proceeded to the

city, and having bribed Mustapha and discovered the house, he made a mark with

dark red chalk upon the door,

was not

examining the

fully

in

in the least conspicuous;

surrounding

a part that

and

care-

to

doors,

no such mark was upon of them, he returned to his com-

be certain

any one

that

pany.

But nothing could escape the prying eyes of Morgiana parted,

;

and, getting

had the robber de-

for scarcely

when she

discovered the red

some red

chalk, she

mark

;

marked seven

doors on each side precisely in the same pilot

and

in the

same manner,

still,

however, keep

ing the matter to herself.

The robber prided himself very highly upon precautions he had taken, and trium-

the

phantly conducted his captain to the spot;

but

great

dismay, difficulty

indeed

when

he

was

his

found

as formerly;

it

the

confusion

and

same strange

was impossible

to


FAVOUBITE FAIEY TALES.

18

among

say,

actly

alike,

marked

houses thus

fifteen

which was the right

captain, furious with this second

ment, returned again with

his

disappoint-

troop to the

and the second robber was

forest;

demned

ex-

The

one.

also con-

to deatL

Having thus

two

lost

captain judged that

of

his

troop,

the

hands were more

their

active than their heads in such services,

and

he resolved not to employ another of them, but to go himself upon the business.

He

accordingly

to

repaired

addressed himself to

the

the city, and

cobbler Mustapha,

who, for six pieces of gold, readily performed the

same

him

service for

other strangers. ally wiser

wisdom by

The

as he

had done

captain, who,

if

for the

not natur-

than his men, had certainly gained experience, did not think of again

contriving any -mark for the door, but spent his time in attentively considering the house

he counted the number of passed

by

it

its

;

windows, and

very often, to be certain that

he should know

it

again.

After his return to the

forest,

he ordered


All BABA

;

OB,

THE FOBTT THTEVEa

19

go into the town and buy nine-

his troop to

teen males and thirty-eight large jars, one full

of

oil

and the

rest empty.

In two or three days the jars were bought,

and

things in readiness

all

man

put a

properly armed

the captain then

;

into each jar, the

jars being rubbed on the outside with

the covers baring holes for the

through.

He

men

oil,

and

to breathe

then loaded his mules, and in

the habit of an oil-merchant entered the town in the

dusk of the evening.

the direction of Ali

approaching " said

it,

he,

Sir/'

He

proceeded in

Baba's house, and

on

found him sitting in the porch,

"

I

have brought this

oil

a great

am too late for this day's way market and as I am a stranger in this town, will you allow me to put my mules into your court yard, and direct me where I may lodge to

sell,

but

;

for the

night?"

Ali Baba,

who was a good-natured man,

gave the pretended oil-merchant a very kind welcome, and offered him a bed in his

own

and having ordered the mules to be unloaded in the yard and properly fed, he

house

;


FAVOUEITE FAIEY TALES.

20

invited his guest in to supper.

The captam,

having seen the jars placed properly in the

Baba

yard, followed All

into the house, and,

soon after supper, was shewn into the chamber

where he was

to sleep.

happened that Morgiana had to sit up that night than usual, to get ready her

It so later

master's bathing-linen for the following morn-

ing; and while she was busy about the

fire,

her lamp went out, and there was no more oil

in the house.

how

After considering

she

could possibly get a light to finish her work by, she

recollected the thirty-eight oil-jars in

the yard, and resolved to take a

them

little oil

She took her

for her lamp.

out of

oil-pot in

her hand, and went noiselessly into the yard

and approaching the

first jar,

within saying, "Is

it

time, captain?"

other slave, perhaps, on hearing a oil-jar,

would have screamed out

suspecting

now

jar,

till

receiving

;

man

Any in

an

but Morgiana,

the true character of the pre-

tended oil-merchant, replied yet; lie still

;

she heard a voice

I call you/'

the

softly,

"No, not

She went

to every

same question from

each,


ALI BABA

;

THE FORTY THIEVES.

OB,

tnd making the same answer,

till

she

21

came to the

one filled with oil, from which she helped herself

Morgiana was now convinced that this was a plot of the robbers to murder her master, Ali Baba; she therefore ran back to the kitchen,

and

no time

lost

which she wood-fire

filled

;

in procuring a large kettle,

with

oil,

set it

on a great

it boiled,

she carried

and

and, as soon as

and poured into each of the jars

it

to the yard,

a

sufficient quantity of the

every

man

boiling oil to kill

within them.

Having done this, she returned to the house, and putting out her fire and her lamp, crept softly to her

chamber.

About midnight, the captain of the robbers arose, and perceiving no light any where, went

down

into the yard to assemble his men.

he

first jar,

boiled oil

he then ran hastily to the

:

felt

Com-

the steams of the

ing to the

rest,

and

found that every one of his troop had been put to death in the

having

same manner.

failed in his design,

Full of rage at

he forced the lock

of a door that led to the garden, and escape over the walls

made

his


FAVOURITE

22

FAIfiY TALES.

The following morning Morgiana

told her

master, Ali Baba, of his wonderful deliverance

from the pretended oil-merchant and his gang Ali Baba at

of robbers.

credit her tale

dead in the

;

he could not

jars,

her courage and sagacity. to themselves,

thirty-seven

first

could scarcely

but when he saw the robbers sufficiently praise

They kept the

secret

and the next night buried the

thieves in

a deep trench at the

bottom of the garden. The jars and the mutes, as they were of no use to Ali Baba, were sent

from time

and

to

time to the different markets,

sold.

While Ali Baba prevent his forest

and

took

Cassirn's

these

measures to

adventures in the

from being known, the captain returned and having lost all his men, and

to his cave,

been thwarted in his design, he for some time abandoned himself to grief and despair. At length,

however,

being determined

to

effect

Ali Baba's destruction, he resolved to adopt a

new plan

He tity

for the

accomplishment of his purpose.

accordingly removed a considerable quanof the valuable merchandise from the cave


ALI BABA to the city,

;

OB,

23

THB FORTY THIKVB&

and took a shop exactly opposite

to

All Baba's house.

Having furnished this shop with every thing was rare and costly, he gave his name as

that

Many persons made

the merchant Cogia Hassan.

acquaintance with the stranger, and, among others, Ali Baba's son,

day

who went almost

every

Cogia Hassan soon pretended

to his shop.

great regard, and even strong affection, for Ali

Baba's son, and offered him

many

presents.

He

sometimes also detained him to dinner, on

which occasions he invariably treated him in the handsomest manner.

Ali Baba's son thought

make some prevailed

return

for

it

was necessary to civilities, and

these

on his father to promise to

invite

Ali Baba did so Cogia Hassan to supper. at an early date, but Cogia Hassan would not accept the invitation, pretending that he had business

home. the

which

demanded

hit

presence

at

ThM excuses only made Ali Baba's son

more eager

to take

and on being again

him

to his father's house ;

invited, the

merchant con-

sented to sup at Ali Baba's the next evening.


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

24

A

very grand supper was provided, which

Morgiana cooked with her best art and, as was her usual custom, she carried in the first ;

herself

dish

The moment she saw Cogia

Hassan she recognised him as the pretended oil-merchant. Morgiana was too prudent to tell

any one of her discovery

the

at

time,

but sent the other slaves into the kitchen,

and waited at table herself; and while Cogia Hassan was drinking, she observed that he After had a dagger hid under his coat. the and when dessert and the wine supper,

had been put on the table, Morgiana went away, and dressed herself in the habit of a dancing-girl; fellow-slave,

she

then

called

and asked her

Abdalla,

a

to play the tabor

while she danced.

As

soon as she appeared at the parlour-

door, her master,

who was

very fond of seeing

her dance, ordered her to come in and entertain his guest.

Cogia Hassan was not very

well pleased with this

new

entertainment, yet

was compelled, for fear of discovering himself, to seem pleased with the dancing although, ;


ALI BABA in

;

THE FORTY THlKVBa.

OB,

Morgiana a great way he should lose lest

he wished

fact,

25

oft and was

alarmed

thia

murdering All Baba which he was quite reupon

and

of

opportunity his

son,

solved

Morgiana danced several dances with the utmost grace and agility, and then, drawing a poniard from her girdle, she performed surprising things with it; at last she

many

drew near

to

where the parties

sat,

and some-

times presented the point of the poniard to one,

sometimes to

teemed as

if

another,

about to strike

Then holding

bosom.

right hand, she

Baba and

his son,

piece of money.

the

presented

who

and sometimes it

into her

the

to

Ali

poniard

her

left

own

in

each gave her a small

She next turned

to Cogia

Hassan, and while he was putting his hand into his purse, she plunged the poniard into his heart

" Wretch

!" cried

hast ruined "

No,

served,

sir,"

Ali Baba, in terror,

me and my

family. "

replied

" thou

Morgiana,

I hare pre-

and not ruined, you and your

son.


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

26

Look him

well at this to

came once before

will find

which

off

the false

Cogia

Hassan wore,

only that he was

and discovered, not

pretended oil-merchant, but

who had

the forty robbers,

who

and murder you." the turban and the

to rob

Baba pulled

Ali

cloak

and you

traitor,

be the pretended oil-merchant,

the

the

captain

of

killed his brother

Cassim; nor could he doubt that his peraim had been to destroy him, and

fidious

son

probably his

with

the

concealed

could not

but

feel

also,

dagger.

who

Ali Baba, strongly the

new

giana for thus saving his

embraced I give

her,

not stop there

who, I

no

and

you your

less

am

;

" said,

liberty

;

life

a second time,

My

dear Morgiana,

but

I will also

sure,

my gratitude shall marry you to my son,

must esteem and admire you

than does his father."

to his son,

he added, " You,

Then, turning

my

son, will not

refuse the wife I offer, for, in marrying giana,

very

obligation he owed to Mor-

you take to wife the

benefactress of yourself

preserver

and your

Morand

family."


ALI BABA

;

OB,

THE FORTY THIEVES.

27

Baba's son, having long entertained a ^gim mmm i strong affection for the good slave jf All

and joyfully accepted

readily

The captain was buried

his proposed bride.

same

that

trench

night, with

along with

hU

great privacy, in

the

troop of robbers

and a few days afterwards

;

All Baba celebrated the marriage of his son

and Morgiana with a sumptuous entertainment and every one who knew Morgiana said she was worthy of her good fortune, ;

and highly commended her master's generosity

to her.

Twelve months thought

it

his

length

elapsed

before

curiosity

another journey.

incited

When

he

Baba

All

wise to go to the forest

him

but at

;

to

came

cave he saw no footsteps of either

make the

to

men

or

and having uttered the magic words, Open, Scxime!" which he never forgot, be went in, and judged, by the state of thir gs, horses

that

;

no one had been there since the pre-

tended Cogia Hassan had removed the merchandise to his shop in the took

home

as

much

city.

gold as his

All

Bab*

hone could


28

FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

carry; and he afterwards to the cave,

conducted his son

and told him the

This secret they handed

secret.

down

to their pos-

good fortune with moderation, they lived in honour and splendour, terity,

arid,

using

their

and served with dignity some of the highest offices

of the

city.


BABES

A

THE WOOD.

IN

GREAT many yean ago

there lived in the

county of Norfolk a gentleman and his lady

who

The gentleman

possessed considerable wealth.

was benevolent and kind, and the lady polio and beautiful

:

they were beloved by

knew them, and were

When

dren, a boy and a girl

only about three years quite two, their

dangerous

illness,

old,

the boy

and the

girl

was not

was seized with a

father

and

who

all

blessed with two chil-

their

while

mother,

waiting on her beloved husband, also caught the disease. assistance,

and,

Notwithstanding every medical their disorder

when they found

rapidly

increased;

that they were likely to

be soon removed by death from their dear

ciul-


30

FAVOURITE FA1EY TALES.

dren, they

and gave " see

Ah

sent for the gentleman's

brother/' said the dying

!

neither the prospect of death nor

can pierce

sufferings

much anguish leaving care.

as

my

what

these dear

fed,

to teach

my

you yet

present

thought of

babes without

them

;

heart with half so

Brother, they will have

and

live

I feel at the

be kind to them, to see

to

"

man,

have but a short time to

I

brother,

their darlings into his care.

a parent's

no one but you them clothed and

to be good."

"Dear, dear brother," said the dying lady,

"you must be

father, mother,

to these dear innocent lambs.

and uncle

too,

Let William be

taught to read, and also to become good and

kind like his

father.

brother, it wrings

Think of

the

my

gentle

And

little

Jane,

heart to talk

oh

!

of ner.

usage she will need,

and take her fondly on your knee, brother, and train her with affection and patience, and she and William too

will,

I

repay your care with love." " How does it grieve my heart you,

my

dear brother

and

sister,

am to

in

sure,

see this


THE BABES IN THE WOOD. mournful condition be

" !

there

comforted,

31 "

replied the uncle.

may

yet

be

But

hopes of

your recovery; but should we have the misfortune to lose yon, I assure you I will do all

you can

In

me

desire for the darling

they shall

well as uncle;

not yet told

find father

but,

me what

children.

and mother, as

dear brother, you have

arrangements yon have

made regarding

the disposal of your money." " * Here, brother," replied the dying man, is

my

in which I have

will,

my

vision for

made ample

pro-

dour babes."

The gentleman and and a

his

lady then

kissed

time afterwards

short

their children,

they both died.

When

the uncle opened the will, he found

was bequeathed three hundred pounds a -year, when he became of age; and that little Jane was to receive five

that to William

hundred day.

pounds

But

die before

if

in

gold on her marriage

the children

of

should chance to

then

all

their

wealth was to belong to their uncle

The

will of

coining

age,

the unfortunate gentleman

next de-


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

32

and

that he

sired

his

beloved wife should

be buried side by side in the same grave.

The two

innocents were

little

now

who

taken

for

some

time treated them with great kindness.

But

the house

to

when he

of their uncle,

kept them about a twelve-

had

month, he began to think lightly of the promises he had made to his brother on his be

deathbed, to uncle,

all

After a

their

father,

and

mother,

in one. little

more time had

the

passed,

uncle could not help thinking that he wished the

little

boy and

should then have

and

self,

at

last

anything else; "It will

self,

girl

all

would

he

him-

he could scarcely think

of

nobody may know any-

thing of the matter, and then

all

their wealth

be mine/"

When his

for

for

and one day says he to himnot be very difficult for me

to kill them, so that

shall

die,

their wealth

mind

the barbarous uncle had once brought to kill the helpless

little

creatures,

he was not long in finding a way to execute his cruel purpose.

He

hired two strong


Of THE WOOD. ruffians,

who

wood

some

at

men

lived

whom

travellers,

33

by what they robbed from

they

a dark thick

lolled, in

distance.

These two wicked

a large reward, to commit was heard

agreed, for

the blackest crime that ever yet

and the uncle began to prepare every-

of,

thing accordingly.

He good to

told it

an

his wife

artful story of

how

would be to have the children sent

London

to have their education forwarded,

and how he had a

relation in

London who,

he was certain, would be delighted to take the greatest care of them, lie then said to the innocent children, " Should you not like,

my

pretty dears, to see the

famous

city of

London, where yon, William, can buy a

wooden horse to

make him

gallop,

by your side? plenty of

and

I

will

ride upon,

and a

And

fine

fine

and a whip to sword to wear

yon, Jane, shall have

pretty dolls

and

pretty

dresses,

get a nice gilded coach to take

you there." The two little children were quite delighted with the thought of going to London in a


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

34 fine coach,

uncle,

I

and William cried

will

go/' said Jane

;

and

out,

"Oh,

yes,

I

will

"Oh

yes,

their

wicked uncle, with

go."

uncle,

soon got them ready for

a heart of stone, the journey.

The unsuspecting few days after

this,

creatures

little

were,

with them went the two

ruffians,

a

and

put into a fine coach,

who were

so

soon to put an end to their joyful prattle, and turn their served as

smiles

into

tears.

One

the coach between

little

them

of

coachman, while the other

sat

William and

in

little

Jane.

When

they had reached

the

entrance

to

the

dark thick wood, the two ruffians took

the

children

they

out of the coach,

might now walk

flowers

;

telling

them

way, and gather and while they were skipping about a

little

enjoying themselves, the ruffians began to consult

truth," in "

"

about what they had to do.

the

now

says

the

one

coach with the children I

In good

who had been all

have seen their cherub

sitting

the way, faces,

and

heard their pretty speech, I have no heart to do


IK THE WOOD. the bloody deed

let

as fling away the ugly

and send the children back to

knife,

their

" That I will not," says the other

uncle." "

;

35

what

boots

Aid who

their

speech

pretty

will

pay us

the

ruffians

us

to

;

?

for being so chicken-

hearted?"

At

last

into

fell

so great a

passion with each other about butchering the

innocent

little

who wished

children, that he

to spare their lives suddenly opened the big

knife he had brought to kill them,

and stabbed

the other to the heart, so that he instantly fell

down

dead.

The one who greatly at

a

loss

had

killed

him was now

as to what he should do

with the children, for he wanted to get away as fast as possible, for fear of being found in the

He was

wood

determining that he

wood, to the chance of by.

"Come,

my

not long, however, in

must

s

roe."

them

in

my

The poor

hand and went on, the

the

traveller passing

pretty ones," said he,

must each take hold of along with

leave

some

"you

hands and come

children each took

tears bursting

from


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

36 their

with

and

eyes,

their

limbs trembling

little

fear.

Thus did

cruel

this

man

children about two miles

lead

these dear

further

on in the

wood, and then told them to wait there

till

he came back with some cakes for them to eat.

William took his sister Jane by the hand, and they wandered wearily up and down the "Will the strange wood for some time.

man come "

with some cakes, Billy ?

Presently, dear

Jane,"

cakes, Billy."

says Jane.

says William

soon again she said sorrowfully,

had some

"

It

"

and

;

I wish I

would almost have

melted a heart of stone to have seen

how

sad

they looked.

After waiting a very long time, they tried

hunger with black-berries but had soon eaten up all that were within they their reach and night too coming on, William, to satisfy their

;

;

who had

tried

little sister,

when Jane hungry

I

he could to comfort his

all

now wanted said

to

am, Billy

;

comfort himself;

him once more,

"

so

How

I b-e-lieve I cannot help


THE crying,"

William

down they

the cold,

damp

putting their arms round each there they starved,

37 ;

and

earth,

and

burst into tears too

upon

lay

THE WOOD.

BJLBES IN

other's neck,

and there they died

No

tmriml thew pretty babta Of layman ratal; But pall* Robin Redbreast, H eovtn them with tearw.

Thus were

these harmless babes

and as no one knew of

murdered

their death, so

;

no one

sought to give them burial In the mean time, the wicked uncle, supposing they had been killed as he desired, told

who asked

after them,

an artful

all

tale of their

having died in London of the smallpox, and took possession openly of their fortune.

But

all this

wealth did him very

His wife died soon

after

;

little

good.

and being very un-

happy, and always thinking too, as he could not help doing, that he saw the UooiHnfl children before his eyes, he "ffltflM his business that, instead

of growing

poorer every day. sons,

richer,

;

so

he became

Hit heard also that his two

who had embarked

for

a foreign land,


FAVOUKITE FAIEY TALES.

38

were both drowned at

sea,

and he became com-

pletely miserable.

Some

years afterwards, the ruffian

who had

taken pity on the children committed another

robbery in the same wood, and being pursued

by some men, he was laid hold of, and brought to prison, and soon after, being tried and found guilty,

he was condemned to be hanged for the

crime.

When must

he was told what his unhappy end

be, he sent for the keeper of the prison,

and confessed to him

all

the crimes he had

been guilty of during his whole

made known

life,

and thus

the story of the children in the

wood, telling him, at the same time, in what part of the

wood he had

The news of the reached the uncle's

them

left

ruffian's ears,

to starve.

confession

soon

who, being already

broken-hearted through his numerous misfortunes,

and unable

to bear the load of public

shame that now awaited him, lay down upon his bed and died that very day.

No

sooner were the tidings of the fate of the

two children made public, than proper persons


THE BABES IN THE WOOD. were sent to search the wood

many

fruitless

;

39

when

after

endeavours, the pretty btbat

were at length found stretched in each other's arms, with William's

arm round

Jane, his face turned close to hers

the neck of

and

his frock

pulled over her body.

They were quite covered over with leaves, all that time had never withered and

which in

on a

;

tree near this little grave

breast tat watching

gentle hearts

still

a Robin Red-

and chirping, so that many it was this pretty

think that

bird which brought the leaves and covered the

Babes in the Wood.


CINDERELLA; OR,

THE LITTLE GLASS-SLIPPER.

AT

a short distance from a certain great

there lived a gentleman of fortune,

and

an amiable and beautiful young

lady,

he had attached greatest

lately

married

each

to

They were

other,

and

by the

birth

of a

fondly the

was,

if

when our

story

daughter;

but,

possible, increased at the time

begins,

whom

enjoyed

however

happiness, which

city,

his wife

unfortunately for the child, the mother died before she left

had reared up her

offspring,

and

her husband a prey to sorrow.

Some time grief

was a

after this,

little

when

the gentleman's

abated, he resolved to look

out for some prudent lady

who might become

both a mother to his dear child, and a com-

panion to himself.

Unfortunately his choice


41 fell

on a widow lady of a proud and tyranni-

cal

disposition,

who had two daughters by

a former marriage, both equally haughty and

bad-tempered with their mother. This

woman

qualities

much

contrived

so well

to conceal her bad

the

that

gentleman was

pleased to think her so amiable, but

they had not been long married

appeared in her real character. attention whatever

sweet

his

and was vants.

little

for

her husband,

to

child

when she

She paid no

ever quarrelling with

The gentleman, who loved

dearly, frequently

remonstrated

subdue

to fell

into

against

spirits,

it

the

only

finding himself unable

the violence

low

the ser-

his daughter

cruelty of his wife's behaviour, but

made her worse; and

treated

with great harshness,

of

her temper, he

which brought him to

a premature grave. After the death of her father, the

little

orphan found the hardships of her situation greatly increased. into

If she

chanced to come

any of the rooms where her stepmother

or her daughters were, she was sure of being


42

FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

scolded;

and

they

were

vexed because

so

she looked handsomer than

themselves, that

they took every opportunity of annoying her. at length

They do

the

assist

went

make her

so far as to

meanest work

about

the

kitchen,

on the

the servants in putting

fires,

washing the pots, and also in cleaning out the rooms, which had all been newly furnished in the

first

style

of

elegance.

At

night they compelled her to sleep in a garret,

on a straw bed without

curtains,

and in winter

she had not even enough of clothes to protect

her from the cold.

But although so barbarously used, the sweet and, when girl was never found repining; her work was done, she would sit down in the corner of the chimney

the cinders,

among

which habit got her the name wench.

The younger of the this

thinking

her the more

and

all

appellation

genteel

of

Cinder-

sisters,

however,

too

name

vulgar,

of

the rest followed her example.

withstanding Cinderella

all

that

she

had

gave

Cinderella,

to

became every day more

Notendure,

beautiful,


43

CTXDERKLLA.

tod

far

standing

surpassed the two all

About vitations

the

this

to

notwith-

sisters,

their fine clothes.

time, the King's son

all

the

nobility

kingdom, for a grand

sent in-

and gentry of he ball, which

proposed giving at court, and amongst others, the two sisters received an

invitation

;

but

poor Cinderella was of course overlooked, as

no one knew anything of her. The two haughty creatures, quite overjoyed with the thoughts of being at a ball given by the King's son, immediately proceeded to arrange their dresses for the grand occasion.

Their

preparations were

Cinderella

very oppressive to

for being remarkably neat-handed,

;

they set her to wash, all their fineries,

plait,

and

iron

out

while they could do nothing

but talk of the fine

ball,

and how they were

be dressed on that evening. "I," said the eldest, "will put on my scarlet velvet, to

with the rich French trimming." said the youngest, "will wear vet, that I

got for the

gold muslin

train,

my

last ball,

"And green

and

which, with the

also

I,"

vel-

my


FAVOUEITE FAIEY TALES.

44 in

hair, will certainly look

my

quite enchant-

ing."

On ball,

the morning of the day fixed for the

a

first-rate hairdresser

was sent

for,

and

becoming and fanciful ornaments procured from almost every fashionable shop the most

Although these vain girls could enough about fine clothes, yet they had no taste in arranging their dresses and in the city.

chatter

ornaments

;

and as they knew that Cinderella

had a natural genius in these matters, they condescended to employ her on this occasion.

Any

other person,

who had met with

the

same cruel

treatment

likely either

have refused, or endeavoured to

make them look

as

Cinderella,

as ugly as possible

good-natured girl entertained

;

but this

no such wicked

thoughts, but at once assisted to deck

out to the best advantage.

them unless Cinderella did hair,

;

them

Nothing pleased and even their

which had been already dressed by one

of the

most fashionable

required taste.

it

would

to

adjust

hairdressers, she

according

to

her

was

own


CINDERELLA.

Yet notwithstanding tion

and

kindness

45

Cinderella's atten-

all

them, the ungrateful

to

creatures could not restrain their accustomed derision,

would

and

like

Cinderella, it is

her

go to the ball are

"you

if

she

"Ah/

said

making sport of me;

not for such poor girls as I

You

balk"

to

repeatedly asked

to

am

are right," said they

to go

" ;

how

would laugh were they to see a cinder- wench dancing in the ball-room I" the

folks

The

silly

up with

young

ladies

were so much taken

their looking-glasses

that they hardly ate

and

the

ball

anything for two days,

and they broke more than a dozen trying to give themselves

*

laces in

slender shape,

The wished-for moment

at length arrived,

and these proud misses stepped into a beauticarriage, attended

ful

handsome

liveries,

by several servants in and drove away to the

city.

Cinderella could

not

coach with her eyes as see,

and when

it

help far

following

as

she

the

could

had disappeared, returned

to the kitchen in tears, where, tor the

first


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

46 time,

she bewailed her hard

degradation.

made her look up

the kitchen, which

what had occasioned see

a

little

She was

it.

who

woman, a

carried

her right hand, while in

the

to see startled

old

curious-looking

very antiquely dressed, in

and cruel

she heard a noise in

until

chimney-corner

to

lot

She continued sobbing in the

wand

other she

held a crutch to support herself Cinderella could not account for this strange

appearance, and thought at

had deceived

droll personage before

first

that her eyes

she had not

her, as ;

seen this

but the old dame, with

a good-natured smile in her countenance, came nearer,

and thus accosted

Cinderella, I

a

fairy,

am

her

" :

My

and knowing the strong

have to go to this fine

ball, I

desire

to

dry up your

be a good

tears,

girl,

and as

I will

you

am come

the purpose of gratifying your wishes fore

dear

your godmother, and being

I

;

for

there-

know you

furnish you with

an equipage suitable to your merit." Cinderella

remembered that she had

often

heard her father and mother talk of her god-


47

CINDERELLA.

nether, and that she was one of those good Caries

who

interest

themselves in the welto

fare of all the children

whom

they stand

sponsors;

and

spirits so

much, that she banished

fear

this

and spoke

to

the

in

fairy

her

revived

recollection

her

all

her usual

pleasant manner.

The

then took Cinderella by the hand,

fairy

her out to a retired spot,

and having led "

Now, my dear, you must go into the garden and bring me a large pumpkin,* said,

Cinderella ran to execute her

commands, and

returned with one of the finest she could

Her godmother took the pumpkin, and ing out the inside of

rind;

it,

she then struck

wand, and

it

most elegant

instantly

gilt

left it

Ma

scoop-

nothing but the

with

her

magic-

became one of

the

coaches that ever was seen.

She next desired Cinderella to go to the She did so,

pantry and fcfek the mousetrap.

and found that there were the trap.

The

six mice alive in

fairy requested

the door very gently,

them might go out

at

her to

lift

up

so that only one of

a time.

Cinderella


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

48

and as the mice came

raised the trap-door,

out one by one, a touch of the magic-wand

transformed them into beautiful carriage-horses richly caparisoned. "

my

Now,

we have

dear

said the fairy,

girl,"

a coach and horses

than your

here

much handsomer

to say the least of

sisters,

"

them;

but as we have neither got a postilion nor a coachman yet, run

where the rat-trap

is

quickly to

Cinderella did not lose a

me."

the stable,

and bring

placed,

it

to

moment

in

the execution of her commands, and soon re-

with the trap, in which she

turned

two large

rats.

The

found

touched both of

fairy

them with her wand, and immediately the one was changed into a handsome postilion, and the other into a

fine jolly-looking coach-

man.

Her godmother

said further

dear Cinderella, you must

garden

again

equipage; right see

side,

the

before

when you and

close

watering-pot

I

to her,

now go

can

to

complete

"

My the

your

get there, keep to the to

the

wall

you

will

standing, look behind

.


T

Trnrr

*

49

and you will find six lizards, which you most bring to me immediately." Cinderella flew to the garden as she was it

and

desired,

found

the

six

which

lizards,

she put into her apron, and brought to her fairy

Another touch of the wonderful

godmother.

wand soon converted

these animals

spruce footmen in splendid

jumped up behind the

diately

much

as

tomed

agility as

to

their

all

it

if

The coachman and their

places

derella

and

said,

"

lives.

having taken

postilion

fairy turned to Cin-

dear

my

Well,

girl,

not this as fine an equipage as you desire to

are

you

go to the

with

carriage

they had been accus-

the

also,

into six

who imme-

liveries,

ball with ?

pleased with

it?"

Tell

"Oh

is

conM

me nov yes,

my

kind jOltmoHMr/* replied Cinderella; and then added hesitatingly, " But how can dear,

I

make

my

grandly-dressed ing

ness

clothes?"

about

with a

among

appearance in

people

"Give

that,

my

no

yourself dear,"

good-humoured

many uneasi-

the

(airy,

"the

most

said

smile;

so

mean-look-

these


50

FAVOVKITE FAIRY TALES.

laborious

part

not

our

of

complished, and

make your

task

is

already

ac-

will be strange if I can-

it

dress correspond with

your

equipage/'

She

touched

then

with

Cinderella

her

magic wand, and her clothes were instantly changed into the most magnificent apparel, ornamented

The

fairy

with

now

the

most

costly

of elastic glass-slippers, which

beautiful pair

and then

she caused Cinderella to put on, desired

her to

into

get

expedition, as the ball

all

jewels.

took from her pocket a most

the

with

carriage

had already com-

menced. Cinderella instantly stepped into the carriage

but before taking leave, her godmother

charged

her

no

on

whatever

account

to

stay at the ball after the clock struck twelve

and added,

that

moment beyond horses, fine

that

coachman,

apparel,

she

if

postilion,

would

original forms of

and mean-looking

her

all

pumpkin, mice, clothes.

single

fine

coach,

footmen,

return

;

a

stopped

time,

;

strictly

to

and their

rats, lizards,


51 Cinderella promised most faithfully to attend

what the good

to

had

fairy

told

and

her,

then, quite overjoyed, took leave of her god-

mother, and drove away to the palace, which, as the carriage

almost

flew

like

lightning,

she reached in a very short time.

The

of such a splendid

arrival

could not

to

fail

attract

palace;

and

information

conveyed to

the

King's son,

the

beautiful

was in

young

been

that

a

most

some

princess,

lady, evidently

he hastened to the

waiting,

the

a few

and

made

the

dumb

gated

dancing

momenta

beard;

struck

one

her

led

Cinderella

music

both

was

he

door,

out of

gracefully

the into

ball-room.

When for

when

at

having

and was in time to hand her carriage,

equipage

general notice

at

not

company

her

appearance,

were

suspended

a whisper seemed to be

even

admiration, and

with

the beauty and

every

magnificence

of this elegant stranger.

They then began their

expressions

to whisper to each other " How

of

admiration

:


FAVOUKITE FAIRY TALES.

52

beautiful she

how

is

what a handsome

!

elegantly she is dressed

figure

!

Even the

!"

King, old as he was, could not behold her

with indifference, but was repeatedly heard the

to

saying

seen so lovely all

engaged

in

observing

had never

he

Queen, that

The

a creature.

how

were

ladies

her

clothes

were made, that they might be able to de-

them

scribe

to

if

ready

so as

their dressmakers,

order the same elegant patterns possible

for

the

next

to

be got

to

evening's

ball.

So

faultless did the lovely stranger appear,

envy seemed to

even

that

be

asleep

;

for

not one of the ladies present had the most distant

her

;

expectation

of

being

they only looked

able

upon her

to

in

and that they might try

to admire,

her in her

many

rival

order

to copy

surpassing qualities.

The Prince took every opportunity of shewing his regard for Cinderella.

He

her to one of the most distinguished placing himself

allow

him

by her

side,

to bring her

conducted seats,

and

begged she would

some

fruit or jellies.


63 These she declined with great politeness.

He

then wyiSJSBd to have the honour of dancing

with her; Cinderella gave a smiling consent,

and the delighted Prince immediately led her oat to the centre of the ball-room, followed

The

by the eyes of the whole company. musicians again took

up

and the dance commenced beauty, elegant figure,

their ;

but

instruments,

if Cinderella's

and the splendour of

her dress, had before excited the admiration of every person in the room, the astonishment

now caused by her dancing it The gracefulness of

describe.

is

impossible to

all

her motions,

and the airy lightness with which she moved for she seemed scarcely to touch the ground drew forth a general murmur of admiration, which, as the Prince led her the

with

loudest acclamations

;

off, changed into and the company

one voice pronounced

her to

be the

most elegant and accomplished female that they had ever seen. '

A msgniinsnt

collation

was then served

up,

consisting of most delicious fruits, confectionery,

and wines

;

but so much

was the young


FAVOUKITE FAIRY TALES.

54

Prince engaged

in

attending

to

Cinderella,

that he hardly ate anything during the whole evening.

Cinderella

her

now happened

sisters, to

whom

seated near

to be

she frequently spoke, and

gave them a part of the delicacies which she received from the Prince ; but they entertained not the slightest suspicion

who

she was, and

were equally astonished and delighted at the civilities

they received from her.

During her conversation with them, Cinderella heard the clock strike eleven and threequarters,

her

when, remembering her promise to

godmother, she

immediately

a hurried leave, and returned

rose,

home

took

in her

carriage.

On

reaching home, she found her godmother

waiting, smile,

who welcomed her with a

and

to

whom

taken place at the

she related

ball,

all

pleasant that

had

thanking her a thou-

sand times for the pleasure she had enjoyed.

She then told the

fairy that there

was to be

another ball on the following evening, to which the Prince had given her a very pressing invi-


55 Ution, and modestly signified the happiness

would

afford her to be present

it

on that occa-

sion also.

Her godmother had just promised to gratify when a load knocking announced

her wishes, the

of

arrival

her

sisters,

and

the

fairy

vaniabML

On

their entrance, Cinderella,

who seemed

to

have been just awakened oat of a sound sleep, fell

a-rubbing her eyes, and yawned out,

how

"Oh

you have stopped I I thought " Had yon would never have come home." dear,

late

you been at the "

I

ball," said

one of the

sisters,

come away am sure you would

don't think yon would have

any sooner

yourself,

and

not have been so sleepy

;

I

for the

most beautiful

and handsome princess ever beheld was there, who paid us great attention, and gave us some of the

iMJBMJM which she had

received from

the Prince. It

was with

refrain

difficulty

from laughing

;

that Cinderella could

but she succeeded in

concealing her mirth, and inquired the the princess.

They

replied that

name

of

nobody at the


FAVOUEITE FAIRY TALES.

56

knew

ball

her,

and that the Prince, being very who she was, had offered a

anxious to learn large reward to

any person who would

satisfy

his curiosity.

Cinderella said, with a smile,

she must be

beautiful

you were in seeing her one peep at her too

!

of your

next

old

gowns,

very

Dear Miss Charlotte, lend

to

I

that

and get a

ball,

How

could only get

if I

Oh,

!

you have the goodness

will

"

and how fortunate

!

may go

sight of

this

me

one

to

the

charm-

ing lady?" "

Do you

lend

am

my

really think I

am

not such a fool

certainly

mind your own

mad

so

to a cinder-wench?

dresses

business,

;

so,

and leave

as to

No, I

go and

balls

and

dresses to your betters."

This was Cinderella

been granted, puzzled

to

the

just

expected

how

she to

;

kind of for,

had

answer that her

would have been

act

in the

request sorely

business.

Next evening, the two ladies went again the ball, and Cinderella soon followed

them,

but,

by the help of the

fairy,

dressed


57 in

a far more magnificent style than formerly.

The

Prince,

who was

quite delighted to see her

again, hardly left her aide the whole evening,

and was continually

Cinderella

the

evening

much

was so and the

the company,

with

paying her

most

the

compliment*.

flattering

civilities

had

of

passed

aware; and the

dancing, as the

away

it

well

Prince, that

she

before

clock struck

she supposed that

up with

taken

as

the

was

when

twelve,

could only be elevea

Alarmed, she sprang from her

seat,

and

almost flew out of the ball-room,

The

Prince

pinned

her,

she dropped one of her \\\*m

made

which

Cinderella run the faster, and in

her hurry

%!. which he

stopped to pick up.

unhid

Fatigued and breathless, fhderelli

home

in

her old

attendants, or

clothing, without

any of

coach,

her grandeur except

the remaining glass-slipper,

which

she

put

carefully into her pocket

The derell*

Prince,

who had

when he

lost

stopped

to

sight of lift

up

Cinthe


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

58

inquired at the guards

slipper,

a

seen the

magnificent

but they

go

a

palace-gates said

no

had seen

they

through

two

or

ago

;

creature

except a poor beggar-girl

out,

When

Cinderella's sisters

they had

if

inquired

beautiful

princess

struck

clock

and

ball,

had

been

had been

said the princess

came home, she

been as well pleased

former

with this as the

the

moment

they had

if

pass

princess

twelve,

if

there.

They when

there, but,

she

out

flew

the

of

the ball-room, and in her haste had dropped

one

her neat

of

glass

-

slippers

that

;

the

Prince having found the slipper, did nothing

but admire ball,

during the remainder of the

it

and every person said he was

violently

in love with the beautiful princess.

A

few

caused

it

after

days to

the

ball,

the

Prince

be proclaimed, that he would

marry the lady whom the glass-slipper fitted and he sent one of the principal officers of his

;

household with It

was

esses,

first

it

to all the ladies of his court.

carried to the princesses

and then

and duch-

to the ladies of inferior rank

;


59 no

found

but he

his

failure.

him

to

sisters,

to

would

it

tud

fit,

The Prince having then ordered

go

to the other ladies in the empire,

at

last

was

it

one

Prince with the account of

returned to the

brought to Cinderella's two

each of

whom

their

squeeze

feet

used every exertion into

but

it,

all

to

no purpose,

who was present during the with a smile, " Pray, sir, may I be

Cinderella, trial, said,

allowed to try

it

on?"

out into laughter, and

indeed

likely

The

foot!"

it

it

officer,

was very

Cinderella try

that

The two

will

sisters burst

"

said

Very

rudely,

fit

your clumsy

however,

seeing

that

beautiful, desired her to

on since she wished

for the Prince

it,

had commanded him to allow every one who Cinderella immewished it to have a trial diately put ease.

it

The two

at seeing

it fit

much more fellow

from

likewise.

At

on her sisters

foot with the greatest

were perfectly astonished

so very exactly

astonished

;

but they were

when she

her

pocket,

that

moment,

and

pulled its

put

it

on

Cinderella's kind


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

60

godmother entered, unperceived by any and touching her with her fairy wand,

fairy

one,

instantly

more

When that

treated

a

two vain young ladies found despised sister was the beautiful

they

her

on

fell

and

knees and en-

their

for

pardon

behaviour to her. sisters,

into

she had ever

than

these

their

princess,

poor clothes

dress

in.

appeared

yet

her

changed

magnificent

their

former

Cinderella raised

freely forgave

them

all

;

cruel

up her which

after

the officer conducted her to the Prince, at once soli cited her

hand

who

in marriage.

Cinderella gave her consent, and the cere-

mony

took

with great

a

place

pomp and

The amiable

few

days

afterwards,

rejoicing.

of

Cinderella were

as conspicuous after as they

had been before

qualities

her marriage, so that she retained the love of her all

husband,

who knew

and gained the esteem of She was so far from re-

her.

senting the ill-treatment of her

she sent for

them

to court,

sisters,

and by her

that

influ-

ence they were shortly after married to two


61 of the

noblemen in the kingdom. Cina long life in * state of great nor did she forget to remember,

first

derella spent felicity

;

with gratitude, her friend the contributed so j.::.-

much

fairy,

to her comfort

who had and hap-


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.

IN the days of King Alfred there lived in a small village, many miles from London, a poor widow, who had a son named Jack been a widow for

many

years,

;

she had

and Jack being

her only child, she had indulged

him

so

much

was growing up in indolence and His mother, who never checked extravagance. that he

him, had by degrees to dispose of almost she possessed, left

anything

and

at

last

there

all

was hardly

but their favourite cow.

The poor woman came to Jack one day with tears in her eyes, and reproaching him for his carelessness,

mains to to part

sell

but

with her,

must not

starve."

said,

my it

"Nothing now

poor cow; I

grieves

me

am

sadly,

re-

sorry

but we


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK. For a few minutes Jack morse, but

it

felt

was soon over

teasing his mother to let

;

63

a degree of

re-

he then began

him go and

sell

the

cow, and she at last consented.

As he was going carrying

some

along, he

curious

colours in his hat,

met a butcher,

beans of

different

and who, knowing Jack's

easy temper, determined to take advantage of

Jack that he meant to

it

So, learning from

sell

the cow, he asked the price of

same time

offering

him

the

all

it,

at the

beans

in

his bat for it

The silly boy at once catched at the offer, and was quite pleased to think that he had He ran away home got such a bargain. as fast as he could and told his mother, the

spreading

beans before

her with great

delight

When very

the heard Jack's story, she became

angry,

and

kicked

the

beans

away

They were uiitiBiA some of them going into

from her in a passion. in all directions,

the garden.

That night they both went supperiess to bed.


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

64

Jack awoke early next morning, and

see-

ing sonnet a ing very strange from his bedroom

window, dressed quickly, and ran out into the garden, where he was surprised to find

some of

that

see

the

top

the

;

had

beans

the

and grown up so high

taken

besides,

stalks,

root,

he could not

that

had en-

twined, and presented the appearance of a ladder. They were also of such an immense

Jack could not shake them.

thickness, that

He was

formed

instantly

climb

the

at

and so he hours, he

His

top.

him not

intreated

the

resolution

and

bean-stalk ladder,

his

set

to

go

out.

;

mother

to

see

what

in

vain

Jack had resolved,

After climbing several

reached the

top

exhausted,

quite

and looking round he found himself in a strange and barren country, where he saw neither

houses,

trees,

nor any living crea-

tures.

He now disobedience the

reflected

to

bean-stalk

ginning to

feel

with

sorrow

his

mother,

against

her

in

will

on

his

climbing ;

but

be-

very hungry, he walked on,


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.

G5

hope of coming to some house, where

in the

might ask for something to eat and drink Presently there appeared to him a

he

most beautiful

wand

white

young

She asked Jack

He

father.

lady,

a

with

small

in her hand. if

he knew anything of his and that

replied that he did not,

whenever he asked his mother about him, she did not

him, but burst into team

answer

The young lady '

not

she would

said

father's history to

3ut before

reveal his

him, but his mother must "

I begin," said she,

quire a solemn promise on your part what I command you, for I am a fairy if

you do not perform exactly what

I re-

do

to ;

and

I desire,

you will be destroyed." Jack got frightened, and promised to do she

required of him

began her story

" :

;

when

Your

the fairy

father

all

thus

was a rich

man, and very benevolent ; he was constantly relieving the poor, and made it a rule never to let

a day pass without doing good

person.

He

to his

board

to

some

used frequently to invite those

who through

misfortune

bad


FAVOURITE FAERY TALES.

66

been reduced in circumstances, and on these occasions he always presided himself, and did in his

all

fortable.

power Such

made him

well

to

a

render his guests combenevolent

known through

disposition

the part

all

A very country where he lived. wicked giant lived some miles distant from the

of

your

father's

house.

but very covetous

;

This

giant

was poor,

and hearing of your

father,

he formed the design of becoming acquainted with him, with the wicked intention of pos-

He sessing himself of your fathers money. removed into your neighbourhood, and shortly afterwards spread the report that he had his property by an earthquake, and had just escaped with his life. Your father gave credit to his story, and pitying him,

lost all

invited

him

to

take

up

his

abode

in

his

was treated very kindly. "Things went on in this way for some

house, where he

time,

when

at last a favourable opportunity

occurred for the

purpose

one

into

giant

day looking

putting his wicked

He was

standing

through a large

telescope

execution.


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK. towards the

sea,

07

which was at some distance

from your father's house, where he saw a

He

of ships apparently in distress. requested your father to

send

fleet

instantly

be good enough to

AU

his SSUSJiis to their assistance.

all

were

immediately

porter

and your

dispatched,

nurse.

The

the

except giant,

quite

delighted with his success, then joined

your

and when your father him down a book which he

father in the library

was

;

handing had been recommending, the giant took the opportunity and stabbed him, when he infell

stantly

down

dead.

hastened and dispatched

The the

then

giant

porter and the

and had determined to kill your nurse, mother and you also; but she fell at his feet and piteously besought him to spare tar. and the life of her dear little baby. " The monster granted her request, but en-

life

joined her by of

your

death

if

no means erer

father,

she

wa

to speak to

threatening her

with

discovered doing

so.

you

cruel

Your

mother then fled with yon in her arms, as quickly

M possible

;

when

the giant loaded himself


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

68

with your father's treasures, and setting the house,

made

his escape long

fire to

before

the

Your poor mother, thus

servants had returned

ruined and widowed, wandered with you for

many

miles without knowing what to do, and

at last settled in the cottage

brought up

;

and

it is

where you were to the

owing

entirely

threats of the giant that she never speaks to

you of your

father, or

answers any of your

questions about him."

The

fairy then told

Jack that she had been

and that her power, which had been temporarily suspended, was now rehis father's fairy

stored.

;

She further informed him that

it

was

by her promptings he had exchanged the cow for the beans, and that she had caused the beans to grow in the shape of a ladder, and to so great a height.

She then said

to him,

"

This

is

in which the wicked giant lives,

the country

and you are

the person appointed to punish him.

have

many

counter, but

dangers

and

you must

difficulties

You to

will

en-

persevere, or you will

not prosper in any of your undertakings."


JACK AND THE HKAX-OTALK. She

69

also desired that he should not let his

mother know that he was acquainted with his father's history and telling him to go straight ;

along the road

I

you,

my

he came to the giant's

till

house, said further,

"

will protect

ontnmaada,

While you do as

you; but

% most

I

order

if

you disobey

dreadful

punishment

and then she disappeared.

awaits you/'

Jack then pursued his journey, according to the directions of the fairy, and shortly after

onset espied to his great joy

reached.

A

the door,

who "

ing

him

my

husband

is

;

to

expressed great surprise at see-

is

"

it is

a powerful

human

nothing of walking

this,

he was

woman came

plain-looking

for," said she,

so fond of

Jack was

for

a large mansion, which he soon

very tired

well

giant,

known

that

and that he

flesh,

that he would think

fifty

miles to procure it"

greatly tallied

when

he heard

but hoping to elude the giant, begged

earnestly for a morsel of bread

and a

night's

The woman, who was of a generous receive disposition, was at last persuaded to

lodging.

him

into the

house

She

led

him through a


FAVOUKITE FAIRY TALES.

70 large hall,

and some long passages, where Jack

heard the groanings of some of the giant's victims issuing from their places of confine-

ment, which made him tremble she at last shewed

him

where she bade him

over ; and

all

into a spacious kitchen,

down, and brought him

sit

something to eat and drink

Jack had almost forgot his

fear,

when he

was aroused by such a loud knocking at the The door, as made the whole house shake. Jack in the oven, then went

giant's wife hid to

husband

her

let

in.

The giant walked

straight into the kitchen, and roared with a " voice like thunder, Wife, I smell fresh meat I" "

No,

my

dear/' she replied,

people in the dungeon. satisfied, fire,

seated

while his

himself

"

it

is

only the

The monster seemed quietly

wife hastened

beside

the

to prepare iho

supper.

When his

wife

Jack's

supper was ended, the giant desired to

bring him his

favourite

hen.

was very great to see the hen so he peeped through a

curiosity

giant and his

;

small crevice, and observed that whenever the


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK. giant said

"

Lay/' the hen laid an egg of solid

The giant amused himself

gold.

time with his hen

At

bed

to

and

71

last

snored like

;

he

some

for

meanwhile his wife went fell

the

asleep

by the

fireside,

roaring of a cannon.

Jack then slipped oat of his hiding-place very softly;

and finding that the giant was not awake soon, seized the hen and ran

likely to

off as fast a*

he could with

After get-

her.

ting out of the house, he soon found his to the bean-stalk ladder,

ing

it,

way

and quickly descend-

presented himself before his surprised

and overjoyed mother.

The hen

laid as

many

golden eggs as they desired, so that they soon

became possessed of great wealth, and

lived

very happily together.

Some months

after this

Jack

a very

felt

strong desire to take a second journey up the

Imn

HiHr

His

loving mother tried

her power ID dissuade him from

it

;

all

and

in al-

though her arguments could not change his resolution, he yet teemed to give up his point, moifis^g, however, to

He

go at

all

hazards.

accordingly had a dress secretly prepared


FAVOUKITE FAIBY TALES.

72

which completely disguised him ing his

and

ing,

;

and colour-

rose very early one

lie

skin,

the

climbed

a

bean-stalk

mornsecond

time.

He

rested

some time

at the

the

pursued his journey to

He

reached

it

ing a pitiful

woman

to

late

tale,

let

supper, the

in

as

The

house,

and

tell-

inducing the

in

formerly.

After

hid him in an old

giant's wife

lumber-closet.

giant's

in the evening,

succeeded

him

and then

top,

came home,

giant soon

and walked so heavily that it seemed as if the house was shaken to its foundations. He had not been long in, when he roared out, as on the former occasion of Jack's visit, "

Wife, I smell fresh meat

!"

His wife answered

was only a piece of raw meat which the crows had left on the top of the house.

that

it

She then went to get the supper. kept peeping out of the the giant was very his wife

been the cause hen.

He

ill

sadly, because,

of

his

Jack,

who

closet, noticed that

tempered, and abused as he said,

losing

at last desired her to

she had

his wonderful

go and fetch


JACK AND TUB BEAN-STALK.

73

bags of silver and gold, that

his

he might His wife soon returned with

arouse himself

two

and the

large bags, one filled with gold,

She then

retired,

and he

began counting out his money,

and

viewed

the glittering heaps with great

delight

other with

silver.

it

kept turning tired,

again,

over and over

and placing it all safely in he fell sound asleep.

was

Jack

.it

first

afraid

lest

He

he

till

the

the

should only be shamming sleep, so

got

bags

giant as

to

pounce on any one who might be concealed but shortly hearing him snore so loudly, as ;

to

sound

like

the

roaring of

high wind, he stole out of his

the

sea in a

hiding-place,

and took up the bags to carry them off Just then a little dog, which he had not noticed before, jumped from under the giant's chair, and barked so furiously that Jack gave himself

up

for lost

The

lect

lying

had

himself; and seeing a near

him, he threw

which instantly seized

however,

giant,

not waken, so that Jack

it,

piece it

did

time to tot*

to

of

meal

the dog,

and afforded Jack


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

74

the opportunity of escaping.

He

bags over his shoulder, and

made

of his as

way

his

him towards glad, indeed,

He

soon

mother a about,

lying

give

to

her,

shocked to find that her

by

his

the

cottage

mother was

his

and was

He

When

widow

learned

safely,

she got better by degrees

that

having got the again lived

cottage

very

son had

her

in

put

greatly

had been

illness

desertion.

it.

his

much put

very

very sick in a neighbour's house.

immediately went

caused

to

when he found

and learned that

deserted,

very

the top of

ran

He was

surprise.

however,

allow

was

and

when he reached and

best

then went

would

heavy burden

the bean-stalk,

descended,

the

He

out of the house.

fast as

threw the

;

the

old

returned

and Jack they

repair,

happily together in

it,

and

had every comfort which they desired. For three years Jack spoke no more of the bean-stalk to

make

her

ever,

give

caused him

his

unhappy. over

much

mother,

He

thinking

lest

could of

it,

he

should

not,

and

uneasiness, especially

howthis

when


tkt fitnorf.

WM

UM by

iJM


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK. remembered

he

of the

the

At

fairy.

commands and

75 threats

became too

last his desire

powerful to be longer repressed, and he

made

secret preparations for another journey.

On the longest day he arose very early, and climbed the bean-stalk and on reach;

ing the top, found his

mansion, as before.

way

This

the

to

time,

giant's

though he

had disguised himself very completely, he found some little difficulty in gaining admission,

but at

he succeeded, and was con-

last

cealed in the copper.

As

soon as the giant came home, he roared,

Wife, I smell fresh

nothing of

on both former

meat I"

as the

this,

occasions.

Jack thought had said so

giant ^

However the giant

wkinnljr started up, anil began

round the room

to search

all

and coming at last to the Jack was ready to die with copper, poor wished at home a thousand and himself fear,

The

times.

ped

his

;

giant, however, fortunately stop-

search

without

the copper, and then at the fireside,

lifting

seated

the lid

of

himself quietly


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

76

Jack had got such a afraid of even

he was

he should be

lest

breathing,

The giant

discovered.

that

fright

ate a hearty

supper,

and then desired his wife to go and fetch Jack by this time had somewhat his harp. recovered his boldness, and peeping out from

under the copper

had

it

lid,

could be

harp that

placed before

whenever he said delightful

saw the most beautiful

"

Play,"

music of

its

when

accord.

this

possess himself

to

the giant

the

played the most

it

own

Jack no sooner saw

mined

The giant table, and

imagined.

him on

than he deter-

of

the harp

fell fast asleep,

a

;

so

while

little

afterwards he slipped out of the copper, and seized

it.

ed by a master noise,

harp,

The harp, however, was enchant" Master fairy, and called loudly,

" !

and seeing Jack running got up

drunk so only

!

The giant was awakened by

reel

much after

called out to

and

would

to

pursue at

him,

with his

him; but he had

supper that although,

him with a certainly

off

this

he

could

indeed,

he

voice like thunder,

have

overtaken

him,


JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK. had he been first

to the

As

sober.

top of the

descended with

all

it

was,

bean-stalk,

hU

that instant he saw

the giant

bean-stalk, bat

Jack got which he

The moment he

speed.

got down, he ran for

down the

77

hatchet

Just at

coming

fast

Jack with the hat-

chet cut the bean-stalk close off at the root,

and

the

giant,

tumbling

headlong

to

the

ground, was killed by the fall Jack's mother

was

not more

astonished

to see the huge giant than she was delighted to see the bean-stalk destroyed.

Jack heartily

begged her pardon for all the sorrow he had caused her, and promised faithfully to be most

dutiful

wst of his

life.

and

attentive

for

all

the


JACK TIE GIANT-KILLER.

IT

is

said that in the reign of the

Arthur, there lived near the

famous King

Land's-end, in

the county, of Cornwall, a worthy farmer,

had an only

named

son,

boy of a bold and daring disposition in

pleasure

hearing

giants and fairies

;

or

reading

and used

whe

Jack was a

Jack.

;

he took

stories

of

to listen eagerly

while his father related some of the deeds of

brave Knights of King Arthur's

Round

Table.

While Jack was yet young, he was sent to take care of the sheep and oxen in the fields,

and while thus engaged he used

to

amuse himself with planning battles, and the means of surprising and conquering a foe.

He

took no delight in

children

;

the

tamer sports of

but hardly any one could excel him


-Jack.

fuaf

M Mi tet. *m MB nrk

Mov

*tt*


JACK THE GIANT-K1LLEIL If he

at wrestling.

strength, his skill

him the Near

met with

79

his equal

in

and address generally gave

victory.

to

mountain

where Jack called

lived, there

was a high

St Michael's Mount, which

rises abruptly out of the sea at

some distance

from the mainland; and on the very top of this mountain there was a gloomy cavern, in

which dwelt a huge giant called Comoran. He was eighteen feet high, and three yards round, and his fierce and

savage looks were

the terror of the whole neighbourhood.

He

used to wade over to the mainland in search of his prey

;

but when he came near, the people

their houses,

and would not return

his departure;

till

left

he took

which was not before he had

glutted his appetite upon their cattle,

when he

would throw half-a-dosen oxen upon his back, and tie three times as many sheep and hogs round his waist, and so march back to bis own

Jack having often heard of the giant's sad ravages, resolved to destroy him.

So, early one

winter's evening, he took a horn, a shovel, a


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

80

pickaxe, and a dark lantern

fell

to

had dug a as

and swam to The

;

Having climbed to near the top, he work at once, and before morning

Mount.

pit

feet

twenty-two

deep and almost

This pit he covered over with

broad.

many

and straw, and then strewed some earth

sticks

over them, to

He

ground.

make

the place resemble solid

then put his horn to his mouth,

and blew such a loud and long tantivy, that he awoke the giant, who came towards Jack, roaring in a voice like thunder, villain, rest.

you

shall

I will broil

"

You

saucy

pay

dearly for breaking

you

for

my

my breakfast/'

Hardly had he spoken these words, when, advancing one step further, he tumbled right into

the

pit,

and his

shook

the very

Giant," said Jack,

laughing

fall

mountain. "

ho

heartily,

Mr

!

and looking into the

found your way so soon to is

your appetite now

?

for breakfast this cold

poor Jack

"have you How the bottom ? pit,

nothing serve you morning but broiling

"Will

" ?

The giant now

tried to rise, but

Jack get-


JACK THE GIANT-KILLER. ting on

his

head gave him such a blow with

he killed him on the spot back to surprise and

his pickaxe, that

Jack then made his

rejoice

81

haste

with the news

friends

of

the

giant's death.

The over

news

of Jack's

exploit soon

the western parts

all

Old Blunderbore,

another giant, called giant kept an

have

(this

enchanted castle in the midst

of a lonely wood) having heard of to

spread

of England; and

his revenge

on Jack,

ever be his fortune to get

him

if

it,

it

vowed should

into his power.

Now, about four months after this, as Jack was taking a journey to Wales, be through this wood, near to Blunder-

pasted bore's

castle,

down

to rest

tain,

and there

and being very weary, he

by

**

the side of a pleasant foun-

fell

into a deep sleep.

The giant came to the fountain for water soon altar, and seeing Jack, he took him

up and

carried

him

to his castle

;

the floor of

which was strewed over with the skulls and bones of captives whom be had killed and eaten.

When

poor Jack

eaw

this

he was very


82

FAVOUEITE FAIEY TALES.

much told

alarmed, particularly

favourite

thoughts

pepper and

with

hearts, eaten

his

and

food;

also,

the

giant

that

men's

vinegar,

went

up, while he

this,

was

he had

that

making a dainty meal on

of

After telling Jack

heart.

when

with a horrid grin,

him,

his

he locked him

to fetch another

giant to

enjoy a dinner off Jack's flesh with him.

While he was shrieks castle

;

away, Jack heard

terrible

and groans from many parts of the and soon after he heard a mournful

voice repeat these lines

:

"Haste, valiant stranger, haste away, Lest you become the giant's prey.

On

his return

Still

he

'11

bring another,

more savage than his brother

A horrid,

cruel monster, who,

Before he

kills, will

"valiant stranger

Or you

'11

!

torture you.

haste away,

become these

giants' prey."

This frightened Jack dreadfully, and he was just giving himself

ceived in a cords,

up

corner of

which revived

for lost,

the

when he

per-

room two strong

his courage

;

with these

he made two nooses, with a slip-knot at the


JACK THE GIANT-KILLER

83

end of each, and as the giants were coming through the gates, which were just below the

window of very

his

adroitly

threw the ropes

he

prison,

orer

their

and

heads,

then

palled with all his might, so that he strangled

When

them.

he saw that they were both

quite black in the face,

down

slid

he drew his sword,

the ropes, and

stabbed the giants

to the heart

Jack then took a bench of keys from Blunpocket, and going into the castle

derbore's

again, he

made a

strict search

through

rooms, and found three ladies tied hair of their heads,

and almost starred to

Jack told them how he had

and then Tery

tip

politely

the

by the death.

killed the giants,

handed orer to them

the keys of the castle, with contained, and went on

all

all

the riches

it

his journey to Wales.

As Jack had not riches for himself,

taken any of the giant's and had Tery little money

of his own, he thought fast as

he could.

and he

lost his

down

for

some

it

best to travel as

Night came

way; time,

on,

however,

he wandered up and

and

at last

was lucky


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

84

come

to

enough

to

a large

and handsome

house.

Jack went

to it boldly,

up

loudly at the gate

and

surprise, it

;

and knocked

to his great terror

when,

was opened by a monstrous

giant with two heads.

He was

a

Welsh

civilly to

Jack

was done

secretly,

;

giant,

and

spoke

very

for all the mischief he did

under the show of friend-

Jack told him that he was

ship or kindness.

who had

way; on which the huge monster welcomed him into his house, and shewed him into a room where there was a traveller

lost his

a good bed, to pass the night

Jack took

in.

off his clothes quickly

and got

bed; but though he was very weary, he could not go to sleep. Soon after this, he to

heard the giant walking backward

ward

in the next room,

and saying

and to

for-

him-

self

"

Though here you lodge with me this You shall not see the morning light,

My "

So

!

night,

club shall dash your brains out quite."

so

!

Mr

Giant/' said Jack to himself,


JACK TEX GIAXT-KILLEB.

85

* are these your tricks I

to prove

hope

a

getting out of bed,

upon travellers match for yon."

place in the bed,

But

And

he found a large thick

of wood, which

billet

?

he

laid in

his

own

and then hid himself in a

dark corner of the room.

In the middle of the night the giant came with his great dab, and struck

blows on the bed, in the

Jack had

laid the billet;

back

his

to

broken

own room,

terrible

many

very place where

and then he went thinking

he

had

Jack's bones.

all

Early in the morning, Jack put a bold face

on the matter, and walking room, thanked him for his giant started to

into the giant's

The

lodging.

when he saw him, and began

stammer out

"

Oh,

dear

Pray how did you sleep

last

me

I

is

it

night?

you ? Did

yon hear or

see anything during the night?" Nothing worth speaking of," said Jack, " a rat, I believe, gave me three or carelessly "

;

four slaps with his little

;

but

I

tail,

and disturbed me a

soon went to sleep again."

The giant was

perfectly astonished at this


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

86

yet did not

answer a word, but went and

fetched two bowls

of hasty pudding for their

Jack, to

breakfast.

make

the

giant believe

he could eat as much as him, had contrived a leathern bag inside his coat, and

to button

slipped most of the hasty-pudding into this bag,

while he seemed to put

it all

into his mouth.

When breakfast was over, he said to the giant, "Now I will shew you a fine trick." He then took up a knife and instantly ripped up the leathern .

bag,

ran out upon the nails/'

cried

shamed as

Jack,

the

when

Welsh

to be outdone

into his

down dead

As

own in a

Ods, splutter her

giant,

little

a-

fellow

that hurself;" so say-

up a

stomach,

and plunged

knife,

when he dropped

moment.

soon as Jack had thus killed the Welsh

monster, he pursued his journey

days

who was

by such a

"hur can do

ing, the giant snatched it

the hasty pudding "

floor.

after,

;

and a few

he met with King Arthur's only

son, who, with his father's leave,

was

travel-

ling into Wales, with the purpose of deliver-

ing

a beautiful young lady from the power


JACK THE

GI ACT-KILLER.

of a wicked magician,

When

enchantment*.

who

87

held her in his

Jack found that

the

young prince had no attendants, he begged the prince at once agreed leave to follow him ;

and gave Jack many thmik*

to this,

for his

kindness.

This prince was a handsome, brave knight

;

too benevolent, for he gave

everybody he

met

coin to an old

polite,

his only fault was, that he

At

money

and was

to almost

length he gave his last

woman, and then bethinking Jack and said, " How are we

himself, turned to

to provide for ourselves the rest of the jour-

ney "

T

"Leave that to me,

I will

came

provide for

on,

my

sir,"

prince."

said Jack,

Night soon

and the prince began to grow uneasy where they should lodge. "Sir,"

at thinking said

well

M

Jack,

further ;

be of

on there

good heart ; two miles a giant, whom I know

lives

he has three heads, and can fight

hundred men, and make them "

*

Alas

" I

we had

flea

five

before him."

replied the prince, in sad surprise,

better

Kiel bam born than meet

with such a monster"

"My

lord," said Jack,


FAVOUEITE FAIRY TALES.

88

me

"leave

patiently

manage him, and wait here

to

till

I return."

The prince

no more, but

said

remained

behind, while Jack rode on at full speed

when he came

The

giant, with a voice like

" thunder, roared out, plied,

and

to the gate of the castle, he gave

a loud knock

"No

;

Who

is

Jack

there?"

re-

one but your poor cousin Jack"

" Well," said the giant, opening the gate, what " said cousin Jack ?" Dear uncle," Jack, news, "

"

"

news."

heavy

Pooh

" I

the

said

"

what heavy news can come to me giant with three heads, and can hundred men, and make them "

Alas

" !

"

said Jack,

"

all

Oh,

men

fight

is

cousin "

Jack,"

this is

said

the

a

five

to

castle."

giant,

heavy news indeed

com-

and

to kill you,

your wealth, and destroy your

agitatior,

am

before me."

the king's son

ing with two thousand take

flee

giant,

I

?

;

with

but

I

have a large vault under ground, where I will hide myself, and you will be good enough to lock, till

bolt,

and bar

the king's son

Jack promised

is

to

me

in,

and keep the keys

gone."

do

this

with great good


JACK THB OlANT-KILLEB. will

;

so,

vault,

when he had made

89

the giant fast in the

he went back and brought the prince to

the castle,

and that night they both

feasted

and

rested very pleasantly, while the poor giant lay

trembling with fear in the vault under ground. Early next

morning,

Jack gave the prince

gold and silver out of the giant's treasure, and set him three miles forward on his journey.

He

then returned to

let

the giant out of the

who asked Jack what he should

vault,

as a reward for saving his castle.

"

give

him

Why, good

uncle," said Jack, "I desire nothing but yon old

coat and cap, with the old rusty sword and the slippers "

which are hanging at your bed-head."

" Then," said the Riant, you shall have

them

;

and pray do not part with them, for The coat will

they are things of grail value.

keep you invisible while you wear will give

it

;

the cap

the sword will cut

you knowledge the shoes are of vast ; and ;

through any thing swiftness.

These

take them with

many

may

all

my

prove useful to you, so

heart"

Jack returned

thanks to the giant, and then set off to

overtake the prince.


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

90

Soon

after

he came up with him, they arrived

at the dwelling of the beautiful

who was under cian.

young

lady,

the power of the wicked magi-

She received the prince very

politely,

and

caused a noble repast to be prepared for him

but when

it

was ended, she

from her pocket a

rose,

;

and taking

fine handkerchief, said,

"

My

you must submit to the custom of my palace to-morrow morning I command you to tell me on whom I bestow this handkerchief, or lord,

:

lose

your head." She then went out of the room.

The young prince

retired very

mournful

:

but Jack comforted him with the promise of

He then put on his cap of knowledge, which told him that the lady was compelled by his help.

the

power of the enchantment

to

meet the

wicked magician every night in the middle of the forest.

Jack instantly put on his coat

of darkness, and his shoes of swiftness, and

When

the lady came,

she gave the handkerchief to

the magician,

was there before

her.

on which Jack, with one blow of sharpness, cut off his head.

was thus ended

;

his

sword of

The enchantment

and the lady the same mo-


it

JACK THE GIAJfT-OLLZB.

91

restored to her former virtue

and good-

She was married to the prince the next day, after returned with her royal husband

and soon

and a great company to the court of King Arthur, where they were received with joyful welcomes

and the valiant

;

as well as the

many

hero, Jack, for this,

other great exploits be

had done for the good of his country, was made one of the Knights of the Round Table, Since Jack had been so lucky in all his adventures, be could not till

do what

to

now be

but resolved

idle,

services he could for the hon-

our of the king and the nation.

He

therefore

humbly begged his majesty to furnish him with a horse and money, that be might travel " in search of new exploits. For/ said he to the "

king,

there are

many

giants yet living in the

remote parts of Wales, to the great terror and distress of if

it

design, I .

your majesty's subjects

please you, sire,

to favour

therefore,

me

in

my

hope soon to rid your kingdom of

these giants and monsters

When

;

in

human

shape."

the king heard Jack's offer, and thought


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

92

of the cruel deeds of these savage monsters, he

he should be pro-

at once gave orders, that

vided with journey.

such a

every thing proper for

Soon

after this,

Jack took his

not forgetting to take with him his

leave,

cap of

knowledge, his sword of sharpness, his shoes of swiftness,

He

and his

invisible coat.

travelled over high hills

and

lofty

moun-

tains, and on the third day he came to a vast forest, which he had hardly entered when he

heard very dreadful shrieks and nothing daunted, forced his trees,

cries.

Jack, the

way through

and saw a monstrous giant

carrying

away, by the hair of the head, a handsome

knight and his beautiful lady. cries

Their dreadful

melted the heart of honest Jack,

got down from

his horse, and, tying

who

him

to

a tree, put on his invisible coat, under which

he carried his sword of sharpness.

When many

he came up to the giant, he made

strokes at him, but could not reach his

body on account of his great height; however, he wounded his thighs in many places, and

at last,

aiming with

all

his might, he cut


JACK TH1 QUXT-KILLER. off

93

one of the giant's legs just below the garter,

so that he tumbled to the ground,

making not

only the trees shake, but the earth itself tremble

with the force of his

fall

Jack then quickly set one foot upon the giant's neck, and plunged his sword into his body

;

yielded

the monster gave a loud groan, and his

up

life

into the

hands of the

vic-

torious Jack.

The knight and his lady not only thanked Jack most heartily for their deliverance, but %lso invited

himself,

and

him

mansion to refresh

to their

also to receive

a reward for his

kindness and bravery. "No," said Jack, with " great politeness, I cannot be at ease till I find -lit

this monster's dwelling.*

When

the knight heard this, he appeared

vexed, and

" replied,

ster lived in

Noble

with a brother of

his,

still

cruel than himself; so let

go with suit"

mon-

stranger, this

a den under yonder mountain,

me

more

fierce

and

persuade y>

and not think of any further pur" Nay," said Jack, though there were

us,

twenty such monsters, I would shed the

last


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

94 drop of

blood before one of them should

my

So Jack got on

escape me/'

his

horse,

and

went away in search of the dead giant's brother. Jack had not rode much over a mile before he came in sight of the mouth of the cavern

and near the entrance of

it

;

he espied the other

giant sitting on a huge block of timber, with a

knotted iron club in his hand, seemingly waiting for his brother.

As Jack came "Fe,

near,

fa, foh,

he heard him

fum,

I smell the blood of

Be he I

'11

invisible

coat,

and aimed a blow of sharpness

an Englishman

be he dead, grind his bones to make

;

;

living, or

Jack got down from

on his

saying

came

at his

my

his horse, close

bread."

and putting

up

to him,

head with his sword

but missing his aim, he only

cut off his nose. claps of thunder,

The giant roared and taking up

began to lay about him with pain and fury.

like

loud

his iron club,

one

like

who was

mad

"Nay," will

said Jack,

"if this

is

put an end to you at once."

the case, I

So slipping


JACK THE GIANT-KILLER.

05

nimbly behind him, and jumping

upon the it, he

block of timber as the giant rose from

stabbed him in the back, when, alter a few howl*, the monster dropped

down

dead.

Jack having thus killed these two giants, went into their cave in search of their treasures.

Hit pitted through

at last led

him

to a

many turnings, which

window secured with

iron

bars, where he aaw a number of wretched captives, whom he set at liberty. They then went

together,

and searched the

Jack shared captives.

all

giant's coffers,

the store in

snd

them among the

The next morning they

set off to

homes, and Jack went on to the knight's house, where he

was received with the greatest

joy by the thankful knight and his lady in

honour of Jack's

feast, to

which

all

exploits,

the nobles

neighbourhood were

;

who,

gave a grand

and gentry

in the

invited.

When the company had assembled, the knight related the

many

great exploits of Jack, and

gave htm, as a mark of respect, a

fine

ring,

on which was engraved the scene of the giant dragging the knight and his lady by the hair.


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

9G

Among who were

the guests were five old gentlemen, fathers of

some of those captives

whom Jack had freed from As

the giant's dungeon.

soon as they heard that he was the person

who had done such wonderful him with

pressed around

things, they

tears of joy, to return

him thanks for the happiness he had caused them. After staying with the knight a considerable time,

Jack grew weary of such an

idle

life,

out again in search of adventures.

set

wandered over

hills

and

dales without

and

He

meeting

with any, but at length coming to the foot of a very high mountain, where was a small and lonely house, he

knocked at the door, which

was opened by an old man, with a head as white as snow. "

Good

traveller

father/' said Jack,

who

has lost his

the hermit, " I can, if as

my

and

entered,

some bread and

can you lodge a

way ?"

you

"

Yes/' replied

will accept such fare

poor house affords."

when

"

the old

Jack thanked him

man

set before

him

fruit for his supper.

After Jack had eaten as much as he chose, the hermit said, " My son, I know you to be


JACK THE GIANT-KILLER.

Now, on

the famous slayer of giants.

mountain

of this

an enchanted

is

97 the top

castle,

kept

by a huge giant named Galligantns, who, by the aid of a vile magician, succeeds in capturing

many

knights,

whom

he conveys into his

and changes into the shape of

castle,

Above

all,

lament the bard

I

daughter of a wealthy duke, as she

was walking

in

(ate

whom

beasts.

of

the

they seized

her father's garden, and

brought hither through the air in a chariot

drawn by two

fiery dragons,

and turned her

Jack promised the

into the shape of a deer."

hermit he would break the enchantment

a sound

after

invisible coat,

When

sleep,

he rose

and got ready

early,

for the

;

so,

put on his

attempt

he had climbed to the top of the

mountain, he found attached to the wall at the

ditto gate a golden trumpet, under which were ',

lit:

Wfcomr ma thb trap* Shall

No the

btar,

mow UM fbat't owthrow."

sooner had Jack read this than he seised

trumpet and blew a

shrill

blast,

which


FAVOUEITE FAIRY TALES.

98

caused the gates to

fly

open, and the very castle

itself to tremble.

When this,

the giant

they

knew

and the magician heard was at

that their wicked course

an end, and stood biting their thumbs and shaking with

fear.

Jack entered, and with

his sword of sharpness soon killed the giant,

while the magician was

carried

away by a

whirlwind.

The knights and

ladies to

thus given liberty rested

whom

Jack had

that night

at

the

hermitage, and next day set out for the court. Jack accompanied them and presenting himself before the king, gave his majesty an ;

account of

all his

wonderful engagements,

jack's fame had now wftole country dtike gave

joy of

krge

him

all his

estate,

;

spread through the

and at the king's

desire, the

his daughter in marriage, to the

kingdom. The king gave him a on which he and his lady lived

the rest of their days in great joy and content-

ment.


-rw tWe


ILE

RED RIDING-HOOD.

OKCB upon a time there tired, in a certain Tillage, a woman, who had a very beautiful little daughter.

This

tittle

girl's

mother was ex-

tremely fond of her, and so also was her grandmother,

who doted

very

much on

her.

The kind

grandmother was frequently giving her presents, and amongst other things she once presented her with a very neat riding-hood

made of red

which became the

so extremely well,

tittle girl

that everybody used to

call

cloth,

Red

her Little

ig-Hood

One

day,

when her mother had been making

custards, she said to her,

"

Go,

my

your grandmamma a costard and a butter,

and see how she

has been very poorly."

is,

dear, carry tittle

pot of

for I bear that

Little

she

Red Riding*


FAVOUEITE FAIKY TALES.

100

Hood, who was very fond of her grandmother, took the custard and the pot of butter, and immediately set out for her cottage, which was

some

in another village at

hungry

wolf,

who had

As

little distance.

wood, she met a

she was going through a

mind

a very great

to

have eaten her up, but durst not because of

some faggot-makers who were

He

little distance.

work

at

at a

asked her, however, where

who

she was going, and the poor child,

did not

think of any danger in speaking to the wolf, '

replied readily,

mamma, who

is

custard and a

mamma." the

I

very

ill,

"

and

am

my

grand-

carrying her a

pot of butter from

little

"Not

wolf.

which you see

see

going to see

"Does she

Red Riding-Hood;

village."

am

very "

my

live far off?" inquired far,"

it is

answered

Little

just beyond that mill

there, at the first

house in the

" Well," said the wolf, I will go and

your grandmother too

way, I will go

this,

;

and we

and

if

you go that

shall see

who

will

be there soonest."

The wolf ran away ing the nearest

way

;

as fast as he could, tak-

while the

little girl

went


LITTLE RED RIDIKO-HOOD.

101

by the ordinary road, which was considerably round about, and besides she stayed diverting herself in gathering nuts, running after butterHies,

and making nosegays. The wolf soon to the old woman's house, and knocked

came up

"Who's there?"

at the door, tap, tap.

the old

woman.

replied *

the

"Little

wolf,

counterfeiting

who has brought you a from mamma."

cried

Red Riding-Hood," her

voice,

custard and a pot of

,

The grandmother, who was very "

fined to bed, cried out,

The wolf

the latch will go up."

ill

and con-

Pull the bobbin,

and

pulled the

bobbin and the door opened, when he entered

and presently fell upon the poor old woman, and ate her up in a moment, for it was above he had got any

three days since

was

food.

1 1

and putthe on went grandmother's night-clothes, ting into the bed, expecting Little Red Ridingthen shut the door as

it

before,

Hood, who came tome time afterwards, and knocked at the door, cried the wolf. at first very

" tap, tap.

Little

much

Who's there

" ?

Red Riding-Hood was when she Wild the

afraid


FAVOURITE FAIKY TALES.

102

hoarse voice, but supposing her grandmother

had got a

cold,

"

she answered,

Red

Little

Riding-Hood, who has brought you a custard and a pot of butter, from mamma." The wolf then cried out to her, softening his voice as

much

"

as he could,

latch will

Pull the bobbin, and the Little

go up."

Red Riding-Hood

pulled the bobbin, and the door opened.

The wolf

come

seeing her

hid himself

in,

under the bedclothes, and said to

" her,

Put

the custard and the pot of butter on the stool,

my

dear,

Little

and come and

lie

down

Red Riding-Hood undressed

went into the bed prised to see

how

;

beside me/' herself,

and

but she was greatly surstrange her

grandmother

looked in her night-clothes, and said to her "

Grandmamma, what

great arms

you have

"

got

!

"That

is

the better to

"Grandmamma, what

hug

thee,

my

dear/'

great legs you have

go!" "

That

"

Grandmamma, what great

got!"

is

to

walk the

better,

my

child."

ears

you have


LITTLE BED RIDING-HOOD. " That *

is to

hear the better,

Grandmamma, what

my

103

child"

great eyes yon have

gotr "

That

*

Grandmamma, what

"They

And

is

my

child."

great teeth you have

are to eat thee up."

saying these words, the wicked wolf

upon poor her

to see the better,

tip in

Little

Red Riding-Hood, and

a few minutes,

fell

ate


PUSS IN BOOTS.

THERE was once a and

at-

among them

who had

three sons, r

in the

gave his mill to the

and

miller

he divided what he .possessed

his death

following

manner

He

:

eldest, his ass to the second,

his cat to the youngest.

Each of the brothers accordingly took what belonged to him ; but the youngest, who had got nothing saving the

was badly joining

"

used.

their

well in the world

eaten

may

my

cat,

My

stocks ;

Oat,

brothers," said he,

together,

may

"

by

do very

but as for me, when

and made a furcap of

soon die of hunger

The

complained that he

cat,

I

have

his skin, I

" I

which had been

all

the time sitting

listening just inside the door of the cupboard,

now ventured

to

come

out,

and address him

:


tr

j Urxl Mi^Mli of

OwOM

b.


FOBS nr

"Do

mx>m

105

not thus distress yourself,

my

good

master only get a pair of boots made for me, and ;

give

me a

bag, and you shall soon see that you

are not quite M> ill provided for as

you imagine." Though the lad did not much depend upon thaw promises, yet, as he had often observed the cunning tricks which Puss used to catch the rats and mice, sueh as hanging by his himllegs,

and hiding in the meal, to make them behe waH dead, he did not entirely

lieve that

despair of his being of

some use

to

him

in his

unhappy condition.

No

sooner were the boots and the bag pro-

vided, than Puss to the

began to equip himself, much his young master he drew

amusement of

:

on the boots quite briskly

and, putting the

bag about hi* neck, took hold of the strings with his fore paws, and bidding his matter take courage, be immediately sallied forth.

The first attempt Puss made was to go into a warren, where there was a great number of rabbits. He pot some bran and some parsley into his

bag

;

and then stretched himself out

at roll length, as

if

he

MI dead,

hoping that


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

106

some young

rabbits, (which as yet

knew

no-

thing of the cunning tricks of the world,) would

soon come and get into the bag, the better to feast

upon the

dainties he

Scarcely had he lain

had put into

down

it.

before he

ceeded as well as could be wished.

A

suc-

giddy

young rabbit crept into the bag, when Puss immediately drew the strings, and killed him without mercy.

Proud of

his prey, he nastened directly to

the palace, where he asked to speak with the

King.

On

being shewn into the apartment of

his Majesty, he made a very respectful bow, and said " I have brought you, sire, this rabbit

from the warren of

Carabas,

my

lord the Marquis of

who commanded me

to present

it

your Majesty with the assurance of his spect."

tc

re-

This was a title the Cat had invented " Tell lord the of

for his master.

my

Carabas/' replied the King,

Marquis

"

that I have

much

pleasure in accepting his present, and that I

am

greatly obliged to him."

Soon self

after this, the

down in

the same

Cat went and laid him-

manner

in a field of corn,


PUSS nt BOOTS.

107

and had as much good fortune as before for lie had not waited long when two fine partridges ;

bag, which he

slipped into his

immediately

and carried to the palace The King was pleased to receive them courteously, as he had kiUed,

done the rabbit

and

;

in this

tinued to carry presents of

from

my Ml

:.

lord the iy

v,

to the

game

Marquis of Oarabas, at

King least

k

-

,

manner Puss con-

One day, having heard

that the

King

intend-

Ml

ed taking a drive by the river-side with daughter,

who was

in the world, will

now but

made.

Take

the most beautiful princess

Puss said to his master follow off

river, just in

my

your

advice,

clothes,

"

If

you

your fortune

and bathe

is

in the

the place I will shew you, and

leave the rest to me,"

Puss's master did exactly as he

was

desired,

without being able to guess the Oat's design.

While he was bathing, the King passed by, and out, as loud as he could

Post directly called

bawl* Help,

I

help

!

or

my lord the Marquis of

Oarabas will be drowned."

The King, hearing window of his

the cries, put his head out at the


FAVOUKITE FAIEY TALES.

108

carriage to see

what was the matter

the very Cat which had brought

;

and seeing

him

so

many

presents, he ordered his attendants to go directly to the assistance of the

While they went

Marquis of Carabas.

to take the

Marquis out of

the river, the Cat ran forward to the King's carriage,

ter

and told

his Majesty, that while his

was bathing, some thieves had run

his clothes as they lay

cunning Cat under a large

When

the

one of his

all

the

by

the river-side

;

the

stone.

King heard

this,

he commanded

from the royal ward-

robe one of the handsomest suits

at the

with

time having hid them

officers to fetch

and present it

mas-

off

to

it

contained,

my lord the Marquis of Carabas,

same time he shewed him a thousand

attentions.

As

the fine clothes which had been

brought him made him look quite

man, and

set off his person,

like a gentle-

which was very

comely, to the greatest advantage, the King's

daughter was very

much

taken with his appear-

and the Marquis of Carabas had no sooner upon her two or three respectful glances,

ance, cast

than she became violently in

love-

with him.


109

PUSS IN BOOTS.

The King

on

insisted

his

the

into

getting

The

carriage, and taking a drive with them.

Cat meanwhile, delighted to see how well his scheme was succeeding, ran on before toamea-

dow

that

mperi, do not

was being reaped, and hailing the them " Good people, if you

said to

tell

the King,

way, that the to

who

soon pass this

will

meadow you

are reaping belongs

lord the Marquis of Carabas,

my

shall

you

be chopped as small as minced meat"

When

was passing the

the King's carriage

meadow, be did not

whom it belonged.

fail

"

to ask the reapers to

To my

lord the Marquis of

Carabas," said they all at once

;

for the threat* -

of the Cat had frightened them.

here a very fine piece of land, quis," said the King.

es not ful

fail

"Truly,

my sire,"

You

have

lord

Mar-

:

to bring in every year

a

j.'.

harvest"

The

Cat, which

now came toa

field

kept going on before, where some other labourers

still

MB

were busy making sheaves of the they had reaped, and to whom he said as before

Good

people, if

you do not

tell

the King, * ho


FAVOUEITE FAIBY TALES.

1 1

will presently pass this

have reaped in this

way, that the corn you belongs to

field

ray lord

the Marquis of Carabas, you shall be chopped as small as

minced meat."

The King passed a few minutes quired to

whom "

longed.

To

my

and

in-

lord the Marquis of Carabas,"

answered they very glibly

King

after,

the noble sheaves of corn be-

;

upon which the

again complimented the Marquis on his

fine possessions.

The

Cat,

which

still

continued to go before,

gave the same charge to so that the

all

the people he

met

;

King was greatly astonished at the

splendid fortune of the Marquis of Carabas.

Puss at length arrived at a stately

which belonged

to a powerful

Ogre,

besides very rich, for all the lands the

passed through and admired were Cat,

castle,

who was King had The

his.

which had taken care to learn every partiand what he could do,

cular about the Ogre,

asked to speak with him, saying, as he entered the room, that he could not think of passing so

near his castle without doing himself the hon-

our of calling to inquire for his health.


Ill

PUSS Df BOOTS.

The Ogre received him as civilly as an Ogre " I could do, and desired him to bt seated. "

have been informed," said the Cat, have the

of animals in a moment, into a elephant, for

example ?"

plied the Ogre, sternly I will directly

was so

that

gill of changing yourself into

;

"

lion,

or an

It is

very true," re" and to convince you,

take the form of a lion."

terrified at finding himself beside

that he sprang from him,

roof of the house

;

you

all sorts

Puss a

lion,

and climbed to the

but this was attended with

considerable difficulty, as his boots were not

very

fit

to walk

upon the

Some minutes

after,

tiles with.

the Cat perceiving that

the Ogre had quitted the form of a lion and had returned to his original form, ventured to

come down from the

tiles,

and owned that he

had been a good deal fHfrhlmii I have been further informed," continued the Oat,

"

but

I

know not how

to believe

it,

that you

have the power of taking the form of

the

smallest animals also; of changing yourself, for

example, into a rat or a mouse.

am

inclined to think this

I confess I

must be impossible"


1

FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

12

"

and

in

an

instant he changed himself into a mouse,

and

Impossible

began

to frisk

shall

you

!

see,"

The Cat had no

about the room.

sooner cast his eyes upon the Ogre in this form,

than he sprang upon him and devoured him in a

moment.

In the mean time the King's carriage drew near the Ogre's magnificent castle ; and as he could not help admiring attendants to

drive

he ordered his

it,

that he

to the gates,

up

The

might take a nearer view of it

Cat, hear-

ing the noise of the carriage on the draw bridge, "

immediately came to the door, saying is

Majesty

welcome

to the castle of

The King,

the Marquis of Carabas."

turned and

astonished,

splendid castle yours also,

of Carabas? stately

I

my

never saw

pleasure-grounds

doubt the

castle is as

me

lord

perfectly is

this

lord the Marquis

any thing more

than the building, or more beautiful

than the

it is

my

"And

said

Your

without

;

pray,

with a sight of

The Marquis

my

around

it.

No

magnificent within as lord Marquis, indulge

it."

offered his

hand

to the

young


113

PU88 IN BOOTH. princess as she alighted,

and they followed the where they found

into a spacious hall,

King

a splendid collation which the Ogre had prepared for some friends he had that day expected to visit

him bat who, on hearing that the King, ;

with the princess and a great gentleman of the court,

were within, had not dared to enter.

The King had become so charmed with his amiable qualities and no less with the noble fortune of the Marquis of

young

princess, too,

had

Carabas, and the

fallen so violently in

love with him. that after the collation, and

when

they had drunk a few glasses of wine, his Majesty said to the Marquis" It will be your

own

fault,

my

lord Marquis of Carabas, if

do not soon become

yon

my son-in-law." The Mar*

quis received the intelligence with a thousand respectful acknowledgments, accepted the hon-

our conferred upon him with the most profound gratitude and joy,

and received the hand of the

princess in marriage thai very day.

The Gat became a

great lord, and never again

needed to run after rats or mice except for his

Mi

::.

:.:


EOBIN HOOD.

IN the reign t)f King Richard

I.

there lived in

town of Locksley, in Nottinghamshire, a handsome youth, named Robin Hood. He was the

sent, while yet

Gamewell

young, to

Hall, in the

live

with his uncle, at

same county, where he

had many opportunities of practising archery, and soon became very expert in the use of the cross-bow.

Robin Hood was once on a rents, living,

when

his uncle, with

was taken

seriously

visit to his pa-

whom ill,

he had been

and sent

to a

neighbouring monastery for one of the monks to

come and

visit

him.

The monk knew that

the squire had plenty of

constantly beside

him

money, and being

in his last illness, suc-

ceeded in inducing him to sign a paper, giving


BOBIK1JOOD.

may all

bis property to the convent to

monk

this

his

When

belonged.

of his uncle's

Hall

115 which

Robin Hood heard

he hastened to Gomcwell

illness,

he arrived there just a short time after

;

uncle's

death,

and learned that

all

his

money and property had been left to this convent, which was called Fountain Abbey. The monks also had taken possession of Gameuncle's

well Hall,

and now turned Robin Hood out of

Robin took very ill with this treatment, especially as he had expected to succeed to his doors.

uncle's estates. to

do

;

He

did not at

first

know what

he soon, however, got together a num-

ber of young men, as poor as himself,

when

they agreed to form themselves into a band,

under Robin Hood's leadership, and adopt the life

of outlaws, living

among

the thick woods

of the famous Sherwood Forest

They were handsomt man, and very and were all excellent marksmen. in

a uniform of Lincoln green,

cap,

bold,

They dratted with a scarlet

and each man was armed with a dagger, littidit a bow and a

and a btsket-hilted sword, quiver

full

of arrows

their captain

had

alto a


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

116

bugle-horn by his

mon

side,

which he used

to

a robber, yet

as to have the

good wishes of almost

He made

poor in those parts.

rob anybody but people

all

He also

money. because

it

who were

very rich, their

disliked exceedingly all priests,

was through

their

lost his uncle's estates

ever,

the

a rule never to

and those who did not make good use of

had

sum-

Though Robin Hood was he behaved in such a manner

his followers.

;

cunning that he the priests, how-

were very domineering, and behaved so

badly that they were greatly disliked by the

common

people also, so that Robin

Hood

did

not lose any of his favour with the poor because of his usage of the priests.

One day Robin Hood rambled away by himself,

in the hope of meeting with

He had

some adventure.

not gone very far when he came to a

brook, over which a narrow plank was thrown for a bridge

the plank, a to cross

;

and just as he was going to cross and handsome stranger began

tall

from the other

middle of the^ plank

seemed disposed

to

;

side. They met on the and as neither of them

give

way,

the

stranger


ROBIN HOOD.

117

Hood" Go

Mid

boldly to Robin

will

be the worse for you."

back, or

it

Robin Hood was

rather displeased with this, for he could not

bear the idea of having to give

way

to

anybody

;

so he proposed to the stranger that they should

each take an oak branch and fight that whoever could

manage

into the brook, should

They

it

out,

win the day.

accordingly set to, in right earnest,

thrashed each other well

however,

and

throw the other

to

;

the stranger at

and last,

succeeded in giving Robin Ilood

a

blow which caused him to tumble into the

When Robin Hood

water.

put

which brought numbers of directions to see

all

He

got out again, he

his bugle to his lips and

told

them of

what

blew a

his followers

their captain

blast,

from

wanted

his adventure with the stran-

ger; on hearing which, they would (kin have* given the handsome stranger a ducking, but

Robin Hood very,

interfered,

"Here's

himself to their band. it,"

is

and praising

his bra-

proposed to him that he should join

said the stranger

John

Little,

you

;

my

hand on

"and though my name

will

find

I

can do great


FAVOUKITE FAIEY TALES.

118

things." Upon this they insisted that their new companion should be re-christened, and changed his name from John Little to Little

John, which at laughter, as he

was a great subject

first

was more than

for

six feet high.

Eobin Hood loved a joke quite as well as he and one day, as he was strol-

loved good booty

;

saw a jolly butcher riding

ling in the forest, he

along on a mare, with panniers laden with meat. "

Good-morrow, good

fellow," said

"you are early on the

road/'

Robin Hood,

On which

the

man

informed him that he was on his way " to Nottingham market to sell his meat. I

"and

never learned any trade," said Robin, I think I

I give

would

you

like to

for the

be a butcher; what shall

mare and the meat?"

"

They

are not dear at four marks," said the butcher, " with some surprise. Throw your blue coat

and your apron into the bargain," said Robin, " and there's your money." The butcher consented

;

when Robin

dressed himself in his

new

and rode away to Nottingham market. put up his horse at an inn, and hired a

dress,

He

stall in

the market, where he exposed his meat


ROBIN IIOOD. for sale;

about

119

bat as ho neither knew nor cared

the price of butcher-meat,

much

for

he sold a*

a penny as his neighbours could

sell

was speedily surroundwhile the other stalls were almost deserted,

for five, so that his stall

ed,

and

this afforded

him some amusement

The butchers wondered very much who this stranger was, who was selling his meat so

Some thought him

cheap. son,

who was doing

clared that be

to invite

him

was

it

to be a gentleman's

for fun, while others de-

silly.

At

to dine with

last

they resolved

them, that they

try and learn something of him, as they feared he would ruin their business. After the

market was over, they repaired to a tavern kept by the Sheriff of Nottingham, and sat down After dinner Robin

to dinner. in

more wine, and

The

Sheriff,

thought

Hood

take

(^

of

advantage

the

penny.

he to Robin Hood, "bast

them any horned beasta to sell?" have,

bill

old miser,

spendthriftatv to turn a

fellow," says

called

on paying the

who was * cunning

he would

stranger's

Good

insisted

"That

I

Master SherinV' replied Robin, -I


1

FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

20

have an hundred or two, and will be delighted that

you go and

The

see them/'

Sheriff sad-

dled his palfrey without delay, and taking with

him

three hundred pounds in gold,

Hood

he and Robin

Sherwood

As

away went

along the road that led to

Forest.

they rode along, and neared the forest, "

the Sheriff said to Robin,

us this day from a

man

May God

they

call

preserve

Robin Hood."

Shortly after they had entered the wood, about

a hundred good fat deer came " sight.

How

do you like

my

skipping in

horned

beasts,

Master Sheriff?" said Robin Hood.

"To

you the

" I wish

truth," replied the

I were away, for I do not

pany." Robin

men

when

this

Hood.

"

like

tell

your com-

three blasts on

Little John,

dressed in green,

of the wood.

come

much

Hood then blew

his bugle-horn,

dred

Sheriff,

with a hun-

came suddenly out

The Sheriff of Nottingham

is

day to dine with us," said Robin

To which

Little

John

" replied,

He

is

welcome, and I hope he will pay us handsomely

They then sat down under a and had plenty to eat and drink, after

for his dinner/' tree,


ROBOT HOOD.

121

which Robin Hood opened the Sheriff's bag, and counted oat the three hundred pounds,

when he

to

seated

him on

him out of the

led

your

then

left

wife/'

and

his palfrey again,

Remember me

forest

bo

said Robin, laughingly, as

.ira, ai.-l

returned to his companions.

Another day, as Robin Hood roamed through the forest, he noticed at some distance a hand-

some young man, going blithely and cheerfully Robin did not along, and singing as he went go near him, or think more of morning he was astonished to

it;

but next

MO

the same

young man returning with a mournful step and drawing deep sighs, whilst he kept saying, "

"

Alack, weil-a-day

!

alack, well-a-day

Robin Hood sent one of the cause of the

bU men

young man's

bought

"

ring, said,

this yesterday to

to inquire

distress.

The young stranger pulled out shewing a

I

his purse,

Alack, well-a-day

marry a maiden

I

and I

I

hare

courted for seren long years, and this morning find that she is

going to church to be married

to another."

On

hearing this story, Robin

Hood

felt

an


FAVOUBITE FAIEY TALES.

122

interest in the

him

further

"

Do you "

Robin.

young

She has told

Then she

and questioned

think she really loves you

said the stranger, "

stranger,

whose name was Allan-a-dale.

not worth oaring about, or griev-

is

"

"

Why

"

" insist

an old cripple

for

does she marry him then

Hood. fully,

match

Because/' said

he

is

upon

is

" ?

and she

is

like him."

asked Robin

Allan-a-dale, sorrow-

a rich old knight, and her parents it,

and

have

sadly as to have got "

Where

But she does "

not love him," said Allan-a-dale, fit

asked

me so a hundred times,"

ing for," replied Robin Hood.

not a

" 1

raged

the wedding to take place

asked Robin Hood.

her so

at

her silent permission." " ?

Allan-a-dale replied,

our parish church, about the Bishop of Hereford,

five

who

then "

At

miles distant, and

is

the bridegroom's

brother, is to perform the ceremony."

Without more ado, Robin Hood dressed him-self

like

a

harper,

twenty of his he, with

men

and

follow

bidding four-and-

him

at a distance,

harp in hand, started for the parish On entering church, which he soon reached.


ROBIN HOOD. the church, the Bishop, his robes, said to * "

want here I "the

best

I

in

who was

Robin Hood,

am all

123

-

putting on

What do yon

a harper/' replied Robin, the country

round; and

having heard that there was to be a wedding

am come to offer my services." " You welcome we shall all be glad to hear your

to-day, I

are

;

music," said the Bishop.

Soon

after this, the bridal procession entered

the church.

Robin Hood noticed that the

was

young and very fair, while the bridegroom was quite old, and hardly able to hobble up to the altar so when all was bride

;

Robin cried out boldly, " This is not a match, and I cannot agree to its taking

quiet, fit

place

;

bat since we are come to the church, the

bride shall choose for herself

Upon

pat his horn to his mouth, and blew

when

this ft

he

blast,

came the four-and-twenty archers, si Hood then turn-

in

Allan-a-dale with them. Robin

ed to the maiden, and said, are free for your

;

tell

me

husband

frankly ;

will

"

Now, my dear, you whom you will choose

you have

this

gouty old

knight, or will you rather have one of these bold


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES,

124

young

fellows

you?" "Were

see before

you

to choose," said the maiden, turning round,

catching the eye of her lover,

hand

my me for Hood,

we

to

young

Allan-a-dale, "

seven long years." "

you and Allan

leave this house."

shall

"

"

I

and

should give

I

who has courted

Then," said Robin

be married before

That cannot be," said

the Bishop, "for the law requires that they

should be asked three times in church, and will never

"

If that is all," said Robin Hood,

settle

the matter."

He

he

" said, laughing,

"

we will soon

then took the Bishop's

gown off from him, and put

whom

it

do to huddle up a marriage this way."

it

on Little John,

to

Indeed you make a

very grave parson ;" then handing him the book, he said, " You had better ask them seven times, lest three

times should not be enough." Robin

Hood then

stepped up to the

altar,

away the maiden to Allan-a-dale

;

and gave while the

Bishop slunk out of the church, and the old knight hobbled after him as well as he could.

The company then retired to Sherwood Forest, and had a jolly dinner on two fat bucks and ;

from that day onwards Allan-a-dale and Robin

Hood were

fast friends.


ROBIN HOOD.

125

The Bishop of Hereford thus became Robin Hood's most deadly

foe,

and often took excur-

Sherwood Forest with a number of

sions into

his servants, in the

hope of finding Robin Hood

by himself, with the intention of taking him On one of these prisoner to Nottingham.

and his party were sur-

occasions, the Bishop

rounded by Robin Hood and his men in the middle of the wood. Robin rode up to the Bishop and said,

me to-day, I

under

"

you must dine with

My Lord,

my

bower

in

merry Bamsdale.

cannot feast yon like a bishop, but I can give

you venison and wine, and I hope you will be content" The Bishop dared not of course refuse, so

away they rode

After dinner, Robin

and

to Barnsdale,

Hood bade

the music

on the Bishop dancing a in his and to this the poor boots, hornpipe

strike up.

Bishop was at

By

last forced to

this time the

Bishop and *

insisted

Ton have

submit far gone,

and the

bis party asked leave to return home.

treated

to Robin Hood, it Tell

day was

*

me

and

me how much

I

very

nobly/' said he

suppose ?" * Lend

I

must pay

for

me your purse,


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

126

said

master," t(

and

I will

Little

settle

John,

stepping forward,

with you."

Upon

this

he

spread the Bishop's cloak on the grass, and

opening his bag, he counted out "

pounds.

you for your company

know how the

five

hundred

"

we thank

Now," said Robin Hood, ;

to be polite,

way home."

led the Bishop

and

we

to

shew you that we

shall see

Robin Hood and

and

you part of

his

men

then

his party through the forest,

and setting them on their way with three cheers, Robin bade the Bishop remember that though he had come into the forest intending

them

to have

all

hanged, they had yet done

him no harm.

One

day, as

Robin Hood and

his

men were

leaping and roaming about in a merry humour in Sherwood Forest, Robin Hood cried to his followers,

there

is

"Now, my good fellows, do you think man that could wrestle or play at

any

quarter-staff with me, or kill a

Ican?

Upon let,

buck

so sure as

;>

this

one of the men, called Will Scar-

stepped forward and

meet with your match,

" said,

I can tell

you wish to you where you

If


ROBIN HOOD. "

can find him." *

There

is

"

Scarlet,

any

man

am

told,

set in

Who?"

who can draw a strong bow

and

will beat

you and heard

he had seen the

till

bow

across his shoulder,

staff in his

aide.

too, I

your yeomen

he could not slinging his

so,

;

and taking his qn hand, away he went to Fountain

He had

not gone very

when he saw

far,

brawny friar rambling along by the if tor Whenever Robin Hood saw him, he

man whom he wit

M

Carry

Robin

said,

over this water, tbou brawny

friar,

so going

seeking;

I

all

this,

friar

guessed this would be the

or

against

1*

When Robin Hood

tall,

Hood

he can handle a quarter-staff

;

rest

a

asked Robin

a friar in Fountain Abbey," said Will

a row.

Dale.

127

me

will crack

to

up

him,

The

thy crown."

friar,

without

saying a word, stooped, and took Robin Hoot

on his back, and carried him side.

called after him,

carry

safely to the other

Robin was going away, when the

me

*

Stop,

my

over this water, or

pain."

Robin took the

silence,

and crossed over

it

friar

to

fine

fellow,

will

on

friar

and

breed thee

his

back in

the other side


1

FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

28

When

again.

the friar had jumped off, Robin "Now, as you are double my weight,

said to him,

but

it is

one

should have two rides for your

fair I

so carry

;

me back

The

again/'

friar

again

took Robin on his back without saying a word

;

but when he reached the middle of the stream, he pitched him into the water, and called out, "

Now,

my

fine fellow, let

"

he said to the be

my

friar,

He

match."

horn, which

I see

who he

me at

said Friar

you are worthy

his followers,

among you

the long bow, then

Tuck

;

whether you

'11

got to the bank, to

when he

was, and asked him

join their band. " If there 's an archer

beat

see

then sounded his bugle-

summoned

told the friar

's

When Robin

sink or swim."

I'll

and pointing

that

to

can

be your man,"

to a

hawk

that

was flying at some distance, he added, "I'll kill it, and he who can strike it again before it falls, will be the better man of the two/' Little

John

at

The arrows

flew

came down,

it

once accepted the challenge. off,

and when the dead bird

was found that the

had pinioned the bird's wings, whilst

friar's

arrow

Little John's


129

BOBIH HOOD.

arrow hid struck the bird right through the centre of the body self outdone, self to

so Friar

;

Tuck owned him-

and there and then he joined him-

Robin Hood's merry band of yeomen.

The whole country round now rang with Robin But Robin was not very

Hood's merry pranks. easy in his mind ; he of

life

knew very well

was against the laws of the

that his way

land,

and that

he were once caught, it would go very hard with him ; so he began to wish that he could if

have an opportunity to change kit manner of

and return

life,

He

to his native village.

therefore took an early opportunity uf

sending a handsome present to Queen Eleanor,

who was

the mother of King Richard The Queen was so much pleased with Robin Hood's present, that she

another year, I

Hood and

was heard

to say,

If

be a friend to

will

King Richard made a

this,

great match at his court for archery. ' .

live

Robin

his gallant men."

Shortly after

I.

I

.

i

i.

r

:

...

Queen : .

:

i

{

Robin Hood, and sent a lo

Sherwood Forest

Biiiiiiflii

to invite

privately

Robin and his


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

130

yeomen

to take the part of her

champions at

the great match.

On

had been

the day which

fixed

for

the

match, there was a grand turn out at court.

The King's bowmen, who were accounted the best archers in all

one

England,

and on the other

side,

the Queen's champions, who,

were the

were ranged on

were ranged

side it

was observed,

Before the match began,

all strangers.

King declared what the

prize

was

to

be,

and soon the noblemen and gentlemen of court were found eagerly betting, but they were al-

most

all

on

my

side?"

hither to

who

said

will venture his

money

"Come

EJeanor.

Queen

me, Sir Robert Lee, thou

knight of high descent."

most

" Is

King's men.

in favour of the

there no knight

politely

begged

to

But

of

Bishop

a

be excused.

The Queen made another time to the

art

Sir Robert Lee

appeal,

and

Hereford.

"

this

Come

hither to me, thou Bishop of Hereford, for thou art a noble priest." "

"

By my

silver

mitre,"

the Bishop, I will not bet a single " If thou wilt not bet on the Queen's penny."

said


BOBDCHOOD. side,"

bet on

said

replied the

money

Robin

"what

Hood,

the King's

"

"On

?

"

Bishop,

thou

wilt

the King's side/'

venture

will

I

Now

in ray parse."

131

this

the

all

happened to

Hood put a big

be a hundred pounds, and Robin of equal value beside it

When

the match

was about

to the King,

to

Queen stepped up must ask a boon of thee before the gins."

"

"What

That you

is

will not

party," said the

the

begin,

and

* said,

I

trial

be-

it?" isked the King. be angry with any of my

Queen

;

"and

be free to remain at court

all

that

the

they shall

time of the

match, and then be allowed forty days to retire."

The King at once agreed to these conditions. The keepers of the ground than began to mark the distances, when the King's lluWMil cried out,

"

Oh, measure no mark for us

can shoot at the sun and the moon." they had ended

+**

ishly they had boasted

the King's

bowmen

they found

At

the

;

we

Before

how

first

fool-

round,

shot so well that several

arrows were placed in

the

inner

ring

of


FAVOUEITE FAIEY TALES.

132 the

target,

and

named Hubert,

at

one

last

them,

The people

the very centre of the bull's eye.

shouted, "A

of

shot an arrow which lighted in

Hubert

!

a Hubert

!"

Robin Hood looked quite pleased to see so " I can't good a shot, and said, get nearer the centre than that, but 111 get as near, his shaft for

him

" ;

I'll

notch

so letting fly his arrow,

it

lighted right on the top of Hubert's, splitting it to shivers, and stuck in its place. The people

were amazed, and cried that there never had been such archery in England

Robin Hood then went

a willow bush

to

and cutting a wand about the thickness of a man's thumb, he placed it at the end of near,

the

A boy with

" field,

might

saying,

hit

a headless arrow

yonder target, but the

cleave that rod I hold

him

fit

man who

to bear a

can

bow

before the best in the land/'

The King's bowmen would not attempt

to

shoot at such a mark, and Hubert said, " I might as well shoot at a I can hardly see

sunbeam "

;

as at a white stick

but Robin

Hood

cleft

the

rod again and again with his arrows, and the prize and

all

the

money were given

to him.


BOBDf HOOD.

133 "

Says the Bishop of Hereford, well

who

theae fellows are

Hood and I

known

I

"

replied,

leare to depart, bnt I cannot break

his

very

Itobin

Had

would not have granted them

The King then ordered a noble

Hood and

know

they are

The Ring

his men."

that, I

;

my

word."

feast for

Robin

yeomen, and sent them away

with honour.

King Richard was very fond of Hood and

archery,

often thought of Robin

and

his yeomen.

He had heard of many of their generous actions, and greatly admired could but get these subjects," he

men

to

become

my

"

If

I

faithful

" thought to himself, what a pride

they would be to

At

their gallantry.

my

court

" !

length he thought of going in

to see Robin Hood,

dJyU*

and hoped that something

might come out of his visit He called twelve lords of his court, and told them his inter he and his lords then dressed themselves

like

monks, and rode away to Sherwood Fotui Robin Hood saw the band coming, and thinking that they were monks, he resolved to attack

them when they bad come a

little

further


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

134-

Accordingly, a few minutes

into the forest.

afterwards, Eobin Hood jumped in front of the little company, and seizing the king's horse by

the bridle, said,

stand

and

I

;

it

was a

"Abbot, I bid you

sternly,

priest that first

worked my

ruin,

have sworn to spare none of his fellows."

" But we are on the King's errand," said Richard. "

God

said

bridle.

"

save the King, and confound

Robin Hood, "

Thou

go

letting

his

all his foes,"

hold of

the

cursest thyself," said the King,

and an outlaw/' "

If thou wert not his servant," replied Robin Hood, " I for thou art a robber

would say you

from

He, for I have never taken

an honest man, but only from those who

live

on other people's earnings, while all the poor for miles around are the better for me."

Robin Hood then blew

his bugle-horn,

yeomen came marching all in a row, would not be used so/' continued Robin his

You

to the

King, "were you not the King's

disguised

messenger

had ever

when "

;

so

but for King Richard's sake,

much money,

I

if you would not deprive

you of a penny." Robin Hood then invited the strangers

to


BOBIN HOOD. dinner, and after dinner the

"Would you

not like,

my

135

Ring

said to Robin,

brave fellow, to secure

the King's pardon? and could you set your

mind

become a true and useful subject?" "Totelljrou the truth, my friend," said Robin to

"

Hood,

I

am

quite tired of this lawless

indeed I never loved to take

me

it;

into his favour, I assure

should never have reason to repent

would find

me

subjects." " I

am King

to be one of his

it,

most

you he but he faithful

Richard," said the stranger.

Robin Hood and his men were

moments

life,

and were King Richard

for

a few

speechless with astonishment, and

fell

" Stand up,

my

down on their knees

before him.

brave men," said the King,

"yon have been

robbers and you should not have been such

;

but

you say you are well disposed, and have power and skill to do me service ; I freely grant to every one of you past shall be

my pardon.

that you behave

a manner aa that repent

my

No account of the

demanded of yon, only take

younJfn I

may

care

In future in such

never have reason to

present kindness to you."


THE THEEE BEARS.

ONCE upon

a time there

were Three Bears,

which lived together in a house of their own, in a wood.

One

of

them was a

Little, Small,

Wee

Bear,

one was a Middle-sized Bear, and the other

was a Great, Huge Bear.

They had each a pot Little, Small,

Wee

for their porridge

Bear had a

;

wee

little

the pot,

the Middle-sized Bear, had a middle-sized pot,

and the Great, Huge Bear had a great big pot. They had each a chair to sit in the Little, ;

Small,

Wee

Bear, had a

little

wee

chair,

Middle-sized Bear had a middle-sized

the

chair,

and the Great, Huge Bear had a great big chair. And they had each a bed to sleep in; the Little,

Small,

Wee

Bear had a

little,

wee bed,


n to

!*&-

TWJVw JM


THE THREE BEARS.

137

the Middle-sUed Bear had a middle-sized bed,

and the Great, Huge Bear had a great big bed.

One morning,

after they

ridge for their breakfasts,

had made the por-

and

filled their

por-

ridge pots, they walked out together into the wood, while their porridge was cooling; and

being very good bears,

and

who

did nobody any

never

suspected that anybody would harm them, they had, according to the usual custom, left their door unfastened.

harm,

While they walked, a pretty little girl, called who was playing in the wood, came

Silverhair,

to the house.

She

first

looked in at the window,

and then she peeped in through the keyhole, and seeing nobody in the house, she ventured to

lift

the latch,

when the door opened,

she went, and well pleated she was to porridge standing on the table.

had been a good waited.till

little

girl,

Now,

at

we

the

if

she

she might have

the Bears came home, and then, per-

haps, they would have asked her to breakfast, for they table,

were very good-natured and

though a

little

hospi-

rough, as the manner of


J

FAVOURITE FAIKY TALES.

38

bears

But she went

is.

straight

on which the porridge was tasted that of

the Great,

up

set,

Huge

was too hot

great big pot, and that

to the table

-and

she

first

Bear, in the for her

and

;

then she tasted the porridge in the middle-sized

and that was too cold

pot,

went

for her

she then

;

to the porridge of the Little, Small,

Bear, in the

little

wee

pot,

Wee

and that was neither

too hot nor too cold, but just right, and so nice, that she ate sat

down

it all

Little Silverhair then

up.

in the great big chair of the Great,

Bear, but that was too hard for her

Huge

;

she

then sat down in the chair of the Middle-sized Bear, but that

was too

seated herself in the Small,

Little,

Wee

for her;

soft

little

so she

wee chair of the

Bear, and as

that

was

neither too hard nor too soft for her, she sat still

in

came

it, till

out,

at last the

bottom of the chair

and down came she plump upon the

ground. Little

Silverhair

went next into the bed-

chamber of the Three Bears

down upon

Huge

;

and

first

she lay

the great big bed of the Great,

Bear, but that was too high at the head


THE THREE BEAR& for her

;

1

39

she then went into the bed of the

Middle-sized Bear, and that was too high at the foot for her little

;

and then she

wee bed of the

Littl-.

lay

down on

Small,

the

Wee Ban;

and that being neither too high at the head nor at the foot, bat very comfortable, she covered herself fell

up very snugly, and

lay there

till

she

fast asleep.

By

this time the

Three Bean, thinking that

porridge would be cold enough, bad returned home. Now, little Silverhair had left

Huge Bear

the spoon of the Great, in his porridge, in his great,

and he seeing

standing

this, cried out,

rough voice

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN AT MY PORRIDGE

Upon

this the

his porridge, in

it also,

The

I"

Middle-abed Bear looked at

and seeing the spoon standing

cried out, in his middle voice

Little,

Small,

his porridge-pot,

and

there, the porridge

out, in his

little,

Wee lo

was

small,

I

Bear then looked at

theugh the spoon was

all

gone, so he too cried

wee voice


FAVOUEITE FAIEY TALES.

140 "

my poiridge, and

Somebody has been at

has eaten

it

all

up/"

The Three Small,

Wee

Bears,

the

seeing that

Bear's porridge

was

all

Little,

eaten up,

guessed that some one had entered their house in their absence,

about them. to

and so they began to look little Silverhair had forgot

Now,

put the cushions of the chairs straight again

when she

left

them, and the Great,

spying his cushion

all ruffled,

Huge

Bear,

cried out, in his

great rough, gruff voice

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR!" The Middle-sized Bear then looked cushion, and seeing out, in his

it all

at his

pressed down, cried

middle voice

" SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIB

Upon

this the Little, Small,

to look at his cushion,

his

little,

small,

"Somebody has

Wee

and soon

" !

Bear went

called out, in

wee voice

been sitting in my chair, " bottom out of it.

and has

sat the

The Three Bears then thought of making and went into their bedroom.

further search,


TUE THBEE Now,

little

the Great,

Silverhair

Ul

BEAJCS.

had pulled the pillow of place, and be

Huge Bear out of iU

seeing this, cried out, iu his great rough, gruff voice

SOMEBODY HAS 0KKN LYING IN MY BKD Little Silverhair

had

" !

also pulled the bolster

of the Middle-aiied Bear out of

its place,

so he

cried out, in his middle voice

" MXBBODT BAS BIEB

The

Little,

LTIXO

Wee

Small,

MT

1D

" !

Bear then went to

look at his bed, and there were the bolster and the pillow in their right enough places, but there also

upon the pillow was little Silverhair 's was not in its proper

head, which certainly place, for she

had no business

there.

Tbt Littl.

,

Wee

Bear than cried out, in perfect astonishment Small,

" &m*od k****** 9 Little

lying

Silverhair

imm 9 kd>-*dktn**

is!"

had heard in her sound

sleep the great rough, gruff voice of the Great,

Huge

Bear, but

it

seemed to her

like the roar-

ing of the wind, or the rumbling of thunder

;


FAVOURITE FAIKY TALES.

142

she had heard also the middle voice of the

Middle-sized Bear, but

it

was only as

one was speaking hi a dream heard the

little,

small,

Small, "Wee Bear, that

it

it

wee voice of the

was

awakened her

;

so sharp,

at once.

some

if

but when she Little,

and so

Up

shrill,

she started,

and when she saw the Three Bears on one

side

of the bed, out she tumbled at the other,

and

ran to the window.

Now

the

window was

open, because the Bears, like tidy bears, as they were, always opened their bed-chamber

when they got up

in

the morning,

window so

out

and away she ran to the wood, and the Three Bears never saw any-

little

Silverhair jumped,

thing more of her.


''

His coat and breeches were

made with

pride,

A tailor's needle hung by his side, A mouse for a horse he used to ride." Tom Thumb.


TOM THUMB.

IK the days of the celebrated Ring Arthur, King of Britain, there tired * great magician, called Merlin, the in

most

skilful enchanter

the world at that time.

This great magician, was travelling in the disguise of

a beggar, and being much

fatigued,

ha stopped at the cottage of an honest plough-

man

to rest himself,

and asked

for

some

re-

freshment

The ploughman's

him a hearty

wife gave

and brought him some milk in a wooden bowl and some coarse brown bread on welcome

a

;

platter.

Merlin was

much

pleased with the kindness

of the ploughman and his wife

;

but he could

not help observing, that, though every thing


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

144

was neat and comfortable in the

cottage, they

seemed both to be very sorrowful and unhappy. He therefore questioned them about the cause of their melancholy, and learned that they were miserable because they had no children.

The poor woman declared, with tears in her eyes, that she would be the happiest creature in the world if

she had a son,

although he

was no bigger than her husband's thumb. Merlin was so much amused with the idea of a boy no bigger than a man's thumb, that

he determined to pay a

visit to the

Queen of

the Fairies, and ask her to gratify the wishes of

the poor woman.

When

he had accomplished

his journey, Merlin, being very intimate with

Queen Mab,

The

among

told her the purpose of his visit.

droll fancy

the

human

of such a

little

race, pleased the

personage

Queen of

the Fairies exceedingly, and she told Merlin that the wish of the poor

woman

should be

granted Accordingly, by and by, the ploughman's wife had a son, who, wonderful to relate,

was exactly the size of his father's thumb. The Queen of the Fairies, who was watching


TOM THUMB. the

the

little

fellow,

came

145

window while

in at the

mother was admiring him.

kisaed the child, giving

Thumb;

the

it

The Queen

name of Tom

she then sent for some of the

to dress her

fairies,

little favourite.

An wk k*f h*l be hi for h en*rn, HU tkirt it WM by .pidtn pan, With JMket wor,

B

troawre

,f

ikiMk'.dova

wm of fottkoM do*

Hi* ttockiop of

rind, thoj

ppl

; ;

U

Witk fjtlMk

|4ack'd tarn kit mother's tjt Hit tkott wert m*de of noatt't tkia,

Kily

uoo'd

ilb

DM

remarkable that

It is

;

kair viikia.

Tom

nercr grew any

bigger than his father's thumb, which was only of an ordinary siie

;

but as he got older, be

be-

came very cunning, and sly, and full of tricks, which his mother did not correct him for.

When

he was old enough to play with the boy%

and had

lost all his

own

cherry-stones, he used

to creep into the bags of his playfellows, his pockets,

and getting out

fill

again, join in the

game.

One

day, however, as he

was coming out of

a bag of cheiry-ctoiies, which he had been steal-


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

146

ing from, as usual, the boy to

chanced to see him.

whom

Ah, ha

!

it

my

belonged

Tom

little

" so I have said the boy, caught

Thumb," stealing

"

my

cherry-stones at last

;

you

I shall pay

off for your thievish tricks." Saying this, he drew the string of the bag tight round his

you

neck, legs,

He

and gave it such a hearty shake, that Tom's thighs, and body were very sadly bruised.

roared with pain, and begged to be

let out,

promising never to do such things again. Shortly afterwards, Tom's mother was

mak-

ing a batter-pudding, and he being very anxious to see

how

she

of the bowl

;

made

it,

climbed up to the edge

and he

but his foot slipped,

plumped over head and ears into the batter, unobserved by his mother, who poured

him

into

the

pudding-bag,

popped into the pot to boil Tom's mouth was filled with the which kept him at

first

and struggled with

all his

it

and

which she then

batter,

from crying but as soon as the water began to grow hot, he kicked ;

might, so that his

mother, seeing the pudding bouncing up and

down

in such a fashion, thought

it

was be-


TOM THUMB. witched, and instantly lifting

the ran with

who was

it

147 out of the pot,

it

A

to the door.

poor tinker,

passing by, was glad to take

pudding, and putting

into his

it

As Tom bad now

walked off

wallet,

the

he

got his mouth

cleared of the batter, he began to cry aloud,

which so frightened the

down

tinker, that

ding was broken to pieces by the

and with

crept out,

he flung

The pud-

the pudding, and ran away.

fall,

Tom homa

so

walked

difficulty

His mother, who was very sorry to see her darling iu such a woful state, put

and soon washed

him

off the batter;

into

a cup,

she then kissed

him, and put him to bed.

Tom's mother one day went to milk her cow meadow, and took him along with her.

in the

As

was a very windy day, for fear of his blown away, she tied him to a thistle being with a needleful of fine thread. But the cow it

soon observed the oak-leaf hat, and, taking a fancy to

op

it,

at one

ing the

she took poor

mouthful

thistle,

Tom,

Tom

and the

thistle

While the cow was chewterrified at

her great teeth,

which threatened to crush him to

pieces, roared


FAVOURITE FAIEY TALES.

148 out

loud as

as

mother

" !

Tommy ? '*

u

"

he

could

Where

bawl,

are you,

"

Mother, dear

Tommy, my

said his mother.

Here, mother, here, in the red cow's mouth.'*

His mother began to cry and wring her hands in despair; but the cow, surprised at the odd noise in her throat, opened her mouth,

and

him

let

Tom

His mother caught falling, or he might

out.

drop

in her apron as he

was

have been dreadfully hurt. in her arms,

She then took

Tom

and ran home with him.

Tom's father made him a whip of a

barley-

straw to drive the cattle with, and having one

day gone into the

fields,

he slipped his foot and

rolled into a deep furrow.

up

flying over, picked little

Tom

along with

A

raven that was

the barley with

it,

poor

and flew with him

to

the top of a giant's castle by the sea-side and there left him.

Old Grumbo, the

on the

swallowed him

like

a

coming out to walk Tom, he took him up and

giant,

terrace, seeing

pill.

The giant had no sooner swallowed Tom, than he began to repent what he had done for ;


TOM THUMB.

Tom

149

began to kick and jump about so much

that the giant felt very uncomfortable,

threw him up into the

last

wallowed

Tom

after caught,

as he fell

and

at

tea,

A

large fish

This

fish

was soon

and sent as a present to King

When they opened the fish, every one was astonished at the sight of little Arthur.

Don.

carried

They

madr Tom * great

him

his dwarf,

to

who

the Ring,

and be soon became

favourite at court

;

for,

by

his

merry

pranks he amused the King and Queen, and all

the Knights of the

When

the

Round

Table.

King rode out on horseback, he

frequently took

Tom

along with him

;

and

if

a

shower came on, he used to creep into his Majesty's waistcoat-pocket, where he slept till the rain was over.

King Arthur one dsy questioned Tom about his psisjrtSj

and asked

as himself

Tom

if

they were at small

replied that his father

and

mother we re as big as any of the persons about On hearing this, court, but were rather poor. the King took Tom to his treasury, where he kept

all

his

money, and told him to take ss


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

150

much

of

it

as he could

carry

home

to his

parents, which made the little fellow caper with joy. Tom went immediately and got a little

purse,

of a soap-bubble, and

made

re-

turned to the treasury, where he got a silver threepenny-piece put into

it,

and

after

some

upon his back. Tom travelled two days and two nights with the huge silver piece on his back, and

difficulty lifted it

was almost

tired to death,

when he saw

his

mother run out to meet him. Tom's parents were overjoyed to see him, especially as he had brought such an amazing

sum

fellow

of

The poor little So his mo-

money with him.

was excessively wearied.

him in a walnut-shell by the fireand feasted him for three days on a

ther placed side,

hazel-nut, which'

made him very sick last him a month.

;

for a

whole nut used to

Tom

soon recovered, and thought

it

was

time to return to court; but as there had

been a heavy

fall

was so wet,

he

King

Arthur

;

of rain,

could not therefore

and the ground travel back to

his

mother,

one


TOM THUMR day,

when

direction,

bric

wind was blowing

the

made a

paper,

him a puff

151

balloon

little

Tom

and tying into the

which soon carried him

to

it,

with

air

in

that

of fine cam-

she gave

her

to the

mouth,

Kings

pa-

The King's conn were happy to see Tom again, and he delighted them by his At length dexterity at tilta and tournament* lace.

his exertions to please

4 severe

fit

spaired ot

of

them brought on such his life was de-

illness, that

But

his

friend,

the

hU

illness,

the Fairies, hearing of

Queen of

came

in

a chariot drawn by flying mice, and placing

Tom

by her

side, she

drove through the air

they arrived at her palace.

till

After restoring him

and shewing him all the diversions of the Queen commanded a fair wind Land, Fairy to rise, on which she placed Tom, and blew to health,

him

straight to the palace of

Just at the time when into

the court-yard

King Arthur. Tutu came flying

of the palace, the cook

happened to be pasting with the Kings great bowl of his favourite soup, furmenty, (a dish his Majesty

was very fond

of),

so poor

Tom


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

152 fell

plump

into the middle of

it,

and splashed

the hot furmenty about the cook's face. Down went the bowl " Oh dear " cried !

Tom.

"

Murder

" !

cried the cook.

The cook, who was an

ill-natured

Tom

being in a terrible rage at

fellow,

for scalding

him with the furmenty, went straight to the King, and swore that Tom had done all this out of

mere

The King was so enraged, to be seized and tried for

mischief.

that he ordered

Tom

high treason

he was found guilty, and sen-

;

tenced by the judge to be beheaded.

Just as

dreadful

this

sentence

was pro-

nounced, poor Tom, seeing no other means of escape,

and observing a miller

close by, gaping

with his great mouth, he took a leap, and

jumped down

his

done with such

agility, that

present, not even the miller, as

Tom

not one person

knew

of

it.

Now,

could not be found, the court broke up,

and the miller went home

When Tom he was

fairly

This exploit was

throat.

safe,

to his mill.

heard the mill at work, he knew

and began

to tumble

and

roll

about, so that the poor miller could get no rest,


TOM THUMB* thinking he was bewitched

Wham

doctor.

to

;

153 ao he sent for a

Tom began which ao alarmed the

the doctor came,

dance and sing;

doctor, that he

sent

in haste

for fire

other

doctors and twenty learned men.

They debated so long upon the cause of

this

extraordinary occurrence, that the tired miller

began to yawn opportunity,

heartily,

when Torn,

made a jump, and

setting the

alighted safely

on the middle of the table

The

much provoked

miller,

at

being tor-

mented by such a little pigmy creature, fell into a terrible rsge; and soiling Tom, he opened the window, and threw him into the river.

A large salmon saw him

fall,

as he wonld a

A

swimming along

and snapped him up

at the time

in

a moment

fly.

fisherman caught the salmon, and sold

in the

market to the steward of a great

it

lord.

The nobleman thought the fish so uncommonly fine, that he made a present of it to King Arthur, who ordered it to be dmaed immediately.

When

the cook cut open the salmon,

he found poor Tom. and ran directly to the


FAVOUKITE FAIEY TALES.

154

King with him with state

;

but his Majesty, being busy

affairs,

ordered him to be taken away

and kept safely till he sent for him. The cook was resolved that Tom should not slip

out of his hands this time, so he put him

into a mouse-trap,

where he remained a week,

by King Arthur, who and took him again into favour. pardoned him, On account of his wonderful feats, Tom was

when he was

sent for

knighted by the King, and went under the

name

of the redoubted Sir

As Tom's

Thomas Thumb.

clothes were getting very

much

worn, his Majesty presented him with a new suit,

and ordered him

to be

mounted

like a

knight. His shirt was made of

butterflies' wings,

His boots were made of chicken's skins, His coat and breeches were made with pride,

A tailor's needle hung by his side, A mouse L-r a horse he used to ride, It

was diverting

to see

Tom thus

mounted, as

he rode a-hunting with the King and nobility,

who laughed

greatly at

Tom and

his fine pranc-

ing steed.

One

day, as they were riding

by a farm-


TOMTHUMR house, a

155

Urge cat jumped out, and seised both his steed. But Tom boldly drew his

Tom and

word, and attacked the eat so fiercely that she let

them both

to the rescue

;

fall,

when one of the nobles came

but poor

Tom was sadly scratched

and torn by the cat, he was carried home, and laid on a bed of down, in a little ivory cabinet

The Queen of

Tom

the Fairies

came soon

after to

visit, and carried him back to Fairy pay he remained several years. Durwhere Land,

a

ing his residence there, Ring Arthur and the persons

who knew Tom had

the Fairy Queen, after dressing

died.

him

suit of clothes of bright green, sent

through the sir to the earth.

now

At

all

last

in

a new

htm

flying

King Thunstone

reigned as the successor of King Arthur.

People flocked from for and near to see him,

and being carried to the King, he was asked who he was whence he came and where he lived

f

Tom answeredFmoi

!

Uw

fetriM

I '*

I* <Mi bu.J.

Bj him

I

w

C


FAVOUKITE FAIRY TALES.

156

The King was order that

Tom

charmed with

so

that he ordered a

little

might

also a palace of gold, a

sit

his table,

upon

and

span high, with a doo/

Tom

an inch wide, for

this address,

chair to be made, in

to live in.

He

also

gave him a coach drawn by six small mice.

The Queen was so enraged because she did not get a coach

Tom

;

too, that she resolved to ruin

so she told the

had been saucy to in great rage

;

King that the little knight The King sent for Tom

her.

but knowing the danger of royal

anger, he crept into an empty snail-shell, and At lay there until he was almost starved.

he ventured to peep

last

and seeing a

out,

large butterfly on the ground, he approached cautiously, and placing himself astride on it,

was carried up by terfly flew with

from

field

to

field,

the King's court. all

it

into the

him from and at

seat into

At

last

to

The buttree,

he flew

and to

The King, the Queen, and

the nobility strove to

but in vain.

air.

tree

last

catch the butterfly,

poor

Tom

a watering-pan, in

found almost drowned.

fell

from his

which he was


TOM THUMR

When

157

Queen saw him, she Towed he

the

should be beheaded; and he was again put into place.

in

a mouse-trap However, a

till

cat,

the trap, knocked

broke,

and

set

The King

Tom

his trial should

take

nmhsf mmstMsm,

alive

about

it

till

the wires

at liberty.

received

but his days were

Tom

again into favour for

numbered,

;

a large

one day attacked him, and although he drew his sword and fought valiantly, yet the

spider

spider's poisjooosji breath at last

overcame him.

dmw

Ml U* pond vim Urteod, A*l UM p.dr nubd raj drp W kit Uood. !!

King Thunstone and into

mourning

monument

white marble

the following epitaph II*r

IMS

and

!

Artkcr'.

U Aitli

*%*!

CM*

UK aad

M a mooM liutlaf vial mink Alift W lira iW cMii

AM!

;

ilk

Bb daik

to

tomv MM p

W.p* vip* JMT lad 07- AIM I

;

bink

tm Md ** Tc

went

a nice

over his grave, with

wfU*'* tnMl bit*

vst iswrn

fit rod*

raised

:

To* Tkub, Kbff

WW dkd by H4

his whole court

for Torn,

yx-r

Tkttb b d^d

I


HISTORY OP

WHITTINGTON-.

AND

HIS CAT.

IN the reign of the famous King Edward the Third, there was a little boy called Dick Whitwhose father and mother died when

tington,

he was very

little

country

village.

enough

to work,

got but

who

fellow

As poor Dick was

not old ;

he

and sometimes

his dinner,

all for his

a

left

about a

breakfast

;

for the people

lived in the village were very poor them-

selves,

and could spare him

the parings of potatoes, and

hard

running

he was in a sorry plight

little for

nothing at

he was

young, so that

ragged

dirty,

crust.

little

more than

now and then

a


WniTTOfOTON AHD HIS CAT. For

all

this,

159

Dick Whittington was a very

sharp boy, and was always listening to what every one talked about, and storing

up the

information in his memory.

On Sundays he

never failed to get near the

ftmifFt at they sat on the tombstones in the churchyard, talking

before

the

parson was

and once a-weck you might be sure to see little Dick leaning against the sign-post of

come

;

the village ale-house, where people stopped to

drink as they came from the next market-town ;

and whenever the barber's shop-door was open, Dick listened to all the news that passed between him and his customers. In of

this

manner, Dick beard of the great city how* the people who lived there ;

London

were

all fine

gentlemen and ladies

were singing and

musk

in

it all

;

that there

day long

;

and

that the streets were paved with gold.

One day a waggoner, with a large waggon and eight horses, all with bells at their heads, drove through the village while Dick was lounging near his favourite

sign-post

thought immediately struck him, that

it

The must


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

160

be going to the

fine

town of London

and

;

taking courage, he asked the waggoner to

let

him walk with him by the side of the waggon. The man, hearing from poor Dick that he had no father or mother

living,

and seeing by his

ragged condition that he could not be worse off

than he was, told him he might go

would

;

if

he

him by

the

so they set off together.

The waggoner was very kind

to

way, and when Dick was tired and footsore,

he would allow him

to take a

seat

on the

waggon.

Dick got

safe to

he to see the

London

fine streets

;

and so eager was

paved

all

over with

gold, that he quite forgot to thank the wag-

goner, and ran as fast as his legs would carry

him through several moment to come to

streets,

expecting every

those that were

paved Dick had three times seen a guinea own village, and observed what a great

with gold. in his

deal of

money

it

brought in change; so he

imagined he had only to take up some bits of the

pavement, to have as

as he wanted.

little

much money


wnirnxGTON AKD Poor Dick ran

he was

till

HIS CAT.

1C1

and at

tired,

last,

grow dark, and that whichever waj he turned he aaw nothing but dirt instead of

finding

it

gold, he sat

down

in a dark corner,

and

cried

himself asleep. Little

Dick remained

all

night in the streets;

and next morning, finding himself very hungry, be got up and walked about, asking those he

met

to give

starving

;

him a halfpenny

to keep

him from

bat scarcely any one staid to answer

tew gave

him, and only two or

him anything

;

so that the poor boy was soon in a most miserable plight

At

last,

death, he laid himself

being almost starved to

down

at the door of a

which belonged to Mr FiUwarren, a great rich merchant Here he was found by the cook-maid, an ill-tempered creature, fine house,

who happened

just

Am

to be very busy pre-

paring dinner for her master and mistress; to *

seeing poor Dick, she called out,

What

ness have you thei^ you Lucy rogue is

nothing else but beggars.

take yourself away, like

we

will

how you

a sousing of some dish-water

that is hot

busi-

There

you do not

If

see

f

I

have

enough U> make you caper."

will

hew


FAVOURITE FAIRY TALES.

162

Just at this

moment Mr Fitzwarren

came home from the

city to dinner,

himself

and seeing

a dirty ragged boy lying at the door, said to

"

Why do you lie there, my lad ? You seem old enough to work I fear you must be somewhat idle." " No, indeed, sir," says Whit-

him,

"that

tington,

and

I

all

not the case, for I would heart

;

!

us see what 's the matter with you."

Dick now lie

my

am

fellow let

is

but I know nobody, " Poor very sick for want of food." " " Mr answered Fitzwarren, get up and

work with

down

tried to rise,

but was obliged to

weak

again, being too

to stand

;

for

he had eaten scarcely anything for three days,

and

-was

no longer able

to

run about and beg

a halfpenny of people in the streets; so the

kind merchant ordered that he should be taken

and have a good dinner immethat and he should be kept to do what diately, work was able for the cook. he dirty

into the house,

Little

Dick would have

lived very happily in

good family, had it not been for the crabbed cook, who was finding fault and scolding this

at

him from morning

withal

so fond

of

till

night

;

basting, that,

and was

when

she


wiirrriKCTOH

had no meat to

AKD

baste, she

16S

BIB CAT.