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MARCH 2015

*THE STUFF THAT REFINES YOU

Killer Curves Dangerously sharp fashion, design, art and architecture

Opening shot The drama behind Raf Simons’ Dior debut

Chair man now LA stories

Jonathan Anderson leads the way in Loewe’s Arts & Crafts revolution

The home-town heroes of John Baldessari and Ed Ruscha

Baroque star Philipp Plein’s pomp and splendour


www.dior.com - 020 7172 0172


J U E R G E N TELLER

A curated series of photography by ANNIE LEIBOVITZ, JUERGEN TELLER and BRUCE WEBER

Sold exclusively in Louis Vuitton stores. louisvuitton.com


ANNIE LEIBOVITZ


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BOSS 0675/S

HUGO BOSS AG Phone +49 7123 940


HUGOBOSS.COM


calvinklein.com Harvey Nichols, London LN - CC, London


Marchon U.K. tel: 0800 72 20 20


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MARCH ARTIST NOÉ SENDAS TURNED OUR GRAPHIC WOMENSWEAR SHOOT INTO A DISAPPEARING ACT, SEE PAGE 156. DRESS, £500, BY SPORTMAX

Heads up Lose yourself in the ultimate style guide

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HUDSON by PHILIPPE STARCK Acquired by MoMA. Designed for the Hudson Hotel. Handcrafted in America from recycled aluminum. Read more at emeco.net


Inheritance.


MARCH FASHION EXECUTIVE ANDREA TREMOLADA, ALL READY FOR THE DAILY COMMUTE IN HIS SELF-BUILT FALCO, SEE PAGE 124

FASHION

111 121 131 172 182 194

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Turning heads Fashion’s most talked about designers Piece corps For a terrific trench or the perfect PJs – meet the one-trick specialists High stakes Small accessory brands thinking big Poise control Nipped and tucked tailoring Modern love His and hers elegance Family ties A mother and daughter pull together in our living sculpture show

ARCHITECTURE

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Sailor made A beachside bolt-hole, and a nautically inclined wardrobe to boot ART

100 156

The village Photographer Viviane Sassen finds magic in the mundane in a Suriname outpost The Lady Vanishes Artist Noé Sendas plays hide and chic with the season’s graphic looks DESIGN

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Chair man now Jonathan Anderson’s Arts and Craftsinspired retail reform at Loewe


b erlut i.c om

LONDON 4 3 C O N D U I T S T R E E T - 4 H A R R I E T S T R E E T - H A R R O D S , K N I G H T S B R I D G E M E N ’ S TA I L O R I N G


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MARCH 146

Crunch time Barbies and blood baths on the runway INTERIORS

148

Baroque star Inside luxury goods supremo Philipp Plein’s Cannes party palace RESOURCES

216

Stockists What you want and where to get it TRAVEL

134

LA stories John Baldessari and Ed Ruscha make a personal pick of creative Los Angeles

SHIRT, €525; TROUSERS, €425, BOTH BY FAÇONNABLE. TOP, £175, BY SANDRO. SHOES, £780, BY DIOR HOMME. SEE PAGE 208

FRONT OF BOOK

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Newspaper Trending this season The Vinson view Helpline heaven and hell for home tech INTELLIGENCE

107 115 118 124 044

Hues talking What’s in a brand colour? Group think French luxury’s power powwows Director’s cut Frédéric Tcheng on making Dior and I Wings of desire Andrea Tremolada, fashion high-flier

WILLIAM MORRIS ‘SUSSEX’ CHAIRS, FROM LOEWE’S PRIVATE COLLECTION, SEE PAGE 127


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CONTRIBUTORS JJ MARTIN Writer and e-retail debutante Our biannual fashion issues would not come together quite so seamlessly without the input of our Italy editor-at-large, JJ Martin. This month, Martin has not only profiled three young accessory designers (page 131), but also divulged the aeronautical passion of a fashion veteran (page 124) and compiled our mind-boggling compendium of fashion facts and figures (page 146). She’s even found time to launch La Double J, a shopable, Milan-centric website of beautifully curated vintage fashion and accessories. DRIES VAN NOTEN Fashion designer

MARCEL FEIL Museum director

Throughout a career spanning nearly 30 years, Dries Van Noten has consistently remained at the top of the fashion pile and is widely respected for his creative ingenuity. He hit a new high note with his S/S 2015 collection, not only with the lavish clothing, but also a catwalk show featuring a magical pastoral carpet by Alexandra Kehayoglou. Van Noten’s favourite recipe (page 218) is just as idyllic: a refreshing rose lemonade perfect for sipping in warmer climes.

The deputy director of Foam photography museum in Amsterdam, Feil also edits its magazine. His friendship with photographer Viviane Sassen made him perfect to write her profile (page 100), which introduces her current show at London’s ICA, ‘Pikin Slee’. ‘We talked about the strange history that enables us to speak Dutch with descendents of former African slaves who live in the South American rainforests,’ he says. ‘We concluded that Suriname is worth a visit.’ CHRISTOPHER STOCKS Writer We’ve had the good fortune of counting on writer Christopher Stocks over the years. From dispatching him to Uruguayan beach resorts and submarine bases off the coast of Sweden, to this month’s story about the fashion industry’s most iconic brands and their synonymous colour identities (page 107), he has always risen to the challenge. The London-based writer also helms a perfume blog, The Sniff Box, and is currently at work on a book about pebbles.

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NOÉ SENDAS Artist

MAX CLARK Stylist

Sendas uses a sculptural eye to sabotage and rework found footage from bygone eras. For our feature on page 156, he created a series of works using images shot on set by photographer Jan Lehner – a first for the Berlin-based artist. ‘I usually work by myself and with my timings,’ he says. ‘But I instantly felt in sync with the Wallpaper* team. We always went for the same photos, shooting and editing on set in real time. This was really precious, and I knew from then that we were in a win-win situation.’

Clark sought to define the Wallpaper* Man for our interiors-inflected fashion story on page 172. ‘We wanted to look at grand, rich and refined environments that felt quite dreamy – almost imagined,’ explains the stylist, who also works as fashion editor at i-D magazine. ‘We liked the idea of a dated version of the exotic, but viewed through our own English filter. Marble walls feel very classic and Italian, [but they are] a bit cracked and stained, which made it more interesting.’

ILLUSTRATOR: RICARDO FUMANAL WRITER: PEI-RU KEH


www.gievesandhawkes.com


SPRINGS U M M E R 15

COLLECTION

SANDRO-PARIS.COM


PHOTOGRAPHED BY STEVEN KLEIN

SHOP PLEIN.COM


OUR AWARDS BASHES AT MILAN’S CARLO E CAMILLA (LEFT), AND BONHAMS IN LONDON, WITH GUESTS (ABOVE) MATHIAS AUGUSTYNIAK AND MICHAEL AMZALAG OF M/M PARIS AND JONATHAN ANDERSON. BELOW, STEPHEN BURKS’ LIGHT FOR PARACHILNA (BEST NEW BRAND); JAN KATH’S ‘SPACECRAFTED/ SPACE 3’ RUG (BEST SPACE RACE); DIOR A/W14 (BEST WOMEN’S FASHION COLLECTION); AND TERRAZZO PROJECT’S ‘TP-PANELS’ BENCH (BEST REUSE)

Starry, starry nights

Newsstand cover by Noé Sendas Photography: Jan Lehner Fashion: Isabelle Kountoure Top, £395, by Valentino. Skirt, €570, by Jil Sander. Detail of ‘Eaton’ side table, £1,764, by Roberto Lazzeroni, for Flexform Mood, from Interdesign See artist Noé Sendas’ surreal take on the season’s graphic offerings, page 156. He also designed this issue’s limitededition cover, right Wallpaper* is printed on UPM Star, upm.com

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January 15 was a stellar night in every sense of the word. Jan Kath’s imposing nebulapatterned rug, the star of our previous issue’s galactic-themed cover (W*191), was a perfect backdrop for the constellation of design literati that joined team Wallpaper* at Bonhams’ London HQ. A small galaxy of laureates had come to town specifically for our Design Awards exhibition and cocktails. Designer of the Year Patricia Urquiola flew over with her husband Alberto and daughter Giulia; Philippe and Jasmine Starck hopped on the Eurostar in celebration of his ‘Axor Starck V’ tap; while Henrik Lindberg and six of his team darted in from Denmark to fete their buffalo horn glasses. The Starcks mingled with the Arads and the Adjayes, Tom Dixon swapped notes with Martino Gamper and the Formafantasma duo lauded their young protégé Éléonore Delisse, our Life Enhancer of the Year winner, who had been their student at Design Academy Eindhoven. Jonathan Anderson, scoring a triple whammy with Best Rebrand and two Best in Shows honours, shared a toast with graphic gurus M/M Paris, while Hans Ulrich Obrist pored over a new tome celebrating their collective reinvention of the house of Loewe. Our celebrations continued three days later in Milan, at an intimate dinner in the dramatic surrounds of Best New Restaurant, Carlo e Camilla in Segheria. Its creators, Tanja Solci and Carlo Cracco, joined me in hosting another glittering gathering of winners, including high-profile creatives such as Rodolfo Dordoni and Dimore Studio’s Britt Moran and Emiliano Salci, and high-powered CEOs such as B&B Italia’s Giorgio Busnelli and Poltrona Frau Group’s Dario Rinero. Adding to the happy bustle were some of our favourite Italian design talents – art director Giulio Cappellini, architect Fabio Novembre, Gufram owner Charley Vezza, as well as curators Caroline Corbetta, Francesca Molteni and Marva Griffin Wilshire. Gallerist Rossana Orlandi beamed behind her oversized white sunglasses: ‘Everyone I wanted to see in Milan is in this room right now.’ I’m pretty sure those glasses weren’t rose-tinted. Tony Chambers, Editor-in-Chief

Limited-edition cover by Noé Sendas Dress, £250, by Sandro. Shoes, €455, by Pierre Hardy. ‘Twist’ chair, £1,388, by Hans Sandgren Jakobsen, for Porada. See page 156 Limited-edition covers are available to subscribers, see Wallpaper.com

Photography: Jule Hering, Mark Cocksedge, Oliver Rudkin

EDITOR’S LETTER


FLAGSHIP STORE: 79 BREWER STREET _ LONDON _ W1F 9ZN WWW.STONEISLAND.CO.UK


42246 FLOWING CAMO REFLEX MAT HOODED JACKET IN REFLEX MAT, AN OPAQUE REFLECTIVE FABRIC WITH A COATING MADE BY THOUSANDS OF GLASS MICROSPHERES, PRINTED WITH AN EXCLUSIVE ‘FLOWING’ VERTICAL CAMOUFLAGE MOTIF. THE GARMENT REFLECTS LIGHT IN THE PRINT FREE AREAS, ENHANCING THEREFORE THE GRAPHIC DESIGN. THE COATING OF THE FABRIC MAKES IT WATER AND WIND RESISTANT. THE DETACHABLE HOOD, WITH FRONT FLAP, INSERTS INTO A V SHAPED PLACKET. BOMBER JACKET COLLAR UNDERNEATH. ZIP-FASTENING DIAGONAL POCKETS. ELASTIC BAND AT CUFFS. ZIP FASTENING.


Wallpaper’s pick of the latest fashion trends and goings-on

Enter the fray

As designers determine to show us their workings, womenswear is star of the sew, while menswear makes deconstructionism dapper

Hair: Tori Hutchinson using Bumble and Bumble. Make-up: Emily Mergaert using Tom Ford Beauty. Manicurist: Beáta Sziklavári. Models: Ineta at IMG and Alek Stoodley at Supa

TRENDING 01 Top stitches

DRESS, £1,355, BY PRADA FOR STOCKISTS THROUGHOUT, SEE PAGE 216

PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE HARVEY FASHION: ZOË SINCLAIR WRITER: KATRINA ISRAEL

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Newspaper JACKET, £1,415; TOP (JUST SEEN), £300; SKIRT, £300, ALL BY VERSACE

JACKET, £845, BY LANVIN

T

his spring, many fashion houses have chosen to showcase their stitches. At Prada, topstitching secured the fraying hems of Mrs Prada’s deconstructed gauze dresses, which almost resembled workshop toiles, albeit finished with flat-felled denim seams. Lanvin’s Alber Elbaz also retained evidence of his atelier’s handiwork, using fine gold tacking thread to embellish his tailoring, while at Versace, contrastingly hued leather stitch detailing added graphic definition to suiting, looking for all the world as though it were forgotten basting.

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Newspaper

TRENDING 02 Deconstructionist

Menswear takes the inside line As any tailor will tell you, at length, the best men’s suits have a complex internal architecture, a shifting set of structural supports. And even the unstructured suit expertly engineers figure-skimming drape. But all this remains hidden. This season, though, tailoring is exposing its inner workings, turning itself inside out and coming apart at the seams. Or doing a good impression of it. Maison Martin Margiela’s suit appears to be decomposing before your eyes, fraying at the edges, going up in smoke, while Lanvin’s turns smartly, partly inside out. Paul Smith, meanwhile, plays mix and match with his whistle and flute. This is conceptual tailoring for the deconstructionist.

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JACKET, £765; SHIRT, £125; TROUSERS, £469, ALL BY PAUL SMITH. TIE, £95, BY LANVIN

JACKET, £2,506; SHIRT, £360, BOTH BY MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA

JACKET, £1,945; SHIRT, £245; TROUSERS, £395; TIE, £95; BOOTS, £665, ALL BY LANVIN ‘9,5°’ CHAIR, £474, BY RASMUS BAEKKEL FEX, FROM 19 GREEK STREET

PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE HARVEY FASHION: MATHEW STEVENSON-WRIGHT WRITER: NICK COMPTON


#BALLY COLLECT ION 0 0 8 0 0 1 8 5 1 1 8 5 1 SWISS DE SIGN SINC E 1 8 5 1 B A L LY.C O M


Newspaper

TRENDING 03 Hard options

Cuff love

Stephanie Simon’s limited-edition approach is borne of the fact that the Trinidad-raised, London-based artist is not a trained jeweller but simply designs with an instinct for materials and subverted forms. No surprise, then, that gallerists and collectors make up much of her clientele, and her work has appeared at Frieze Art Fair, as part of a Rob Pruitt installation. Now Simon has turned her gaze to the sensuous, tactile qualities of marble: Black Belgian, White Carrara, Calacatta Luccicoso, Grand Antique and Portoro, to be precise. At first she struggled to find the right makers for her new seven-piece collection of single marble cuffs, but, when an art-dealer friend recommended an Italian cutting specialist favoured by contemporary sculptors and used to nontraditional requests, her idea started to take shape.

CUFF IN WHITE CARRARA MARBLE AND 18CT YELLOW GOLD, £8,100; CUFF IN BLACK BELGIAN MARBLE AND 18CT YELLOW GOLD, £6,590, BOTH BY STEPHANIE SIMON. STUDIO VISITS BY APPOINTMENT: STEPHANIE@ STEPHANIESIMON.CO.UK

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIPPE LACOMBE SET DESIGNER: CAROLE GREGORIS WRITER: CARAGH MCKAY

‘I was essentially working with marble people who hadn’t dealt with jewellery, and jewellery people who hadn’t worked with marble, so it was tough,’ she admits. ‘It also doesn’t help that we are working on such a small scale, as the structural make-up of different types of marble can sometimes pose problems – Black Belgian, for instance, while easy to carve, comes from a more vegetative fossilisation process, like coal, so it chipped and flaked when the gold was first inlaid.’ It took two years for Simon and her collaborators to find a way to realise the cuffs, which are light and warm against the skin. But they’re particularly lovely to wear because, in keeping precious elements to a minimum, or non-existent, Simon allows the material’s natural opulence to provide its own subtle glamour.

Fashion: Alice Shaughnessy. Set assistant: Camille Csech

An arresting marble collection makes the cut

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Newspaper

Flat line

TRENDING 04 Mannish steps

Ladies, it’s time to man up in the shoe department

Walking in someone else’s shoes can be a tall order. But our pick of the flat, men’s-inspired footwear on the women’s S/S15 catwalks makes it a particularly smart cinch. Flat shoes have always been a mainstay of women’s wardrobes, but, rather than dainty ballet pumps and pointed toes, these offerings are unabashedly masculine. From heavy-duty brogues and monk-straps to lounge-friendly loafers and slippers, their mannish silhouettes have been minimally tinkered with.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, SLIPPERS, £395, BY BALLY. BROGUES, £380, BY FRATELLI ROSSETTI. SHOES, £740, BY CHANEL. LOAFERS, £620, BY HERMÈS. DOUBLE MONK-STRAP SHOES, £495, BY JIMMY CHOO

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIPPE LACOMBE SET DESIGNER: CAROLE GREGORIS WRITER: PEI-RU KEH


Newspaper

TRENDING 05 Wristlet rising

BAG, €2,335, BY PERRIN PARIS. SHIRT, £590, BY JW ANDERSON

BAG, €1,150; JUMPSUIT, €1,750, BOTH BY CÉLINE

BAG, £900; SHIRT, £210, BOTH BY BOSS. TROUSERS, £475, BY JW ANDERSON

Strap on Handbags benefit from some elegant new wrist action

We’re quite hung up on a new method of toting our bags. The wristlet, a compact handbag with a short wrist strap, references how the fashion elite have been carrying theirs for the past few seasons: under the arm and on the hip. Only this way there’s no risk of the bag slipping from one’s grasp. This spin on the clutch also possesses the ladylike elegance of a short-handled tote. Perrin Paris’ bracelet version (top left) turns up the glamour, while Céline (above) and Boss (left) keep things cool with structure and subtle detailing.

PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE HARVEY FASHION: ZOË SINCLAIR WRITER: PEI-RU KEH

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Newspaper BAG £1,100 BY TOD’S. SHOES, $740, BY SANTONI. GILET, PRICE ON REQUEST, BY FENDI

TRENDING 06 Perforation

Punch lines

Perforated leather is cutting a dash

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Perforated – punched if you prefer – leather may still carry the masculine whiff of the gentleman driver, the leather-gloved hand at the wheel of an E-Type. But this season, re-engineered with laser-cut precision, it has been adapted for use across the wardrobe, and comes off as utterly modern, lightweight, breathable and optically arresting. Tod’s has used it in a handsome tote and its iconic ‘Gommino’ loafer, Santoni in this muscular update of the double monk-strap shoe, and Fendi in an elegantly ventilated gilet. Wholly convincing.

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIPPE LACOMBE SET DESIGNER: CAROLE GREGORIS WRITER: NICK COMPTON


VILLA SANTO SOSPIR, SAINT-JEAN-CAP-FERRAT - SPRING-SUMMER 2015 FACONNABLE.COM


Newspaper

Top of the fops

Dandy dressing is de rigueur if you want to stand out from the corporate crowd

TRENDING 07 Lining up

JACKET, £2,090; SHIRT, £450; BANDANA, £145, ALL BY ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE

SUIT, €6,009; SHIRT, €522, BOTH BY KITON

Model: George Elliott at FM

COAT, £3,670; SUIT, £3,450; SHIRT, £600, ALL BY BRIONI

Wearing a suit is increasingly a matter of personal persuasion rather than professional obligation. And this season, the finest Italian tailors are playing to the determined dandy rather than the corporation man. Bold pinstripes, plaids, Prince of Wales checks, and oversized houndstooths have been mixed and matched to dazzling effect. Stefano Pilati expertly engineered straight lines and stripes in his third collection for Ermenegildo Zegna Couture, while Brendan Mullane at Brioni reimagined the house’s Hollywood heyday, reviving the columnar silhouette and working with LA artist James Welling on repeat prints and patterns. Kiton, meanwhile, presented the sharpest pinstripes in the lightest and most luxurious of fabrics.

PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE HARVEY FASHION: MATHEW STEVENSON-WRIGHT WRITER: NICK COMPTON

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Caran d’Ache inoduces the latest addion to its Arste Collecon. A genuine ibute to the richness of Chinese culre and a maificent demonsaon of Swiss Made experse by the Geneva Company’s masters of lacquering. Caran d’Ache. Swiss Made excellence since 1915.

carandache.com


Newspaper

What a carry on Something for the weekend Weekending with style starts with the choice of the consummate carry-on. And everyone has an opinion on what the essential criteria should be. If practical requirements such as effortless portability and space for gadgets top the list, Piquadro’s cabin trolley, which combines water-resistant fabric with silken calfskin and incorporates laptop and iPad holders, is just the ticket. Should it be the look that you like to be effortless, Saint Laurent’s ‘Monogram’ briefcase, also with designated iPad pocket, has a removable shoulder strap to take you from desk to departures seamlessly. Loewe, meanwhile, gives us what might be the season’s truest weekender – a soft tan calfskin duffle bag that prioritises everything but the iPad. And you thought choices began and ended with picking a destination…

TRENDING 08 Light loads

DUFFLE BAG, £1,750, BY LOEWE. ‘MONOGRAM’ BRIEFCASE, £1,235, BY SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE. CABIN TROLLEY, £430, BY PIQUADRO

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIPPE LACOMBE SET DESIGNER: CAROLE GREGORIS WRITER: EMMA MOORE

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Newspaper

TRENDING 09 Woven wonders

BELT, £325, BY GUCCI. SHIRT, £125, BY HARDY AMIES. TROUSERS, £475, BY JW ANDERSON

ABOVE AND BELOW, STOOL, £1,980, BY MARK ALBRECHT, FROM STAFFAN TOLLGÅRD DESIGN STORE

BAG, £1,400, BY MULBERRY. TOP, £119, BY WOLFORD. TROUSERS, AS BEFORE

BOOTS, £1,850, BY DIOR. SKIRT, £225, BY WOLFORD

New weave Designers bring a fresh twist to classic designs with bold colours and textures

Weaving was an unexpected hit on the runways this season. What was traditionally associated with touristic handicrafts has been appropriated to become the height of urban cool, making for some eye-catching new designs. Fashion houses such as Gucci, Mulberry and Dior were quick to fuse braided, houndstooth and basket weaves in leather and nylon yarns with some of their most iconic designs. While Gucci’s leather belt retains the brand’s classic equestrian appeal, Dior’s boots, their heels and silhouette having become a Raf Simons signature, take on a lively woven texture. Meanwhile, Mulberry’s classic ‘Bayswater’ bag exudes a new, carefree spirit with its bold green and white body.

PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE HARVEY FASHION: ZOË SINCLAIR WRITER: PEI-RU KEH

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Newspaper

TRENDING 10 Trunkadelics

SWIM SHORTS, £225, BY ORLEBAR BROWN + EMILIO PUCCI. TOWEL, £550, BY EMILIO PUCCI

Prints of tides One of the joys of being a Wallpaper* contributor is thinking up collaborative dream teams for our Handmade issue, now in its sixth year. One such pairing came to us on a beach in the Philippines while chatting with Laudomia Pucci, CEO of the Florentine house founded by her father. We put to her, while surveying the crowd in their baggy, patterned swim shorts, that some guys, ourselves included, usually wear print only on a tie or on the beach, and we needed to team up Pucci with Orlebar Brown, the go-to label for tailored

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swim shorts. Alas, we didn’t make it for that year’s Handmade issue, but the idea stuck. Laudomia and Pucci’s artistic director Peter Dundas were introduced to Orlebar Brown founder Adam Brown and finally, this spring, a co-branded collection launches. Tailored in three tightly formatted geometric prints created by Emilio Pucci in the 1960s and 1970s – including Dischi (pictured) – are Orlebar Brown’s mid-length ‘Bulldog’, shorter ‘Setter’ and women’s ‘Whippet’ shorts. orlebarbrown.co.uk; emiliopucci.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE HARVEY FASHION: MATHEW STEVENSON-WRIGHT WRITER: NICK VINSON

Model: George Elliott at FM

Tailored swim shorts for geometric junkies


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Newspaper

TRENDING 11 Ship shapes

Rope trick This season’s menswear is all at sea

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There’s a seafaring spin to much of this season’s menswear, though the feel is more 1980s Aegean deckhand than contemporary America’s Cup crew. Berluti ties the knots with a dressy take on the deck shoe, while Prada makes a splash reimagining the rope-soled sandal. Gucci’s leather sea bag, meanwhile, is just the thing for all your nautical needs.

BAG, £3,050, BY GUCCI. SHOES, £625, BY BERLUTI. SANDALS, £595, BY PRADA

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIPPE LACOMBE SET DESIGNER: CAROLE GREGORIS WRITER: NICK COMPTON


Column

THE VINSON VIEW

Quality maniac and master shopper Nick Vinson on the who, what, when, where and why

WHAT TO INSTALL AT HOME Sonos The Sonos music system is best installed near your router, out of sight and connected to built-in speakers, zoned throughout the house. You can control music, radio and other digital streaming via your smartphone. sonos.com Nest The Learning Thermostat adapts to your habits and cuts back on wasted energy. Protect is a smoke and carbon monoxide detector that keeps you informed via an app. It also doubles as a motion-sensing night light. nest.com Trufig A range of flush-fitted products designed by Patrick McInerney, including sockets, switches, data jacks and speakers, reduces the usual wall and ceiling clutter to a mere whisper. trufig.com Lutron Set up the automated light control system in your out-of-sight data centre, then change the settings by smartphone. lutron.com Siedle With Siedle’s Scope video entry phone and app, you can answer the door from anywhere, and control shutters and external lights. siedle.com

01

Wireless without tears However swish the home tech, it’s the support line that counts

The newly completed apartment I share with my husband in London’s Marylebone runs on Wi-Fi, thanks to our Chipperfieldtrained architect, Patrick McInerney. He is based in San Diego, and introduced us to quite a few Californian gadgets. The Sonos music system (from Santa Barbara) is hidden away in our ‘data centre’ (we didn’t need one till Patrick put it on the plans) and is wirelessly connected to the flush speakers he designed for Trufig (from San Clemente). There are two Nest Learning Thermostats (from Palo Alto; they won a Wallpaper* Design Award in 2012 after they launched in the US, and are now available in the UK), four Protect smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, also from Nest, and an Apple TV (from Cupertino) fitted behind the Loewe TV (actually from Kronach, Germany). These products all look great and can be controlled from our Apple smartphones at home or away. It’s a shame that all Nest installers aren’t Silicon Valley natives. The one the company sent us admitted he couldn’t operate his smartphone, then took one look at our underfloor heating and fled. Our electrician took on the job with gusto and, once it was connected, the Learning Thermostat’s flawless self-set-up left us in awe. The Protect made us laugh when a woman’s voice announced seductively she was ‘ready

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in the bedroom’; it was only slightly less funny when we moved on to the kitchen. This state-of-the-art gadgetry is all very well provided you have a great router. Shortly after installation, the Sonos music system failed, followed by all four Nest Protects, then the two Nest Learning Thermostats and the Apple TV, while the Hewlett-Packard printer (also from Palo Alto) refused to connect with the computer (Cupertino). After around 15 phone calls, over a couple of weeks, to the various technical support lines (average length around 30 to 40 minutes), one clever chap from Sonos, called Yvain Barraud, identified that the issue was with our router. Once it was replaced by something superior, all the devices worked fine. Speed and ease of use are now a given for most contemporary technology. Indeed, our expectations for functionality are so high, we become instantly agitated if something doesn’t work first time. When calling technical support, we are already annoyed, frustrated, even angry. When you get the right help fast, admiration for brand and product returns and remains; if you get a notquite-up-to-the-mark adviser (and, trust me, I have), the pain is severe. In this purchaseonline and in-cloud-we-trust era, technical support may be our only real contact with a brand. It must deliver a superior service to match the level of its fantastic products. 

02 On my radar Gucci releases its new home collection very soon, and I’ll be hoping to find tableware in ‘Flora’ (above), the house’s famous pattern introduced in 1996.

03 New design dream teams Look out for ceramics by Scholten & Baijings (top and left) with Emilio Pucci; a Michael Anastassiades (right) project with silversmith Puiforcat; and Aldo Bakker’s (front) furniture for Karakter and porcelain for Lyngby.

ILLUSTRATOR: DANAE DIAZ


Art

The village Fashion photographer Viviane Sassen finds beauty in the not-so-ordinary life of Pikin Slee SELF-PORTRAIT: VIVIANE SASSEN WRITER: MARCEL FEIL

OPPOSITE, THE DUTCH PHOTOGRAPHER’S 2013 ‘PIKIN SLEE’ PROJECT INCLUDES THESE C-PRINT PHOTOGRAPHS, FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT: LATUM; UNTITLED/ME #5; VELA; CELL; ALISI; MOSCINO; SETA; HÁTI; AND BLUE SHOULDER. SHOWING AT THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ARTS IN LONDON, UNTIL 12 APRIL


Photographs: Courtesy of the artist and Stevenson Gallery

∑

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Art

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hotographer Viviane Sassen moves successfully back and forth between the worlds of fashion photography and art. In fashion, she occupies a place all her own, with a visual language that is as powerful as it is distinctive. Born in Amsterdam in 1972, Sassen studied fashion design in Arnhem, then photography at the University of the Arts in Utrecht and fine art at Ateliers Arnhem. She also modelled briefly, for Viktor & Rolf, among others. Her work is characterised by a sculptural approach to the human body, combined with a strong feeling for the use of colour and the graphic potential of the flat photographic print. Models are often presented as anonymous physical forms in complex compositions. Body parts overlap each other or are merged with the colourful fabrics or the dark shadows that are so characteristic of Sassen’s work. By defying convention, and by leaving space for experimentation and intuition in her approach, Sassen’s commissioned work offers a powerful alternative to the coded world of advertising and fashion. Indeed, she has an ambivalent relationship with the fashion industry, and regularly takes her distance from it to concentrate on personal projects, usually shot far from the hubs of high fashion and from her Amsterdam studio. The latest example of this is her exhibition ‘Pikin Slee’, at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, which focuses on photographs she took in the summer of 2013, in an eponymous village in the upper reaches of the Suriname River, deep in the rainforest of Suriname, a former Dutch colony and South America’s smallest state. Sassen was captivated by life in Pikin Slee, a village with neither running water nor electricity, reachable only after a long journey by canoe, and where the local community carries on a unique, traditional way of life. The population of Pikin Slee is made up mainly of Maroons, descendants of Africans who were brought to Suriname by slave traders to work on plantations. ‘The Maroons,’ explains Sassen, ‘freed themselves from slavery and settled in the primeval forest, building a new life for themselves. They have been free to develop as they choose ever since, making Maroon culture the best-preserved piece of Africa outside Africa.’ On her first visit in 2012, Sassen was intrigued by the strange quirks of fate that linked her personal history to that of the Maroons. A doctor’s daughter, she spent part of her childhood in remote west Kenya. Even though she returned to Amsterdam when she was six, it is easy to imagine how much the years in Kenya influenced her visual vocabulary: the vivid colours, the sharp contrast between light and shade and her receptivity to the magical. And Sassen has returned to Africa regularly over the last 20 years. While in Pikin Slee in 2012, working on her book In and Out of Fashion, the first comprehensive overview of her fashion photography, it struck Sassen how artificial much of that work was. In an environment

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MANJA, C-PRINT, AMONG SASSEN’S IMAGES OF EVERYDAY LIFE AND OBJECTS IN PIKIN SLEE

where beauty is revealed in small, everyday things, Sassen felt a growing urge to photograph the village. ‘I was immediately intrigued by Pikin Slee,’ she says. ‘I felt the need to photograph in a different manner, to work very simply, without a plan or an idea. Not in a stage-managed way, not with sets, models or assistants, or based on elaborate concepts, but intuitively recording what I came upon in the village. The whole series is primarily about looking.’ The images show a couple of buckets on the ground; a tub of washing; a rusting oil drum raised on a few stones; a stick on a corrugated roof; leaves black against the sky; a shirt on a dark back. ‘It’s so intriguing,’ says Sassen. ‘On the one hand there is the rainforest that feels like an omnipresent force that both gives and threatens life in the village. On the other hand there are these everyday object that ended up in the village after a very long journey. Pikin Slee is something like a strange bubble where only some bits and pieces of the outside world can be found.’ Mostly shot in black and white and presented at a modest size, each work is an ode to silence and peace, and an exercise in observation. With her strong eye for composition, Sassen manages to lift the apparently banal. She approaches her subjects almost like a sculptor who knows that light and shadow can create spaces, do away with them, or make them flow into each other. In this series, Sassen makes use, perhaps more convincingly than ever, of the power of photography to transform reality – precisely because so little, if anything, is stage-managed. In each of these photographs, the point of view is chosen with great care and Sassen makes meticulous use of the space within the chosen frame. The outside world is absent, there is no reference to time or place and only occasionally is a human being visible, and then often merely in part, as pure form. ‘Of course I am very interested in the abstract qualities of a photograph, in the sculptural approach, but I am also very much interested in animism. This feeling of animism is something I felt very strongly in this isolated village,’ she says. ‘To try and capture this, I have approached all these everyday objects really as magical objects.’ It gives the works in ‘Pikin Slee’ a timeless, almost religious aura. In that sense, Sassen has succeeded in creating true icons – images offering a view of a world both natural and supernatural – in the Surinamese rainforest. You just need to have an eye for it. Sassen saw it, shot it, and by doing so pulled something of the magical out of the everyday world.  ‘Viviane Sassen: Pikin Slee’ is at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts until 12 April, ica.org.uk

‘I felt the need to work very simply, without a plan, intuitively recording what I came upon’


Intelligence OUR AT-A-GLANCE CHART OF JUST A FEW BRAND COLOURS, ALL OF WHICH MAY CONTRIBUTE TO A COMPANY’S SUCCESS

DIOR

GUCCI

HERMÈS

LOUBOUTIN TIFFANY CHANEL

SAINT LAURENT

ACNE LANVIN

Hues talking Why so many fashion brands are on the spectrum ILLUSTRATOR: CHAD HAGEN WRITER: CHRISTOPHER STOCKS

Now here’s a funny thing. Fashion is about constant reinvention: a restless, hyperactive shuffling of pattern, colour, texture and shape. Yet luxury brands spend a vast amount of time and effort creating, promoting and policing a single, strictly defined visual identity. Of the three elements that generally make up this identity – logo, typography and colour – the last is, perhaps, the least understood. It’s arguably the most important, however, and often the first element that a particular brand brings to mind: Hermès orange, Dior grey, Tiffany blue and Chanel black and white. ‘Nothing grabs our attention better than the thoughtful use of colour,’ says Laurie Pressman, vice-president of Pantone Color Institute. She should know: Pantone is the world’s leading colour specification company, working with brands to ensure accuracy in print, in store and online. ‘It is a differentiator,’ Pressman adds. ‘Because each colour conveys its own message and meaning, it has an outsize role in how consumers perceive a brand.’ According to colour psychologist Angela Wright, there’s a good reason for this: our

ability to interpret colour is more deeply rooted in our evolutionary history than the development of language or signs. Wright, who founded consultancy Colour Affects in 1985 and teaches at the London College of Fashion, says ‘about 80 per cent of our response to colour is unconscious’, deriving from what our ancestors learned from nature. Thus we associate blue with coolness, from water and the sky, and make a link between a wasp’s black-and-yellow stripes and danger. ‘Brands spend a lot of time choosing a colour,’ says Wright, ‘but they don’t always realise what it suggests.’ Badly chosen colours can be like a Freudian slip, subverting a supposed message. ‘Sometimes they make me smile and think, “Oh, I didn’t know that about you.”’ On-message or not, luxury brands guard their colours fiercely – an onerous task. ‘It is possible to register a colour as a trademark, but it’s not easy,’ says Hugh Devlin of Withers Worldwide, a legal adviser to the fashion and luxury sector. ‘Generally, a colour will only be registrable if it can be shown to be very distinctive, and the brand can demonstrate

its association.’ For example, Louboutin red may be a cliché of fashion journalism, but the designer has lost two court battles defending his scarlet soles. The first was against Zara in France, for selling a shoe with a red sole that Louboutin said was based on his ‘Yoyo’ pump; the second was against Yves Saint Laurent in the US, for selling red heels with matching soles. Zara pointed out Louboutin had neglected to trademark a specific red (the brand has since registered Pantone 18-1663 TPX), while in the latter case, it was ruled that Louboutin’s trademark only applied to the use of red as a contrast colour on the sole. Nevertheless, Devlin believes a trademark colour ‘can be a significant element of a brand’s success. It’s clear the red sole was an identifiable badge, not dissimilar to an Hermès buckle or Gucci’s intertwined Gs. When they are accepted by the consumer, they can, in time, add to a brand’s value.’ Yet, he cautions, ‘a colour in itself isn’t valuable. If the products aren’t desirable, the packaging won’t make them sell more.’ A truth that fashion brands ignore at their peril. »

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Intelligence

These fashion houses have nailed their colours to the mast – but which have shades of greatness?

Tiffany COMPANY FOUNDED: 1837

Often described as robin’s-egg blue, Tiffany blue may be the longest-established luxury brand colour, and it’s certainly among the most instantly recognisable. It was chosen by founder Charles Lewis Tiffany for the cover of the firm’s first annual jewellery catalogue, which became known as the Blue Book. ‘It’s an interesting colour,’ says Angela Wright, ‘as it could be cold, but it’s mixed with a quite light-hearted shade of green. It’s certainly very sophisticated and aspirational, but that touch of green also makes it a friendlier colour than it might be.’ Today, Tiffany blue is trademarked and standardised, specified as a bespoke Pantone colour – PMS1837 – which, rather nicely, references the year that the company was founded. ‘The desirability of the colour can be linked to the desirability of the product,’ says Devlin. ‘A few years ago, I gave a very sophisticated American friend a small gift that I’d bought for him in Smythson. On unwrapping it and seeing the packaging, his response was, “Oh, this is the blue box that everyone wants now…” which was a clear reference to that fact that Tiffany was, at that time, less desirable than it had been.’

Hermès COLOUR: TIFFANY BLUE, PANTONE PMS1837 YEAR ADOPTED: 1845

COLOUR: HERMÈS ORANGE YEAR ADOPTED: CIRCA 1952

Lanvin COMPANY FOUNDED: 1889

Jeanne Lanvin loved the colour blue so much that she trademarked a shade in her name. Originally known by the rather less romantic title of Ultramarine blue shade no.2, field cornflower, she found it in a guide to chrysanthemums – though she claimed to have been inspired by a Fra Angelico fresco. In 1923, she was able to buy her own dye factory in Nanterre to ensure complete control of the colours used in her clothes. The factory produced not only Lanvin blue but also shades such as Polignac pink (her daughter was married to the Comte Jean de Polignac) and Velásquez green. The current house colour, however, was chosen by Alber Elbaz, when he took over as creative director after the company was bought by Shaw-Lan Wang in 2001. While the cool, grey-blue has many fans, us included, Wright isn’t enthusiastic about its effect with the black lettering: ‘People forget that we’re influenced by colour combinations.’ She compares colour to music: an individual note has no particular character on its own, and it’s only when you put it with other notes that you get harmony – or discord.

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COMPANY FOUNDED: 1837

Those burnt-orange boxes have an intriguing history, as Jean-René Guerrand – who married Aline Hermès and worked for the company from 1926 until he retired in 1990 – recalled in his autobiography. ‘Up until the Second World War, our boxes and packaging were covered in paper of a pale beige colour, similar to pigskin. The Occupation came and the few stocks of cardboard were quickly exhausted… Hermès had to be content with a plain orange cardboard that our suppliers had in stock. This stock, too, quickly became exhausted, and during the course of the war, the colour changed twice. The Liberation came and I chose an orange that was reminiscent of that which we had used in more desperate times, only of a brighter tone. Today, this colour has become as representative of the brand as our ‘calèche’ [carriage] – people recognise it from afar and it adds strength to our communication.’ Wright loves the colour, too. ‘It communicates abundance and richness, but also outdoorsiness,’ she says. ‘Orange is generally about having fun: it mixes red and yellow – both exciting and energetic – and that makes for a very sexy colour.’

Acne COMPANY FOUNDED: 1996

COLOUR: LANVIN BLUE YEAR ADOPTED: 2001

COLOUR: ACNE PINK YEAR ADOPTED: 2014

The youngest, coolest company here also has the most relaxed attitude towards branding – and it was the only firm we approached that was happy to talk about it publicly. ‘We started with red in 1998, as a colour representing democracy,’ explains creative director Jonny Johansson. ‘But some time after that, I had a pink sandwich wrapper lying on my desk and we decided to shift to that colour, as it felt less dramatic somehow.’ This shell pink is a particularly interesting choice for a fashion house that appeals to men as strongly as it does to women, but Johansson says that it’s ‘a very positive colour for me’. It seems spot-on for Acne’s hip, relaxed demographic, though Wright isn’t entirely convinced. ‘It’s a very nice pink,’ she says, ‘but it’s killed stone dead when used with black lettering.’ The current Acne pink is also close to that used by Miu Miu, but as Johansson points out, ‘There are so many different shades of pink. We have slightly changed ours maybe six or seven times without anyone noticing. It’s not interesting for me to find the perfect nuance; I like the freedom of change.’ ∂


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Fashion

Turning heads Fashion’s most talked about new starters make their mark

The seemingly constant shunt and shuffle of design talent in the fashion industry is dizzying. Frankly, it is not easy keeping track. And in a season where Nicolas Ghesquière presented his second Louis Vuitton show, within Frank Gehry’s new Louis Vuitton Fondation (W*187), and Jonathan Anderson (see page 127) staged a sit-in at Paris’ Unesco HQ for his Loewe womenswear debut, the efforts of other new appointments were in danger of being overshadowed. That didn’t happen. Indeed, few recent starters garnered such immediate buzz as Julie de Libran in her debut for Sonia Rykiel, Rodolfo Paglialunga with his first collection for Jil Sander, and Julien Dossena, making his third presentation for Paco Rabanne.

JULIE DE LIBRAN SONIA RYKIEL You may not be familiar with Julie de Libran’s name just yet, but you will certainly know her work. Before taking up her role as artistic director of Sonia Rykiel in May 2014, de Libran was studio director of Louis Vuitton womenswear under Marc Jacobs, designing the house’s Icons collection, cruise and pre-fall lines. And before Louis Vuitton, she shadowed Miuccia Prada for a decade as design director of Prada womenswear. Born in Aix-en-Provence, de Libran spent the 1980s in California, later moving to Italy to study at the prestigious Istituto Marangoni in Milan, followed by Paris’ École de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne. While de Libran was expanding her skillset at Louis Vuitton, working on everything from advertising campaigns to fashion shows, maison Sonia Rykiel passed through the hands of several designers following the retirement of its founder in 2009. Back in the 1970s, Left Bank-based Madame Rykiel was part of a group of Parisian fashion designers who were at the core of the ready-to-wear revolution, launching their labels outside of the established haute

ILLUSTRATOR: MAGDA ANTONIUK WRITER: KATRINA ISRAEL

JULIE DE LIBRAN (TOP) TAPPED INTO MEMORIES OF HER MOTHER’S SONIA RYKIEL WARDROBE, FEATURING SIGNATURE STRIPES AND SAILOR TROUSERS WITH DOUBLE ROWS OF BUTTONS

couture system and igniting an obsession with the city’s insouciant gamine look. She was also known for championing the sweater’s powers of seduction, cutting it close to the body and earning herself the title ‘Queen of Knits’. Channelling its founder’s Left Bank lineage, de Libran chose the house’s Boulevard Saint-Germain atelier for her debut show and tapped into her memories of the Sonia Rykiel designs her mother wore during her youth – all ‘stripes, mohair and glamour’, she recalls. She opened with the house’s signature stripes – albeit subtly woven rather than knitted – in patriotic red and blue on the sleeves of a boxy white tweedy jacket, paired with bouclé shorts and Mary Jane sandals, while mariner stripes leapt off jumpers onto transparent evening dresses. Knitted ponchos with frayed edges updated the house cardigan, and khaki sailor trousers and denim jumpsuits sported Madame Rykiel’s double button rows. It was a fitting salute to Saint-Germain-des-Prés legend. soniarykiel.com

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JULIEN DOSSENA PACO RABANNE DOSSENA (TOP) OFFERED UP AN ATHLETIC AESTHETIC, INCLUDING CUT-AWAY, SWIMSUIT-INSPIRED TOPS

Rarely does a show, especially one stripped of high theatrics, receive as much attention as Julien Dossena’s third outing at Paco Rabanne. In just a few seasons, he has updated the house’s hardware heritage, generating the same charge that electrified France in the late 1960s when Serge Gainsbourg’s new girlfriend, Jane Birkin, rewrote chain mail’s entry in the history books. Birkin was snapped in Paco Rabanne’s rather abbreviated metal ‘Rabannette’ dress. ‘As a French boy, its aesthetic is part of my memory,’ says Dossena, ‘this radical way of thinking in fashion.’ For spring, he added feminine flounces to the hems of chain-mail skirts, and metal grommets to evening dresses. Paco Rabanne’s own material experimentation is legendary; he first found notoriety in Paris in 1966 with ‘12 Unwearable Dresses’, a collection exhibiting his penchant for aluminium jersey, knitted fur and moulded plastic. Having worked with Nicolas Ghesquière as senior designer at Balenciaga for four years, Dossena is no stranger to conceptual fashion, but he is also dedicated to bringing a ‘contemporary attitude’ to his clothing. Olympic-issue swimsuits were reimagined as cut-away tops, just as Dossena repackaged trousers – some relaxed with a sloping waistband, others skin-tight with elastic foot loops. ‘Effortless, young, intellectual and sharp,’ he says, summing up his vision for the house. pacorabanne.com

RODOLFO PAGLIALUNGA JIL SANDER In spite of Jil Sander’s solid design foundation, built on strict lines and precision tailoring, the brand has endured plenty of tremors over the years. The most recent came with the departure of its namesake designer for the third time since she founded the label in 1968. Thankfully, Rodolfo Paglialunga’s debut collection quickly put the Sander world right again. The Italian designer’s CV boasts ten years at Prada, where he was womenswear design director, before becoming creative director at Vionnet in 2009. ‘Beauty, pureness and innovative thinking are distinctive parts of the Jil Sander DNA,’ says Paglialunga, who is determined to preserve the brand’s core values while continuing the evolutionary process that he sees as key to its dynamism. Adding his own touch, for spring he created a new uniform for urban professionals, defined by sophisticated separates such as crisp cotton shirting worn under fine gauge vests, or drawstring blouses teamed with roomy culottes or origami wrap skirts. Paglialunga talks of ‘contemporary simplicity’, an effort to shake the ‘minimalist’ tag that roots the brand in a particular moment. ‘Nowadays, it is quite hard to talk about minimalism,’ he says. ‘In the 1990s, this aesthetic movement was part of people’s lifestyle as a reaction to what the 1980s represented. Now, a lot of things have changed and it would be more appropriate to talk about pureness in a modern way.’ jilsander.com

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AIMING TO TAKE THE JIL SANDER AESTHETIC FORWARD WHILE MAINTAINING ITS KEY VALUES, PAGLIALUNGA (ABOVE) FEATURED NEAT, SOPHISTICATED SEPARATES SUCH AS THIS TIE-WAIST SHIRT AND SLIT SKIRT


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Intelligence FASHION HOUSES SUCH AS CHANEL ARE AMONG THE DIVERSE MEMBERS OF THE COMITÉ COLBERT, SWAPPING NOTES AND ENSURING THE ADVANCE OF THE FRENCH LUXURY INDUSTRY STRAIGHT-CUT JACKET IN BLACK AND GREY TWEED WITH SILVER LAMÉ THREADS CUT ON THE BIAS TO CREATE A SUBTLE QUILTED EFFECT, WITH STRAIGHT HIGHCOLLAR, PATCH POCKETS AND CUFFS EMBROIDERED WITH SMALL CONCRETE TUBES AND SILVER SEQUINS, BY CHANEL HAUTE COUTURE, 31 RUE CAMBON, PARIS, TEL: 33.1 44 50 66 00

Fashion: Sivan Currie. Hair: Victoria Hutchinson using Bumble and Bumble. Make-up: Emily Mergaert using Tom Ford Beauty and Radical Skincare. Model: Ava Courtney at Established

Group think

Why France’s luxury goods heavy hitters have gathered for a high-powered huddle

PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE HARVEY WRITER: DAN THAWLEY

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Photography: © Cartier

Intelligence

C

omité Colbert sounds rather like a shadowy cabal of French power brokers and éminences – grises and otherwise – bent on world domination. And that’s because it is. Well, perhaps shadowy is a little strong. It was established in 1954 by perfumer Jean-Jacques Guerlain, who brought 14 other entrepreneurs to the table. Guerlain’s new committee took its name from Jean-Baptiste Colbert, the 17th-century politician and minister of finances, famed for his progressive ideals and cultivation of French manufacturing that revived a nation on the edge of bankruptcy under the rule of Louis XIV (even though the Sun King spent most of the money Colbert raised on going to war). Some of Colbert’s initiatives survive to this day, including the royal tapestry factories in Paris and Beauvais, where skilled craftsmen and women toil for years at a time over exquisite wall hangings in both contemporary and classical designs. Guerlain hoped his new guild could take up Colbert’s mission, working together to protect and encourage the French way with the finer things; from the champagne of Reims and porcelain of Sèvres to hubs of watchmaking, leather goods, glassware and the Parisian world of high jewellery and haute couture. Guerlain was on to something. The Comité Colbert has prospered along with the French luxury-goods industry, and now includes 78 luxury companies and a host of cultural institutions, many of whom remain in fierce competition in their daily operations. The committee’s membership list is exhaustive and surprising: it brings together haute-couture houses (Chanel, Givenchy and Chloé are members) with Michelin-starred chefs such as Guy Savoy and Alain Ducasse; the high-jewellery ateliers of the Place Vendôme, from Cartier to Mellerio dits Meller; the nation’s leading vineyards, including Krug, Bollinger and Château Lafite Rothschild; accessories specialists from Berluti to Hermès; chocolatiers and patissiers; interior designers; and even Yves Delorme, purveyors of fine linens. Associated members include institutions such as the Musée du Louvre and the Opéra National de Paris. As a place where rival CEOs can compare notes and find common cause, the Comité Colbert is unique. The organisation is now part pan-industry talking shop, part think tank and research institute, part lobbying group and part trade mission, with regular events in emerging markets, from China to Turkey. It also organises apprenticeships for design students at the

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A CARTIER JEWELLER COMPLETES OPENWORK ON METAL. THE COMITÉ COLBERT’S REMIT INCLUDES PROMOTING ARTISANAL SKILLS TO ENABLE LUXURY GOODS COMPANIES TO REPLENISH THEIR RANKS

École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Appliqués et des Métiers d’Art, as well as working with the Paris school board to encourage schoolchildren to consider careers as craftsmen, makers or designers, at a time when companies are struggling to replenish their artisan ranks and bring young blood into their ateliers. ‘For Chanel, the Comité Colbert stands for the ultimate in design, creativity, quality, attention to detail and exceptional service – which are the DNA of our house,’ says Chanel’s president of fashion Bruno Pavlovsky. ‘We have a common goal, to preserve and perpetuate the uniqueness of French luxury.’ And Chanel’s Paraffection initiative, launched in 1997 and designed to guarantee the survival of a portfolio of smaller accessory and couture ateliers – from Lesage’s embroidery to Guillet’s fabric flowers, Causse gloves, and further afield to Barrie knitwear in Scotland – is very much in the Comité Colbert spirit. But there is more to the committee’s work than rearguard preservationism. Last November, it celebrated the 60th anniversary of operations, congregating in the halls of the Château de Versailles (an associated member). But instead of backward-looking backslapping, it chose the occasion to unveil its latest project, ‘Dreaming 2074’. The initiative has brought together six authors, collectively dubbed ‘Utopia Factory’ and led by sciencefiction novelist Jean-Claude Dunyach, to write short stories imagining what luxury might mean 60 years hence. These have been published digitally, available free across a host of online platforms, and on the Comité’s website. Some consider the preciousness of time and family, mixing it with technological prophecy, while others ponder the allure of heirlooms, keepsakes and objects sourced from the earth and shaped by man. French linguist Alain Rey has also coined 14 words, ‘a new luxury vocabulary’ (solely in French for the time being), though more collective mission statement than useful taxonomy. ‘Noventique’ is a favourite: both noun and adjective, it marries ‘innovation’ and ‘authenticity’ – two crucial weapons in the fight to keep luxury relevant, covetable and meaningful for generations to come. www.comitecolbert.com; www.dreaming2074.com

A place where rival CEOs find common cause, the Comité Colbert is unique – part pan-industry talking shop, part think tank and research institute, part lobbying group and part trade mission


DIRECTOR’S CUT Frédéric Tcheng turns the lens on Raf Simons in Dior and I PORTRAIT: KATE ORNE INTERVIEW: KATRINA ISRAEL

There was a time, and not so long ago, when the fashion world was an esoteric place, unravelled by trusted writers whose detailed reports compensated for the lack of pictures allocated to their column inches. Today, technology has opened up the industry to multimedia scrutiny and encouraged a new genre of documentary fashion films. Frédéric Tcheng has been a key driver of this trend and, having co-produced Valentino: The Last Emperor and co-directed Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel, has now taken his place in the director’s chair for Dior and I. The film captures the eight-week lead-up to Raf Simons’ first haute couture collection for Dior. ‘I was interested in seeing the birth of a new direction,’ explains Tcheng. ‘The flip side of the end of an era is a new designer stepping into the shoes of the founder, and that seemed like a very good premise to me.’ The project arose from a conversation with Dior’s director of communications, Olivier Bialobos, at a screening of The Eye Has to Travel a few months before Simons’ appointment was announced. ‘I was intrigued by what was going on at Dior,’ says Tcheng. ‘I told him, “If Raf comes to Dior you have a great story.” I was fascinated by Raf ’s approach. He talks like an artist and has a process of collaboration that is very interesting.’ The first time he actually met Simons, Tcheng was behind the camera, filming his arrival at Dior, where he

OPPOSITE, FRÉDÉRIC TCHENG IN HIS BROOKLYN APARTMENT ABOVE, STILLS FROM THE FILM, DIOR AND I, INCLUDING RAF SIMONS’ FIRST COUTURE COLLECTION FOR THE HOUSE (TOP LEFT AND BOTTOM RIGHT); DIOR’S ARTISANS AT WORK (TOP RIGHT); AND SIMONS CRITIQUING A SAMPLE LOOK IN HIS STUDIO (BOTTOM LEFT)

‘Raf Simons was initially against the idea. Once he gave access, he gave a lot of access’ 118

meets the haute couture seamstresses for the first time. ‘It was tense, as Simons was initially against the idea [of being filmed],’ Tcheng says. ‘I had sent him a letter explaining my process and what I was interested in – the collaboration with the seamstresses, and how those two worlds would collide and create something new.’ He got the OK to film for a week, and worked with just one cameraman. ‘Once Raf gave access, he gave a lot of access,’ Tcheng says. What was unexpected was the extent of Simons’ unease with the publicity that came with his Dior debut – something Christian Dior had also struggled with. This parallel became central to the narrative, with Tcheng using the founder’s voice to aid in narrating Simons’ journey. ‘I did not expect the level of emotion that Raf brought,’ he adds. The pressures the film documents are balanced by moments of the ‘sublime’ (Simons’ preferred descriptive), from artist Sterling Ruby’s paintings reworked as gowns, to the remodelling of the show venue into a four-walled take on Jeff Koons’ floral Puppy, and the comedy double act of the heads of the haute couture ateliers. ‘There was a social element that was important to me,’ Tcheng says. ‘[The film] had to be grounded in real life – the workplace. I was thinking a lot about the upstairs, downstairs narrative.’ Key scenes are shot in the lift that connects the couture atelier with the design room. ‘I tried to portray everyone’s experience,’ he adds, ‘not just Raf ’s, but the multiple points of view of the seamstresses.’ Which brings us to the deliberate ambiguity of the film’s title, Dior and I.  In cinemas from 27 March, diormovie.com


Culture


Profile

Piece corps Five single-minded designers proving you can do just one thing if you do it well PHOTOGRAPHY: MACIEK POZOGA WRITER: KATRINA ISRAEL

Make-up: David Lenhardt

DRYCE LAHSSAN’S FRIENDS AND MUSES (FROM LEFT, MICHELLE ELIE MEIRÉ, MARIA LOKS, BIANCA O’BRIEN, AND NADINE STRITTMATTER) MODEL HIS LATEST COLLECTION. TRENCH COATS, €750 EACH, BY LAHSSAN, FROM NET-A-PORTER.COM

Lahssan Trench coats French designer Dryce Lahssan was up a ladder in a showroom playing handyman when the buyers for cult retailer Opening Ceremony first laid eyes on his fledgling collection of seven trench coats. ‘There was no label, no logo. They froze in front of the rack and asked, “Who makes this?”’ says the designer. The showroom’s owner, a friend of Lahssan’s, replied: ‘The handyman over there.’ It was 2009 and the next person to drop by was from Colette, followed by a Japanese agent who asked to take the designs to Rei Kawakubo, who then bought this first

collection for Dover Street Market. ‘It was such a huge validation,’ says Lahssan. ‘As a designer you need to be reassured, and Rei Kawakubo is everything.’ Colette and Opening Ceremony also put in orders. ‘We made all the mistakes that young designers are supposed to make,’ he says, speaking from his local café/workspace near the Eiffel Tower. ‘We were late on production, a day late on delivery, not good on the quality control, but there was a lot of support from stores. We lost some, we gained others.’ Lahssan has since carved out a covetable niche for his avant-garde trenches. ‘People are always challenging me about my business model, saying, “How long are you going to

be able to do just the trench coat?” I reply, “For as long as I can.” I love that even the business model forces me to be creative.’ After studying psychology in Angers, Lahssan went to Paris to pursue fashion design in 2000. Post-graduation, he became an industry all-rounder: ‘I did lots of jobs, assisting casting directors, producers, stylists. Then I started to do those jobs myself.’ His line was born of disillusionment with the traditional fashion career ladder. ‘In this industry you never really get what you deserve. Sometimes you get more, other times less. One night I felt quite frustrated; I spent it at my computer, drawing. In the morning I had a trench collection. You know how »

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Profile A FORMER STUDENT OF TOP PARISIAN FASHION SCHOOL STUDIO BERÇOT, LAHSSAN FOUNDED HIS EPONYMOUS TRENCH COAT LINE IN 2009

Raphaëlla Riboud Pyjamas Inspired by her elegant mother – who used to wear Yves Saint Laurent silk pyjamas for cocktail hour – Raphaëlla Riboud set about designing her own collection of satin pyjama pieces that deserve a life outside the bedroom. The stylish Parisian, whose atelier looks out over the city’s Palais Royal, worked in fashion publishing and at Ralph Lauren and Dior before launching her own ‘private wear’ line in 2012. raphaellariboud.com

Atlantique Ascoli Blouses In 2013, French art director and singer/ songwriter Atlantique Ascoli launched an eponymous label dedicated to the linchpin of her own personal wardrobe: the blouse. Ascoli’s cotton and linen pieces come with an architectural volume and consideration for detailing that elevates the humble shirt to that of a design heavyweight. Her threedimensional approach is no doubt inherited from her industrial designer father and fashion designer mother.

Heart Heart Heart Scarves

you have those genius ideas at 3am, and you wake up and they’re not genius anymore? Well, this time it still was a good idea.’ Why the trench? ‘The frame – it keeps me focused,’ he says. ‘You need the double button, the flap in the front and back, that belt.’ It has classic characteristics that also pose endless design questions: ‘How do you make a masculine uniform sexy? And I always say you wear a trench in London because it’s raining, but when a guy wears one in Paris, it suggests a certain British elegance. In France,’ he adds, ‘it has been adopted more by women and it’s a very feminine piece.’ Lahssan started out producing his trench coats with small Parisian ateliers, but quickly found himself competing with the big fashion houses that were using the same studios for their show samples. Last season, thanks to a sizeable order from Net-a-Porter, he moved production to Eastern Europe. The matter of materials is a far simpler equation: ‘It’s gabardine,’ he says. ‘That’s what a trench coat

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is supposed to be. Like Yves Saint Laurent used to say he wished he had invented blue jeans, I wish I had invented gabardine – it is both practical and luxurious.’ Each season, Lahssan’s mission is to twist the coat’s traditional codes. For S/S 2015, the Frenchman was inspired by Lucio Fontana’s slashed canvases: ‘I sliced the whole side,’ he says of his military green offerings that reveal everything from the armpit to the hip, while remaining ‘buttoned up’ in the front. Lahssan says there’s only one true trench icon. ‘Greta Garbo and Katharine Hepburn were strong women wearing men’s outfits. But the one who made the trench a women’s piece of clothing is Catherine Deneuve. The way she wears it. She owns it on every level. I’ve seen her walk through a Parisian hotel lobby smoking a cigarette. Everybody froze, but nobody said anything, as she is the true first lady of France.’ He pauses. ‘And you know what she was wearing? A beige trench.’ lahssan.com

When Iracema Trevisan, bass player of Brazilian indie-electro band CSS, decided to switch her focus from music to fashion, the scarf quickly became her new instrument of choice. After enrolling at the Institut Français de la Mode in Paris, and working for Lanvin and Kenzo, she launched her line of silk and virgin wool squares in 2011. Often edged with rich embroidery, they are inspired by nature and the work of architect Lina Bo Bardi. heartheartheart.com

Alice Made This Cufflinks Alice Walsh enjoyed a successful industrial design career working for Tom Dixon, Conran and De Beers, before the search for cufflinks for her fiancé’s wedding outfit led her to start her own artisan accessory label. Walsh opened her contact book to enlist a diverse range of British craftspeople, enabling her to reimagine the humble cufflink in materials as unorthodox as hand-braided rope and engineered ceramics. alicemadethis.com


TREND REPORT 2015 WORKPL ACE AND LIFESPACE DESIGN FOR THE DIVERSE DECADE

Minding the mindful workspace

Taking a stand for a longer life

Creating the ultimate workplace/homelife balance

OFFICE BIOLOGY HOW OUR MINDS AND BODIES REACT AND ADAPT TO OUR WORK ENVIRONMENT

Discover the design opportunities in the workplace for the coming decade in the Kinnarps Trend Report 2015 Join us in the count down to the November 10th release on kinnarps.com/trend


Profile TREMOLADA WITH HIS BELOVED FALCO, WHICH HE USES FOR HIS MILANFLORENCE COMMUTE. HE DESCRIBES THE PLANE’S DESIGNER, STELIO FRATI, AS ‘THE CHRISTIAN DIOR OF AEROPLANES’


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Wings of desire

Fashion executive Andrea Tremolada’s passion for planes

PHOTOGRAPHY: PIERPAOLO FERRARI WRITER: JJ MARTIN

ndrea Tremolada’s near-perfect English isn’t the result of any formal schooling he received while he was growing up in Italy. Rather, the fashion executive taught himself by studying the aviation catalogues he collected as a child. ‘All of the best magazines were in English,’ he says. ‘So I forced myself to learn.’ A former communications director for Versace and Salvatore Ferragamo, and now at Roberto Cavalli, Milan-born Tremolada is a self-described aeroplane junkie whose high-profile day job pays for his habit. Over three decades, he has built or restored six planes. He currently owns two – a 1974 Duke, which he rebuilt using pieces he bought, made or restored, and a custom-built Falco – and he recently sold a custom-built Lancair Legacy. ‘I’m obsessed with restoring things,’ says Tremolada, who has also refurbished six cars and six Milan homes. ‘I have a workshop at home. I can’t have anyone else do it because they’re not as precise as me.’ Tremolada’s passion for flight started early. He attended his first aviation fair when he was ten, and began flying gliders at 14. He earned his commercial pilot’s licence at 18, after vigilantly washing planes and working as a petrol-station attendant to cover the costs, and he bought and restored his first aircraft, a 1946 Stampe SV4C, aged just 22. From a collector’s viewpoint, his first conquest was the cherry-red Falco. Designed in 1955 by Stelio Frati, the Falco won a Compasso d’Oro for industrial design in 1960. Only 100 or so were ever produced, and Tremolada couldn’t afford one anyway. So in the 1980s he bought plans from the Sequoia Aircraft Corporation, waited three years to get construction authorisation in Italy, and eventually finished building his Falco in 1999. He celebrated in 2000 by loading the wooden two-seater with 600 litres of extra fuel and flying to Recife, Brazil (via Seville and Cape Verde), a perilous trip that won him a Cavaliere della Repubblica, the Italian order of merit. ‘Aerodynamically, it’s the most efficient plane in its class,’ says Tremolada, who now flies the Falco between his home in Milan and his office in Florence. ‘I fly 350km in 45 minutes and burn only 28 litres of gas.’ His leather-lined Duke, meanwhile, with aluminium walls twice as thick as aircraft built today, makes less economic sense – but makes up for this with its sleek, long-nosed beauty. Designed in 1966 by Beechcraft, fewer than 600 Dukes were produced between 1968 and 1982. Tremolada spent three years painstakingly breaking down and rebuilding his 1974-model B60 – a job that cost six times the price of the plane. But it was worth it. ‘I don’t care about the costs or convenience,’ says Tremolada. ‘These planes have always been my dream. Without a dream you die.’ 

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Design JONATHAN ANDERSON WITH A SET OF WILLIAM MORRIS ‘SUSSEX’ CHAIRS, FROM LOEWE’S PRIVATE COLLECTION

Hot seats

Fired by his passion for the past, Loewe creative director Jonathan Anderson is furnishing its stores with love PORTRAIT: JOACHIM MUELLER-RUCHHOLTZ WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI

The fashion world has taken a close interest in Spanish leather-goods brand Loewe since 30-year-old British designer Jonathan Anderson was appointed creative director in September 2013. And there has been a lot to keep track of. Anderson, who still handles design duties at his own JW Anderson label, has enlisted design duo Michael Amzalag and Mathias Augustyniak of M/M (Paris) to collaborate with him on a rebranding (Best Rebrand in Wallpaper’s 2015 Design Awards, W*191); engineered a new handbag, the ‘Puzzle’, using an innovative leather-cutting and assembling system; and resurrected a 1997 set of editorial photographs by Steven Meisel to use as Loewe’s »

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Design FOR USE IN LOEWE STORE DESIGN, ANDERSON HAS UPDATED JAVIER CARVAJAL’S 1959 ‘SILLA CARVAJAL’ WITH BRIGHTLY COLOURED LEATHER STRIPS

autumn/winter 2014 advertising campaign. He has also taken control of store design, working alongside local artists and craftsmen on new Omotesando and Milan locations. Anderson is now bringing more of his own passions into the brand by amassing an ambitious collection of Arts and Crafts furniture, displayed in its stores worldwide. ‘I like this idea that you could go into a Loewe store and be able to see something at the same level as you’d see at the V&A or MoMA,’ he explains. ‘I think there is something very interesting in the movement that hasn’t really had the light shone back on to it and I find it extremely modern.’ The craftsmanship and durability of the designs is what attracted Anderson. Over the past few years, he has acquired a considerable personal collection of works by Arts and Crafts designers and architects such as Harry Napper, William Morris and Baillie Scott. He then started collecting for Loewe, picking up rare designs by Sir Ambrose Heal, Sir Edwin Lutyens and Charles Rennie Mackintosh, aiming to steer the brand ‘into a cultural landscape’. The collection, bought at stores and auctions around the world, now includes more than 100 pieces. ‘I think interiors are more powerful than fashion,’ Anderson says. ‘Sometimes

‘I like the idea that you could go into a Loewe store and see something at the same level as the V&A or MoMA’ 128

you get very demotivated with fashion. It’s never lasting, while a Mackintosh chair will last forever.’ The designer’s approach to the job was inspired by Javier Carvajal, the Spanish architect who worked on many projects for Loewe in the 1950s and 1960s, including designing the factory in Barcelona and several stores. ‘I found Carvajal’s work in the archives. It was [the time] when the ‘Amazona’ bag was created, a moment when Loewe went from being a manufacturer to a fashion brand.’ Carvajal’s work impressed Anderson so much that he decided to resurrect the ‘Silla Carvajal’, a chair the architect designed for the opening of Loewe’s Serrano Street store in Madrid in 1959. The modernist piece features a sinuous wooden frame with a seat composed of leather slats — simplicity meets sensuality. Anderson kept the original proportions, updating the design with leather strips in bright hues — a typically irreverent touch. His plan is to bring back more Carvajal pieces in the future, while also focusing on the brand’s own lifestyle pieces and new side projects. Coming up next is a new store in Miami’s Design District. The shop will feature an installation that represents an hórreo, a traditional 17th-century Spanish building used to store grain. Housed in a glass box, it will include Arts and Crafts-inspired touches. Also in the pipeline is a tribute to Austrian-born ceramicist Lucy Rie; Anderson is creating a collection of modular leather bowls in homage to her craftsmanship and shapes. He acknowledges that these side projects could be seen as random indulgences. But he was given freedom (and clearly a lot of trust) to rebuild the Loewe brand and the results of his experiments are coming together. ‘We have seen a very clear shift in the articulation of the brand, with an intellectual and cultural approach that is sensitive to our environment as a luxury producer with a global shop window,’ says Lisa Montague, CEO of Loewe. She is confident that Anderson’s ‘extracurricular’ activities within the brand will develop a language that reflects his design aesthetic and appeals to both its existing customer base and also to the customers of tomorrow. ‘I believe you cannot overthink these things,’ concludes Anderson. ‘Sometimes you have to get it wrong. That is what excites me about these projects. I hope I get many things wrong, and I hope I get many things right. But ultimately, if I can inspire someone else, I have done my job.’ ∂

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN SHORT


«I often need a change of perspective – that’s why I value a system adaptable enough to open up new horizons.» Laura Tusevo, Design Student, ECAL, Lausanne

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Fashion

HIGH STAKES How smart accessories start-ups are taking on the big shots

‘MAUREEN’ SHOES, £625, BY MALONE SOULIERS. PART OF THE BRAND’S CLASSIC COLLECTION, THE HANDMADE SHOES ARE AVAILABLE IN FIVE COLOURS

When it comes to today’s accessories wars, a young designer can’t help but feel like a puny David facing off against a skyscraper-sized Goliath. Brands such as Louis Vuitton and Prada dominate the sector with their gigantic market shares and marketing muscle. For a young label, the trick is not so much in designing a precision slingshot to take out their opponents, but rather to do business on a totally different battlefield. ‘We have to be dexterous and light-footed to make a splash,’ says Mary Alice Malone, founder of Malone Souliers. In less than a year, Malone and her business partner Roy Luwolt have levered themselves into the accessories business by handmaking original, covetable, quality products. ‘I’m proud to say we offer some of the only fully handmade shoes available,’ says Malone. This attention to detail is shared by Milan-based designer Paula Cademartori, whose trademark »

PHOTOGRAPHY: KATE JACKLING WRITER: JJ MARTIN

01 MALONE SOULIERS Handmade heaven for the sole

Mary Alice Malone, creative director of Malone Souliers, studied furniture design before enrolling in the prestigious Cordwainers school at the London College of Fashion. ‘But the fundamentals of both furniture and shoemaking are the same,’ she insists. ‘The object has to be functional before it can be beautiful.’ Her shoes, which feature hand-painted soles and handmade heels, neatly fit both bills. Her sexy-meets-retro designs have, in just two seasons, gained traction with retailers such as New York’s Bergdorf Goodman and London’s Matches. Private clients, meanwhile, can enjoy the made-to-measure version, from £1,500. malonesouliers.com

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Fashion handbags feature an intarsia technique so complicated that at first her Italian supplier refused to make her a prototype. So the tenacious Cademartori (who secured her first big client, 10 Corso Como, by calling the receptionist every day for six months) went to the factory, cut all the flower petals by hand and made it herself. In fact, getting an Italian leather factory to produce pieces can be immensely challenging for tiny fish. Says Rachel Mansur of Mansur Graviel, a New York-based label specialising in simple bucketbags and backpacks: ‘It requires both luck and persistence.’ In Mansur Graviel’s case, the perseverance paid off. ‘They hit the perfect price point with a beautifully made product,’ explains Ana Maria Pimentel Hood, accessories director at Bergdorf Goodman. ‘But it’s hard to infiltrate today’s high-end retailers,’ she concedes. ‘A lot of these small brands are being put on the map now by social media. Put a few pictures up, tag them, pin them. That is the easiest and quickest way to get exposure.’ ∂

02 PAULA CADEMARTORI

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03 MANSUR GAVRIEL

Savvy strategist's floral arrangements

Cross-continental accessory genius

Brazilian-born, Milan-based handbag designer Paula Cademartori started out at Versace, where she learned the ins and outs of big-brand management. Over the last year, she has won admirers with her eponymous handbag label. Cademartori’s signature product is a rigid, calfskin bag with an intricate, colourful floral intarsia of leather, suede and exotic skins. All of her collection, from the trademark clutches and totes to her new Plexiglas bags, is impeccably produced by Italian leather goods specialists. A savvy strategist, Cademartori gave her bags as arm candy early on to Europe’s street-style stars, reaping free exposure as she slowly built her network. Her company now employs 13 people and is available at 166 stores, including Harvey Nichols and Saks Fifth Avenue. paulacademartori.com

Students of textile and fashion design respectively, Californian Rachel Mansur and Berliner Floriana Gavriel met at a concert in 2010 and quickly became cross-continental collaborators. Now based in New York, their label Mansur Gavriel’s claim to fame is a basic bucket bag so hot it is consistently sold out at stores such as Colette, Barneys and Dover Street Market. Crafted from a beautiful vegetable-tanned leather, with a contrastingly coloured interior, the drawstring bag offers both quality and capacity. Mansur Gavriel keeps its offer limited to the bucket bag, a tote, a clutch, a backpack and a wallet, and the strategy is paying off: the last time the company restocked its online store, 95 per cent of the merchandise was sold out in the first hour. mansurgavriel.com

ABOVE LEFT, SHOULDER BAG, €1,425, BY PAULA CADEMARTORI. ABOVE RIGHT, BUCKET BAG, $625, BY MANSUR GAVRIEL


FLÂNEUR FOREVER


LA stories Angelino art patriarchs John Baldessari and Ed Ruscha pick out their home city’s truest voices and brightest new talent PHOTOGRAPHY: CEDRIC BUCHET WRITER: TIBBY ROTHMAN

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Culture JOHN BALDESSARI AND ED RUSCHA PHOTOGRAPHED ON 8 JANUARY 2015 AT RUSCHA’S STUDIO IN CULVER CITY


‘Los Angeles is just a bunch of nerve endings,’ begins Ed Ruscha. The artist is sitting at a rectangular table in his library, a generously sized warehouse room in his Culver City studio that houses his extensive collection of artist catalogues and monographs, and other books, fiction and non-fiction, that he’s gathered over time: subjects include poetry, art criticism and history, literature, pop culture, film, fashion, politics and, of course, LA. ‘A lot of these nerve endings happen to be artists, and they’re the ones that I listen to. I keep myself open to that, so that’s how I’ve met these people or know about them,’ he says. ‘All are completely different from one another and yet they all have the same kind of potency and drive that makes you wake up and smell the roses.’ Take, for instance, Ariel Pink, pioneer of lo-fi sound – ‘he’s way out there,’ notes Ruscha. Ruscha caught an early-career Pink set at a nice dinner, a ‘theatrical, disjointed performance,’ that was so ‘edgy and challenging’, Ruscha recalls that payment was temporarily withheld. ‘All share the same kinds of quirkiness in the idea of living here,’ he goes on. ‘They’re all pretty much doing their own thing.’ Some are friends, a few he has encountered briefly, several he doesn’t know directly but collects. (The studio walls proffer pieces by so many other artists, one is hard pressed to find a Ruscha.) ‘I’ve never met him but have a couple of his works. He uses text in funny ways,’ says Ruscha, picking up a Jon Pylypchuk collage in which stream-of-consciousness dialogue is scrawled primitively, attached to a smallish character costumed in a swatch of applied fabric. Near the Pylypchuk are two Dani Tull watercolours. Setting off one are variations of a loosely rendered line, refractions of a shape in the body. Ruscha also talks about novelist Mark Z Danielewski, who arranges his words into distinct shapes and form. Again, he isn’t personally acquainted but reads him, if that is what you do with Danielewski. Ruscha first met Daniel Joseph Martinez when Martinez was a teenage photographer and he was the assignment. In the decades since, he has tracked this particular nerve ending, whose conceptual, printed and performance work marches into ‘artist-activist’ territories. ‘He’s got something to say,’ states Ruscha. Ruscha, of course, has his own renditions of the city, including Hollywood, Sunset, Santa Monica, Vine (1998), The Back of Hollywood (1977), and The Los Angeles County Museum on Fire (1965–68). Ruscha does black and white and colour but now thinks of the city in monochrome. ‘When I dream about this place, I picture it very much like a black and white movie,’ he says. Not that he’s disengaged. ‘Thirteen thousand people

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arrive daily to live here. The mayor came by and I told him that and he kind of changed the subject,’ mentions Ruscha with an easygoing laugh. Even Sunset Boulevard, the subject of Ruscha’s seminal 25ft Every Building on the Sunset Strip (1966), is to be deluged with ‘recently approved skyscrapers.’ ‘They’re on a real rush to develop this city out and maximise the density,’ says Ruscha. ‘It’s getting to be claustrophobic.’ His respite from the density is twofold – the solitude of his Mojave Desert home, and his warehouse studio. ‘I’ve always had this lovehate relationship with LA. I’ve lived here for 60 years or so and I still find it inspiring but I can’t say why.’ John Baldessari is another artist with an intense relationship with the city. So much so that when Michael Govan, director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, was struggling to find anyone that could deliver a new logo for the museum, he turned to Baldessari. Several days later, the artist invited Govan to his studio to see the imagery: an iPhone-photograph – palm tree, thumb, pencil – that replicated an image originally used by the artist in the 1960s. ‘Palm trees are omnipresent in LA. The pencil and thumb are a device for drawing students to use to get perspective right,’ Baldessari explains. It could be his logo too. In the catalogue for the Hammer Museum’s biennial ‘Made in LA 2014’ exhibition, which focuses on emerging and under-recognised LA artists, the museum’s chief curator Connie Butler wrote: ‘In New York, it was said, an artist knew she had made it when she could quit her teaching job; in California, an artist knew she had made it when she landed a teaching job.’ With an 18-year-run at CalArts, begun in 1970 and followed by nearly a dozen more at UCLA, Baldessari exemplifies the tradition. He remained a teacher even as international recognition grew. His laidback style and humour were a stark contrast to the viciousness of the typical art-school-crit. ‘He didn’t resist younger generations’ work,’ one former student remembers. ‘He was unthreatened by it.’ Instead, more than four decades’ worth of students have been through classes that Baldessari taught, creating a sort of LA art world iteration of ‘six degrees of Baldessari’ in which everyone seems to connect back to John.


Culture

Mark Z Danielewski Ergodic novelist ‘The book has me under house arrest,’ laughs novelist Mark Z Danielewski. He’s talking about the deadline for his upcoming, multi-volume novel The Familiar. In Danielewski’s written worlds, narratives composed of characters’ quotes, tone poems, or even reader-contributed data, form swatches, symbols or line drawings. His West Hollywood home sports notebooks full of thick-line doodles akin to artists’ studies. Patches and patterns in different orientations represent characters. ‘I’m trying to get the energy, the movement of what a character will look like’. When Danielewski shifts to computer, he writes using InDesign, stocked with a library of 24,000 typefaces. ‘The font choice is a major thing,’ he says, taking ‘several years of experimentation’. Alterations to a character’s voice require type adjustments, while alternative sample layouts deepen his understanding of the story. For The Familiar, he is adding photographs to the mix.

SELECTED WORKS HOUSE OF LEAVES, 2000 IN HIS DEBUT NOVEL, THE WORD ‘HOME’ ALWAYS APPEARED IN PANTONE 287 U, A BLUE. ‘WITHOUT IT, IT’S MISSPELT,’ SAYS THE AUTHOR. ONLY REVOLUTIONS, 2006 THIS ROAD-TRIP STORY, ABOUT TWO AGELESS TEENAGERS, RUNS IN STRIPS, UPSIDE-DOWN AND BACK TO FRONT. PHOTOGRAPHED ON THE ROOFTOP GARDEN OF RESTORATION HARDWARE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, 10 JAN 2015


Culture

Molly Berman Photographer

As a teenager, Molly Berman, daughter of Star Trek producer Rick Berman, attended a private school in Los Angeles but felt a distance from her peers. LA seemed vapid, misunderstood by those attracted to it, a glamorous surface with little beneath. Returning from Bard College, a small New York State liberal arts institution, ‘I realised how wrong I was. When you get out of a place, you can start to see new parts of it,’ says the 24-year-old photographer. On a road trip across America, taken just after graduating, Berman became transfixed by decrepit buildings in decaying towns or on stretches of withering roads between them. She took photographs of them and, in doing so, wondered, ‘Is it elitist to find beauty in them?’ Her current series of images of comfortable Angelenos, living in highly sought-after zip codes, considers that same question. Posed with a set of their belongings, the images have the tinge of a luxury advertisement. ‘But I try and add a little bit of emptiness to them,’ she says.

SELECTED WORKS ‘ORDINARY COMBUSTIBLES’ ‘I TAKE PHOTOGRAPHS AS A JUSTIFICATION FOR MY TENDENCY TO STARE. MY SHOW’S TITLE DERIVES FROM THE FACT THAT I PHOTOGRAPH

Greg Wilken Artist and field explorer SELECTED WORKS ‘ON THE ROAD OF A THOUSAND WONDERS’, 2011 WILKEN TRACES WALKING TRAILS IN CALIFORNIA, INCLUDING THE CAMINO REAL, THAT BECAME RAIL LINES, THEN ROADS – ‘PALIMPSESTS OFFERING TRACES OF MAN’S MOVEMENT ACROSS THE LAND’. ‘ON THE NATURAL HISTORY OF JUAN FERNANDEZ’, 2006 THIS TOOK WILKEN TO AN ISLAND OFF CHILE WHERE A SCOTTISH SAILOR LANGUISHED FOR FOUR POST-SHIPWRECK YEARS IN THE 1700S. HE WOULD LATER BECOME THE INSPIRATION FOR DANIEL DEFOE’S ROBINSON CRUSOE. PHOTOGRAPHED ON HIS SAILBOAT IN MARINA DEL REY, 8 JANUARY 2015

‘Art is a great excuse to be curious about the world and, while doing so, live a pretty interesting life,’ says Greg Wilken, a graduate of LA’s Otis College of Art and Design, who now lives on a sailboat he restored in Marina del Rey. His large-format photographs and self-published books are in-the-field explorations of extraordinary history and geography. Wilken’s most recent excursion is his most far-flung: ten months in the Republic of Kiribati, a remote nation of tiny atolls in the equatorial Pacific that’s at risk of disappearing because of sea level rise. The trip, funded by a Fulbright grant, also took him to a new creative place – working with moving image and sound. In this case, he collected footage for an installation that uses the impact of global warming on land to explore ‘the mental space that opens when viewers are confronted by the friction between different ideas, or scales, of time’. He says, ‘The concept that during one lifetime an entire nation could disappear is akin to someone telling me the sun won’t rise tomorrow.’

EVERYDAY OBJECTS WITH THE HOPES OF BRINGING NEW LIFE TO THEM AND ALTERING THE WAY THEY ARE VIEWED’ PHOTOGRAPHED AT HOME IN MIRACLE MILE, 9 JANUARY 2015


PHOTOGRAPHED AT LA FUENTE RESTAURANT IN HIGHLAND PARK, 10 JANUARY 2015

Ariel Pink The godfather of lo-fi In 2010, Ariel Pink outdid Kanye West to claim Pitchfork’s top song gong for Round and Round, and he has just released his tenth album Pom Pom. The album’s unique, crowded-room-sound is exuberant, but some of the videos produced for the album, collaborations with director Grant Singer, strike a more misanthropic note. ‘Very Midnight Cowboy,’ notes the musician of Put Your Number in My Phone’s emotional dystopia. Meanwhile, Picture Me Gone’s desolate characters, in contorted masks cast from Pink’s face, are less upbeat MTV vid,

more conceptual CalArts. But then Pink studied fine arts at the college. And the methodologies for his early albums so paralleled an artist’s process, his first review came from Dennis Cooper in Art Forum. Covers were hand drawn or collage, sometimes incorporating Pink’s image pasted on another band’s graphic. He produced every sound, often rudimentarily, and played every instrument on the lo-fi home recordings with mixes that still had hiss. ‘It was so uncommercial, it could only be seen as art,’ observes the musician.

SELECTED WORKS THE DOLDRUMS, 2004 ONE PITCHFORK REVIEWER DESCRIBED PINK’S THIRD ALBUM AS ‘THINK AUTISTIC KIDS COVERING BRIAN WILSON OR TOM WAITS SINGING A NURSERY RHYME’. BEFORE TODAY, 2010 INCLUDES THE GUITARRIFIC TRACK BUTT-HOUSE BLONDIES.

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Culture SELECTED WORKS ‘GAWDHEAD AND THE CAVE MIND’, 2009 POST-PSYCHEDELIA, TAKING IN CAVE MEN, CREATION, PSYCHOACTIVE DRUGS AND ANCIENT TOTEMS. ‘ODD ARK’, 2006 LINE DRAWINGS OF HEAVYLIDDED CARTOON STONERS AND MOCK-UPS FOR A MAGAZINE TITLED MY FLUORESCENT BEATITUDE. PHOTOGRAPHED AT HIS STUDIO IN HIGHLAND PARK, 10 JANUARY 2015 SELECTED WORKS MAPS TO THE STARS WAGNER’S SCREENPLAY FOR THE FILM, DIRECTED BY DAVID CRONENBERG, SECURED A GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINATION FOR JULIANNE MOORE. WILD PALMS FIVE-HOUR ORWELLIAN MINISERIES, SCREENED IN 1993 AND BASED ON WAGNER’S COMIC STRIP OF THE SAME NAME, FIRST PUBLISHED IN DETAILS MAGAZINE. PHOTOGRAPHED AT A PRIVATE RESIDENCE NEAR SUNSET BOULEVARD, 9 JANUARY 2015

Dani Tull Third generation artist and musician Dani Tull possesses serious LA cultural pedigree. His grandfather, Sam Cherry, photographed Charles Bukowski, while his parents – both artists – founded pioneering vintage clothing store Aardvark’s on Melrose Avenue. Early-career solo outings, such as a show at Blum & Poe, had a PoMo bent, while more recently, he’s been known for pieces that tap into the mystical and subconscious. His latest show, at LAM Gallery, features hand-built sculptures that reflect

Tull’s new interest in ‘the analogue’. Web tendrils are etched into the incandescent wax surface of irregularly shaped tripodal forms, then inlaid with paint. ‘I could easily get these fabricated or 3D printed but I want my hand involved,’ he says. ‘The work I am making, and a lot of other work that I see being made right now, is a response to social media and the way technology is so deeply integrated into our lives. There is a natural response for us to seek out things that are handmade.’


Bruce Wagner Acerbic wordsmith For decades, Bruce Wagner’s articles, screenplays and, most personally, novels, have skewered LA’s narcissism with text that glimmers and pops like 4th of July fireworks off the Malibu coast, matched with truth-telling as incisive as a prison yard shiv. ‘My work is about anguish and human struggle and failure and hopefully transcendence. But I’m not contemptuous of Hollywood. It’s my hometown,’ he adds, sitting comfortably in a room at the LA outpost of Soho House, where he informally offices. (The staff, he demurs, are ‘faultlessly kind’.) Wagner famously dropped out of the nearby Beverly Hills High School to concentrate on the slick and the seedy, first as an ambulance driver, then as a hotel limo driver, ferrying the likes of Orson Welles and Andy Warhol. The terrain of the city is so familiar to him, he thinks of it as a home. ‘The beach is the bedroom. East Los Angeles is the living or a dining room.’

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Culture

Delia Brown

PHOTOGRAPHED AT HER HOME IN SANTA MONICA, 9 JANUARY 2015

Artist of leisure A few years ago, the painter Delia Brown returned from a spell in New York to a single-family home neighbourhood a few blocks north of Venice. The buzz of her ‘Sex in the City phase’ was over, replaced by open water swims in the Pacific. Brown first earned critical attention, not all of it friendly, for her ‘Guerilla Lounging’ series, paintings of her girlfriends in the homes of wealthy collectors, arranged in decadent tableaux to create Monet-tinged portraits, drenched

in fine wine, lipstick and luxuries. Televisual glamour remained a concern, and the artist’s current obsession is The Real Housewives series. Brown’s original idea was to get cast as a ‘housewife that painted’ but she has scaled that back to pastoral portraits. In the first to be completed, Countess LuAnn, of the The Real Housewives of New York City, gazes from a private dock, languid in an open bathrobe, as she enjoys her morning coffee. It is the first of a series that could run and run.

SELECTED WORKS ‘LAST EXIT: PUNTA JUNTA’, 2012 A GLAMOROUS FEMALE MILITIA PARTY ON ST BARTHS. ‘WHAT, ARE YOU JEALOUS?’, 2000 BIKINI-CLAD WOMEN LOUNGE AROUND BEVERLY HILLS SWIMMING POOLS.


Daniel Joseph Martinez Art activist Daniel Joseph Martinez’s output distills terabytes worth of complex ideas into deceptively simple pieces that confront economic, political and social disparities. He introduced himself at the 1993 Whitney Biennial by slicing open the sentence ‘I Can’t Ever Imagine Wanting to Be White’ and imprinting its disembodied words on museum admission badges. His show at Roberts & Tilton last year, ‘The report of my death is an exaggeration; Memoirs; Of Becoming Narrenschiff ’, was considerably darker. A rumination on LA’s dehumanisation of the mad and impoverished, it was based on Sebastian Brant’s satirical 1494 work Das Narrenschiff (The Ship of Fools). For three years, Martinez rode buses across LA, from morning to night, listening and recording, and working through Michel Foucault’s interpretation of Das Narrenschiff. SELECTED WORKS ‘I AM A VERB’, 2012 HUNCHBACK POPES, FALLEN STATUES OF LIBERTY, AND NEON SIGNS. ‘THE HOUSE AMERICA BUILT’, 2004 A DISSECTED SCALE MODEL OF THE CABIN USED BY THEODORE KACZYNSKI, AKA THE UNABOMBER, PAINTED IN COLOURS FROM MARTHA STEWART’S PAINT LINE. PHOTOGRAPHED IN HUNTINGTON PARK, 10 JANUARY 2015

Meet more of Baldessari and Ruscha’s creative LA crowd at Wallpaper.com

Jon Pylypchuk Anthropomorphic sculptor

SELECTED WORKS

The titles are as important as the pieces for the Winnipeg-born Jon Pylypchuk, whose current show is at LA’s China Art Objects Galleries. Titles – such as I wish my parents were still alive and I have thought deep through this trouble – create a dialogue with his anthropomorphic creations. ‘They might not be something I would say in “normal life”, but I could articulate it through little characters,’ says Pylypchuk. Initially the titles came to him through the music he played in the studio, lyrics lodged somewhere but slowly becoming something else. ‘It gets adjusted in your mind to become something that makes sense to you.’ Today, he keep useful phrases in a mental ‘repository’. He now refers to his adopted home town as The Greatest City that Ever Existed!, a visceral appreciation of its artistic freedom.

‘IN THE ABSENCE OF HUMAN BASTARDS’, 2011 MORDANT HUMOUR AND TERRIBLE PATHOS AS FLUFFY BUG-EYED HORSE TOSSES OFF FLAT DOORMAT RIDER. ‘HOPEFULLY, I WILL LIVE THROUGH THIS WITH A LITTLE BIT OF DIGNITY’, 2005 RAGDOLL RAT ARMY DIES IN MYSTERIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES. PHOTOGRAPHED AT HIS STUDIO IN HUNTINGTON PARK, 10 JANUARY 2015

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Crunch time

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Storeys that showgoers ascended for Jason Wu’s fashion show for Hugo Boss at 4 World Trade Center

Number of arches on Fendi’s runway, designed to recreate Rome’s Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana

From Barbie to blood baths, the shows in numbers WRITER: JJ MARTIN ILLUSTRATOR: NATHALIE LEES

15,000

6

Artworks that Miley Cyrus gluegunned together from toys and stage debris for her exhibition ‘Dirty Hippie’ with V Magazine

Tons of steel used to create Frank Gehry’s Louis Vuitton Foundation, the new site for the French brand’s fashion shows

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15

Models in stripes and oversized wigs that danced in white stilettos and socks for Jean Paul Gaultier’s farewell to ready-to-wear fashion

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Models with black patent face braces at Alexander McQueen

Life-sized Barbie who roller-skated down the Moschino runway

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5 6

Golf ball-sized rivets on a single Marc Jacobs woman’s jacket

Outfits that may, or may not, have been put through a Texas Chainsaw Massacrestyle blood bath at Comme des Garçons

Claws forming the soles of Rick Owens’ cave girl/ Grecian platform sandals

9.7 Millions of page impressions generated by 89 fashion bloggers during Calvin Klein’s show – a fashion week record

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1,000 28,000

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Age in months of North West, who secured her own gold chair with calligraphed nameplace at the Givenchy women’s show. She wore a sheer black lace top for the occasion

Models’ heads shrink-wrapped into flat plastic helmets at Junya Watanabe

Different poses by model Coco Rocha in a leotard in her book Study of Pose, shot by Steven Sebring with a 360-degree photography rig

150,000 Number of copies of The Karl Daily, Karl Lagerfeld’s satirical newspaper, distributed during Paris Fashion Week

32

130,000

Fresh flowers for sale at Marni’s pop-up market at Milan’s Rotonda della Besana

Flowers planted on Tommy Hilfiger’s sprawling golf course-cum-music carnival runway

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Weeks it took Argentine artist Alexandra Kehayoglou to create Dries Van Noten’s mossy runway

Stuffed elephants waiting on the guests’ seats at Oscar de la Renta’s show

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Giant red cherries inscribed with skulls loitering at Jun Takahashi’s Undercover show

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Fashion

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Bicycle wheels spinning on the Antonio Marras runway

Fashion editors who left New York Fashion Week early to fly to Cupertino for the Apple Watch presentation

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Women’s hats in the form of a man’s suit at the Thom Browne show

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Cement skateboard ramps on the runway at Kenzo

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Size in square feet of the Pepto-Bismol-pink house on the runway at the Marc Jacobs show

White sails billowing on the Lacoste runway

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16,000

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Precious gems that encrusted the $2m ‘Fantasy’ bras worn at the Victoria’s Secret fashion show

Years that Farida Khelfa trailed and filmed Christian Louboutin for her first documentary

Length in metres of Chanel’s life-like street, created inside Paris’ Grand Palais, featuring seven-storey buildings, pavements, potholes and protesting models

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Cost in euros of a box of limited-edition Kellogg’s Fashion Flakes designed by Anya Hindmarch

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Dancers from British choreographer Wayne McGregor’s Random Dance Company who sizzled on Gareth Pugh’s runway

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Number of oversized metal rings piercing the eyebrows of each model at Rodarte

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Number of former supermodels on stage to tell stories for Olivier Saillard’s performance art piece ‘Models Never Talk’ during New York Fashion Week

12

Cream-filled, penis-shaped cookies served on each tray before the Acne show

30

10 5

Length in minutes of Polo Ralph Lauren’s 3D movie, projected on a 60ft-tall wall of water in New York’s Central Park

Enormous purple sand dunes constructed for the Prada show

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Length in minutes of a one-act fashion play written by Spike Jonze and Jonah Hill for the Opening Ceremony show

Types of brocade replicated by Prada from centuries-old textiles for its women’s collection

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Number of gold safety pins holding together one of Anthony Vaccarello’s dresses for Versus


In Residence

Mickey taker Irreverent bling reigns at his Cannes villa, but luxury goods supremo Philipp Plein is made of stern stuff PHOTOGRAPHY: RONALD DICK WRITER: AMY SERAFIN

The first thing you notice in the courtyard of Philipp Plein’s villa in Cannes is the garage, open to reveal a trio of testosterone-raising toys: a Lamborghini, a Ferrari and a HarleyDavidson. The message ‘Every Weapon Needs a Master’ is written in a heavy-metal font and coloured lights on the back wall. On the way to the pool, you can’t miss the 2.3m-tall statue of a red gorilla beating his chest. In Cannes, houses have names, and Plein dubbed his ‘La Jungle du Roi’. The gorilla notwithstanding, there’s no question who’s king here. In less than a decade 37-year-old Plein has built a global luxury fashion brand with an annual turnover of €200m and stores from Moscow to Macao. He has created an empire in a business that can seem all but closed-off to newcomers, and done it on his own and in his own way. Tall and lean with a friendly face and short gelled hair, Plein dresses almost exclusively in his eponymous brand. Today that means black jeans, a black cashmere V-neck with a trademark Swarovski skull on the back and tapered black leather shoes. A Red Bull in hand, he settles onto a couch under the gaze of two zebra heads and talks about his meteoric rise. Born to an upper-middle-class family in Munich, he wanted to be an entrepreneur but pursued a law degree, finding it more practical than an MBA. He loved art and architecture, yet feared he wouldn’t succeed as an artist. Instead, in an effort to be financially independent during his studies, he started designing furniture, figuring that it ‘gives you the possibility to reproduce your art pieces and make money out of it, like Warhol did’. He made stainless steel »


PHILIPP PLEIN AT HIS SAINT- TROPEZ PARTY PAD. MIRRORED PANELS, GIANT SKULLS AND MICKEY MOUSE ARE ALL RECURRING THEMES IN HIS DESIGNS

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In Residence

furniture inspired by Mies Van der Rohe and Le Corbusier, produced by industrial steel manufacturers. To drum up business, he printed flyers and stuffed them into mailboxes in his parents’ neighbourhood. Eventually he started doing the rounds at trade shows in Paris, Cologne and Milan. He recalls his first Salone del Mobile, where he and a girlfriend stayed in a motel room they had to vacate each day because it was rented out by the hour. But with each show his orders increased, and a growing roster of interior architects hired him to furnish spaces such as hotel bars and yachts. By subcontracting his production, working to order and using his parents’ basement as his office, he had few overheads and no debt. In 2001, he noticed that the fashion business had gone crazy for crocodile-printed leather, and he found somebody in Italy who could print pigskins big enough for furniture. The first sample he ordered was too thick for sofas, so he covered a table with the skin and brought it to Cologne. ‘It was my first big success,’ he says. ‘I turned over more than a million [euros] in the first year. Nobody in

the furniture industry was using printed crocodile yet.’ Unsurprisingly, he dropped out of law school that same year. Always with his eye on an opportunity, he took his leftover leather scraps and used them to produce wallets and handbags. Asked to furnish a lounge for a champagne brand during the Bread & Butter clothing trade show in Cologne, he negotiated the opportunity to display his handbags and sold €100,000-worth in three days. Gradually he turned away from furniture and towards fashion, targeting the luxury market. He felt that consumers were bored with the same offerings and open to something new – but only if it really stood out. ‘When you are not a brand, people will not buy your name,’ he says. ‘The only thing I could go for is a strong product.’ Understanding that straight-ahead, unapologetic bling was a potential cash cow (and not only in new-money markets), he offered sexiness, swagger and Swarovski in equal parts, with price tags to rival the most coveted luxury brands. The company moved quickly into Russia and China,

Plein offers sexiness, swagger and Swarovski in equal parts, and price tags to match

places Plein calls ‘hungry to consume’. Today they remain his biggest markets. ‘He found a clientele that really likes this kind of style,’ says Franca Sozzani, editor-inchief of Vogue Italia. They met about five years ago, when she turned down his selection of photos for an advertising campaign. They’ve since become friendly, and sometimes she gives him informal advice. Sozzani says his approach to growing the brand has been unique: ‘In the beginning, his success didn’t come through the press. He had many stockists, and he found his own clients. He only used the press later on. So he did exactly the opposite that everybody else is doing.’ He proved himself a master at marketing, too. In 2008, he managed to get Naomi Campbell to pose for him in Ibiza, and she also walked in his cowgirl-themed show in February 2014. Terry Richardson and Steven Klein have photographed his campaigns, starring bad girls from Mischa Barton to Lindsay Lohan (whom Plein reportedly dated). His over-the-top runway shows, held in Milan, have featured a military helicopter, a Vegas-style casino, and Theophilus London rapping from a jet ski in a swimming pool. In 2008 Plein’s first retail store opened in Monte Carlo, and since then the brand has expanded to nearly 50 boutiques around the world. In each one, customers are greeted


Photography: Luke White

by an enormous skull covered in Swarovski crystals and custom-made Murano chandeliers with glass skulls on the branches. Most are franchises, though lately the house has started opening its own stores, and is buying out some of its franchise partners. The designer says he has no outside investors. ‘We are 100 per cent independent. We don’t have one euro in loans or a credit line from a bank.’ Now he’s targeting more mature markets. Over the last year he’s opened stores in Miami, on New York’s Madison Avenue and LA’s Rodeo Drive. This spring he lands in the UK with a three-level shop on New Bond Street, London. By the end of the year, he plans to have between 80 and 100 stores worldwide. Plein still does all the designing, overseeing a creative team of ten and turning out 12 collections a year, for men, women and children. He says everything is produced in the highest quality Italian factories, and that he personally controls all the prototypes. Back in the office, he verifies every invoice. As we are talking, some men in ties are sitting in a meeting room of the house. They are accountants, and at one point they all go out together to sign papers for the Cannes boutique. Plein actually lives in Lugano, Switzerland. The Riviera house is a workspace and a party palace – guest bedrooms have names like Lust and Envy. When he bought

CLOCKWISE FROM OPPOSITE, THE POOL, SURROUNDED BY GREEK GAZEBOS; THE MIRROR-PANELLED LIVING ROOM FEATURES PHILIPP PLEIN CUSHIONS AND THROWS AND A SIGNATURE SKULL ON THE COFFEE TABLE; A GORILLA STATUE IN THE GARDENS

the house three years ago it had been empty for a while. The garden, he says, was ‘a fucking jungle’. Remembering an iconic club in SaintTropez, Les Caves du Roy, he decided to name this place La Jungle du Roi, and the jungle theme inspired the rest: zebra trophies on the wall, springbok horns on the mantel. Currently he’s renovating a smaller house at the front, where he’ll put a real stuffed lion. The living room where we chat is both virile and baroque, with one wall in dark grey marble and another tiled in mirrors. He silver-plated the carved wooden ceiling, put shag rugs on the floors, and covered the sofas with his own fur cushions – including one embroidered in crystals: ‘Rich girls will take your heart, bitch girls will take your money’. The real party space is downstairs, where a spa boasts an exposed tub, and a marble bar bearing the message ‘Champagne Sucker!’ is set near two Mickey Mouse statuettes. All that’s missing is Paris Hilton. Few in the fashion industry saw Plein coming – or if they did, they failed to take him seriously. And yet, he has proven himself a force to be reckoned with. ‘There’s a lot of brands out there that have an amazing image, a big name, but they don’t make money,’ he says. ‘I’m here to sell. I don’t want to die beautiful, I want to die rich and successful.’ philipp-plein.com

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W* Bespoke Promotion BELOW, A PROTOTYPE OF FIAT’S NEW LIMITED EDITION 500 RON ARAD, AND, IN REFLECTION, THE ORIGINAL NUOVA 500, FIRST PRODUCED IN 1957. FAR RIGHT, DESIGNER ARAD, A LONG-TERM FAN OF THE ITALIAN BRAND

ROOF The production model will feature a glass roof that lets natural light flood in

SEATS The upholstery is in black Frau leather with ivory-coloured trim

NUMBER PLATE Arad designed custom plates especially for this photo shoot

WHEELS The 16in alloy wheels give a sporty look

BODY The side panels feature the silhouette of the iconic 1957 Nuova 500


LITTLE WONDER Ron Arad works his wizardry on the Fiat 500 PHOTOGRAPHY: LUKE

‘I’m not a car fanatic, but I’ve always liked the Fiat 500,’ says Ron Arad, as he swipes through a polychromatic portfolio of his Fiat-themed projects, old and new. The acclaimed London-based designer has assembled an eclectic back catalogue over the course of his long career, starting with post-industrial furniture and segueing seamlessly into objects, exhibition design, graphics, architecture and installations. Arad’s association with the Italian carmaker is a very personal one: he drove a vintage Fiat Cinquecento for many years.

‘It’s a car that creates memories – no one is indifferent to it,’ he explains. Fiat’s 1957 Nuova 500 was a miracle of packaging design, ‘the smallest vehicle you can design that still qualifies as a car’, according to Arad. The reborn Fiat 500 became an instant icon when it first surfaced in 2007. It captured the zeitgeist, embodying the compact character of the original without sacrificing any of its zest or style, to create a modern city car of unparalleled ability. Now Fiat has offered Arad the opportunity to craft his own customised

version of the Fiat 500. His car bears an outline of designer Dante Giacosa’s diminutive original, a ghostly graphic along for the ride. The design is available in a limited edition, offering up other delights such as rich black Frau leather, black metallic paintwork, a 7in digital instrument panel and a panoramic glass roof, all sitting on smart 16in alloy wheels. Playful pop and a love of form turn this moving artwork into an object of functional delight. fiat.co.uk/500/500-Ron-Arad. For more, see Wallpaper.com

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SATURN, ARMCHAIR DESIGN ROBERTO LAZZERONI WWW.CECCOTTICOLLEZIONI.IT

SHOWROOM VIA GASTONE PISONI, 2 MILANO


MARCH IS ALL ABOUT...

Fashion to lose your head over – p156 The Herzog & de Meuron-designed Miu Miu store opening in Tokyo Vein glory in the marble room – p172 The launch of Four Seasons’ retrofitted 52-seat private Boeing 757 Brutalism, benches and classy cardigans – p182 Alexander McQueen’s ‘Savage Beauty’ arriving at the V&A Mother and daughter in an elegant twist – p194 The Taste fair celebrating ten years of edible innovation in Florence New wave nautical tailoring – p208 The bumperest edition of Design Days Dubai Dries Van Noten’s rose petal lemonade – p218 ∑

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Art This page, top, £395, by Valentino. Skirt, €570, by Jil Sander Detail of ‘Eaton’ side table, £1,764, by Roberto Lazzeroni, for Flexform Mood, from Interdesign Opposite, dress, £726, by Versus Versace


The Lady Vanishes Artist Noé Sendas puts a surreal twist on this season’s black and white classics Photography Jan Lehner Fashion Isabelle Kountoure

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Art This page, jacket, £1,485; trousers, £465; shoes, £470, all by Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane Opposite, dress, £1,925, by Salvatore Ferragamo. Shoes, €455, by Pierre Hardy


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Art This page, dress, price on request, by Fendi Detail of ‘Concorde’ dining table, £3,412, by Emmanuel Gallina, for Poliform Opposite, swimsuit, £635, by Chanel


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Art This page and opposite, dress, price on request, by Boss


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Art Dress, £1,895; skirt, £400, both by Calvin Klein Collection


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Art This page and opposite, dress, £3,100, by Dior. Vintage black body suit. Shoes, €455, by Pierre Hardy Detail of ‘Eaton’ side table, £1,764, by Roberto Lazzeroni, for Flexform Mood, from Interdesign. ‘Twist’ chair, £1,388, by Hans Sandgren Jakobsen, for Porada


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Art This page, dress, £229, by Sandro Opposite, dress, £7,670, by Louis Vuitton


Art This page, dress, £2,970, by Akris Opposite, top, €2,050; trousers, €1,320; shoes, €420, all by Céline For stockists, see page 216 Interiors: Maria Sobrino Hair: Alexander Soltermann using Kiehl’s Make-up: Naomi Nakamura using Sisley Manicurist: Sharon Gritton at Factory Fashion assistants: Marianthi Chatzikidi, Kinza Shenn Photography assistants: Jori Komulainen, Sam Henry, Alec Mcleish Model: Serena Amirante at Elite An exhibition of our collaboration with Noé Sendas will be held at Michael Hoppen Gallery during London Fashion Week in February 2015. For more information and an interview with the artist, visit Wallpaper.com

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Fashion This page, shirt, £300, by Calvin Klein Collection. Trousers, £395, by Kilgour. Shoes, £575, by Loewe Opposite, shirt, £490; scarf, £885, both by Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane. Trousers, £770, by Prada


Poise control Tighten up with nipped and tucked tailoring Photography Andrew Vowles Fashion Max Clark

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Fashion

This page, jacket (part of suit), £2,295; jumper, £655; trousers, £345, all by Ralph Lauren Purple Label Opposite, jacket (part of suit), £500, by Boss. Shirt, £450; trousers, £585, both by JW Anderson. Shoes, as before ‘Lello’ umbrella stand, £3,318, by Maddalena Casadei, for Marsotto Edizioni, from Twentytwentyone


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Fashion This page, coat, £1,465, by Giorgio Armani. Shoes, as before ‘Lello’ umbrella stand, as before Opposite, jacket, £2,260; trousers, £860, both by Lanvin


This page, coat, £1,840, by Cerruti 1881 Paris. Vest, €320, by Raf Simons. Shoes, as before ‘Wow’ screen, £1,395, by Maurizio Galante and Tal Lancman, for Cerruti Baleri, from Chaplins Opposite, jacket, £1,095; shirt, £255, both by Comme des Garçons Homme Plus

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Fashion


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Fashion This page, jacket, £4,000, by Brioni. Jeans, £160, by Zadig & Voltaire

Grooming: Alexander Soltermann using Kiehl’s

Opposite, shirt, price on request, by Versace

Photography assistants: Freddy Lee, Willow Williams, Daniel Kasper

For stockists, see page 216

Fashion assistant: Kinza Shenn

Interiors: Matthew Morris

Model: Timothee Bertoni at Supa Casting: Julia Lange Production: Laura Galligan Shot on location at Town House, London, by Groves Natcheva Architects. For more information, visit Wallpaper.com

π


This page, Ilvie wears coat, £2,390, by Victoria Beckham. Shoes (worn throughout), £525, by Loewe. Alek wears coat, £795; shirt, £145, both by Gieves & Hawkes. Cardigan, £13,420; trousers, £455, both by Hermès. Socks (worn throughout), £12, by Falke. Shoes (worn throughout), £450, by Burberry Prorsum Opposite, Alek wears coat, £2,860; shirt, £310; trousers, £495, all by Berluti. Cardigan, £325, by Margaret Howell. Ilvie wears top, £3,410; skirt, £4,160, both by Hermès

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Fashion

Modern love Setting the benchmark for his and hers style with elongated silhouettes, statement coats and classic cardigans Photography Jerome Corpuz Fashion Jason Hughes


This page, coat, £1,950; top, £525, both by Louis Vuitton Opposite, coat, £6,715, by Louis Vuitton. Shirt, £385; trousers (part of a suit), £2,800, both by Valentino. Cardigan, £550, by Burberry Prorsum

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Fashion


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Fashion

Opposite, Alek wears coat, price on request; shirt, £290; trousers, £450, all by Fendi. Cardigan, £550, by Burberry Prorsum. Ilvie wears coat, £1,795, by Bally. Dress, £1,850, by Dior This page, dress, £535; skirt, £535, both by Kenzo


This page, dress, £3,095, by Loewe Opposite, dress, £950, by Pringle of Scotland. Skirt, £375, by Margaret Howell

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Fashion


This page, jacket, £2,900, by Tod’s. Dress, £1,600, by Fendi Opposite, coat, £3,595; shirt, £275; trousers, £495, all by Bally. Cardigan, £325, by Margaret Howell

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Fashion


192


Fashion

Opposite, Ilvie wears coat, £3,928, by Céline. Alek wears coat, £1,720; shirt, £345; jumper, £805; trousers, £770, all by Prada This page, Alek wears coat, £895, by Burberry Prorsum. Shirt, £145; trousers, £245, both by Gieves & Hawkes. Cardigan, £920, by Salvatore Ferragamo. Ilvie wears top; skirt, prices on request, both by Salvatore Ferragamo For stockists, see page 216 Hair: Alexander Soltermann using Kiehl’s Make-up: Mel Arter at CLM using Givenchy Manicurist: Ama Quashie at CLM using Sisley Photographer’s assistants: Darren Hall, Phillip White Fashion assistants: Isabella Goumal, Sophie Watson Make-up assistant: Frances Lee Done Models: Ilvie Wittek at Viva, Alek Stoodley at Supa Casting: Julia Lange Production: Artistry Shot on location at the Barbican Centre, London EC2


Family ties There are twists and turns as iconic Spanish model Violeta Sanchez and her daughter Luz pull together for our living sculpture show Photography Brigitte Niedermair Fashion Isabelle Kountoure

194

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Performance Luz wears body, £1,320, by Chanel. Violeta wears top, £430, by Prada


Violeta wears body, £495, by Bottega Veneta. Luz wears top; shorts, prices on request, both by Bottega Veneta ‘DU 55’ armchair, €3,070, by Gastone Rinaldi, for Poltrona Frau

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Performance


Performance Violeta wears top, £645, by Stella McCartney. Luz wears skirt, £400, by Calvin Klein Collection ‘Metropolitan’ chair, from €2,795, by Ejner Larsen and Aksel Bender Madsen, for Carl Hansen & Søn, from The Conran Shop Paris


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Performance Luz wears bra, €145, by Eres. Skirt, £790, by Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane. Violeta wears top, £1,150; skirt, £2,200, both by Dior


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Performance Luz wears dress, £255, by MaxMara. Violeta wears dress, £90, by Polo Ralph Lauren ‘BO63’ chair, €990, by Finn Juhl, for Bovirke, from Galerie Møbler


Performance Dress, £2,245, by Lanvin Vintage 1950s armchair, €800, from Gaëtan Lanzani


205


Performance Luz wears top, £430, by Prada. Violeta wears dress, £2,175, by Valentino ‘Model 78’ chair, €550, by Niels O Møller, for JL Møllers Møbelfabrik, from Galerie Møbler For stockists, see page 216 Hair: Peter Gray at Home Agency Make-up: Topolino at Calliste Set: Alexis Barbera at Walter Schupfer Photographer’s assistants: Katrin Backes, Giulio Castelli Fashion assistant: Hannah Porter, Kinza Shenn Models: Violeta Sanchez, Luz Sanchez Godin Contortionist: Elena Ramos Casting: Julia Lange


207


Sailor made The new tailoring has us indulging in a spot of naval gazing

Photography James Naylor Fashion Mathew Stevenson-Wright

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Architecture This page, coat, £1,240; trousers, £650, both by Gucci. Shoes, £780, by Dior Homme Opposite, suit, £975, by Boglioli. Jumper, £395, by Gieves & Hawkes


210


Architecture This page, jacket £2,040; trousers, £475; belt, £530, all by Hermès. Shirt, £360; tie, £125; shoes, £780, all by Dior Homme Opposite, coat, £1,790; trousers, £790, both by Ermenegildo Zegna Couture


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Architecture This page, coat, £2,035; shirt, £375; trousers, £675, all by Louis Vuitton. Tie, £125, by Dior Homme Opposite, jacket, £1,750; jumper, £550; shirt, £360; trousers, £580, all by Dior Homme


Architecture This page, jacket, £1,590; trousers, £420, both by Dunhill. Jumper, £193, by Belstaff. Shoes, as before Opposite, jacket, £1,169; shirt, £180; trousers, £469, all by Paul Smith For stockists, see page 216 Grooming: Naomi Nakamura using Sisley cosmetics Photographer’s assistant: Alexander Wilson Digital operator: Phil Hewitt Fashion assistant: Kinza Shenn Model: Johannes at Tomorrow is Another Day Casting: Julia Lange Production: Artistry Shot at Pobble House in Dungeness, designed by Guy Hollaway Architects, pobblehouse.com. For more on the architecture, visit Wallpaper.com


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Stockists 19 Greek Street Tel: 44.20 7734 5594 (UK) 19greekstreet.com

A

C

Calvin Klein Collection Tel: 44.800 7463 6499 (UK) calvinklein.com

F

Falke Tel: 49.2225 926176 (Germany) falke.com

K

Kenzo Tel: 44.20 7491 8469 (UK) kenzo.com

Akris Tel: 44.20 7758 8060 (UK) akris.ch

Céline Tel: 44.20 7491 8200 (UK) celine.com

Fendi Tel: 44.20 7927 4172 (UK) fendi.com

Kilgour Tel: 44.20 3283 8941 (UK) kilgour.com

Alessi Tel: 44.20 7518 9091 (UK) alessi.com

Cerruti 1881 Paris cerruti.com

Fratelli Rossetti Tel: 39.03 3155 2226 (Italy) fratellirossetti.com

Kiton Tel: 39.02 8413 7400 (Italy) kiton.it

B

Bally Tel: 44.20 7499 0057 (UK) bally.com Belstaff Tel: 44.800 210 0302 (UK) belstaff.co.uk Berluti Tel: 44.20 7437 1740 (UK) berluti.com Boglioli Tel: 39.02 545 6387 (Italy) boglioli.it Boss Tel: 44.20 7259 1240 (UK) hugoboss.com

Chanel Tel: 44.20 7493 5040 (UK) chanel.com Chaplins Tel: 44.20 7352 6195 (UK) chaplins.co.uk Comme des Garçons Homme Plus at Dover Street Market Tel: 44.20 7518 0680 (UK) doverstreetmarket.com The Conran Shop Paris Tel: 33.1 42 84 10 01 (France) conranshop.fr

D

Dior/Dior Homme Tel: 44.20 7172 0172 (UK) dior.com

Bottega Veneta Tel: 44.20 7838 9394 (UK) bottegaveneta.com

Dries Van Noten Tel: 33.1 42 74 44 07 (France) driesvannoten.be

Brioni Tel: 44.20 7491 7700 (UK) brioni.com

Dunhill dunhill.co.uk

Burberry Prorsum Tel: 44.20 7806 8904 (UK) burberry.com

E

Eres eres.fr Ermenegildo Zegna Couture Tel: 44.20 7210 7000 (UK) zegna.com

NEXT MONTH

Global Interiors Inside knowledge We gather the best international-level design from Poland, Sweden, USA, South Korea, Singapore and China, and find covetable new quarters in The Netherlands, Australia and Greece. Plus, Zaha’s space-age Moscow dream home for the man from Aman ON SALE 12 MARCH

G

Gaëtan Lanzani Tel: 33.1 43 79 00 74 (France) gaetanlanzani.com Galerie Møbler Tel: 33.6 16 17 61 31 (France) galerie-mobler.com Gieves & Hawkes Tel: 44.20 7434 2001 (UK) gievesandhawkes.com

The Kooples Tel: 44.800 026 0588 (UK) thekooples.co.uk Kristof Hock Tel: 1.212 836 4828 (US) hockdesign.com

L

Lanvin Tel: 44.20 7491 1839 (UK) lanvin.com

Giorgio Armani Tel: 44.20 7235 6232 (UK) armani.com

Loewe Tel: 44.20 7499 0266 (UK) loewe.com

Gucci Tel: 44.20 7235 6707 (UK) gucci.com

Louis Vuitton Tel: 44.20 7399 4050 (UK) louisvuitton.co.uk

H

Hardy Amies Tel: 44.20 3696 1408 (UK) hardyamies.com

M

Maison Martin Margiela Tel: 44.20 7629 2682 (UK) maisonmartinmargiela.com

Harrods Tel: 44.20 7730 1234 (UK) harrods.com

Margaret Howell Tel: 44.20 7009 9009 (UK) margarethowell.co.uk

Hermès Tel: 44.20 7499 8856 (UK) hermes.com

MaxMara Tel: 44.20 7499 7902 (UK) maxmara.com

I

Interdesign Tel: 44.20 7376 5272 (UK) interdesignuk.biz

J

Jil Sander jilsander.com Jimmy Choo Tel: 44.800 044 3221 (UK) jimmychoo.com JW Anderson j-w-anderson.com

Moncler Gamme Rouge moncler.com Mulberry Tel: 44.20 7491 3900 (UK) mulberry.com

P

Paul Smith Tel: 44.800 023 4006 (UK) paulsmith.co.uk Perrin Paris Tel: 33.1 42 36 53 54 (France) perrinparis.com Pierre Hardy at Harrods Tel: 44.20 7730 1234 (UK) harrods.com Piquadro Tel: 39.05 3440 9001 (Italy) piquadro.com Poliform Tel: 44.20 7368 7600 (UK) poliformuk.com


Reebok Tel: 44.800 279 4979 (UK) reebok.co.uk Romo Tel: 44.1623 756699 (UK) romo.com

S

Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane Tel: 44.20 7235 6706 (UK) ysl.com Salvatore Ferragamo Tel: 44.20 7629 5007 (UK) ferragamo.com Sandro Tel: 44.20 7486 9176 (UK) sandro-paris.com Santoni santonishoes.com Sportmax at Matches Tel: 44.20 7022 0828 (UK) matchesfashion.com Staffan Tollgard Design Store Tel: 44.20 7952 6070 (UK) tollgard.co.uk Stella McCartney Tel: 44.800 157 7357 (UK) stellamccartney.com

T

Tod’s Tel: 44.20 7493 2237 (UK) tods.com Twentytwentyone Tel: 44.20 7288 1996 (UK) twentytwentyone.com

V

Valentino Tel: 44.20 7235 5855 (UK) valentino.com Versace/Versus Versace Tel: 44.20 7259 5700 (UK) versace.com Victoria Beckham Tel: 44.20 7042 0700 (UK) victoriabeckham.com Vista Alegre Tel: 351.234 320 600 (Portugal) myvistaalegre.com

Top, £590, by Stella McCartney. See page 156 Polo Ralph Lauren Tel: 44.20 7535 4600 (UK) ralphlauren.com

Prada Tel: 44.20 7647 5000 (UK) prada.com

Poltrona Frau Tel: 44.20 7014 5980 (UK) poltronafrau.it

Pringle of Scotland Tel: 44.20 3011 0031 (UK) pringlescotland.com

Porada Tel: 39.03 176 6215 (Italy) porada.it

R

Raf Simons rafsimons.com Ralph Lauren Purple Label Tel: 44.20 3450 7750 (UK) ralphlauren.com

W

Wolford Tel: 44.20 7287 8599 (UK) wolfordshop.co.uk

Z

Zadig & Voltaire Tel: 33.1 42 21 89 27 (France) zadig-et-voltaire.com

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Artist’s Palate

DRIES VAN NOTEN’S Fresh summer Rosenade

#60

Dries Van Noten’s green thumb is no secret. The Belgian fashion designer has famously credited gardening as his way of dealing with the stresses of the fashion industry, and he has the plot to prove it. His flower-filled, 60-acre estate, located 20 miles outside of Antwerp, is tended to all year round, whether he has a collection to create or not. Van Noten’s favoured recipe – a reviving summer lemonade made with plenty of rose petals from the garden – reaps the fruits of his labours. Sumptuous, delicate and a little offbeat (it involves no lemons), the drink is the perfect embodiment of Van Noten’s artistic, nature-driven aesthetic. For Van Noten’s recipe, visit Wallpaper.com or download the iPad edition at Wallpaper.com/iPad

‘Mille Nuits Candy Box’, £1,550; ‘Harmonie’ highball, £160, both by Baccarat, from Harrods. Stirrer, £19, by Ettore Sottsass, for Alessi. ‘Fantasy’ pitcher, €120, by Vista Alegre. ‘Forenza’ fabric in Palm, £57 per m, by Romo. Coat ; skirt, prices on request, both by Dries Van Noten For stockists, see page 216

218

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN SHORT INTERIORS: MARIA SOBRINO WRITER: PEI-RU KEH


Tod’s Boutiques: Tel. 020.74932237 - 020.72351321

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