Page 1

A FESTIVAL OF MUSIC FOR SMALL ENSEMBLES MAY 10 – 13, 2012

PROGRAM 70 DIVERSE PERFORMANCES 7 SUPERB SOUTH BANK VENUES 4 JAM-PACKED DAYS


A FESTIVAL OF MUSIC FOR SMALL ENSEMBLES MAY 10 – 13, 2012

CONTENTS WELCOME 2 DAILY PROGRAM 4 DAILY SYNOPSES 8 CONCENTRIC CIRCUITS PROGRAM 16 SPONSORS 20

Katie Noonan + Elixir Thursday 10 May, 7:00-8:15pm, Ian Hanger Recital Hall


WELCOME

WELCOME Queensland has a long and sucessful history of small ensembles in various genres and styles across classical, jazz, pop, world, technology-based and new music. Surprisingly, we rarely celebrate this as a distinctive strength of music in Queensland. We say goodbye to this false modesty with Crossbows, a four-day festival highlighting music for small ensembles in all its glory for a broad live and mediated audience on South Bank, at the heart of Brisbane’s cultural precinct. The event also celebrates the harmonious proximity (after two years of construction) of the three lead partners of the festival: Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University, Queensland Symphony Orchestra and ABC — responsible for training, employing and disseminating talent respectively. In addition, the festival is delighted to partner with South Bank Corporation, and divergent organisations like ACPA (Indigenous), BEMAC (world), and ANAM (elite classical). In this way, it will be the first event that brings together, side by side, on this scale, and in this diversity, classical string quartets, cutting-edge new music ensembles, jazz trios, world music groups and rock bands. We invite audiences to curate their own experience: delight in the familiar, but also discover the new. Enjoy! Professor Huib Schippers, Director Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University

2


CROSSBOWS 70 concerts in 4 days…why? Because we had to! The wealth of musical talent in Queensland, and from Queensland, is extraordinary, diverse and often very surprising. And so much of the talent is centred on small ensembles; be they jazz combos, bands, string quartets, contemporary classical music or hybrids of them all. Small ensembles — which we can only define as an unconducted group of musicians — share the joy of making music and invite you to be part of the experience. Crossbows will feature an amazing cross-section of internationally renowned Queensland artists like Topology, Katie Noonan, Clocked Out, Camerata of St. John’s, Southern Cross Soloists, The Australian Voices. There will be phenomenal works such as Steve Reich’s epic and enduring Music for 18 Musicians, and the Australian premiere of Richard Barrett’s new chamber violin concerto Wound, performed by Graeme Jennings with international new music group ELISION. The alumni program will bring back some of our outstanding graduates from around the world to work with current students and inspire new projects including violist Kathryn Lockwood, oboist Cathy Milliken, clarinetist Richard Haynes and Didgeridoo player William Barton. I predict these concerts will be outstanding. Student groups from jazz, popular, classical and world music will all be featured. You can experience the Queensland Conservatorium Gamelan Ensemble up close in addition to the amazing electronic music series curated by Lawrence English (separately listed at the back of this program). We will somehow weave in some world premieres, including a new string quartet by Erik Griswold performed by the wonderful Kurilpa Quartet. There are many ways to approach Crossbows. Treat yourself to a Festival Pass to tune in with particular bands, musicians, and styles of music you already know about. If you are curious about music, and would like to see and hear things beyond your imagination, the $30 Day Pass musical taster might be for you. Alternatively, take a walk through the Conservatorium and visit the foyer, the courtyard or the new outdoor stage and hear a selection of free events. These include world music, jazz and body-painted acrobalance acts. You are all part of this music-making event. Anything is possible; everything is happening — at Crossbows. Enjoy. Associate Professor Vanessa Tomlinson Co-Artistic Curator, Crossbows

3


DAILY PROGRAM

THURSDAY 10 MAY CON THEATRE

FOYER

IAN HANGER

BASIL JONES

3pm

3–4pm

Toby Wren & Tunji Beier

4pm 6pm

Reception: William Barton, ACPA

7pm

7–8.15pm

8pm

Elixir simulcast on screens in foyer

3–5pm

Student Chamber Ensembles

3.30–4.30pm

5–6pm

5–6pm

Body Paint Performance

Elision Open Rehearsal

Gamelan Ensemble

Cobra John Zorn

6.30–7.30pm

The Scrapes 7–8.15pm

Katie Noonan + Elixir + Tulipwood Quartet

7–8pm

Christopher Wrench

11pm

10pm

9pm

8.30–9.45pm

Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians 9.45pm–12am

Electroacoustic Ensemble Griffith Film School VJs

Below: Elision Open Rehearsal 3–5pm, 1.21

4

ABC FOYER

Lily Hubbard and Friends

5.30–6.30pm 6–7pm

1.21

4–5pm

5pm

Forum: Futures of Small Ensembles in QLD

ABC STAGE

3-4pm

Conservatorium Piano Showcase 4–5.30pm

COURTYARD

5–8.30pm

Concentric Circuits Installations


FRIDAY 11 MAY FOYER

BASIL JONES

COURTYARD

ABC STAGE

1.21

10.30–12.30pm

Divertiment & QSO Chamber Strings

ABC FOYER 11am–6pm

Student Jazz Ensembles

11.30–1pm

Concentric Circuits Installations

ANAM 1 open rehearsal 12–12.50pm

QSO String Quartet

1–2pm

12–1.30pm

Trip down memory lane The Lecture

12-1pm

Student Chamber Ensembles

12.30–1.30pm

Student Jazz Vocalists

1–1.50pm

China Conservatory Virtuosi Orchestra

QSO Wind Ensemble

1.30–3pm

ANAM 2 open rehearsal 2–3pm

2pm

1pm

IAN HANGER

11–11.55am

12pm

11am

CON THEATRE

2–3pm

Daniel Salecich & student groups

Louise Denson Group

3pm

3-4pm

3–4pm

ANAM Piano Trio

Student Chamber Ensembles 3.30–4.30pm

Con Artists 4pm

4–5pm

Kupka’s Piano

5pm

5–6pm

William Barton

5–6pm

ANAM Wind Quintet

The Phoncurves

6–7.25pm

6pm

4–5pm

Bart Van OortKawai forte piano

6–7pm

Yitzhak Yedid Recital

7pm

8.10–9pm

Haynes Project

Emma Dean

7–9pm

Theatre simulcast on screens in foyer

Elision

9pm–12am

Concentric Circuits anonymeye hunz dot.ay

9–10pm

The Quadratic Contingency

11pm

10pm

9pm

8pm

6.30–7.30pm 7–7.50pm

5


SATURDAY 12 MAY FOYER

IAN HANGER

BASIL JONES

COURTYARD

ABC STAGE

10-11am

10-10.30am

Student Chamber Ensembles 11am–12pm

OQ STUDIO

OPERA SPACE Camerata of St John’s Open Rehearsal

11am–6pm

Midmorning Raga

Concentric Circuits Installations

12–1pm

Feet Teeth 12.30–1.15pm

Machado Trio

1pm

1–2pm

Fortepiano & Friends Van Oort/ Roennfeldt

1.30–2.30pm

Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts

1.30–2.30pm

2pm

Greshka

3pm

Intertraditional Kirtan

2.30–3.30pm

Grabowsky/ Dalgleish

4pm

3.30–5pm

3.30–4.15pm

Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra

4–5pm

5pm

5–6.30pm

The Australian Voices

Ensemble Fabrique

6pm

5–5.45pm

Mzaza Balkan Workshop 5.40–6.30pm

Collusion

5.30– 6.30pm

Trip Down Memory Lane

8pm

7pm

6.40–8.00pm

Clocked Out with Topology

8–8.30pm

Concussion 8.30–10pm

11pm

10pm

9pm

TRIPOD

10–12am

Electroacoustic Ensemble Griffith Film School VJs

Umkancho

Songs of Earth, Sky and Sea

4.30–5.20pm

6

Cathy Milliken Project 2–2.45pm

2.30–3.15pm

8.30– 10.30pm

Eugene carchesio stern/ manning duet primitive motion, tralala blip

1–3pm

1.30–2.30pm

Student groups

5.45–6.30

Mzaza

ABC FOYER

10am–1pm

Student Jazz Ensemble

11am–12pm

NZ String Quartet

12pm

11am

10am

CON THEATRE

NZ String Quartet Masterclass


SUNDAY 13 MAY CON THEATRE

FOYER

IAN HANGER

BASIL JONES

9am 10am

OPERA SPACE

ABC FOYER

10am–12pm

10am–6pm

9-10am

Student Chamber Ensembles 10–11am

Kathryn Lockwood Project

10am–12pm

Young Con Ensembles & Big Band

10–11am

Aether Quintet

Camerata of St John’s Open Rehearsal

Concentric Circuits Installations

11am–12pm

11am 12pm

COURTYARD

Ba Da Boom 11.30am– 12.30pm

Trichotomy + Barega Quartet

12–1.30pm

Southern Cross Soloists

12–1.30pm

Lunaire Collective Open Rehearsal

12.30–1.30pm 1–2pm

1pm

David Bentley Trio

Badinerie Players

1.30–2.15pm

2pm

Lucia MedeirosHodge

3pm

2.30–4pm

2:15–3pm

Lunaire Collective & Con Chamber Players

3–3.50pm

Student Chamber Ensembles

Kurilpa Quartet 3.30–6pm

aa cell Timothy Tate N4rgh1I3 Botborg

5pm

4pm

4.05–5pm

Camerata of St John’s

3:50-4:10pm Student Chamber Ensembles

5–6pm

Closing Reception

Right: Kathryn Lockwood Project 10–11am, Conservatorium Theatre

7


DAILY SYNOPSES

THURSDAY 10 MAY

8

CONSERVATORIUM THEATRE

CONSERVATORIUM FOYER

8.30–9.45pm

6.00–7.00pm

Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians

Opening Event

Written in 1978, Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians is one of the most enduring works of the twentieth century. Directed by percussionist Rebecca Lloyd-Jones, this hour-long composition creates a rich, pulsing and intricate sound world with violin, cello, clarinets, women’s voices, pianos, marimbas, xylophones, vibraphone and maracas. This performance will be accompanied by visuals created by the Griffith Film School, adding yet another dimension to this amazing work.

Enjoy drinks, canapes and tastetester performances from the festival program. Performers include: William Barton and students from the Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts. 9.45pm–late

Conservatorium Electronica and Griffith Film School VJs Party till late at the Conservatorium Theatre Bar as Conservatorium and Griffith Film School students transform the foyer into electronica/VJ heaven.


IAN HANGER RECITAL HALL

BASIL JONES ORCHESTRAL HALL

ABC STAGE

3.00–4.00pm

5.30–6.30pm

Body painted ensemble

Conservatorium Piano Showcase

Toby Wren and Tunji Beier

This cross-platform collaboration presents moments of intrigue and tongue-in-cheek humour arising from the interaction between movement and sound. Featuring acrobalance performers Jeff Turpin and Friends, with Queensland Conservatorium’s Dr Nicholas Ng, and members of the MuTech, percussion, piano, string, and vocal departments.

Renowned pianists Natasha Vlassenko and Oleg Stepanov are joined in concert by Queensland Conservatorium students Aaron Liu and Alex Raineri. Liu and Rainieri are among 36 finalists selected from around the world to participate in the 2012 Sydney International Piano Competition. 4.00–5.30pm

Forum: Futures of Small Ensemble Music in Queensland Join practitioners, researchers and industry representatives in a discussion about the futures of small ensemble music in Queensland. Chaired by Chris Bowen (Arts Queensland). 7.00–8.15pm

Katie Noonan + Elixir + Tulipwood Strings Four times ARIA Award winning and six times platinum selling vocalist extraordinaire Katie Noonan is joined by Elixir featuring guitarist Stephen Magnusson, saxophonist Zac Hurren and the Tulipwood String Quartet. Together they present an intimateevening of sublime, lyrical music. Simulcast to the Conservatorium Bar and Foyer.

A musical conversation between two improvisers who are forging new sounds in-between musical traditions. At different times, Toby and Tunji have studied Carnatic music in South India with master musicians, and in performance they draw on this and other traditions including, jazz, new music and world music. This concert features repertoire from Carnatic and jazz and original compositions. The musicians draw freely on their backgrounds to create a musical dialogue that is stylistically complex and compelling. 7.00–8.00pm

Christopher Wrench Organist Christopher Wrench appears regularly as a recitalist throughout Australia and Europe and has performed as soloist with the Adelaide and Australian Chamber Orchestras, and the Queensland Philharmonic, Queensland Symphony and Queensland Youth Symphony Orchestras. For Crossbows, Christopher will present works by Bach and Sweelink.

COURTYARD 5.00–6.00pm

Javanese Gamelan at Twilight As the sun goes down, experience the sublime sounds of the Conservatorium’s gamelan ensemble, joined by special international guest Dr Joko Susilo from Java.

3.30–4.30pm

5.00–6.00pm

Cobra by John Zorn The ConZorn Ensemble: Directed and conducted by Yitzhak Yedid. Cobra (1984) is an unpublished composition by John Zorn. It is probably the most celebrated of Zorn’s ‘game’ pieces. The composition consists of a set of cues notated on cards, and rules corresponding to the cues, which direct the players’ actions. The number of players, instrumentation, and length of the piece is indeterminate. This kind of directed improvisation has its roots in the work of John Cage and Stockhausen, but Zorn’s approach is different. While Cage distrusted improvisation and Stockhausen shrouded it in mysticism, Zorn seeks to draw out the individuality of the players involved and ‘have fun’ with it. 6.30–7.30pm

The Scrapes The Scrapes, formed in Brisbane in 2009, are an unusual duo of feedback drenched guitar and scraping, epic violin. Their music is rooted firmly in the traditions of western classical music while attempting to break the chains of these traditions.

Left: The Scrapes 6:30-7:30pm, ABC Stage

9


FRIDAY 11 MAY CONSERVATORIUM THEATRE

CONSERVATORIUM FOYER

BASIL JONES ORCHESTRAL HALL

11.00–11.55am

5.00–6.00pm

12.00–1.30pm

Divertimenti and QSO Chamber Strings

Australian National Academy of Music Wind Quintet

A Crossbows celebration of works for double string orchestra presented by Divertimenti (the Queensland Conservatorium’s premier string ensemble ) and QSO Chamber Strings, led by Graham Jennings.

The Australian National Academy of Music presents two of its finest ensembles to Crossbows audiences. The Wind Quintet will present works by Hindson, Cage and Nielsen.

“A Trip Down Brisbane’s (Chamber Music) Memory Lane - the lecture”.

1.00–2.00pm

China Conservatory Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra The China Conservatory Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra is a frequent winner of national and international competitions. The ensemble is one of the most active chamber orchestras in China. Performers include Professor Cao Dewei (Erhu), Professor Lin Ling (Guzheng), Professor Li Lingling (Yangchin), Professor Zuo Jicheng (Guanzi and Suona), and the young Pipa player Yang Tingting. 7.00–7.50pm

The Richard Haynes Project Richard Haynes, a Crossbows artistin-residence, is an internationally sought-after clarinettist and new music specialist. In this project he will present works by Michael Smetanin, Queensland Conservatorium alumni Daniel Salecich and Michael Norris for chamber ensemble, utilising the expertise of Queensland Conservatorium New Music Ensemble. 8.10–9.00pm

Elision Crossbows ensemble-in-residence Elision has established a virtuosic profile for the performance of new music. The ensemble has a reputation for delivering authoritative interpretations of complex, unusual and challenging aesthetics often developed in close collaboration with the composer. This program will feature music by Richard Barrett, Liza Lim, Timothy McCormack and Rebecca Saunders.

10

IAN HANGER RECITAL HALL 12.00–12.50pm

QSO String Quartet Crossbows partner Queensland Symphony Orchestra (QSO) presents the QSO String Quartet, featuring Associate Concertmaster Alan Smith and special guest Gerhard Mallon (flute). Works to be performed include QSO’s Composer in Residence Elena Kats-Chernin’s Russian Rag, Moody Tango, Blue Silence and Grotesk, presented as a four movement string quartet. 1.00–1.50pm

QSO Wind Ensemble Crossbows partner Queensland Symphony Orchestra (QSO), presents the QSO Wind Ensemble featuring Section Principal Clarinet, Irit Silver. The ensemble will perform works by Villa Lobos, Muczynski and Elliot Carter. 3.00–4.00pm

Australian National Academy of Music Piano Trio Crossbows partner The Australian National Academy of Music presents two of its finest chamber ensembles. The piano trio will present works by Mozart and Smetana.

This lecture accompanies the concert of the same name, held 5.30pm, Saturday 12 May, Basil Jones Orchestral Hall. Well known for his local music history research, Professor Peter Roennfeldt will speak about Brisbane’s early chamber music scene, from the 1870s when violinist Richard Thomas Jefferies performed with pianist Madame Mallalieu (Henrietta Willmore) in the ‘Monday Popular Concerts’, through to the contribution of the Queensland State String Quartet (1944–1953) and the Musica da Camera Society which promoted concerts from 1955 to 1972, most of which were held at the newly established Queensland Conservatorium. View archival photographs, concert programs, recordings and hear reminiscences by those who heard the work of these chamber musicians over a 100 year period. 4.00–5.00pm

Kupka’s Piano: Solos, Duos, Trios: The Strangeness of Intimacy Taking its name from an incredible painting by a little known Czech artist, Kupka’s Piano is Brisbane’s newly formed emerging new music ensemble. In their first ever concert, these talented young musicians present the works of living composers (save one!) for one, two, or three instruments. The program includes works by Saariaho, Kurtág, Manoury, Messiaen, Carter, and Brisbane composers Peter Clark and Liam Flenady.


9.00–10.00pm

The Quadratic Contingency The Quadratic Contingency (TQC) has been described as a ‘Cinematic, Avant-Jazz’ ensemble that explores the grey areas that otherwise defines typical genres such as 3rd Stream, Minimalism, organic improvisational & 21st Century Art Music. After featuring as part of the internationally acclaimed Valley Jazz Festival and finishing a two-month residency at the Gallery of Modern Art writing and performing music for silent Alfred Hitchcock Films, The Quadratic Contingency launched its second EP ‘>>>>’ at the Brisbane jazz club to remarkable reviews.

COURTYARD 12.00am–1.00pm 3.00pm–4.00pm

Student Chamber Ensembles Enjoy the music of Conservatorium chamber ensembles in the Courtyard. 4.00–5.00pm

William Barton Joined by Conservatorium students, renowned didgeridoo player and Crossbows artist-in-residence William Barton performs his own compositions, improvisations and works by Peter Sculthorpe.

ABC STAGE 10.30-1.30pm

Student Jazz Ensembles 2.00–3.00pm

Louise Denson Group (LDG) Swing, bossa nova, samba, ballad and bolero originals by renowned jazz composer/pianist Louise Denson. LDG was formed in 2000, shortly after pianist/composer Louise Denson emigrated from Canada to Brisbane to teach at Queensland Conservatorium. It is the Australian incarnation of a Montreal-based group, started in 1996, with a remarkably similar name… LDG started as an originals and standards project, but has gradually morphed into an originals-only project. 3.30–4.30pm

Con Artists The Con’s big band, led by trumpeterextraordinaire John Hoffman, swing out high-energy contemporary and classic jazz tunes and a special Crossbows commission by celebrated alumnus composer Rafael Karlen.

5.00–6.00pm

The Phoncurves The Phoncurves blend distinct new musical flavours with an aftertaste of pleasant nostalgia. Their tunes toe the line between alternative folk and indie pop, with their eclectic style enhancing their already memorable, hooky songs. Their use of extensive vocal harmonies, both static and percussive, has become a characteristic inherent in their music, enveloping you in a cocoon of colour and warmth. 6.30–7.30pm

Emma Dean Emma Dean’s eccentric, effervescent pop toes the magical line between music and theatre. Named “one of ten artists to watch in 2011” by New York Post, Dean’s singular sound is all her own. She has toured Australia and internationally with sold-out solo shows and festival appearances, as well as in support of Jesca Hoop (US), Kate Miller-Heidke, Katie Noonan, Amanda Palmer, and The Dresden Dolls. Right: Australian National Academy

of Music Wind Quintet

5:00-6:00pm, Conservatorium Foyer

11


SATURDAY 12 MAY CONSERVATORIUM THEATRE

6.40–8.00pm

5.00–6.30pm

Clocked Out with Topology: From Small Things Grow

The Australian Voices

11.00am–12.00pm

Iconic Brisbane ensembles Clocked Out and Topology combine their instrumental and artistic fodder to present their greatest hits from the past few years together with a special collaborative Crossbows project. These include Above Ground by Robert Davidson, From Small Things Grow by Erik Griswold, Tourbillon by John Babbage.

New Zealand String Quartet Brisbane welcomes back one of the most dynamic string quartets working today to perform a concert of Beethoven String Quartets; Opus 95 and Opus 59 No.3. This Quartet has particularly distinguished itself through imaginative programming, insightful interpretations of the string quartet repertoire and the development of an international audience for important new works from New Zealand composers. 1.30–2.30pm

Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts’ impressive singers and musicians will collaborate with Queensland Conservatorium’s finest singers and musicians under the direction of professional artists and teachers to present a fabulous event of song and music with a soulful and contemporary feel. The performance will showcase emerging Indigenous artists in our region and their original music that is both culturally reflective and progressive. Rappers, soul singers, guitarists, bassists, drummers and pianists will workshop a series of musical pieces that reflect both traditional and modern Australian ideas and stories. Facilitators are Laine Loxlea-Danann, Bradley McCaw and Nik Hills. 3.30–5.00pm

Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra The Conservatorium Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Michael Morgan, performs a special “largeensemble” program showcasing some of the best emerging talent from Queensland Conservatorium. Repertoire includes On Hearing the First Cuckoo of Spring by Delius, Jacob’s Concerto for Flute and Strings featuring Brijette Tubb, Tchaikovsky’s Variations on a Rococo Theme and Mozart’s Paris Symphony No.31.

OQ STUDIO 12.00–1.00pm

Cathy Milliken Project Crossbows artist-in-residence and Con alumna Cathy Milliken is an internationally-renowned oboist and composer now based in Germany. Inspired by the tragic earthquakes which hit Japan in 2011, the works presented for Crossbows incorporate acoustic instruments, electronic music, graphic notation and film. This concert features more than twenty musicians from the New Music Ensemble, Electronic Music Ensemble and Griffith Film School.

CONSERVATORIUM FOYER 12.00–1.00pm

Feet Teeth Digitally-mangled, acoustic freejazz from the Brisbane-based duo featuring trumpet, drums, and laptop. Feet Teeth uses live processing and improvising that draws on jazz, minimalism and noise traditions. The two-piece released their debut CD at the Judith Wright Centre as part of the Valley Jazz Festival in mid-2011 and have received airplay on ABC Radio National’s Sound Quality, 4ZzZ and FBi. 2.30–3.15pm

Inter-traditional Kirtan The word kirtan (Sanskrit for ‘praise’ or ‘eulogy’) traditionally refers to Indian devotional music. Often in call-and-response format, a cantor and congregation sing to the accompaniment of the harmonium and various percussion instruments such as tabla, mrdangam (‘double-headed drum’) and hand cymbals. In this inter-traditional meeting, Huib Schippers, Kim Cunio, Nicholas Ng, Tunji Beier and Dheeraj Shrestha meet with instrumentalists of various traditions in an invigorating celebration of sound.

12

The Australian Voices has been recognised by many international awards and honours as one of the finest vocal ensembles of its type in the world. For Crossbows they will perform works by composers including William Barton, Stephen Leek, Edvard Grieg, Nicholas Ng, Anton Bruckner, Joseph Twist, Nathan Falkenhagen, Peter Clark, Lisa Young, Gordon Hamilton and Robert Davidson. 8.30–10.00pm

Tripod When Tripod started tooling around with music, they weren’t very good at it. So they played all their mistakes for laughs. With more gigs, they improved at the music so they had to start writing proper jokes. The music and the jokes coalesced into what we have now: A solid piece of entertainment that cannot be broken using any technology we have available to us here on Earth. You might have seen/heard them on Skithouse, The Sideshow, Triple J
. “««««« Sometimes five stars just aren’t enough” – The Scotsman, Edinburgh

 

 9.45pm-late

Conservatorium Electronica and Griffith Film School VJs Party till late at the Conservatorium Theatre Bar. Conservatorium and Griffith Film School students transform the foyer into electronica/VJ heaven.

IAN HANGER RECITAL HALL 1.00–2.00pm

Fortepiano and Friends – Four Hands at One Keyboard by Mozart Special Crossbows collaboration: Celebrated fortepianist Bart van Oort is joined by Peter Roennfeldt to perform two works by Mozart for four hands. 2.30–3.30pm

Grabowsky and Dalgleish Special Crossbows collaboration: Renowned pianist and composer Paul Grabowsky and outstanding experimental saxophonist Elliott Dalgleish present a one-off improvisation session.


4.30–5.20pm

Ensemble Fabrique: From a Dying Land Vibrant emerging contemporary music devotees Ensemble Fabrique presents a musical exploration of destruction, loss of life and a dying world. Featuring Madrigals Book II (George Crumb), Dead Songs (Andrew Shultz) and the world premiere of 2 young Queensland composers. 5.40–6.30pm

Collusion Collusion Musical Arts Ensemble will join composer Susan Hawkins, videographer Jonas Hill and rising choreographic star Gareth Belling to fuse the worlds of live art music and dance video into one superb 5 minute length work, i read the old dream slowly. Collusion will also premiere Andrew Ball’s new work for Collusion Clockwork Ghost.’ Joseph Twist’s Le Tombeau de Monk (written for Collusion) and the lyrical yet haunting Clarinet Quartet by Paul Hindemith will complete the concert.

COURTYARD 10.00–11.00am 1.00–1.30pm 3.15–3.30pm

Student Chamber Ensembles Enjoy the music of Conservatorium chamber ensembles in the Courtyard. 4.00–5.00pm

Kim Cunio, Nicholas Ng and Heather Lee: Songs of Earth, Sky and Sea This scintillating musical treat weaves ancient lines of connection between Europe and the old world cultures of the Middle East, India and China. Combining spoken word with instrumental and vocal repertoire, Kim Cunio and Nicholas Ng join forces with Australian soprano Heather Lee to evoke images, feelings and sounds relating to the earth, sky and sea from bygone times. The program involves an exciting array of traditional instruments including harmonium, bağlama (Turkish lute), erhu (Chinese violin) and pipa (Chinese lute).

BASIL JONES ORCHESTRAL HALL

ABC STAGE

5.30–6.30pm

Student Jazz Ensemble

Roennfeldt and Friends: A Trip down Brisbane’s (chamber music) memory lane A program of repertoire that was once very popular with performers and audiences in the pioneering days of Brisbane’s classical music scene. Performing with period string instruments and on an antique grand piano built in Vienna in 1843, Peter Roennfeldt presents an anthology of works that were often performed by local musicians, and sometimes under the auspices of organisations such as The Brisbane Chamber Music Society established in 1921.

10–10:30am 11.00am–12.00pm

Huib Schippers and Dheeraj Shrestha: Mid-morning Raga Performed by two of Australia’s most accomplished musicians in the North Indian Classical tradition. Dheeraj Shrestha – tabla and Huib Schippers – sitar. 12.30–1.30pm

Jason Machado Trio: Songs from Brazil ‘Songs from Brazil’ is a look into the world of Música Popular Brasileira or MPB. This genre embraces all of Brazil’s musical styles from the recent past, layering themselves into the already rich traditions of European, African and Indigenous origins.

2.00–3.00pm

Greshka Loosen your suspenders, tighten your shoelaces and get ready to dance in ways never thought possible. Greshka is in town and this high-energy, high-paced and high-volume music will certainly get the toes-a-tappin. After distilling the grooves of EasternEuropean klezmer and brass bands from the Balkans, Greshka mixes in western-classical, metal and jazz to make a potent concoction of in-yourface multicultural ear-alcohol. 3.30–4.30pm

Umkancho New wave African music. Umkancho perform original and traditional compositions with the colour and flavour of Africa in song and stories, featuring unique live vocals, original compositions and traditional music. 5.00–5.45pm

Mzaza Balkan Workshop The Mzaza crew will teach you some banging Balkan beats. Workshop attendees can use whatever percussion instruments they have; darabuka, djembe, bendir or they can just clap along to learn the rhythms of the Turkish gypsies, Bulgarian dancers and Macedonian maestros. Mzaza invites you to hit the floor with some simple Balkan dances. 5.45–6.00pm

Mzaza Balkan Party Mzaza transports its listeners to distant shores with repertoire featuring significantly reworked traditional pieces from the Balkans and the Middle East (including Turkey, Macedonia and Bulgaria), original compositions as well as songs from Spain, Tunisia and France.

OPERA SPACE 1.00–3.00pm

New Zealand String Quartet Masterclass Open to the public.

Left: Tripod 8:30-10:00pm, Conservatorium Foyer

13


SUNDAY 13 MAY CONSERVATORIUM THEATRE

CONSERVATORIUM FOYER

10.00–11.00am

10.00am–12.00pm

Kathryn Lockwood Project

Young Con Jazz Ensembles and Big Bands

New York-based violist Kathryn Lockwood has been hailed as one of the most exceptionally gifted violists in the USA. A Crossbows artist-in-residence and Queensland Conservatorium alumna, she will be returning to Brisbane to present a concert with conservatorium students performing Dvorak String Quintet in E-flat major and Ljova’s Vjola Suite. 12.00–1.30pm

Southern Cross Soloists: Smoke Encrypted Whispers Southern Cross Soloists is one of Australia’s most popular and respected small ensembles. For Crossbows, they will present Smoke-Encrypted Whispers: 23 miniatures by Brisbane composers. The work takes inspiration from the poems of Brisbane’s aboriginal poet Sam Wagan Watson. 3.00–3.50pm

1.30–2.15pm

Lucia Medeiros-Hodge Brazilian Jazz. 5.00–6.00pm

Closing Reception Enjoy the Crossbows wrap-up with drinks at the Conservatorium Theatre Bar.

IAN HANGER RECITAL HALL 10.00–11.00am

Aether Instrumental Quintet: French Romantic music for harp, flute and strings.

Kurilpa String Quartet was formed in 2011 by leading Brisbane musicians Graeme Jennings, Brendan Joyce, Yoko Okayasu and Katherine Philp. Bartok is the quartet’s specialty. In this concert they will also perform a world premiere by Erik Griswold and Haydn’s Quartet in E Major.

The Aether Instrumental Quintet combines the beautiful sounds of harp, flute and string trio performed by some of Australia’s finest musicians: Michele Walsh, Patricia Pollett, Louise King, Patrick Nolan and Lucy Reeves. These vibrant and dynamic performers present a varied program of beautiful and romantic repertoire from around the turn of the 20th century.

4.10–5.00pm

11.30–12.30pm

Camerata of St John’s

Trichotomy (aka Misinterprotato) and Barega Saxophone Quartet

Kurilpa Quartet

Camerata of St John’s—Queensland’s Chamber Orchestra—has developed a splendid reputation for its verve, stylish presentations, and innovative programming. In what promises to be a thrilling festival finale the group is joined by Tibetan singer Tenzin Choegyal and Queensland Conservatorium – Camerata alumna violist Kathryn Lockwood, and includes music from Bartok and Davidson, a gypsy number from Olivier Kikteff, and Elgar’s virtuosic Introduction and Allegro for string quartet and string orchestra. “a treasure of an ensemble in the tradition of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields” – Patricia Kelly

14

Young Con presents four of its most inspiring young jazz groups.

Inimitable jazz trio Trichotomy are joined by Barega saxophone quartet in a special Crossbows collaborative affair. Trichotomy’s compelling, hugely dynamic trio music draws on the avant-rock of Radiohead, ECM minimalism and their love of improvisation, in an entrancing Australian echo of the European jazz innovations of the likes of EST or Tord Gustavsen. The Barega Saxophone Quartet was formed in 2007 and is fast becoming Queensland’s premier single reed ensemble. The group features Chris Moore, Emma Di Marco, Andrew Ball and Diana Tolmie.


1.00–2.00pm

12.30–1.30pm

David Bentley Trio (DB3)

Badinerie Players

Singer-songwriter-pianist David Bentley is a Brisbane-based jazz icon. His trademark keys work has found its way onto many a local CD, not to mention countless stages across the South East. Bentley is globally recognised for having penned the still smouldering hit, In A Broken Dream, originally sung by Rod Stewart with Bentley’s band Python Lee Jackson. DB3 will perform Bentley’s original songs and re-harmonised jazz classics.

Hannibal found it difficult but in the Baroque period, music and musicians had no trouble crossing the Alps. Many German musicians had to show that they had studied in Italy, and Italians took some of the most lucrative positions in northern Europe. In France, the extrovert Italian style was the elephant in the room: there was outrage at the incursions of the Italians on the pure French style. While Marais preserved that purity, Couperin set about achieving his aesthetic ideal, the happy unity of styles.

2.30–4.00pm

Lunaire Collective and The Conservatorium Chamber Players Formed in 2010, The Lunaire Collective is a versatile and innovative chamber music ensemble whose members are drawn from Queensland’s top professional musicians, composers, conductors and creative artists. They will be performing Façade by William Walton featuring Greg Massingham plus Janacek’s Mladi and Ridout’s The Emperor featuring Adele Nisbet and Patrick Nolan. Also on the program is the emerging shadow ensemble The Conservatorium Chamber Players.

BASIL JONES ORCHESTRAL HALL

In this concert we present some of the finest chamber music from the time leading up to the “Querelle des Bouffons”, the fight between supporters of the French and Italian styles in the middle of the eighteenth century, interspersed with brief readings from the combatants.

COURTYARD 9.00-10.00am 2.15–3.00pm 3.50–4.10pm

Student Chamber Ensembles Enjoy the music of Conservatorium chamber ensembles in the Courtyard.

11.00am–12.00pm

Ba Da Boom: Thanks Australia Ba Da Boom is a percussion ensemble in residence at Queensland Conservatorium. Focused equally on improvisation, new works and pre-existing repertoire, Ba Da Boom has become an important laboratory for percussion in Australia today. This concert looks at the contribution of Australian composers to our repertoire and features Sticks by Robert Lloyd, Three Views of Katmandu by Michael Askill, Random Round by Percy Grainger and Prelude and Dragonfly by Ross Edwardes.

Right: Camerata of St John’s 4.10–5.00pm, Conservatorium Theatre

15


CONCENTRIC CIRCUITS PROGRAM Electronic artist program curated by Lawrence English Live electronic music is more often than not produced by very small ensembles and solo artists. This trend has been driven by the rich sonic potential of individual electronic and computer music systems, some technical hurdles in synchronising, networking and coordinating these instruments, and the organisational and commercial restrictions on larger ensembles. Despite these challenges and because of more recent technical and economic accessibility to computer music instruments larger ensembles have been emerging under names such as Laptop Orchestras. The Concentric Circuits program reflects these trends by featuring performances, artist talks, workshops and sound installations from a variety of Queensland and national electronic music artists and ensembles, many of whom have connections with Queensland Conservatorium and its MuTech (music technology) teaching and research programs. Expect music ranging from the experimental to the popular, from the highly prepared to the improvised, from the gentle to the robust, with many works augmented by a range of acoustic sound sources and visual media.

CONCENTRIC CIRCUITS FRIDAY 11 MAY 9PM-12AM FOYER dot.ay - chiptune chaos, 8-bit insanities Alex Yabsley aka dot.ay has long been in search of a musical form that can be highly experimental and creatively satisfying, whilst being accessible and dance friendly. Through his time studying a Bachelor of Music Technology with Honours at Queensland Conservatorium he came upon Chiptunes, a musical genre which involves the repurposing of video game hardware for creating music, he now believes Chiptunes are what he was born to make. His music juxtaposes hard fast noise with cute melodies in a high energy performance. The key component of Dot.ay’s work is based in live performance with electronics that has developed through regular live shows in Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney and Adelaide. He has also supported international acts such as Crystal Castles, Girl Talk and Dan Deacon.

hunz - pulsing electronic pop dreams Hunz is a three-piece electronic pop band, spearheaded by Brisbane-based electronic musician and producer, Hans Van Vliet. With a background in music programming and motion design, Hans pulls his notes out of a binary soup of ones and zeroes, hand-crafting synth patches and the creation of beats from scratch. The result is a mix of pulsating, glitchy electronics and ethereal vocals that hint at the sinister while succumbing to the pleasures of pop music hooks. Songs are brought to life by drummer Richie Young and bassist Phil Evans. Collaborations with animators, motion designers and visualists to produce film clips and live visuals have ensured that Hunz’s raw, emotive and lo-fi aesthetic is just as much visual as it is sonic. Previous releases include When Victims Fight (2008) and Thoughts

16

That Move (2009) that have received critical acclaim. The band has also been working on a music and gaming sideproject, 7bithero, the fruits of which will be available later this year.

anonymeye - A one man fury bound in looping layers of electronics, guitars and banjo. Anonymeye is the nom de plume of Andrew Tuttle from Brisbane, Australia. Anonymeye reconfigures country and folk musics by injecting electronic production techniques to electronic and acoustic instrumentation including laptop, guitar, and vocals. Tuttle’s fascination with micronations, current affairs, obscure modern historical minutae, and the internet, may possibly influence Anonymeye but you will have to see the performance to see how they manifest themselves uniquely in each show.

Hugh Francis - DJ Hugh Francis is a sound artist and curator based in Brisbane, Australia. Best known for his audio/visual sculpture work under the pseudonym “Reighna”, Hugh takes influence from a wide range of different social cues. He is often caught up in the investigation of interactions between audience and performance, and is interested in perceptions of artistic expression. As a mechanical engineer in a past life, Hugh is obsessed with understanding the underlying mechanisms behind human discernment and sensitivity and expressing these through creative technologies. Hugh is responsible for curating the fledging electronic label and artist collective “Silo Arts”. Right: dot.ay Friday 11 May, 9–12am, Conservatorium Foyer


17


CONCENTRIC CIRCUITS SATURDAY 12 MAY 8.00-8.30PM CONSERVATORIUM FOYER Concussion – the iPad ensemble Concussion is a live electronic music ensemble whose performances use Apple iPads as an instrument for sound production and control. The group consists of Kim Cunio, Andrew Brown, Toby Gifford and Matt Hitchcock who perform a repertoire of original music specifically written for the ensemble and its unique capabilities and technologies. This repertoire includes ambient soundscapes, electronica, works for the ensemble and guest acoustic musicians, and collaborations with visual artists.

SATURDAY 12 MAY 8.30-10.30PM BASIL JONES Eugene Carchesio - haunted laptops, hidden pulses, revealed in a fluttering of sonic colours. Eugene Carchesio is a self-taught, Brisbane-based artist who works in collage, drawing, watercolour and sound. Carchesio’s materials are usually modest and collected from everyday life. His works have a poetic presence, and their intimate scale and serial nature invite quiet wonder and private contemplation. According to The Blub “Carchesio is one of the most instantly recognisable and yet constantly challenging artists of his generation.” With a strong reputation as a visual artists Carchesio will delight us for this performance with an all too rare focus on electronics and sound.

Joel Stern/ Ross Manning self made sonic distractions, unsettled duets. Primitive Motion - post-synth, postpunk, post-anything they can “Primitive Motion, a perfect something akin to ancient melodies of the future, the sonic equivalent of idiot savant cave etchings, a sound that feels distant and near all at once” Raymond Cummings. Joel and Ross will explore these ideas in a frenzy of the hand made and lo fi. Joel Stern spends his time making music, writing, organising concerts and screenings, and teaching. He

18

has performed throughout Europe, Japan, New Zealand and at the major experimental music events in Australia. Stern often uses a combination of modified instruments, custom microphones, feedback devices, and field recordings. Ross Manning is a Brisbane based artist working with optics, sound and installation. Ross has a background in instrument building and sound sculpture, performing in noise duo Faber and currently with the band Sky Needle. He has perfromed with sonic art festivals such as What Is Music, Liquid Architecture and The Now now, and his self made instruments are said to have have one foot in sound art, the other in sculpture.

Tralala Blip - community sound makers orbiting the outer fringes of electro, pop and song deconstructions Tralala Blip discover new forms of musical expression that are accessible, experimental and most of all, fun. Based in the regional northern NSW town of Lismore, the sounds of Tralala Blip can be heard comin’ from the hills, inland from the east coast of Australia. Collective members have a range of disabilities and the Tralala Blip set up is all about immediate and spontaneous access to music making, in a leading contemporary way. They have been described as Outsider Pop, Alternative, Indie, and Experimental. These terms mean very little to most of the members of Tralala Blip who prefer to say “What’s outsider pop?”

SUNDAY 13 MAY 3.30-6PM BASIL JONES aa cell - live code sound explosions aa-cell are the live coding duo of Andrew Sorensen and Andrew Brown. Since the mid 2000s they have been using the forces of algorithmic process and software coding for live electronic music performances around Australia and in Europe and, when pressed, they code generative visual images as well. aa-cell produce a blend of experimental and electronic sonic goodness as they take laptop, as instrument, to the edge.

Botborg - Sheer hellish audio visual virtuosity Botborg presents extreme electronic sound and video manipulation informed by fringe science and esoteric cultural theories. These completely improvised demonstrations explore the boundary at which pure noise becomes pure signal and have been described with terms as varied as ‘cannibalistic orgies’ and ‘transcendental’. Botborg has performed in over 15 countries over the past 8 years.

Timothy Tate - elegant tape deconstructions Timothy Tate is a Brisbane based composer, conductor and performer. He holds a Bachelor of Music with Honours in Composition and his works have been performed throughout Australia and abroad. Whilst actively composing, Timothy presents performances and installations incorporating a hybrid of viola, ¼ inch magnetic tape and modular synthesisers, creating spontaneous and multilayered situations which encompass the architecture of the performance space.

N4rgh1l3 - rendered audio visual landscapes N4rgh1l3 is an Audio-Visual project by Andrew Thomson and Lloyd Barrett, artists with over a decade experience in the Brisbane experimental music scene. Dissatisfied with bland laptop performance, N4rh1l3 approaches ambient sound and image with a view towards emulating and inducing hypnagogic states. Inspired by the visual music of Jordan Belson, Len Lye and Stan Brakhage, they edge away from a digital aesthetic through the dense layering of both generated, and captured sound and image.


CONCENTRIC CIRCUITS ARTISTS TALKS, WORKSHOPS AND INSTALLATIONS ARTIST TALKS

WORKSHOPS

Wednesday 9 May 2.00-3.00pm, QCGU room 1.39 Joel Stern – experimental

Saturday 5.00–6.30pm, QCGU room 3.63

sound and image

Joel Stern talks about his creative practice and shares techniques, inspirations and anecdotes. Thursday 10 May, 1.00–2.00 pm, QCGU room 3.66

Ross Manning – Unseen Sound/ electronics workshop. A tutorial on how to construct receivers of sounds that humans can’t normally hear with their ears. Contact mics for vibrations, photovoltaic cells for light emissions and (maybe) transducer coils for magnetic waves.

Lloyd Barrett – the performing audiovisualist

Sunday 1.30–3.00pm, QCGU room 3.63

Lloyd Barrett talks about his experiences as an audio-visual performer describing some of the technical and creative aspects of his practice.

Timothy Tait – So you want to build your own synth? He means it. All you need to know about modular synth creation.

INSTALLATIONS Thursday 10 May–Sunday 12 May: All day in the ABC Building

Lawrence English and various Concentric Circuits artists

Below: aa-cell Sunday 13 May, 3:30–6pm, Basil Jones

19


SPONSORS

PRIVATE DONORS Jocelyn and Bruce Wolfe – Indigenous program

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Crossbows Curators Mr Graeme Jennings

Crossbows Manager Dr Danielle Bentley Crossbows Technical Manager Mr Cameron Hipwell Crossbows Committee Dr Helen Lancaster Prof Huib Schippers Ms Sarah Sullivan The Enterprise team Crossbows volunteers

20

Designed by Herbey Wagner at Liveworm Studio, Queensland College of Art, Griffith University

Assoc Prof Vanessa Tomlinson


griffith.edu.au/crossbows

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Crossbows 2012 Program  

May 10 - 13 2012 Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University, South Bank

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you