Frontier issue 4

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SCAN QR CODE WITH A MOBILE DEVICE TO VIEW THE ONLINE EDITION

Meet the people whose contributions are making a difference in the lives of South Africans

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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ENKE: MAKE YOUR MARK Empowering young people

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BUSINESS BRIDGE Uplifting businesses

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MUSEUM OF AFRICAN DESIGN The house that design built

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OGILVY DIGITAL MARKETING ACADEMY Digital dynamite

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KWV Reinventing a cellar

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ART INSURE Safekeeping SA art

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EUGENIO GALLI Moving images

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GNP+ Healing together


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PHOTOGRAPHER: GIOVANNI AGRESTI FIUMARA

W W W . E D S L A W . C O . Z A PHOTOGRAPHER: GIOVANNI AGRESTI FIUMARA


FRONTIER ONLINE SCAN THE QR CODE WITH A MOBILE DEVICE TO VIEW THE ONLINE EDITION OF FRONTIER MAGAZINE NE

EDITORIAL & CREATIVE TEAM ED ITOR-IN-CHIEF Gary Eisenberg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Stefanie de Saude CREATIVE DIRECTOR Andrew Burke ED ITOR Jessica Gliddon DEPUT Y ART DIRECTOR Dave Strauss SENIOR D ESIG NER Tess Green PRODUCTION MANAGER Marianne Burke FR ONTIER is distributed by Eisenberg de Saude quarterly and is available on request (email info@edslaw.co.za) or scan the QR code below. FRONTIER MAGAZINE

is designed

and published by PURE CREATIVE AGENCY for EISENBERG DE SAUDE

www.purecreative.co.za Call +27 21 424 6918

OUR LEGAL SERVICES

WELCOME I

t is with great pride that we welcome you to the fourth issue of FRONTIER. In this issue we look back in recent years and discover a wealth of clients who have brought with them unrivalled passion, entrepreneurship and investment funds into South Africa, enriching its people and the environment in which we live. Thus far, South Africa’s immigration system has allowed the inflow of exceptionally skilled foreigners, smartmonied market makers, many of whom have transformed the South African landscape into an exciting and inviting destination. In the wake of this, South Africa is fast becoming known internationally for its progressive thinking. Titled Entrepreneurship & Investment, the fourth issue showcases the intellectual capital, work and contributions of foreigners who have chosen South Africa as their home. Each featured individual is actively breaking moulds – whether it

be in the health, business or design sectors – establishing them as thought leaders in their respective fields and in their own unique way, illuminating a distinctive pathway to discovery, human enlightenment and upliftment. For too long, the benefits that foreigners introduce have been largely misunderstood, overlooked and undervalued. But as this issue of FRONTIER demonstrates, foreigners play a vital role in the metamorphosis of South Africa into a country to be reckoned with. Eisenberg de Saude salutes each of these individuals as well as the multitude of other foreigners who chose South Africa as their new home and playground.

SOUTH AFRICAN IMMIGRATION AND CITIZENSHIP Eisenberg de Saude advises on, prepares and facilitates the filing of temporary and permanent residence and citizenship applications locally or at South African diplomatic missions abroad. We ensure that our clients submit compliant applications to the Department of Home Affairs and that their applications are treated with dignity and are lawfully processed and adjudicated. OBTAINING LITHUANIAN CITIZENSHIP Eisenberg de Saude assists the descendants of former Lithuanian citizens to obtain Lithuanian citizenship. Lithuanian citizens have complete freedom of movement within the European Union and enjoy visa-free travel to many countries, including the United States, Canada and Australia. OUR KEY SERVICES INCLUDE: TEMPORARY RESIDENCE (Work, Corporate, Relative, Study, Retired, Medical) PERMANENT RESIDENCE CITIZENSHIP (Regularising Status, Naturalisation) LITIGATION (Deportation, Extradition, Inspectorate Investigations) OBTAINING LITHUANIAN CITIZENSHIP

Please enjoy your reading.

CONTACT DETAILS

Gary Eisenberg & Stefanie de Saude

EISENBER G D E SAU D E AT TOR NEYS AT L AW TELEPHONE: +27 21 421 7003 INFO@EDSL AW.CO.ZA WWW.EDSL AW.CO.ZA

GARY EISENBERG / STEFANIE DE SAUDE EISENBERG DE SAUDE


E N TREPREN EU R S

ENKE: MAKE YOUR MARK

EMPOWERING YOUNG PEOPLE Dynamic Australian humanitarian Pip Wheaton is one of the co-founders of enke: Make Your Mark, an ambitious programme helping young people follow their dreams

BRINGING A HUNDRED-ODD YOUNG PEOPLE INTO THE SAME SPACE WAS TOTALLY INFECTIOUS. parents or other people. They’re not taken seriously. Also, it’s often the first time that they’ve done something like this. They just haven’t had the real-world experience to know what it’s like to come up against these types of challenges.” At first, enke's organisers thought that funding was a major issue. Every year, they mobilise seed funding for projects, yet funding uptake has remained low. “The young people are incredibly adept at getting stuff for nothing,” Pip says. “I think that says a lot about their mentality.”

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Enke is an unique youth programme in that it gives young people a lot of autonomy. “When it comes to the actual programmes, we ask young people what they feel passionate about,” Pip says. “I think it’s quite a novelty in the South African context where there is a strong cultural focus on respecting your elders, which sometimes gets confused with 'don’t speak up’. We let young people set the agenda at every level of our organisation.”

ip Wheaton came to South Africa for a short volunteer stint, helping children at under-resourced schools in Durban. She never intended to stay in South Africa, but found herself inspired by the kids she worked with, and by the country itself. She and several other volunteers decided to stay and found a new organisation that would give South African youth the power to shape their futures.

So if it wasn’t apathy, what was holding these kids back? “I realised they felt that they couldn’t create change,” Pip says. “It’s not a lack of desire, it’s a lack of belief, tools and support to create what they want to see in the world.” The first enke: Make Your Mark programme was meant to be a one-off, but this quickly changed. “The absolute explosiveness

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BEFORE I GOT HERE, WE WERE TOLD THAT YOUTH APATHY WAS ONE OF THE BIGGEST ISSUES IN SOUTH AFRICA. THEN I ARRIVED AND FOUND SOME OF THE MOST FIRED-UP AND INSPIRING PEOPLE I’VE EVER MET.

that was created by bringing a hundredodd young people into the same space was totally infectious, addictive and amazing,” Pip says. “That first year we wanted to bring together a diverse group of young people who could throw their own ideas around and get inspired by each other. Since then, we focus a lot more on what’s next. Each of the young people we work with leaves our youth leadership forums with a detailed action plan that outlines how they’re going to turn their ideas into reality.”

NAME: PIP WHEATON COUNTRY OF BIRTH: AUSTRALIA RELATIONSHIP WITH EISENBERG DE SAUDE:

There are various issues facing ambitious young people in South Africa. “These issues are as diverse as the young people we work with,” Pip says. “The thing we see again and again is that the adults in their lives shut them down, whether it’s the school, the

ONE OF THE EARLIEST BARRIERS FACED BY ENKE STAFF WAS GETTING VISAS, AND NOW IT’S GETTING EVEN HARDER SO WE NEEDED EISENBERG DE SAUDE. THEY SORTED OUT MY VISA, AND ANOTHER FOUNDER OF ENKE, FROM THE UK, IS THEIR CLIENT AS WELL.

PHOTOGRAPHERS: ILIZWE PHOTO CLUB, UMUZI PHOTO CLUB

“Before I got here, we were told that youth apathy was one of the biggest issues in South Africa,” Pip explains. “Then I arrived and found some of the most fired-up and inspiring people I’ve ever met. This was one of the big moments of realisation for me. We were seeing young people who were incredibly frustrated by the myriad issues they faced. Even if they worked really hard at school, chances are, the system would still not do right by them. If they did pass matric, how would they get into university for further training? Would they even get a job then?”

Pip and her partners have big dreams for enke’s future. “We started with a single programme in Johannesburg,” Pip explains. “In 2012, we expanded to Cape Town; this year we’re expanding to Bloemfontein. Over the next four years we’re hoping to expand across South Africa, then on to other countries in the region.”


ENT REPRENEU RS

T H E B U S I N E S S B R I D G E I N I T I AT I V E

UPLIFTING BUSINESSES Tom Parry, the global head of development at The Business Bridge Initiative, is educating small business owners in a bid to uplift poor communities through networking and skill expansion

WITH TOM Why is business education important for South Africa’s future? South Africa unfortunately has the world’s worst divide between rich and poor. In addition, 80 percent of start-up businesses go under in the first three years of operation. Much focus for alleviating these problems is put on supporting the youth of South Africa in developing into the leaders of tomorrow. This is undoubtedly the case, but it cannot come at the expense of the adults who suffer from many of the same problems. Most of the business owners whom we train are outside of the youth category, meaning they are afforded few opportunities to develop. There are literally millions of micro and small businesses, which if given the right training and support, could create jobs. Unfortunately, it’s incredibly hard to both deliver and measure the impact of business education, hence the reason for a desperately under-resourced sector. People talk about the ‘missing middle’ in emerging economies, referring to the high number of micro businesses and large businesses, with very little in-between.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN SOUTH AFRICA 2013

We believe this is also the case with business education. There is a growing number of organisations trying to get people into work, an increasing number of incubators, accelerators, and mentorship programmes to help ‘high growth potential’ businesses, but almost nothing in-between.

Entrepreneurial activity in South Africa by gender

Do you think the current economic climate in South Africa supports entrepreneurship on both a big and small scale? I think the right steps are being taken, but that it takes time to change deeply ingrained business behaviours. Enterprise Development legislation is trying to do the right thing by encouraging those firms with BBBEE scorecards to support SMMEs, but this won’t happen overnight. The issue is that there are two almost entirely separate economies developing in South Africa, formal and informal. If something drastic isn’t done to bridge this gap, then the socioeconomic divide will continue to grow. What are some of the barriers that small business entrepreneurs face in today’s South Africa? How does Business Bridge address this? South African entrepreneurs face a variety of challenges ranging from hyper-competition, access to funding and high cost of capital, to a lack of education, training, business skills development and

12.3% support. Business Bridge addresses training and development needs by offering relevant courses in marketing and finance. We address the behavioural practices that need to be espoused and entrenched in order to arrest negative business practices that individually and collectively contribute to the aforementioned challenges. What have been some of the most effective ways Business Bridge has found to uplift struggling entrepreneurs and small businesses? Invariably most small businesses struggle at the basic level for one of two reasons. Firstly, there is a weak understanding of the market structure and changes in market dynamics, resulting in a mismatch between capabilities and customer needs. Secondly, most businesses fail to separate business from personal finances, massively restricting growth and profitability. Our diagnosis has demonstrated that entrepreneurs need to focus on arresting haemorrhaging from their business through understanding costs, expenses and their relationship to profitability. They can then focus on driving growth.

9%

South Africa's entrepreneurial rate was ranked as

35

OUT OF 68 COUNTIRES

Necessity-driven & opportunitydriven entrepreneurial activity

30.3%

68.6%

NECESSITYDRIVEN

OPPORTUNITYDRIVEN

SOURCE: 2013 GLOBAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP MONITOR (GEM) SOUTH AFRICAN REPORT

NAME: TOM PARRY COUNTRY OF BIRTH: UNITED KINGDOM

CURRENTLY, 80 PERCENT OF START-UP BUSINESSES IN SA GO UNDER IN THE FIRST THREE YEARS OF OPERATION.

How successful has Business Bridge been?

RELATIONSHIP WITH EISENBERG DE SAUDE:

A World Bank Study on the Business Bridge model has shown a 366 percent profit growth for Managing Money Course students and 805 percent increase in sales for How to Win Sales course attendees.

THE FIRM SUCCESSFULLY OBTAINED MY EXCEPTIONAL SKILLS VISA FOR SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP.

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MUSEUM OF AFRICAN DESIGN

THE HOUSE THAT DESIGN BUILT Headed by the young, dynamic Aaron Kohn, The Museum of African Design is planting the seeds for both African design and Johannesburg culture to flourish

and design and maybe they’ll get interested in going to other art institutions.

WITH AARON

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n 2011, Maboneng Precinct’s developers purchased a 1920’s mining factory in Johannesburg CBD, earmarking it as a future museum. They then made the acquaintance of Aaron Kohn, a talented student in African Art History at Columbia University in New York. He was studying for a year abroad at Witwatersrand University, and had founded a company called African Lookbook, representing South African design in the United States. They had found their perfect match. As soon as he graduated from university, Aaron returned to South Africa to become director of the Museum of African Design (MOAD), which opened its doors in October 2013. MOAD is the first museum in Africa dedicated to design. Yet it doesn’t present itself as a museum, but rather as a cultural hub. What was the thinking behind this? There are a ton of museums in Johannesburg, and South Africa in general. So it may seem silly to open another one, but our thinking is to treat MOAD as the museum that you don’t really think of as a museum per se. I call it the gateway drug of museums. We have a cocktail bar; tomorrow we're hosting a roller disco. Our goal is if people come to MOAD, they will get exposed to art

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The museum is a work in progress. It’s in a space that doesn’t look very much like a museum, in a part of town that doesn't have the normal demographics for one. Some people get it right away – others don’t. The other thing is that there is very little exposure to the rest of Africa here. My educational experience and background includes the rest of the continent; what is going on elsewhere in Africa is really exciting. That’s our other focus. Tell us a little bit more about the Maboneng Precinct development, where MOAD is based. I think it’s the most similar thing in South Africa to New York City. It’s strange being in a neighbourhood in Johannesburg where you can walk around. People are always shocked to hear where I’m living. Things are happening in the CBD. In many ways it’s the first design neighbourhood in South Africa. Thinking about your urban environment as a new development really means that everything that has gone on has been super design oriented. The developers are involving architects from all over the world, like David Adjaye. He opened the museum and is probably Africa’s most famous architect – his museum in Washington D.C. opens next year. Africa seems to be having a design moment – was this a factor in the opening of MOAD? African design has existed in contemporary academics for only the last 15-20 years. Before, all the objects brought

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MABONENG PRECINCT

A RT S

THE MABONENG PRECINCT

A

A

THE MUSEUM IS A WORK IN PROGRESS. IT’S IN A SPACE THAT DOESN’T LOOK VERY MUCH LIKE A MUSEUM, IN A PART OF TOWN THAT DOESN'T HAVE THE NORMAL DEMOGRAPHICS FOR ONE. SOME PEOPLE GET IT RIGHT AWAY – OTHERS DON’T.

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back to Europe and America from Africa were called ‘ethnographic objects’ by anthropologists. In the 1920’s, the Brooklyn Museum (in New York) decided to call their African collection from the Rockefeller family an art collection instead of an ethnographic collection. I think design is the next step in that. What do you think the future holds for design in South Africa?

E

There are so many different facets. African fashion design is growing up all over the world. There are a number of really high-end designers in South Africa. There is also a lot of community-focused design. There are many design schools in the country and it’s growing big time. I think what’s exciting is that much of the design here is commercial. This raises

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questions about design as a practice, but it also means there’s design everywhere. The idea of a design movement is complex. There are many of exhibitions and retrospectives, and it’s important to talk about the problems, innovations and young design that’s happening here, to get people exploring design. How is the museum supporting new, young designers? The start-up trend we’re seeing in the US, we’re seeing here as well. That will be a big part of design. Starting in June we will have a ‘maker space’ in the museum funded by the British Council, so people can arrive here with ideas and design skills that they want to learn, and we’ll have tools and resources available for them.

ANTI-CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: A. Exterior drawing of MOAD. B. Photograph of MOAD at night. C. Demoiselles de Porto-Novo 2 by Leonce Raphel Agbodjelou, courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery London. D. Demoiselles de Porto-Novo 3 by Leonce Raphel Agbodjelou, courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery London.

NAME:

E. MOAD'S Native Nostalgia exhibition. F. The gallery space at MOAD.

AND I'M NOW APPLYING FOR PERMANENT

In only a few years, the Maboneng Precinct has redefined the way people look at Johannesburg’s CBD. The ambitious regeneration project began with the Arts on Main Creative Hub, and has expanded to create a bustling environment full of unique shops, restaurants, a cinema, a spa, a yoga studio, markets and much more. It has also become a hub for start-up businesses and a showcase for art and architecture. The neighbourhood is now made up of over seven completed developments, including Main Street Life and The Main Change, and is set to expand to include 50 buildings in the CBD, bringing with it thousands of residents and hundreds of jobs.

BUILDINGS

CURRENT 150 000 m2

MEDIUM TERM 600 000 m2

LONG TERM 1 000 000 m2

PROPERTY BUILDINGS

CURRENT 37

FUTURE 50

RESIDENTS

WORKERS

CURRENT 500

CURRENT 500

AARON KOHN COUNTRY OF BIRTH: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

FUTURE 3 000

FUTURE 1 500

RELATIONSHIP WITH EISENBERG DE SAUDE: EISENBERG

VISITORS

TREES

DE SAUDE ARRANGED MY WORK PERMIT RESIDENCY WITH THEIR HELP.

DAILY 1 000

EVENTS 2 500

CURRENT 100

FUTURE 350

SOURCE: THE MABONENG PRECINCT PROPERTY GROWTH F R O N T I E R M AREPORT G A Z2013 I N

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I N N O VAT I O N

O G I LV Y D I G I TA L M A R K E T I N G A C A D E M Y

DIGITAL DYNAMITE A

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hris Rawlinson has a lot to live up to. His great-great grandfather ran the British East India Trading Company and discovered the translation of cuneiform; his great-grandfather got the second pilot’s licence in the world. As if this weren’t impressive enough, his father, Sir Anthony Rawlinson, is a famous photographer. It didn’t take long for Chris to live up to his family name. He started out designing intelligent homes for Sting and Madonna, but his true dream was to fly planes. After dating a South African, and intent on a new adventure, he decided he would learn to fly in South Africa. He started out by getting a commercial pilot’s licence in George, then travelled to Cape Town and ended up staying. There, he happened to rent an apartment from Graham Knox, an ex-ad man who had started a wine brand called Stormhoek. “I’d started blogging with a friend of mine, Dave Duarte,” Chris explains. “I told Graham about it and he said it sounds like word-ofmouth marketing. That’s advertising’s holy grail – people talk about you for free.”

With their feet firmly in the marketing world, Chris and Dave decided to team up for a new venture: an online education course. “Dave’s got a knack for making complicated things understandable,” Chris says. “We started doing courses at the Graduate School of Business at the University of Cape Town. It was one of the first online mobile marketing courses.” Then one day the pair were approached by Rob Hill, the COO of Ogilvy & Mather South Africa. “He explained that people coming out of the advertising schools weren’t being taught online marketing,”

OGILVY IS ONE OF THE LARGEST AND MOST HISTORIC AGENCIES. ONE OF THE FOUNDERS STILL COMES IN EVERY DAY AND SITS IN THE STUDIO WRITING COPY.

Chris ended up joining Stormhoek. “All of our marketing was through digital advertising,” Chris explains. It was the early days of blogging, so he experimented with courting bloggers, sending them free personalised bottles of wine. “Pretty much all of them wrote about us,” Chris says. “We didn’t envision Stormhoek as a wine brand; we thought of it as an entertainment brand, since wine is about enjoyment and going out and meeting interesting people.” One way they stirred up publicity was by bringing tech types together with a concept called Geek Dinners. “We’d send them a case of wine with some lithographs done by famous bloggers,” Chris says. Stormhoek became the first brand in the world to successfully grow itself through social media marketing. “It caught the attention of Ad Age magazine; we got listed in the top 50 brands in the world,” Chris recalls. “We went from selling 20,000 cases of wine a year to 980,000 cases.”

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Chris Rawlinson. C. An Intel installation by Ogilvy.

Chris recalls. So the dynamic duo customised their course, giving birth to the Ogilvy Digital Marketing Academy. ODMA started as a test run before becoming more permanent. “We’d talk about SEO, social media marketing, and how these things fit into traditional marketing,” Chris says. About six months in, Chris was hired to work at Ogilvy full time. “The mission for me was to try to make us the number one integrated agency in the country. It was quite daunting: Ogilvy is already one of the largest and most historic agencies. One of the founders still comes in every day and sits in the studio writing copy. I found that the tools to make great integrated digital work were already here. It was about changing the culture to make it a place where we’re inquisitive about the new digital world.” Chris’ efforts proved successful. “In the last two years we’ve been the number one creative agency in the country and number one agency in digital as well," Chris says. "We’ve won more digital awards as a traditional agency than the digital agencies that specialise in that. We also became the third ranked Ogilvy office in the world.”

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FROM THE TOP: A. The Ogilvy Cape Town offices at night. B. ODMA founders Dave Duarte and

Chris Rawlinson is a self-made adman extraordinaire, pioneer of the digital age and trailblazer of the Ogilvy Digital Marketing Academy (ODMA), a project catapulting his agency into the 21 st Century and beyond

ODMA has since been rolled out across South Africa and is now open to the general public. Always ahead of the game, Chris is already taking the courses into their next phase. “An innovation lab is the next evolution," Chris says. "If you really want education to stick, you need to physically interact. So we mess around with emerging technologies like Google Glass to better understand and find interesting uses for them. Now there are ODMA classes on the maker revolution, wearable technology and the internet of things.” ODMA is essentially about lifelong learning. “David Ogilvy calls learning the lifeblood of the agency,” Chris says. “ODMA has helped us stay ahead of the competition. Alvin Toffler once said: ‘The illiterate of the 21st Century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.’ It’s very true nowadays. The world is shifting dramatically and we need to realise our common perceptions are often no longer valid.”

THE DIGITAL CAPE The Western Cape is rapidly becoming a hub for African digital innovation, falling under the umbrella of the ‘Silicon Cape’, where projects such as Dave Duarte's Huddlemind, which was South Africa’s first social media agency, and Geek Dinners, now called 27 Dinners, bring together like-minded tech people. Here’s Chris’ take on why the Cape is the perfect place for digital innovation:

CHRIS’ INGREDIENTS FOR A TECH START-UP: INFRASTRUCTURE: Most of the big undersea Internet cables come into Cape Town, with fibre-optic landlines available up to 100mbps. COMMUNITY: You can quickly and easily meet people in the same industry. In Woodstock for example, you have little incubators, particularly in places like the Woodstock Foundry and the Biscuit Mill. NATURAL BEAUTY: When you’re working hard, you want to be in a place where you’re easily set free of it. In Cape Town you can decompress easily, and fantastic coffee is easily available. NAME: CHRIS RAWLINSON COUNTRY OF BIRTH: UK RELATIONSHIP WITH EISENBERG DE SAUDE: I WAS INTRODUCED TO EISENBERG DE SAUDE THROUGH ONE OF MY MUM’S FRIENDS IN THE HOTEL INDUSTRY. “IF YOU NEED ANYTHING TO DO WITH IMMIGRATION, CHAT TO GARY,” THE FRIEND SAID. “HE GETS THE JOB DONE WITH VERY LITTLE HASSLE.”


K WV

INNOVATION

A SHORT HISTORY: SA WINE & KWV

KWV began as a co-operative headquartered in Paarl, established in 1918 to regulate the fledgling South African wine industry. The company today remains the guardian of South Africa’s wine history, holding significant museum stocks of very old fortified wines and Muscadels going back to the 1930s.

1918 KWV is registered as a company.

REINVENTING A CELLAR Richard Rowe was brought to KWV from Australia to give the venerable winery a global perspective and breathe new life into the South African wine industry transformation in wine quality and style that caught everyone by surprise. We have been successful, but it can be a challenge getting the message across, especially within South Africa, where old perceptions can be slow to change.

WITH RICHARD

R

ichard Rowe is a veritable wine veteran, with 40 years of experience working across Australia’s various wine-producing regions. So when KWV recruited him as their Chief Winemaker, he was uniquely qualified with his understanding of large-scale winemaking. Richard is now KWV’s Consultant Winemaker, spending part of his time travelling the world, spreading the good word about South African wine. KWV has had a unique role in the South African wine world, with its beginnings as a wine co-operative and regulator. How has the company adapted to changing times? The history of KWV created a culture that was not totally consistent with the requirements of a modern, dynamic, privately owned commercial organisation. It was necessary to transform the business, and my appointment was intended to evolve wine styles and better align them with the requirements of our international customers. Over the past six years we have gone through a very dramatic

Do you find working with South African wines comparable to working with Australian wines? Both countries have relatively new wine regions – do you find parallels between the two? I find many similarities. Both countries have warm, friendly people, who work hard, are innovative, love the outdoors, and are very passionate about their sports. Particularly as a cricket lover, I’ve taken my share of beatings over the past few years. An especially brutal test defeat at Newlands springs to mind. Fortunately my South African mates were very kind and we eased the pain with a few drops of KWV. I find the South African wine industry at times to be quite regulated and conservative and, as an impatient Aussie, this has proved challenging. Despite this, the progress made here over the past 10 years has still been very rapid. The climate and grape varieties in South Africa and Australia are very similar, with the exception of Pinotage, a unique and fascinating variety that I have grown to love. Chenin Blanc is also an extraordinary grape here, so it has been exciting getting to know how to work with these wonderful styles.

KWV recruited you to offer a more global perspective on winemaking. How far do you think the South African wine business has come, and do you think it's still in need of becoming more worldly? I think the evolution in the South African wine industry over the past 10 years, particularly in terms of wine style and wine quality, has been extraordinary. The pre-1994 isolation years did not prepare the industry at all for global understanding, wine style evolution, and efficient and dynamic service. This was well recognised and the energy and enthusiasm of local producers to catch up is commendable. Today, KWV is in the top 50 wine brands globally, and is the only South African wine brand there. This speaks volumes for how effective KWV has been in establishing new markets around the world and playing a vital role in the globalisation of the South African wine industry.

1924 The KWV Act gives KWV

administrative responsibilities and the position of sole exporter and importer of alcohol.

1926 The first brandy is produced at KWV and the first consignment of fortified wine exported to the UK.

1928 KWV appoints viticultural

expert, Professor Perold, the inventor of Pinotage, as its winemaker.

1935 In return for importing

South African crayfish, the French Government obtains exclusive rights to French geographical terms such as Champagne and Bordeaux.

1971

Serious natural wine shortages in the local industry force KWV to import large quantities of wine from Bordeaux.

1997

KWV converts from a co-operative to a company.

2004 For the first time, KWV products enter the local market.

I think we really started producing world-quality wines only in the last 10 years or so, although there are some notable exceptions. Putting this in perspective, many of the old world producers have been producing great wines for centuries, so South Africa needs to be seen as fresh, exciting and innovative.

What do you think is the future for South African wine? Do you think it is becoming more appreciated globally?

Two well-credentialed English wine writers, on visiting the Western Cape last year, said that South Africa is the most exciting wine country on the planet at the moment. We have certainly come a long way, and this is being noticed around the world.

TWO WELL-CREDENTIALED ENGLISH WINE WRITERS, ON VISITING THE WESTERN CAPE LAST YEAR, SAID THAT SOUTH AFRICA IS THE MOST EXCITING WINE COUNTRY ON THE PLANET AT THE MOMENT.

NAME: RICHARD ROWE COUNTRY OF BIRTH: AUSTRALIA RELATIONSHIP WITH EISENBERG DE SAUDE: I HAD EISENBERG DE SAUDE QUICKLY AND EFFORTLESSLY EXTEND MY WORKING VISA ON THE BASIS OF AN EXCEPTIONAL SKILLS WORK PERMIT.

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ART INSURE

SAFEKEEPING SA ART With the recent meteoric rise in the value of African art, collectors need protection more than ever. Seasoned art insurer Gordon Massie found an unexpected gap in the market and became South Africa’s art insurance pioneer

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very so often, life events converge in just the right way. For Gordon Massie, it was a combination of a career in insurance, a passion for art collecting and a move abroad that created an unexpected opportunity.

Massie’s love of art collecting began when he was only 18. “I bought my first piece, a small bronze, with money I saved from working at a pub,” he recalls fondly. He began his career working in the London insurance market, but soon realised that he could combine this with his passion for art collecting. It was a formula that proved to be successful: his art insurance company soon expanded internationally. Then Gordon married a South African woman and moved to Johannesburg. “When my art collection arrived here, I asked my insurance broker to sort out art insurance for me,” he recalls. “He looked at me as though I was speaking Chinese. He said they could only attach it to my household policy.” At that stage, art insurance had developed to mature levels in Europe, North America and Australasia, so Massie was surprised to find that South African art insurance didn’t exist. “I found out that unless you had your insurance exported to London via a local broker, you were slapped with a local asset product, which really did nothing for you as a collector, dealer or auctioneer,” he says. Seeing a demand in the burgeoning South African art scene, he set up Art Insure, partnering with Hollard Insurance. A

Today, Art Insure insures a variety of items, including paintings, sculptures, ephemera, documents, militaria, coins, libraries and LPs. “We can identify, value and insure items in a specific way,” Massie says. “For example, Gary Eisenberg has a Robert Hodgins legal satire on the wall in his office – you can’t replace that. It’s about understanding the value of the client’s assets.” Art insurance was a completely new concept in South Africa. “It was the definition of pioneering,” Massie says. “We had to change 100 years of buyer behaviour, broker behaviour, and awareness. Art insurance has just never been seen as necessary here and never really understood.”

Paving the way meant basic infrastructure had to be established. “When we launched, no one knew what their works were worth,” Massie says. “We set up a series of evaluation solutions made up of specialist valuers who already existed, but nobody really knew about.” Art Insure’s biggest challenge was to spread awareness. “There is one fundamental reason people need art insurance: shortterm insurers, 99 percent of the time, insure depreciated assets,” Massie says. “The assets we insure are appreciating assets. When an asset is damaged, we restore it, provide indemnity for loss, and pay a value we have already agreed ahead of time – it’s a completely different approach.” Art can get damaged through injury, smoke or water damage. “The biggest reason for art loss is accidental damage,” Massie says. “This has enormous consequences for value, and needs special handling. For example, the floods last year in Franschhoek and Somerset West were perilous to art collections.”

WHEN WE STARTED, THERE WAS ONE POLICE OFFICER IN THE WHOLE OF SOUTH AFRICA DEALING WITH ART THEFT. TO PUT THAT INTO CONTEXT, IN ITALY THE CARBONARI HAS OVER 90 OFFICERS COMBATING CULTURAL CRIME FULL TIME.

Increasing interest in South African art has meant an increase in art theft. “When we first set up Art Insure, we were told nobody here steals art – they rather steal cell phones and TVs,” Massie says. “There was one police officer in the whole of South Africa dealing with art theft: she was in the endangered species division. To put that into context, in Italy the Carbonari has over 90 officers combatting cultural crime full time.”

TOP 10

MOST VALUABLE SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTINGS

01 02 03 04 05 06

07

08 09 10

Irma Stern, Two Arabs, 1939 ZAR 21,166,000 Irma Stern, Arab ZAR 17,267,000 Irma Stern, Gladioli, 1939 ZAR 13,368,000 Irma Stern, Malay Girl, 1938 ZAR 11,697,000 Irma Stern, White Lilies, 1936 ZAR 11,140,000 Irma Stern, Still Life of Delphiniums, 1938 ZAR 10,583,000 Jacob Hendrik Pierneef, Extensive Landscape Northern Transvaal, ZAR 10,583,000 Irma Stern, Young Arab, 1945 ZAR 9,800,000 Irma Stern, Lilies, 1944 ZAR 8,355,000 Irma Stern, Portrait of a Woman Wearing a Pink Hijab ZAR 8,355,000

SOURCE: LIST COMPILED BY STRAUSS & CO MARCH 2013. VALUES LISTED REFLECT PRICE AT AUCTION.

B

C

To keep track of art theft, Massie set up a free website called the Art Theft Register. “Every art theft we are advised of we register to improve the prospects of recovery,” Massie says. The website revealed several types of increasing theft. “There’s opportunistic theft, driven by awareness of art values, and targeted theft, where there’s evidence of deliberate theft,” Massie explains. “Art made from recyclable materials is being stolen and taken to scrapyards. Three bronze Eduardo Villa sculptures have been stolen from private residences. A scrap dealer probably paid ZAR 1,000 for them. It’s a pandemic.”

BOTTOM, CLOCKWISE: A. Robert Hodgins, On the Cruise, Monotype, 2007 B. Robert Hodgins, My CEO, Lithograph, 2007 C. Vladimir Tretchikoff, Chinese Girl, Oil paint, 1952 Sources: Robert Hodgins Print Archive, Wits Art Museum; The Tretchikoff Project

NAME: GORDON MASSIE COUNTRY OF BIRTH:

Ultimately, the growing art world will continue to fuel demand for companies like Art Insure. “The general trend is that values are increasing significantly,” Massie says. “This is a correction as art from here was ignored before 2000. Now we are looking at other territories, using South Africa as a base to replicate similar aspects around the world.”

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THE BAHAMAS (NATIONALITY, BRITISH) RELATIONSHIP WITH EISENBERG DE SAUDE: EISENBERG DE SAUDE HAS REPRESENTED ART INSURE SINCE WE STARTED.


EU GENI O GA LLI

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MOVING IMAGES Eugenio Galli is a highly respected cinematographer in both his native Italy and in South Africa, where he works as a director of photography with renowned film directors for commercials and music videos

A

WITH EUGENIO How did you come to live and work in South Africa? I worked on and off in the South African advertising film industry for about 10 years; I came here to shoot a few times with an Italian production house. Over the last few years I received many requests for my exceptional skills from South African production companies. I came here to shoot for the local market, and I was surprised by the high level of creativity and professionalism from the crew. I decided to move here permanently. How would you describe your aesthetic approach to a film?

PHOTOGRAPHERS: GRANT DE SOUSA, KEITH ROSE

The director of photography oversees the camera and lighting crews, and is responsible for achieving artistic and technical decisions related to the image. I consider my work very dynamic because it gives me the opportunity to go through different experiences while still respecting the director’s needs, observing the development of the action during the shooting and taking part in the completion of the work. I like to spend time with the director to get as much information as possible from him regarding the mood and look of the film. What I love about my job is the magic that can happen when you go off in a creative direction and seize opportunities. I started out working as a focus puller, and then as a camera operator with one of the most talented and well-known Italian directors of photography: Fabio Cianchetti. Cooperating with Fabio, I had the opportunity to shoot important movies such as The Dreamers and Besieged by Bernardo Bertolucci, Julius Caesar by Uli Edel and Canone Inverso by Ricky Tognazzi. During these years of professional growth, I got a lot of experience, giving me hope to follow my dreams.

A

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: A. Assupol Life advertisement by director Grant de Sousa. B & C. Prudential advertisement by director Keith Rose.

How would you describe the film industry in South Africa? I consider the South African advertising film industry to be one of the most creative and professional of all markets. When I started my career as cinematographer for commercials in Italy, the structure of the industry was very different: there was a lot more opportunity for developing the creative aspect with the director and opportunity to stylistically develop the

I CONSIDER THE SOUTH AFRICAN FILM INDUSTRY TO BE ONE OF THE MOST CREATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL OF ALL MARKETS. look and the approach early on, which is really what it’s all about for me. I was very fortunate to start working in those days, when you’d have a lot of prep and a lot of discussion, and the director’s vision and input from his team would really drive the creative brief. The best work, to my mind, whether it’s a commercial or a movie, comes first from a great idea, carried out through the imagination, the eyes and the mind of the director, with a strong supporting team.

Sadly in Italy and in many parts of Europe it’s very different these days: the general approach on commercials tends to be locked down quite early, and because budgets are being squeezed, there is pressure to bring on key crew like the cinematographer much later. Happily in South Africa there are great exceptions to the rule, and the project often starts for main crew members at an early stage. South Africa has become an attractive place for foreign companies to make films. Why do you think this is? I think South Africa is one of the world’s top locations for film and commercials because of its excellent crews and equipment, diverse geography, low costs, state-of-the-art studios, good exchange rates and long days of sunshine. It also has a diverse range of people that can gratify casting requirements.

negative multiplier effect. Because of the financial crisis, people would drop their prices really low just to get the job instead of competing fairly. There is no “fair competition” board in Europe and the price cuts are unfortunately legal. There aren’t many skilled workers left in Italy due to this fact, so it was a blessing in disguise to work in South Africa. I can only hope South Africa will continue in such a way that exceptional skills and professionalism are the main values.

NAME: EUGENIO GALLI COUNTRY OF BIRTH:

What do you think the South African film industry needs to continue to grow?

ITALY RELATIONSHIP WITH EISENBERG DE SAUDE:

What happened in Italy and in a few other European countries was unfair quotation competition that resulted in a

EISENBERG DE SAUDE ORGANISED MY VISA AND WORK PERMIT.

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INNOVATION

ESTIMATED HIV PREVALENCE IN AFRICA

G NP +

HEALING TOGETHER GNP+ connects HIV positive people around the world, empowering sufferers to shape decisions that will affect their health and their lives. Key Populations Officer Ed Ngoksin works tirelessly to support these communities across Southern Africa

WITH ED

T

here is no doubt HIV causes physical pain and suffering, but living with the disease can also have serious social and psychological side effects. This is the purpose of GNP+, a global network for, and by, people living with HIV. It works to achieve equitable access to health and social services for people living with HIV by focusing on social justice, rights and involvement. GNP+ believes that those who best understand what HIV sufferers need are the victims themselves, so promotes the greater and more meaningful involvement of these people in programmes and policy development. How has GNP+ become important to HIV sufferers in South Africa? People living with HIV face stigma, discrimination and human rights violations on a regular basis. We address these complex issues by supporting groups, organisations and networks of people living with HIV to respond to these challenges. We assist them to undertake research and conduct evidence-based campaigning to ensure governments deliver a co-ordinated and effective response to HIV. For example, we have just concluded a programme supporting the People Living with HIV network in South Africa in documenting human rights abuses and assessing the responsiveness of programmes and policies to the sexual reproductive health needs of people living with HIV. These groups were able to work with lawyers to address cases of forced marriage, and arrest 12 abductors in the Eastern Cape. The network leadership development has been strengthened as a result of this. What are some of the primary ways that GNP+ works to improve the lives of those living with HIV?

people living with HIV to participate in community-led research projects across 10 countries where 15 million people living with HIV reside. By generating evidence and building skills in research and advocacy, people living with HIV have established themselves as 'agents of change' and engage confidently with decision makers. GNP+ also works with key international development agencies, such as UNAIDS, the World Health Organisation and UNICEF to ensure the policies, guidelines, programmes and political commitments on HIV are shaped by the perspectives of people living with HIV around the world. What is it like working at an NGO organisation within South Africa? Is the infrastructure generally supportive? Working at an NGO in South Africa has been a rewarding and inspiring experience. Cape Town carries so much legitimacy when it comes to communities exercising their civil rights. For example, the Treatment Action Campaign — a small group of activists living with HIV in Cape Town — has become the leading force behind a comprehensive health care service for people living with HIV in South Africa. They took the government to court demanding to make life-saving antiretroviral drugs available to people who need them. There is a lot of history in this city; a strong treatment-access movement and broader civil society means that South Africa is at the intersection of global, regional and local organisations in the epidemiological and activist movements. What are some of the greatest hurdles that those living with HIV in South Africa face? What most needs improving? South Africa is a country with a high prevalence of HIV in a region, which, is by far the most affected by the epidemic. It has the highest proportion of people living with HIV in the world, with a prevalence rate in adults aged 15-49 standing at 18 percent. In 2012, there were an estimated 370,000 new infections, driven mainly by heterosexual transmission.

THE HISTORY OF A STRONG TREATMENT-ACCESS MOVEMENT MEANS THAT SOUTH AFRICA IS AT THE INTERSECTION OF GLOBAL, REGIONAL AND LOCAL ORGANISATIONS.

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One of the most significant challenges is to ensure that people living with

15.0% – 28.0%

0.1% – <15.0%

5.0% – <15.0%

<0.1%

1.0% – <5.0%

No data

0.5% – <1.0%

ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUG COVERAGE IN AFRICA Estimated ART coverage among adults (15+) (%):

HIV have access to the life-saving treatment they need. Despite South Africa having one of the largest government treatment programmes in the world, only one-third of people living with HIV have access to lifesaving antiretroviral medicines. The reality here is that people living with HIV are diagnosed very late when their immune system has already been compromised. Many also drop out of the health system, do not seek medical care or closely monitor their health status. Many people living with HIV are also co-infected with tuberculosis. With our partners we work to better understand how to encourage an early uptake of HIV testing, linking and retaining people in the support and care system. A greater attention and dedication is needed to respond to the epidemic in this country.

KEY: 80 – 100

20 – 39

60 – 79

0 – 19

40 – 59

No data

SOURCE: WWW.UNICEF.ORG

MOST COMMONLY DENIED RIGHTS OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV IN SOUTH AFRICA 20% Right to privacy

NAME: ED NGOKSIN COUNTRY OF BIRTH:

15%

Freedom from torture

THAILAND RELATIONSHIP WITH

12% Right to health

EISENBERG DE SAUDE: GNP+ LODGED MY APPLICATION FOR AN EXCEPTIONAL SKILLS PERMIT WITH

Employing the principle of learning by doing, our programmes have enabled 16,000

KEY:

EISENBERG DE SAUDE LAST YEAR.

10% Right to family and marriage 7% Right to work SOURCE: HUMAN RIGHTS COUNT! SOUTH AFRICA: EASTERN CAPE ASSESSMENT (2011) NAPWA


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