Page 1


The Standard View Maximise Profit Profit = Sales – Operating Costs

  We are all taught by practically every advisor or other source of advice that we  should focus on the profitability of our business and that the number we should  focus on is the level of profit it generates.  Profit is important but to focus on it and use it as the fundamental (financial) guide  on how we run the business is not only bad but fundamentally dangerous.  This is not a marketing concept, an ethical concept or even a psychological idea.  It is  simply and as you will see mathematically flawed.  And when you understand the  demonstration and grasp its implications for business as a whole it will change your  approaches to business.  The demonstration is based on a manufacturing environment because it is the  easiest way to make the proof but it is logic is equally applicable in any other  business environment, be it project management (construction or computer  programming for example) or service (e.g. solicitors or shops)  It may take a little time to follow and perhaps seem a little complicated but bear  with it – at the end when you have reflected upon it you will – like almost everyone  else say:  “Obvious really, just common sense!” 


The Investors Decision How much interest will it pay? Building Society A 

10%

Building Society B

5%

Where should I put my money?

The standard approach misses out the one thing that any Investor thinks about, the  interest rate that their investment will enjoy.  If you had a choice between two equally secure building societies but one offered  you a 10% interest rate and the other only 5% you would not have too much  difficulty deciding which one to place your money with.  When we are considering the investment in an aspect of a business we call the  interest rate Return On Capital Employed or ROCE for short


Return On Capital Employed ROCE  =

Profit Capital Employed

This appears similar to the sum one would do to calculate the interest rate on an  investment in a building society.  Actually it is exactly the same!  The profit is the amount of money you retain after your running expenses and the  capital employed is the amount of money tied up in the operation.  If I make £200 profit and I have to invest £10,000 to do so I will have made a 2%  ROCE.  If I only make £100 profit but only need to tie up £500 I will have made 20% ROCE.  Clearly I would be sensible to invest my money in the second of these propositions  and find somewhere else to invest my remaining funds.  Obvious really, just common sense!  It is curious therefore that most businesses tend to adopt the first investment  simply because it makes the higher profit.  And, in fact, there is one particular area  of business that has spawned thousands of articles analysing the best approach to  the first investment and entirely missing the implication. 


Economic Batch Quantities  Set up cost (for a printer)  Half an hour to produce plates  Put them on the press  Add the ink and paper  Running costs  Labour for each hour  Paper  Ink  Power

Getting the Economic Batch Quantity right is regarded as critical for any  manufacturing company that produces its products in batches.  Before a batch can be produced the machinery has to be set up.  This takes time and  therefore there is a cost before anything has actually been produced.   Once you begin producing the goods you have to pay for the materials being  consumed by the process, the electricity being used and the time of those people  operating the machinery.


Production Costs Unit Cost 300

250

200

150 Unit Cost 100

50

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

This means that if you only produce one item it has to bear all the costs of setting up  the machinery as well as the costs immediately associated with it.    If you produce two items then they share the set up costs and therefore half the  amount each is bearing and then have to carry their own immediate costs.  If you produce three then the costs are similarly reduced.  This results in a Cost curve similar to the one shown above.


Holding Cost Holding Cost 140

120

100

80 Holding Cost

60

40

20

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

Unfortunately there is a further aspect to consider.  As I produce more I have additional costs simply to hold the volume I produce.  I  have to store the goods which means I have warehousing costs – space, heat and  light, I have money tied up in the materials required to produce the goods on which  I am either paying interest or foregoing interest.  I have expended money on the  labour used to produce them. I will have to pay insurance, I may lose some or get  them damaged or I may find the market for them declines.  As a consequence I have a holding cost that rises – this time in a straight line – as  shown above.


Total Unit Cost 300

Lowest Cost 250

200

Unit Cost

150

Holding Cost Total Unit Cost 100

50

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

This means I have to add the two costs (production and holding) to find the Total  Unit Cost.  This produces a graph that looks similar to the one above.    The lowest total cost will be at the point where the two lines cross.     


Profit 300

250

Maximum Profit 200 Unit Cost Holding Cost

150

Total Unit Cost Price

100

50

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

We can also add to this graph a horizontal line that show the price at which we sell  the goods.  It is not difficult to see that the profit can be derived by measuring the difference  between the Price line and the Total Unit Cost line. It also shows that the point of  maximum profit falls at the point where the two cost lines cross.  We can see that profit starts low, the rises rapidly to the point where the two cost  lines cross and then gradually declines.


Profit Profit 100

50

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24 Profit

‐50

‐100

‐150

Following this fairly basic logic we can draw the profit graph as shown above.  It is  simply the Total Unit Cost Line inverted (turned upside down).


Maximum Profit Profit 100

50

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24 Profit

‐50

‐100

‐150

And we can see the point of maximum profit!


Return on Capital Employed Profit 100

50

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24 Profit

‐50

‐100

Stock Quantity

‐150

Now reflect on the fact that the X axis is a quantity of stock.  This has a value (the  quantity multiplied by the Unit Cost) and we have money tied up in it – Capital  Employed.  So the more we produce in each batch the more money we have tied up –   or the more capital employed!  And because, as we approach the point of maximum profit the slope of the graph  does not change much it means that if we reduce the quantity we produce we make  very little difference to the profit.    Typically we can almost half the batch quantity and only sacrifice about 10% of our  profit.  So – produce at maximum profit and ROCE equals (say)  100/1000 = 10%  Or   90/500= 18%  Which do you want?  And bear in mind this is not 8% more ROCE it is 80% more.  And you still have 50% of your capital to invest in something else!   


ROCE 100

60

40 50 20

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

0 Profit ROCE ‐20

‐50

‐40 ‐100 ‐60

‐80

‐150

And as you will see from the graph above the maximum return on your capital is  always at a point well below the maximum profit level.  And incidentally if you drift  just a little to the right of the maximum profit level your Return continues to drop  dramatically.   The point about this explanation has not been to teach you about Economic Batch  Quantities nor just to show that the focus on profit is wrong.    It is wrong and, if you follow the implications through, it will change foundations of  the way you approach your business, it obviously affects decisions on production  quantities but changing the focus will also affect investment decisions on plant, on  relations with suppliers, on staffing levels, on your sales propositions to your  customers.  Even More Important  May I suggest that if the advice you have been receiving from your accountants,  bank managers and from the mass of business books is so fundamentally flawed and  potentially dangerous there might just be other basic concepts that have equally  shaky foundations?  I promise you there are, an when you see them your reaction will be:  “Obvious really, just common sense!”   

A Fundamental Business Misconception  

Most businesses use profitability to assess their business decisions. This is not only logically and mathematically flawed but dangerous sna...