Issuu on Google+

PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE

Health

2010

ENGLISH SAN FRANCISCO

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT & GUIDELINES Y

LA PAZ

EVALUACION AMBIENTAL DE SOSTENIBILIDAD PAUTAS

窶右SPAテ前L

Client

A collaboration by

PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE


Core project team / Grupo central de proyecto Liz Ogbu, Public Architecture Marian Keeler, Simon & Associates Rupal Sanghvi, HealthxDesign Bolivian resource team / Red de recursos Boliviano Faride Tarido, Cruz Verde Bolivia Fernando Martinez, H2O Architectura Fernando Pati単o, CIES Shelim Tarido, Architect International resource team / Red de recursos internacionales Amy Ress, Public Architecture Bill Burke, PG&E Energy Center Carrie Rich, Perkins+Will Jan Stensland, Inside Matters Jennivine Kwan, US Green Building Council John Peterson, Public Architecture Kevin Hydes, Integral Group Prescott Reavis, Anshen+Allen | Stantec Steve Guttmann, Guttmann & Blaevoet Tyler Krehlik, Anshen+Allen|Stantec Victor Fong, Anshen+Allen|Stantec Yu Tsuji, Anshen+Allen|Stantec

This guide is licensed by CIES, Public Architecture, HealthxDesign, and Simon & Associates under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.


Page 4-17

Page 18-31

3


CIES Led by Executive Director Dr. Jhonny Lopez Garcia, CIES Sexual and Reproductive Health is a member association of International Planned Parenthood Federation. A non-profit, CIES has been working for over 20 years to improve the health and education of the Bolivian population through specialized medical and educational services in sexual and reproductive health. Public Architecture A nonprofit organization established in 2002, Public Architecture was started by architect John Peterson. The organization works to leverage design to affect social change through pro bono design pledges and service grants, public interest design and strategic initiatives, and dissemination of best practices and advocacy through resources. Simon & Associates A highly regarded green building consultancy, Simon & Associates strives to achieve a high level of sustainability through an integrated and collaborative design process that sets priorities for environmental performance and develops contextually appropriate strategies in which to achieve those goals. HealthxDesign HealthxDesign (Health By Design), is an initiative of the Public Health Institute.  Founded by Rupal Sanghvi, who has been developing and evaluating public health programs for over 15 years.  HealthxDesign explores the role of design, including urban design, building design and service design, to improve health outcomes.

CIES WWW.CIES.ORG.BO PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE WWW.PUBLICARCHITECTURE.ORG SIMON & ASSOCIATES WWW.GREENBUILD.COM HEALTHxDESIGN WWW.HEALTHXDESIGN.ORG


ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT & GUIDELINES

OBJECTIVES METHODOLOGY KEY RECOMMENDATIONS BUILDING INFRASTRUCTURE Energy & ventilation analysis & strategy Environmental building materials Heat island effect Maximizing green/open space PBT reduction in building materials Water use efficiency Roadmap for green clinic building

OPERATIONS Chemical management strategy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Green cleaning guidelines Mercury reduction plan Sustainable food program

INTEGRATED PROGRAMMING Green education program Implications of sustainability recommendations to projects and programs Organization-wide environmental policy

NEXT STEPS CONCLUSION

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


6


Environmental sustainability and its interconnected relationship to public health represent an emerging and important theme in global development. The impact ranges from the systems scale to that of the individual. For example, the fact that hospitals in Brazil account for over 10 percent of the country’s total commercial energy consumption speaks to the health sector’s significant climate footprint.1 Other environmental factors are linked to harm to individual health. The US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) has reported that indoor levels of air pollutants can be up two to five (and in some cases up to 100) times higher than outdoor levels. Poor indoor air quality has been connected to negative health effects such as asthma and other respiratory ailments.2 These and other policy links and priorities have been articulated in international climate change conferences, the Millennium Development Goals, the Earth Charter, and more recently, renewed dialogue around population and the environment.3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11

are currently unformed. The high reliance on adequate infrastructure and building performance for achieving its outcomes, and concomitant high-energy costs, makes environmental sustainability an important strategic area for a SRH organization. In Bolivia, in concert with global discussions, there exist great grassroots, local and national level momentum around the importance of environmental sustainability. For example, the Bolivian Constitution now includes “Pachamama” (Mother Earth), who is caretaker of the land and everything that grows on or lives in it. Such legislation underscores the increasing interest in stewardship and the environment within the Bolivian context. Given that Pachamama has great meaning in the broader Andean culture, this larger interconnected vision of sustainability potentially also has strong significance at the regional level.

Amidst this policy context, the implications, opportunities and recommendations/guidelines for operationalizing key environmental sustainability principles for sexual and reproductive health service organizations remain relatively unexplored. More specifically, models that articulate strategic guidance for optimizing environmental sustainability in order to protect human health, the environment, and strengthen institutional sustainability and quality of care within the sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service setting 7


1

 ealthcare Without Harm, WHO. Healthy Hospitals, Healthy H Planet, Healthy People. Available from http://www.noharm.org/ lib/downloads/climate/Healthy_Hosp_Planet_Peop.pdf

2

 S EPA, IAQ Tools for Schools, Available from http://www.epa. U gov/iaq/schools/media.html#IAQ%20and%20Student%20 Performance

3

 Change. 2007: The physical science basis: summary for poliC cymakers. Geneva: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change secretariat; 2007

4

J A Patz, D Campbell-Lendrum, T Holloway, JA Foley. Impact of regional climate change on human health. Nature 2005; 438: 310-7

5

 UN Annan. Secretary-general’s address to the 2006 UN Climate K Change Conference. Nairobi, 2006. Available from: http://www. un.org/News/Press/docs/2006/sgsm10739.doc.htm

6

 arth Charter Initiative. The Earth Charter. Available from http:// E www.earthcharterinaction.org/invent/images/uploads/eCharter_english.pdf

7

 Ezzati, A Lopez, A Rodgers, C Murray. editors. Comparative M quantification of health risks: global and regional burden of disease due to selected major risk factors. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2004

8

 K Treasury. Stern review on the economics of climate change. U London: UK Treasury; 2006. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Ecosystems and human well-being: health synthesis. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2005

9

 Prüss-Üstün, C Corvalán. Preventing disease through healthy A environments: Towards an estimate of the environmental burden of disease. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2006

10 A  J McMichael. Population health as the ‘bottom line’ of sustainability: a contemporary challenge for public health researchers. Eur J Public Health 2006; 16: 579-81 11 M  Chan. WHO director-general elect’s speech to the World Health Assembly. Geneva, 2006. Available from: http://www.who.int/dg/ speeches/2006/wha/en/index.htmlfrom: http://www.who.int/ globalchange/climate/en/


OBJECTIVES

METHODOLOGY

During fall 2010 through spring 2011, the Bolivian affiliate of International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Centro de Investigación Educación y Servicios (CIES) will develop its next strategic plan. Integral to the plan will be animportant consideration of environmental sustainability. In an effort to define concrete opportunities for advancement in the area of environmental sustainability of its infrastructure, CIES commissioned Public Architecture, in collaboration with HealthxDesign, to conduct an assessment. Green building consultants Simon & Associates were brought in to complete the core team. Together, they spearheaded an assessment that identifies opportunities and recommendations for (1) Identifying and reducing negative environmental impacts of CIES facilities and (2) Identifying human factors issues related to supporting environmental sustainability of infrastructure.

Sustainability, particularly within the context of “healthy design,” touches upon multiple sectors, including health, environment, social, and economics. Thus, any strategy around situational assessments and solution development must be similarly positioned in a broad context of understanding and exploration. With a goal of developing a robust but flexible framework to inform CIES and its ability to make sustainability-related decisions, Public Architecture leveraged experts from its varied network of professionals in sustainability, healthcare design, landscape architecture, and public health. The team of – primarily pro bono – experts engaged the project in different capacities and at different phases. Local expertise, particularly in the design community, was also engaged where possible. The experts consulted as part of this project include:

––   Anshen + Allen | Stantec ––   Cruz Verde (Bolivia) ––   Guttman & Blaevoet Consulting Engineers ––   H2O Arcquitectura (Bolivia) ––   Inside Matters ––   Integral Group ––   Perkins + Will ––   PG&E Energy Center ––   Society of Bolivian Architects ––   US Green Building Council The project developed over the course of five phases: (1) Development of assessment strategies and preliminary research into leading barriers in developing “healthy design;” (2) Weeklong on the ground assessment, including site visits to the clinics in La Paz and El Alto, interviews with CIES organizational and clinic staff, and meetings with potential collaborators and donors; (3) Synthesis of data collected into the categories“low hanging fruit” and “deeper analysis;” (4) Engagement of relevant experts to explore “deeper analysis” issues further; and (5) Development of a sustainability framework report. Overview of Proposed Sustainability Framework The report provides analysis and recommendations on specific issues identified during the team’s research and development. It is possible to provide key global insights about how to understand the strategies proposed. Building type as a driver of outcome In order to understand the analysis and gauge the

9


potential scale of changes needed, it is important to classify CIES’ facilities into three categories: Existing Older (constructed more than five years ago), ExistingRecent (constructed within the last five years), and Future (facilities to be built in the future). Clinica El Alto would qualify as an Existing-Older facility. Clinica La Paz would be an Exisiting-Recent building. These two facilities were the focus of the team’s investigation, but solutions suggested can often apply more broadly within these classifications. Harnessing Technology, Tools, and Users In conjunction with the filters suggested above, there should be a matrix of implementation. In ExistingOlder facilities, there will likely be a significant cost associated with implementing the technology necessary to bring the facility into compliance. In such cases, it may be necessary to phase changes in over a long period time. In the interim, tools and people can be used to fill the gap. For example, until the ventilation system in Clinica El Alto is fully retrofitted, formal policies about manually ventilating the space and implementation of that policy by staff can address some of air quality issues. In Existing-Recent and Future facilities, there can be more of a reliance on technological systems, though the need for tools and users would never be completely eliminated.

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS The recommendations outlined in this report are not meant to be viewed as prescriptive strategies. Instead, they should serve as a guide that can be a tool for institutional decision-making. The recommendations fall into three categories: physical considerations related to building infrastructure, operational strategies that require institutional decisions and processes to be in place, and programmatic suggestions that should be integrated within existing program frameworks. All recommendations are grounded in an awareness of their relation to overall public health goals, potential implementation processes, ease or difficulty of actualization, harnessing or building local capacity, and relevant precedents and resources. In addition to a detailed account of recommendations, the report includes a robust appendix. The appendix, which is similarly organized into three categories, has information ranging from informational websites to content specific white papers. Within the three recommendation categories, the assessment identified and developed strategies and plans for the following opportunities:

Capitalizing on synergies Many of the strategies proposed overlap with one another, so rather than looking at them as separate measures to implement, be open to harnessing their shared potential. Furthermore, the on the ground assessment revealed that there are existing frameworks, such as CIES’ Quality of Care Guidelines, into which some of these strategies can be easily integrated. The sustainability practices recommended do not require the development of a new framework. Prototype solutions The process of becoming a more sustainable organization in form and function will not occur overnight. As CIES moves forward in incorporating this framework in its strategic plan, it can test some of the proposed strategies through phasing and prototypes. Changes at the level of a room or series of rooms can provide an opportunity to test various implementation strategies, build comfort among staff and clients with the changes occurring, and generate metrics that might support funding requests.

10


BUILDING INFRASTRUCTURE Energy and ventilation analysis and strategy – Energy and indoor air quality are key components of a successful environmental sustainability strategy with profound human health and economic impacts. They are related to issues of thermal comfort, appropriate ventilation, adequate air movement and costs associated with inefficient systems. From reducing the potential of disease susceptibility or transmission to generating more money for programming through reductions in energy costs, implementing responsive strategies can have significant benefits. The strategies presented are specific to Clinicas La Paz and El Alto, but the general themes can be applied to other clinics. At the most intensive level, wholesale retrofit may be needed in some cases to fully correct the problem. At a more practical level, several strategies can be implemented through a phased approach, either as incremental steps to a full remedy or as prototypes to test for total implementation. Some of the corrective measures proposed include insulating exterior walls (currently there is none) to reduce heat loss, developing a manual alert system for opening windows to improve air quality, purchasing portable fume hoods for the laboratories to increase ventilation, and installing aftermarket film on the windows to reduce solar glare. Suggestions for appropriate testing needed to determine the scale of retrofit is also provided.

Environmental building materials – Building materials can have negative impacts on the environment in many ways: 1) Depletion and contamination of natural resources; 2) Effects of landfilled demolition and construction waste, which can lead to the leaking of contaminants and toxins; 3) Water used to manufacture, convey and install materials; 4) Energy used to manufacture, convey and install materials; and 5) Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and human health effects from VOC (volatile organic compounds) emissions such as off-gassing. The recommendations presented include suggested characteristics of sustainable materials, an Environmental Preferable Purchasing Policy to manage the selection of sustainable materials, and preferred standards for sustainable manufacturers.

Heat island effect – The term “heat island” refers to the difference in temperature between urban and rural areas as a result of the absorption of solar energy on

built surfaces. Higher temperatures on such surfaces are often due to decreased vegetation and an increase in the amount of developed land. These “islands of heat” contribute to 1) increased energy consumption because of the need to cool indoor spaces, 2) increased air pollution from the need to generate energy, 3) negative impacts to human health and thermal comfort, and 4) bad water quality from the transfer of excess heat to aquatic ecosystems. Some key strategies in addressing the heat island effect are using roofing and paving materials with high reflectance properties andplanting vegetation as ground and roof cover.

Maximizing green/open space – Various studies have demonstrated the therapeutic and stress reduction effects of natural elements. Taking advantage of exterior opportunities for landscaping can significantly contribute to the well being of the clinics’ staff and patients. The assessment team found that previous attempts have met with mixed success, but the strategies and plant suggestions presented as part of this report have been specifically chosen for the particular climate conditions of La Paz and El Alto (subtropical highland). While suggestions are specific to this climate, the overall recommendation for increasing landscaping and the general sensibilities should be considered for all of CIES’ clinics. Recommendations have also been made as to the best time to plant as well as appropriate locations to plant, including courtyards, interior light wells, and the roof. Beyond the environmental benefits, the gardens can bridge other goals of CIES. Engaging youth as stewards and implementing healing gardens and sustainable food production are potentially highly synergistic opportunities.

PBT reduction in building materials – Persistent BioaccumulativeToxins (PBTs) are toxic chemicals that do not break down easily, that accumulate and concentrate in the body as they move up the food chain. They contribute to endocrine disruption, immune system disorders, cancer, reproductive disorders and damaged neurological development. The goal for this strategy is to reduce and phase out PBTs from the clinic’s building materials. Some of the most common PBTs include dioxin (byproducts of manufacturing some plastics such as PVCs), heavy metals such lead, formaldehyde, and flame retardants. Ways to reduce PBTs in building materials include using paints that don’t contain any heavy metals or VOCs; eliminate use of vinyl in wall, ceiling, or flooring applications; and adopting the precautionary materials list developed by the U.S. based architecture firm Perkins+Will. 11


Water use efficiency – Among the challenges faced by water conservationists in Bolivia are the numerous infrastructure difficulties, sewage conveyance, point of entry into receiving streams and rivers, contamination of sources of drinking water and climate change impacts. For this reason it makes sense for buildings, especially those (like hospitals) with high water use to conserve water to the maximum extent possible. It is suggested that CIES should aspire to reduce potable water use by 10% by the year 2012 in all existing clinics and by 40% in new clinics. Water efficiency can be achieved by developing a phase out plan for all high water use plumbing fixtures, developing a specifications and procurement plan for efficient plumbing fixtures, installing water aerators, and erecting informational signage for staff and clients. For future clinics, strategies around water capture and reuse should be considered.

Roadmap for green clinic building – Incorporating environmental sustainability into a clinic doesn’t have to be about strategies or systems implemented after a facility is built. Green building principles can be integrated into the design and construction of any new or renovated facility. Designing a sustainable clinic building must consider several variables: site conditions, building orientation, building and site size, climate, solar access, proximity of natural resources, energy and air quality goals, potential for passive heating and cooling, construction type and human factors. For maximum impact, these issues should be thought about early. Some green strategies may necessitate significant upfront costs, but could result in significant operational savings and improved human well-being over the life of the building. Green buildings are high performance buildings and “living machines;” they occupy a small environmental footprint, live in harmony with their surroundings, harvest energy from the sun and wind, use natural resources responsibly, mitigate carbon emissions and reduce operational costs.

OPERATIONS Chemical management strategy – In clinics and hospitals, health care workers, staff, patients and clinic visitors are at risk of exposure to a variety of hazardous chemicals. These exposures can include airborne pathogens, indoor particulates, off-gassing from building materials and hospital waste, stored chemicals, cleaning materials and pharmaceuticals. Doctors and nurses are even more at risk to these exposures because of the time spent handling pharmaceuticals as well as plastics and heavy metals in medical devices and equipment. Indoor air quality specialists agree that chronic, repeated exposure to hazardous chemicals of concern can cause the greatest harm. If a clinic has inadequate ventilation (the supply, circulation and exhaust of outside air), there is even more risk of harm. The list of recommendations include developing and Environmental Preferable Purchasing Policy, setting a mercury elimination goal, properly storing contaminants and chemicals, and restricting areas in which smoking is allowed.

Environmentally Preferable Purchasing – An Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) Program is an institutional policy initiative which adds environmental considerations to purchasing decisions. This is in addition to traditional factors such as performance, price, health, and safety. The benefits of such a program are that it can help an organization achieve its environmental goals, improve staff and client health, and increase the amount of sustainable products on the market by increasing demand. And at a broader level, more sustainable products can reduce the amount of energy consumed and greenhouse gases emitted in the production of non-green products. The first step is to establish a “green team” consisting of representatives from various departments. Together, they can establish goals and develop a responsive plan for implementation. Implementation can be done on a pilot basis, allowing for an ability to study metrics and make adjustments as needed.

Green cleaning guidelines – There is growing importance of infection prevention and control due in part to rapidly developing strains of multi-drug resistant organisms that can negatively impact staff and patients. The potential harm caused by cleaning can be attributed to various things, including the chemical characteristics of the cleaning product, the physical characteristics (aerosols vs. liquids),

12


the characteristics of cleaning tasks (spraying vs. mopping), the cleaning procedures of the staff (e.g., changing uniforms depending on cleaning task), and the characteristics of the built environment (e.g., ventilation). Thus, a comprehensive green cleaning strategy requires addressing both the cleaning products and the overall cleaning system. Guidelines should include an environmental preferable purchasing policy, strategies around cleaning practices, and spatial configurations that can support such practices.

Mercury reduction plan – Mercury is a toxic metal, in both organic and inorganic forms, able to migrate through soil, air and water as well asbio-accumulate in the body. Mercury is pervasive in a hospital setting: medical instruments, clinical laboratory chemicals, electrical equipment and cleaning solutions. Incineration, landfilling, autoclaving and accidental spills release of mercury into the environment are all potential hazards. Development and implementation of “Best Management Practices” (BMPs) are the best way to control these releases. Suggestions and resources for BMPs have been included in this report. In addition, it is recommended that a mercury reduction plan be created and implemented on a phased basis. Sustainable food program – Because of size and purchasing power, health systems can provide leadership by adopting food purchasing policies and practices that more positively support the entire food system. An institution can establish food purchasing guidelines that reflect its values and desired goals. Target goals that are realistic as well as geographic area should be considered. From eliminating food with synthetic or non-therapeutic hormones to food gardens and farmers markets, a sustainable food program can provide access to healthier food that promotes wellness among patients, visitors and staff. Buying food produced in ways that are ecologically sound, economically viable, and socially responsible also supports a food system that ultimately benefits healthier individuals and communities.

INTEGRATED PROGRAMMING Green education program – In the 2009 joint report “Healthy Hospital, Healthy Planet, Healthy People,” the WHO and NGO Healthcare Without Harm wrote that the “health sector can play a key role in helping societies adapt to the effects of climate change and the risk it poses to human health.” CIES can serve as a steward on this issue by looking beyond just “greening” its operations and facilities. Sustainable facilities are not just about the latest technology or material. Human behavior is often key to making such features truly work. Educating staff and patients alike about green practices can solve the implementation gap. Opportunities to do so include signage, brochures, presentations, and tours. CIES can also help to build awareness among the larger Bolivian healthcare, design, and government communities. By building a greater foundation of understanding and know how about sustainability within and beyond the organization, CIES will in turn be increasing its own capacity to achieve a healthy and sustainable future.

I mplications of sustainability recommendations to projects and programs – CIES can serve as a leader on this issue by not only “greening” its operations and facilities, but also taking advantage of its existing project and programmatic infrastructure to fully integrate sustainability practices. Specifically, CIES could identify areas of environmental sustainability that are cross-cutting or strengthen its projects and programs, such as Quality of Care, Youth programming, Education, and Sustainability. In doing so, CIES can use existing infrastructure and expertise to advance new issue areas and strengthen its existing work through new synergies. It should be noted that some strategies will make sense as standalone strategies. It is also important to incorporate Monitoring and Evaluation, including targets and indicators, as part of this process.

Organization‐wide environmental policy – An environmental policy is intended to guide the development of specific policies for key sustainability goals such as reduction of energy and water use, better indoor air quality and appropriate waste and chemical management. The benchmarks provided for the new procedures and practices aligned with these goals should have an environmental and human health focus. A good

13


environmental policy will contain a justification for the policy, a description of those affected by the policy, a discussion as to how the policy is to be implemented and by whom, and a set of guiding principles. The policy should apply to the clinic directors, healthcare workers, lab technicians, facilities and cleaning personnel and clinic patients. To be truly effective, the policy should be more than a statement of intent; it must be supported by practical implementation programs.

NEXT STEPS It is envisioned that the analysis, opportunities, and key recommendations included in this assessment report will provide a framework for CIES to advance in the strategic area of environmental sustainability. Based on the key findings, it is evident that the outcomes related to advancing environmental sustainability often overlap with current institutional or programmatic objectives (i.e., financial sustainability, quality of care) and therefore can serve to further leverage those existing priorities. There are several ways in which CIES can move forward in actualizing this sustainability framework. The first, which CIES has already begun, is to share the report among staff. As noted earlier, adoption is one of the biggest keys to making sustainability work. CIES has shared the report with senior staff and in the coming months will be disseminating the findings more widely among the overall staff. It is recommended that such an effort happen in parallel with the development of the “green team.” Another step in advancing this framework is to develop a workplan for implementation that contains both short and long term tasks and goals. Many of the recommendations in the report were framed to provide guidance in this area. CIES has already begun implementation of “low hanging fruit,” such as water use reduction and phasing out mercury bulbs. Additionally, the development of this report occurred concurrent with the development of CIES’ five year strategic plan. This report is serving as a key reference point for the plan, helping to highlight important cross cutting strategies that can be institutionalized. Inherent in this project is the goal to build local capacity within the design sectors to understand and address issues of environmental sustainability. Expanding such capacity not only provides CIES with greater local support as it moves towards long term sustainability, but also has positive implications on design projects throughout the country. During the team’s investigation, initial meetings were held with local technical resources such as H2O Arquitectura and Green Cross Bolivia. We were accompanied to these meetings by Fernando Patino, National Infrastructure Manager for CIES. Although no green building organization exist within Bolivia, we have made contact with representatives of such

14


organizations in Argentina, Chile, and Brazil. The team is aware of the variability in local context(s). However, these organizations have expressed willingness to be a resource, as relevant and to the extent that their experiences translate to the Bolivian context. Advancing these conversations can happen concurrently with other efforts laid out in the report. Where possible, these networks can also help accomplish some of the identified project goals. Finally, the resource team that led the development of this report can continue to be utilized in support of the implementation process. As CIES moves forward, the team can assist with refining the sustainability framework, identifying and strategizing around particular technical resources, and evaluating efficacy of strategies implemented. In the short term, this has occurred in the form of conversations with CIES Executive Director Dr. Lopez and his team around clarifying components of the report. However, this process can be formalized in the form of discreet projects or ongoing consultancy.

15


CONCLUSION “Climate change is not just an ‘environmental’ issue. It requires collective action that brings together sustainable development, energy security, and actions to safeguard health and well-being.” (UNICEF, 2011). Heightened global conversations about climate change preparedness, rising energy costs, and donor demands present challenges as well opportunities for a response from the SRH community at large with respect to environmental sustainability. In addition to outlining concrete strategies that can advance environmental sustainability for CIES, the proposed framework serves as an example of how SRH organizations can begin taking steps towards articulating and advancing sustainability strategically within their networks. More specifically, it provides essential components of an analytic model and useful tools for programming and decision-making that can be modified to help other SRH organizations strengthen existing objectives around institutional sustainability and quality of care, as well as position SRH organizations as important partners in the systemic shift towards fostering healthier environments. With over 58,000 clinical sites – many of which are IPPF/MA (Member Association) owned and/or built and most of which are MA operated – IPPF can be a significant leader in this arena. IPPF can make important and strategic decisions that leverage environmental sustainability as a tool to not only improve its physical infrastructure, but in so doing, strengthen its capacity to improve long term health outcomes. These recommendations can be a useful initial step in a strategic response to that call to action.

16


UNICEF, 2011

PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE WWW.PUBLICARCHITECTURE.ORG SIMON & ASSOCIATES WWW.GREENBUILD.COM

“CLIMATE CHANGE IS NOT JUST AN ‘ENVIRONMENTAL’ ISSUE. IT REQUIRES COLLECTIVE ACTION THAT BRINGS TOGETHER SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, ENERGY SECURITY, AND ACTIONS TO SAFEGUARD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING ” NEW YORK

SAN FRANCISCO

HEALTHxDESIGN WWW.HEALTHXDESIGN.ORG NEW YORK


CIES Encabezada por el Director Ejecutivo Dr. Jhonny López Gallardo, el CIES Salud Sexual y Reproductiva es una Asociación Miembro de Asociación Internacional de Planificación de la Familia. Una  institución privada sin fines de lucro que trabaja desde hace 23 años aportando a mejorar la salud y educación de la población boliviana a través de servicios médicos y educativos especializados en Salud Sexual y Reproductiva. Public Architecture Text Simon & Associates Text HealthxDesign HealthxDesign (Salud por Diseno), es una iniciativa del Instituto de Salud Publica.  Iniciada por Rupal Sanghvi, quien esta desarollando y evaluando intervenciones por quince anos.  HealthxDesign esta expolrando el rol de diseno, incluso diseno urbano, de infraestructura tanto como servicios, para mejorar resultados de salud.

CIES WWW.CIES.ORG.BO PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE WWW.PUBLICARCHITECTURE.ORG SIMON & ASSOCIATES WWW.GREENBUILD.COM HEALTHxDESIGN WWW.HEALTHXDESIGN.ORG


EVALUACION AMBIENTAL DE SOSTENIBILIDAD Y PAUTAS

RESUMEN EJECUTIVO

OBJETIVOS METODOLOGÍA RECOMENDACIONES CLAVE INFRAESTRUCTURA EDIFICADA Análisis y estrategias energía y ventilación Materiales de construcción ambientales Efecto isla de calor Maximización de los espacios verdes/abiertos Reducción de las TPBs en los materiales de construcción Utilización eficiente del agua Hoja de ruta para el diseño de construcción de una clínica verde

OPERACIONES Estrategia de gestión de las sustancias químicas Política de compras de productos ambientalmente preferibles Pautas de limpieza verde Plan de reducción del mercurio Programa de alimentación sostenible

PROGRAMACIÓN INTEGRADA Programa educativo sobre sostenibilidad Implicaciones de las recomendaciones de sostenibilidad para proyectos y programas Política ambiental en toda la organización

PASOS SIGUIENTES CONCLUSIÓN


La sostenibilidad ambiental, por su estrecha relación con la salud pública, representa un tema emergente importante en el desarrollo global. El ámbito de impacto va desde la escala de sistemas hasta el individuo. Por ejemplo, el hecho de que en Brasil los hospitales dan cuenta de más del 10% del consumo de la energía comercial total del país revela la significante huella climática del sector sanitario.1 Al otro lado del espectro, ciertos factores ambientales también están relacionados con daños a la salud humana. La US EPA (Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE. UU.) ha informado de que los niveles de contaminantes del aire interno pueden ser entre dos y cinco (a veces hasta cien) veces más altos que los del aire externo. Una baja calidad de aire interno ha sido relacionada con efectos adversos sobre la salud, como el asma y otras enfermedades respiratorias. 2 Estas y otras relaciones y prioridades han sido articuladas en conferencias internacionales sobre cambio climático, en los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio , la Carta de la Tierra y, más recientemente, en un diálogo renovado sobre la población y el medioambiente.3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11

la salud humana y el medioambiente, y reforzar la sostenibilidad institucional y la calidad de la atención sanitaria dentro del servicio de Salud Sexual y Reproductiva. La alta dependencia en un rendimiento adecuado de la infraestructura y la construcción para alcanzar sus fines, así como los costes de alta energía concomitantes, hacen de la sostenibilidad ambiental una importante área estratégica para una organización de Salud Sexual y Reproductiva. En Bolivia, en concierto con las proposiciones globales, existe el dinamismo de base, a nivel local como nacional, que reconoce la importancia de abordar la sostenibilidad ambiental. Por ejemplo, la Constitución Boliviana ahora incluye a “Pachaama” (la Madre Tierra), que es la cuidadora de la tierra y de todo lo que en ella crece o vive. Tal legislación subraya el creciente interés de la administración boliviana por el medioambiente. Dada la importancia de Pachaama en la cultura andina en general, esta visión más amplia de interconectibilidad podría tener gran relevancia a nivel regional3.

Dentro de este contexto político, las implicaciones, oportunidades y recomendaciones/guías para operacionalizar los principios clave de sostenibilidad ambiental para las organizaciones de salud sexual y reproductiva permanecen relativamente inexploradas. Más específicamente, todavía no se han formulado modelos que articulen una guía estratégica para optimizar la sostenibilidad ambiental a fin de proteger 21


1

 ealthcare Without Harm, WHO. Healthy Hospitals, Healthy H Planet, Healthy People. Available from http://www.noharm.org/ lib/downloads/climate/Healthy_Hosp_Planet_Peop.pdf

2

 S EPA, IAQ Tools for Schools, Available from http://www.epa. U gov/iaq/schools/media.html#IAQ%20and%20Student%20 Performance

3

 Change. 2007: The physical science basis: summary for poliC cymakers. Geneva: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change secretariat; 2007

4

J A Patz, D Campbell-Lendrum, T Holloway, JA Foley. Impact of regional climate change on human health. Nature 2005; 438: 310-7

5

 UN Annan. Secretary-general’s address to the 2006 UN Climate K Change Conference. Nairobi, 2006. Available from: http://www. un.org/News/Press/docs/2006/sgsm10739.doc.htm

6

 arth Charter Initiative. The Earth Charter. Available from http:// E www.earthcharterinaction.org/invent/images/uploads/eCharter_english.pdf

7

 Ezzati, A Lopez, A Rodgers, C Murray. editors. Comparative M quantification of health risks: global and regional burden of disease due to selected major risk factors. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2004

8

 K Treasury. Stern review on the economics of climate change. U London: UK Treasury; 2006. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Ecosystems and human well-being: health synthesis. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2005

9

 Prüss-Üstün, C Corvalán. Preventing disease through healthy A environments: Towards an estimate of the environmental burden of disease. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2006

10 A  J McMichael. Population health as the ‘bottom line’ of sustainability: a contemporary challenge for public health researchers. Eur J Public Health 2006; 16: 579-81 11 M  Chan. WHO director-general elect’s speech to the World Health Assembly. Geneva, 2006. Available from: http://www.who.int/dg/ speeches/2006/wha/en/index.htmlfrom: http://www.who.int/ globalchange/climate/en/


OBJETIVOS

METODOLOGÍA

Durante el otoño de 2010 hasta finales de la primavera de 2011, la filial boliviana de International Planned Parenthood Federation, esto es, el Centro de Investigación, Educación y Servicios (CIES), desarrollará su nuevo plan estratégico. La sostenibilidad ambiental será parte integral de ese plan. En un esfuerzo por definir oportunidades concretas para el avance de su infraestructura en el área de la sostenibilidad ambiental, CIES contrato a Public Architecture en colaboración con HealthxDesign (Salud por Diseño).  Adicionalmente, los consultores de la firma Simon y Associates eran incluidos para completar el equipo central.  Juntos, se llevaron acabo una evaluación que identifique oportunidades y recomendaciones para (1) identificar y reducir los impactos ambientales negativos de las instalaciones de CIES; y (2) identificar cuestiones de factor humano relacionadas con el apoyo a la sostenibilidad ambiental de la infraestructura.

La sostenibilidad, particularmente dentro del contexto del “diseño saludable,” toca múltiples sectores, entre ellos la salud, el medioambiente, el ámbito social y la economía. Por ello, cualquier estrategia de evaluación de situaciones y desarrollo de soluciones debe estar posicionada en un amplio contexto de comprensión y exploración. Con el propósito de desarrollar un plan robusto pero flexible para CIES y su capacidad de tomar decisiones relacionadas con la sostenibilidad, Public Architecture consultó dentro de su amplia red de profesionales a expertos en sostenibilidad, asistencia sanitaria, arquitectura paisajista y salud pública. El equipo de expertos contribuyó —esencialmente gratis— al proyecto, en distintos grados durante las distintas fases. En la medida de lo posible se emplearon expertos locales, particularmente dentro de la comunidad del diseño. Los expertos consultados como parte de este proyecto incluyen: ––   Anshen + Allen | Stantec ––   Cruz Verde (Bolivia) ––   Guttman & Blaevoet Consulting Engineers ––   H2O Arquitectura (Bolivia) ––   Inside Matters ––   Integral Group ––   Perkins + Will ––   PG&E Energy Center ––   Society of Bolivian Architects ––   US Green Building Council El proyecto se desarrolló en cinco fases: (1) Desarrollo de las estrategias de evaluación e investigación preliminar de las principales barreras para desarrollar un “diseño saludable;” (2) Evaluación in situ durante una semana, con visitas a las clínicas de La Paz y El Alto, entrevistas con el personal organizativo y clínico de CIES, y reuniones con colaboradores y donantes potenciales; (3) Agrupación de los datos obtenidos en dos categorías, “fáciles” y “que requieren un análisis más profundo;” (4) Contratación de los expertos pertinentes para explorar los temas “que requieren un análisis más profundo”; y (5) Desarrollo de un informe sobre una estructura de sostenibilidad. Sinopsis del marco de sostenibilidad propuesto El informe analiza y propone recomendaciones sobre cuestiones específicas que el equipo identificó durante la investigación y el desarrollo. Se puede proporcionar una visión global clave sobre cómo comprender las estrategias propuestas.

23


Tipo de edificación como condicionante del resultado Para entender el análisis y evaluar la escala potencial de los cambios necesarios, es importante clasificar las instalaciones de CIES en tres categorías: La de las Existentes viejas (edificadas hace muchos años), la de las Existentes recientes (edificadas hace un año o dos), y la de las Futuras (instalaciones que se edificarán en el futuro). La clínica El Alto se consideraría edificación Existente vieja. La Clínica La Paz sería una edificación Existente reciente. Estas dos instalaciones constituyeron el foco de la investigación del equipo, pero las soluciones propuestas pueden a menudo aplicarse más ampliamente dentro de estas clasificaciones.

Soluciones prototipo El proceso de convertirse en una organización más sostenible en forma y en función no ocurrirá de un día para otro. A medida que CIES avance en la incorporación de esta estructura a su plan estratégico, podrá examinar algunas de las estrategias propuestas en etapas y prototipos. Realizar cambios a nivel de una habitación, o serie de habitaciones, puede proporcionar la oportunidad de examinar varias estrategias de implementación, ayudar a que tanto el personal como los clientes se sientan cómodos con los cambios llevados a cabo y generar resultados cuantificables que podrían utilizarse como apoyo en las solicitudes de fondos.

I ntegración de la tecnología, las herramientas y los usuarios. Junto con los filtros sugeridos anteriormente debiera existir una matriz de implementación. En las instalaciones Existentes viejas, habrá probablemente un coste significativo asociado con la implementación de la tecnología necesaria para que la instalación cumpla con los requisitos de sostenibilidad. En esos casos, puede resultar necesario hacer los cambios durante un largo período de tiempo . Entretanto, se pueden utilizar herramientas y personas para llenar el hueco. Por ejemplo, hasta que el sistema de ventilación de la clínica El Alto se haya actualizado del todo, se puede instaurar una política formal para que el personal ventile el espacio manualmente. En las instalaciones Existentes recientes y en las Futuras se podrá confiar más en los sistemas tecnológicos, pese a que la neesidad de herramientas y usuarios no se eliminará nunca completamente. Capitalizar las sinergías Muchas de las estrategias propuestas se solapan unas con otras, así que en lugar de verlas como medidas distintas a implementar, se intentará utilizar su potencial compartido. Es más, la evaluación in situ reveló que existen ya estructuras a las que estas estrategias pueden integrarse fácilmente, como las Pautas para una asistencia de calidad de CIES. Las prácticas de sostenibilidad recomendadas no requieren el desarrollo de una nueva estructura.

24


RECOMENDACIONES CLAVE

INFRAESTRUCTURA EDIFICADA

Las recomendaciones esbozadas en este informe no pretenden ser estrategias preceptivas. Debieran, por el contrario, considerarse como un instrumento guía en la toma de decisiones de la institución. Las recomendaciones son de tres categorías: consideraciones físicas relacionadas con la infraestructura del edificio, estrategias operativas que requieren decisiones institucionales y procesos previos, y sugerencias programáticas que debieran integrarse dentro de los marcos de programas existentes. Todas las recomendaciones están basadas en el entendimiento de su relación con los objetivos de la salud pública general, en los procesos de implementación potenciales, en la facilidad o dificultad de actualización, y en precedentes relevantes y recursos. Además de una serie de recomendaciones detalladas, el informe incluye un sólido apéndice. Éste, organizado también en tres categorías, incluye información que va desde páginas web informativas hasta whitepapers de contenido específico.

Análisis y estrategia de energía y ventilación –

Dentro de estas tres categorías de recomendaciones, la evaluación identificó y desarrolló estrategias y planes para las siguientes oportunidades:

La energía y la calidad del aire interior son componentes clave de una estrategia exitosa de sostenibilidad ambiental con un impacto profundo en la salud humana y en la economía. Están relacionadas con cuestiones de confort térmico, con una ventilación apropiada, con un movimiento adecuado del aire y con los costes asociados a sistemas ineficientes. La puesta en práctica de estrategias responsables puede generar beneficios considerables, desde la reducción de susceptibilidad a ciertas enfermedades o a su transmisión hasta la generación de más dinero para programación gracias a las reducciones de costes energéticos. Las estrategias presentadas son específicas para la Clínica de La Paz y la de El Alto, pero los temas generales pueden aplicarse a otras clínicas. En algunos casos, puede necesitarse una modernización integral para corregir el problema del todo. A un nivel más práctico, se pueden aplicar varias estrategias por etapas, ya sea como pasos incrementales hacia un remedio completo o como prototipos para poner a prueba una implementación completa. Algunas de las medidas correctoras propuestas incluyen el aislamiento de paredes exteriores (actualmente no existe ninguno) para reducir la pérdida de calor, el desarrollo de un sistema manual de alerta para abrir ventanas y mejorar así la calidad del aire, la compra de extractores portátiles para los laboratorios afin de aumentar la ventilación, y la instalación de una lámina reflectante en las ventanas para reducir el resplandor del sol. Se proporcionan también sugerencias de pruebas necesarias apropiadas para determinar la magnitud de la modernización necesaria.

Materiales de construcción ambientales – Los materiales de construcción pueden tener impactos negativos en el medioambiente de muchas maneras: 1) Agotamiento y contaminación de los recursos naturales; 2) Efectos de los vertederos de demolición de edificios y de desechos de la construcción, que pueden llevar a la filtración de sustancias contaminantes y tóxicas; 3) Agua utilizada para la fabricación, el transporte y la instalación de materiales; 4) Energía utilizada para la fabricación, el transporte y la instalación de materiales; y 5) Calidad del aire interior y efectos de las emisiones de COVs (compuestos orgánicos volátiles) sobre la salud humana. Las recomendaciones

25


presentadas incluyen sugerencias sobre las características de los materiales sostenibles, una política de compras de productos ambientalmente preferibles para gestionar la selección de materiales sostenibles y los estándares preferidos para seleccionar los fabricantes de esos materiales.

 educción de las TPBs en los materiales de R construcción – Las sustancias tóxicas, persistentes

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT &sustancias GUIDELINES y bioacumulativas (TPBs) son químicas

Efecto isla de calor – El término “isla de calor” hace referencia a la diferencia de temperatura entre las zonas rurales y urbanas como resultado de la absorción de energía solar en las superficies construidas. El aumento de temperatura en esas superficies suele deberse a la disminución de la vegetación y al aumento de suelo construido. Esas “islas de calor” contribuyen 1) a un mayor consumo de energía debido a la necesidad de enfriar los espacios interiores, 2) a una mayor contaminación del aire debido a la necesidad de generar energía, 3) a impactos negativos sobre la salud humana y el confort térmico y 4) a una mala calidad del agua debido a la transferencia del exceso de calor a los ecosistemas acuáticos. Para tratar el efecto de isla de calor, algunas estrategias clave son la utilización de materiales para techar y pavimentar con propiedades altamente reflectantes y el recubrimiento del suelo y los tejados con vegetación.

Maximización de los espacios verdes/abiertos – Los efectos terapéuticos y de reducción de estrés de los elementos naturales han sido probados en varios estudios. El aprovechamiento de las oportunidades exteriores para ajardinar puede contribuir de manera significativa al bienestar del personal y de los pacientes de la clínica. El equipo de evaluación encontró que varios intentos anteriores habían alcanzado solamente un éxito relativo, sin embargo las estrategias y las sugerencias de plantas presentadas como parte de este informe han sido seleccionadas específicamente para las condiciones climáticas de La Paz y El Alto (tierras altas subtropicales). Pese a que las sugerencias son específicas para este clima, la recomendación general de aumentar las superficies ajardinadas debiera considerarse para todas las clínicas de CIES. Asimismo, se han hecho recomendaciones sobre la mejor época para plantar y los mejores lugares en los que plantar, entre ellos patios, tragaluces interiores y tejados. Además de aportar beneficios ambientales, los jardines pueden ayudar a CIES a alcanzar otras de sus metas, puesto que emplear a la juventud y poner en práctica el desarrollo de jardines curativos y la producción de una alimentación sostenible son oportunidades de gran potencial sinérgico.

tóxicas que no se descomponen fácilmente, y que se acumulan y concentran en el cuerpo a medida que suben por la cadena alimentaria. Contribuyen a desarreglos endocrinos, a afecciones del sistema inmunitario, al cáncer, a problemas reproductivos y a un desarrollo neurológico dañado. El propósito de esta estrategia es reducir y eliminar las TPBs de los materiales de construcción de la clínica. Entre las TPBs más comunes se encuentran: la dioxina (subproducto de la fabricación de algunos plásticos, como el PVC), los metales pesados como el plomo, el formaldehído y los retardadores de llama. Se puede reducir las TPBs en los materiales de construcción de varias maneras: utilizando pinturas que no contengan metales pesados o COVs, eliminando el uso de aplicaciones de vinilo en las paredes, el techo o el piso, y adoptando la lista de materiales de precaución desarrollada por la firma de arquitectura estadounidense Perkins+Will.

Utilización eficiente del agua – En Bolivia, los conservadores de agua se enfrentan a numerosas dificultades en la infraestructura, la conducción de aguas residuales, los puntos de entrada a arroyos y ríos, la contaminación de fuentes de agua potable y los impactos del cambio climático. Por ese motivo, es importante que los edificios (como los hospitales) con un alto consumo de agua conserven agua al máximo. Se sugiere que CIES reduzca el consumo de agua potable en un 10% antes del año 2012 en todas las clínicas existentes y en un 40% en las nuevas clínicas. Puede conseguirse un consumo de agua eficiente eliminando progresivamente todos los elementos del sistema de plomería con un alto consumo de agua, desarrollando un plan de especificaciones y de adquisición de accesorios de plomería eficientes, e instalando aireadores de agua y un sistema de señalización informativa para el personal y los clientes. Para futuras clínicas, se considerarán estrategias de captación y reutilización de agua.

Hoja de ruta para la construcción de clínicas sostenibles – La sostenibilidad ambiental de una clínica no tiene porqué depender de estrategias o sistemas implementados tras su construcción. Se pueden integrar principios de construcción sostenible en el diseño y la construcción de cualquier instalación nueva o en vías de renovación. El diseño de una instalación clínica sostenible debe considerar diversas variables: las condiciones del lugar, la orientación del

26


edificio, el tamaño de éste y de la parcela en que será edificado, el clima, el acceso al solar, la proximidad de recursos naturales, los objetivos energéticos y de calidad del aire, el potencial de calefacción y refrigeración pasivas, el tipo de construcción y los factores humanos. Para obtener un mayor impacto, esas cuestiones debieran considerarse pronto. Algunas estrategias sostenibles pueden conllevar costes iniciales considerables, pero proporcionar ahorros operacionales significativos y una mejora del bienestar humano durante la vida del edificio. Los edificios sostenibles tienen un alto rendimiento y son “máquinas vivientes;” su huella ambiental es muy pequeña, viven en harmonía con su entorno, obtienen energía del sol y del viento, utilizan recursos naturales de manera responsable, atenúan las emisiones de carbono y reducen los costes operativos.

OPERACIONES Estrategia de gestión de las sustancias químicas – En clínicas y hospitales, los trabajadores de la salud, el personal, los pacientes y los visitantes de éstos se encuentran en peligro de exposición a una variedad de sustancias químicas peligrosas. Éstas pueden incluir elementos patógenos del aire, partículas del aire interior, liberación de gases de los materiales de construcción y de los desechos hospitalarios, productos químicos almacenados, materiales de limpieza y fármacos. Los médicos y las enfermeras sufren un riesgo mayor debido al tiempo que pasan manejando fármacos, así como plásticos y metales pesados en aparatos y equipos médicos. Los especialistas en calidad del aire interior concuerdan en que una exposición crónica y repetida a sustancias químicas peligrosas puede ser lo más peligroso. Si una clínica tiene una ventilación inadecuada (suministro, circulación y gases de combustión del aire exterior), el riesgo de daño es incluso mayor. La lista de recomendaciones incluye el desarrollo de una política de compras de productos ambientalmente preferibles, la instauración de un proceso de eliminación del mercurio, el almacenamiento adecuado de los productos contaminantes y de las sustancias químicas, y las zonas restringidas para fumadores.

Política de compras de productos ambientalmente preferibles – Un Programa de compras de productos ambientalmente preferibles es una iniciativa política institucional que añade consideraciones ambientales a las decisiones de compras. Estas consideraciones se suman a los factores tradicionales tales como el rendimiento, el precio, la salud y la seguridad. Un programa de esta índole puede ayudar a una organización a alcanzar sus metas ambientales, mejorar la salud del personal y de los clientes, y aumentar la cantidad de productos sostenibles en el mercado al aumentar la demanda. Además a un nivel más general, un mayor número de productos sostenibles puede ayudar a reducir la cantidad de energía consumida, así como la cantidad de gases invernadero emitidos en la producción de productos no-verdes. El primer paso es constituir un “equipo verde” que incluya a representantes de varios departamentos. Juntos, podrán establecer objetivos y desarrollar un plan de implementación adecuado. La implementación podrá realizarse con un programa piloto que permita estudiar los parámetros de evaluación cuantitativos obtenidos y hacer los ajustes necesarios. Pautas de limpieza verde – Está aumentando la importancia de la prevención y control de infecciones debidas

27


PROGRAMACIÓN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT & GUIDELINES INTEGRADA en parte a cepas de organismos resistentes a múltiples fármacos y que pueden afectar negativamente tanto al personal como a los pacientes. El posible daño causado por la limpieza puede ser atribuido a varias causas, entre ellas las características químicas del producto de limpieza, sus características físicas (aerosol o líquido), las características de las tareas de limpieza (con espray o mopa), los procedimientos de limpieza del personal (por ej. el cambio de uniformes en función de la tarea de limpieza), y las características del edificio (por ej. la ventilación). Por todo ello, una estrategia global de limpieza verde requiere abordar tanto los productos de limpieza como el sistema de limpieza en general. Las pautas deberán incluir una política de compras de productos ambientalmente preferibles, estrategias de prácticas de limpieza, y configuraciones espaciales que puedan apoyar tales prácticas.

Plan de reducción del mercurio – El mercurio es un metal tóxico, tanto en su forma orgánica como inorgánica, capaz de migrar a través del suelo, del aire y del agua y de bio-acumularse en el cuerpo. En un hospital, el mercurio es omnipresente: se encuentra en instrumentos médicos, en sustancias químicas de laboratorio, en equipo eléctrico y en soluciones de limpieza. La incineración, el desecho, el autoclavado y los vertidos accidentales son todos ellos riesgos potenciales de introducción de mercurio en el ambiente. El desarrollo y la puesta en práctica de “Mejores prácticas de gestión” (MPGs) son la mejor manera de controlar esos vertidos indeseados. Este informe incluye sugerencias y recursos de MPGs. Además, se recomienda establecer un plan de reducción de mercurio e implementarlo en fases.

Programa de alimentación sostenible – Dado su tamaño y su poder adquisitivo, los sistemas de salud pueden llevar todo el sistema alimentario en direcciones más positivas adoptando políticas de compras de alimentos. Una institución puede establecer pautas de compras de alimentos que reflejen sus valores y sus resultados deseados. Las metas establecidas deberán ser realistas y se considerará la región geográfica. Un programa de alimentación sostenible que elimine los alimentos con hormonas sintéticas o no-terapéuticas y establezca huertos y mercados de agricultores puede proporcionar alimentos más sanos, que a su vez promoverán el bienestar entre pacientes, visitantes y personal. Comprar alimentos producidos de manera ecológica, económicamente viable y socialmente responsable favorece también un sistema alimentario que produce individuos y comunidades más sanos.

Programa educativo sobre sostenibilidad – En su informe conjunto de 2009, “Healthy Hospital, Healthy Planet, Healthy People”(Hospital Sano, Planeta Sano, Gente Sana) la OMS y la ONG Healthcare Without Harm escribieron que “el sector de la salud puede jugar un papel clave en la tarea de ayudar a las sociedades a adaptarse a los efectos del cambio climático y al riesgo que éste representa para la salud humana.” CIES puede actuar como modelo en este tema fijándose objetivos que vayan más allá de hacer que sus instalaciones y operaciones sean sostenibles. Los edificios sostenibles no son simplemente última tecnología y materiales. El comportamiento humano es a menudo clave a la hora de hacer que esas características funcionen de verdad. La educación del personal y de los pacientes sobre prácticas sostenibles puede salvar las dificultades de la puesta en práctica. Esa educación puede llevarse a cabo con una buena señalización, con folletos, con presentaciones y con tours. CIES puede también ayudar a desarrollar la conciencia del sistema boliviano de salud en general, de los profesionales del diseño y del gobierno. Al crear un mayor conocimiento tanto teórico como práctico sobre sostenibilidad en la organización como fuera de ella, CIES aumentará su propia capacidad para alcanzar un futuro sano y sostenible.

Implicaciones de las recomendaciones de sostenibilidad para proyectos y programas – CIES puede convertirse en líder en este tema no sólo haciendo que sus operaciones e instalaciones sean sostenibles, sino aprovechando su proyecto existente y su infraestructura proyectada para integrar prácticas sostenibles. En concreto, CIES podría identificar áreas de sostenibilidad ambiental que sean transversales o refuercen sus proyectos y programas, como la Calidad de los cuidados médicos, la Programación para la juventud, la Educación y la Sostenibilidad. Al hacerlo, CIES puede utilizar las infraestructuras existentes y la experiencia adquirida para promover nuevos temas y reforzar su trabajo actual a través de nuevas sinergias. Debe destacarse que algunas estrategias tendrán sentido por sí solas. También es importante incorporar un proceso de Seguimiento y Evaluación que incluya metas e indicadores.

28


Política ambiental en toda la organización – Una política ambiental tiene por objeto guiar el desarrollo de políticas específicas para lograr los principales objetivos de la sostenibilidad, como la reducción del consumo de energía y de agua, una mejor calidad del aire interior y del medioambiente, y una eliminación adecuada de residuos y sustancias químicas. Tal política también establecerá nuevos puntos de referencia para que los nuevos procedimientos y prácticas tengan un enfoque ambiental y de salud humana. Asimismo, la política ambiental tendrá una justificación, una descripción de aquellas personas a las que afecta, una discusión de cómo debe implementarse y por quién, y una serie de principios rectores. Se aplicará esta política a los directores de las clínicas, al personal sanitario, a los técnicos de laboratorio, al personal administrativo y al de limpieza. Para ser verdaderamente efectiva, esta política deberá ser más que una declaración de intenciones y estar apoyada por programas de aplicación práctica.

PASOS SIGUIENTES Se espera que las oportunidades, el análisis y las recomendaciones clave incluidos en este informe de evaluación proporcionen a CIES una estructura que le permita avanzar en el área estratégica de la sostenibilidad ambiental. Según los datos obtenidos, resulta evidente que los resultados relacionados con el avance de la sostenibilidad ambiental a menudo se solapan con los objetivos institucionales o programáticos actuales (por ej. sostenibilidad financiera, calidad de la asistencia médica) y por lo tanto pueden servir para consolidar las prioridades existentes. CIES puede avanzar dentro de este marco de sostenibilidad de varias maneras. Primero —algo que CIES ya ha comenzado a hacer— debe compartir el informe con el personal. Como se ha dicho anteriormente, una de las claves para que la sostenibilidad funcione es la adopción de los nuevos procedimientos por parte del personal. CIES ha compartido el informe con su personal directivo y en los próximos meses difundirá los resultados más ampliamente entre el resto del personal. Se recomienda que ese esfuerzo se lleve a cabo en paralelo con el desarrollo del “equipo verde”. Otro paso en la instauración de este marco es desarrollar un plan de trabajo que contenga tareas y metas tanto a corto como a largo plazo. Muchas de las recomendaciones del informe se hicieron de modo a proporcionar orientación en este área. CIES ha comenzado ya la aplicación de aquellas resoluciones fáciles de poner en práctica, como la reducción en el consumo de agua y la eliminación progresiva de las bombillas de mercurio. Además, el desarrollo de este informe y el plan estratégico a cinco años de CIES se llevaron a cabo simultáneamente. Este informe sirve de referencia clave para ese plan, y permitirá destacar estrategias transversales que pueden ser institucionalizadas. Inherente a este proyecto está el propósito de desarrollar capacidad local dentro de los sectores del diseño para que éstos puedan comprender y tratar las cuestiones de sostenibilidad ambiental. La expansión de esa capacidad proporcionará a CIES un mayor apoyo local a medida que avanza hacia la sostenibilidad a largo plazo, al tiempo que tendrá implicaciones positivas en proyectos de diseño por todo el país. Durante la investigación de nuestro equipo, se celebraron varias reuniones iniciales con firmas de recursos técnicos locales, como H2O Arquitectura y Cruz Verde Bolivia. En

29


esas reuniones estuvimos acompañados por Fernando Patino, Gerente de Infraestrucuta Nacional de CIES. Aunque no existe dentro de Bolivia una organización para la consturcción sostenible, hemos contactado con representantes de este tipo de organizaciones en Argentina, Chile y Brasil. El equipo es consciente de la variabilidad de contextos locales. Sin embargo, esas organizaciones han expresado su deseo de servir de fuente de recursos, con la relevancia y en la medida en que sus experiencias se traduzcan al contexto boliviano. Proseguir esas conversaciones puede hacerse al tiempo que se realizan otros esfuerzos expuestos en el informe. En la medida de lo posible, esas redes de contacto también pueden ayudar a alcanzar algunas de las metas identificadas del proyecto.

CONCLUSIÓN

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT & GUIDELINES

Por último, el equipo de recursos que desarrolló este informe puede seguir siendo utilizado como apoyo en el proceso de aplicación. A medida que CIES vaya avanzando, nuestro equipo puede ayudar a refinar el marco de sostenibilidad, identificando y formulando estrategias en torno a recursos técnicos específicos, y evaluando la eficacia de las estrategias implementadas. Hasta ahora, esto se ha realizado por medio de conversaciones informales con el Dr. López, Director Ejecutivo de CIES, y su equipo para clarificar apartados del informe. Sin embargo, ese proceso puede formalizarse y tomar la forma de pequeños proyectos o de una consultoría en curso.

“El cambio climático no es simplemente una cuestión “ambiental”. Requiere una acción colectiva del desarrollo sostenible, la seguridad energética y las acciones que salvaguarden la salud y el bienestar.” (UNICEF, 2011) La intensificación de las conversaciones globales sobre la preparación para el cambio climático, el coste cada vez más alto de la energía, y las exigencias de los donantes presentan tanto desafíos como oportunidades para una respuesta por parte de la comunidad de la Salud Sexual Reproductiva en cuanto a sostenibilidad ambiental. Además de esbozar estrategias concretas que pueden ayudar a CIES a promover la sostenibilidad ambiental, el marco propuesto constituye un ejemplo de cómo las organizaciones de Salud Sexual Reproductiva pueden comenzar a formular y promover una estrategia de sostenibilidad dentro de sus redes. Más concretamente, este marco proporciona los componentes esenciales de un modelo analítico y unas herramientas útiles para la programación y la toma de decisiones, que pueden modificarse para ayudar a otras organizaciones de Salud Sexual Reproductiva a consolidar objetivos existentes sobre sostenibilidad institucional y calidad de la atención médica. Este paso hacia la sostenibilidad posicionará a estas organizaciones como socios importantes dentro del cambio sistémico hacia ambientes más saludables. Con más de 58.000 clínicas —muchas de las cuales han sido construidas y/o son propiedad conjunta de la IPPF y de una Asociación Miembro (AM), y la mayoría de las cuales están dirigidas por la AM— la IPPF puede erigirse como líder importante en este campo. La IPPF puede tomar decisiones importantes y estratégicas que promuevan la sostenibilidad ambiental no solamente como medio para mejorar su infraestructura física, sino para aumentar su capacidad de mejorar la salud a largo plazo. Estas recomendaciones pueden constituir un primer paso útil dentro de una respuesta estratégica a esta llamada a la acción.

30


UNICEF, 2011

TRINIDAD

LA PAZ EL ALTO

COCHABAMBA ORURO

SANTA CRUZ

SUCRE

TAJIRA

CIES OFICINA NACIONAL WWW.CIES.ORG.BO

31

“EL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO NO ES SIMPLEMENTE UNA CUESTIÓN ‘AMBIENTAL.’ REQUIERE UNA ACCIÓN COLECTIVA DEL DESARROLLO SOSTENIBLE, LA SEGURIDAD ENERGÉTICA Y LAS ACCIONES QUE SALVAGUARDEN LA SALUD Y EL BIENESTAR”


ENGLISH

LA PAZ

SAN FRANCISCO

窶右SPAテ前L

Client

A collaboration by

PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE


ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT & GUIDELINES