GreenFleet 133

Page 1

ISSUe 133

www.greenfleet.net

GreenFleet DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

TRANSITIONING TO ELECTRIC POWER What to consider if you’re making the switch

PUBLIC SECTOR SPECIAL

DESTINATION NET-ZERO Advice for the public sector on EV charging infrastructure, clean air zones and grey fleet management PLUS: TYRE PERFORMANCE | ROAD TESTS | COMMERCIAL VEHICLES | LAST MILE LOGISTICS


The all-electric ID.3. It comes at little cost to you, or the planet With an exceptionally low BIK rate of 1%, the acceleration you only get from electric and a 336 mile range (WLTP),* the ID.3 is fun, but not frivolous.

To arrange a demonstration and find out more, contact the Volkswagen Business Centre on 08000 093 397.

*Range of up to 336 miles (WLTP combined) for the ID.3 Pro S (with 77 kWh net battery energy; Electricity consumption, kWh/100 km: combined 16.1-15.5; CO2 emission combined, g/km: 0; Efficiency class: A+). Range values of the series car according to WLTP may differ depending on final equipment. Figures shown are for comparability purposes and were obtained after the battery had been fully charged. Mains electricity required for charging. Only compare electric range figures with vehicles tested to the same technical procedures. Figures may not reflect real life driving results.


Comment

ISSUe 133

www.greenfleet.net

GreenFleet DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

TRANSITIONING TO ELECTRIC POWER What to consider if you’re making the switch

PUBLIC SECTOR SPECIAL

DESTINATION NET-ZERO Advice for the public sector on EV charging infrastructure, clean air zones and grey fleet management PLUS: TYRE PERFORMANCE | ROAD TESTS | COMMERCIAL VEHICLES | LAST MILE LOGISTICS

Decarbonising larger vehicles While it seems to have become accepted that petrol and diesel cars will eventually become a thing of the past, attention has turned towards meeting the zero emission goal for heavier forms of transport, such as trucks, buses and larger vans. The government is in the process of developing a transport decarbonisation plan, which should include details on when the it expects to phase out new diesel trucks.

Follow and interact with us on Twitter:

@GreenFleetNews

GF

et

nFle

Gree

Visit et fleet.n ws, n e e e gr n t s late for the , road tests s feature terviews and in

Of course, those working in freight and logistics may be cautious of such plans, as currently, little exists in the form of zero emission truck solutions. This is changing, with more manufacturers announcing electric trucks, and more investment being put into hydrogen, which is touted as a solution for long-haul, heavy duty zero-emission applications. In the Commercial section of GreenFleet, we focus on how heavy duty vehicles can become zero emission. Brian Robinson from Zemo Partnership writes about present and emerging low and zero emission technologies for freight vehicles, as well as what can be done now to lower emissions. Jo Bamford meanwhie writes about how hydrogen needs to be central to any decarbonisation plans. There are also features on electric vans, and an interview with Dave Canavan from FedEx Express Europe, who talks about the company’s goal to achieve carbon-neutral operations globally by 2040. This issue of GreenFleet also has a public sector theme, with advice on EV charging infrastructure, clean air zones and grey fleet management. Angela Pisanu, editor

P ONLINE P IN PRINT P MOBILE P FACE-TO-FACE If you would like to receive 6 issues of GreenFleet magazine for £150 a year, please contact Public Sector Information Limited, 226 High Road, Loughton, Essex IG10 1ET. Tel: 020 8532 0055

GreenFleet DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS

GreenFleet® would like to thank the following organisations for their support:

PUBLISHED BY PUBLIC SECTOR INFORMATION LIMITED

226 High Rd, Loughton, Essex IG10 1ET. Tel: 020 8532 0055 Web: www.psi-media.co.uk EDITOR Angela Pisanu PRODUCTION MANAGER/DESIGNER Dan Kanolik PRODUCTION CONTROL Lucy Maynard WEB PRODUCTION & ADMINISTRATION Victoria Casey PUBLISHER George Petrou ACCOUNT MANAGER Kylie Glover

© 2021 Public Sector Information Limited. No part of this publication can be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any other means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the publisher. Whilst every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial content the publisher cannot be held responsible for errors or omissions. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the publisher. ISSN 2399-4940

GreenFleet is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (which regulates the UK’s magazine and newspaper industry). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint please contact Michael Lyons or Angela Pisanu on 0208 532 0055. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

3


bp pulse provides tailored EV charging solutions to suit your business Our expertise, unrivalled experience and comprehensive product range mean we are the right partner to provide electric vehicle charging solutions for your business, drivers and customers. Home charging for your staff Workplace charging for your office or depot Public charging for your fleets on the go

Get in touch to find out more salesdesk@bp.com www.bppulse.co.uk/charging-for-business


Contents

Contents GREENFLEET 133 07 News

13

Government zero-emission transition plans a ‘huge challenge’; Connected Kerb to deliver EV charging in hard-to-reach communities; Ford calls for co-ordinated action to achieve 2030 target

13 Electric Vehicles

The pressure is on for fleet operators to move away from diesel and petrol vehicles. But careful consideration needs to be given before a full-scale switch to electric vehicles can occur. Charlie Gilbert shares some lessons learned on fleet electrification

22

Special

To support the successful transition to electric vehicles, public sector organisations need a clear strategy in relation to their charging. Lorraine Chiu, decarbonisation commercial lead at Crown Commercial Service discusses workplace and home charging considerations, as well as how local authorities can support the public in the uptake of electric vehicles

22 Charging Infrastructure

The Energy Saving Trust looks at some of the lessons learnt from each of the cities involved in the Go Ultra Low Cities scheme

25 Air Quality

Clean Air Zones seek to restrict the most polluting vehicles from entering parts of towns and cities suffering from poor air quality. Andrea Lee from environmental law charity ClientEarth gives an update on the progress being made on these essential schemes

29 Grey Fleet

With local authorities under scrutiny over their participation in national net zero ambitions, and many under financial pressure, the use of grey fleet is no longer practical or sensible. But how can it be tackled? James Lancaster, chair of the Urban Mobility Partnership, shares his views

32 Road test: Vauxhall Corsa-e Vauxhall’s first all-electric car, Richard Gooding discovers the Vauxhall Corsae’s efficient and ease of use personality should win it many fleet friends

34 Road Test:

DS 3 Crossback E-Tense

48

Trading on a name from years gone by, Richard Gooding finds that everything about Citroën’s new all-electric city star owes nothing to the past

36 Road test -

First Drive: Kia Sorento PHEV

Packed with hybrid technology, Richard Gooding finds the first plug-in version of its Sorento SUV offers impressive and spacious zero-emissions-capable practicality

ROAD TO ZERO

A new tyre performance label and digital viewing system was introduced on 1 May 2021 to help motorists understand how well tyres perform, especially for fuel efficiency and grip. Here’s what’s changed

20 Charging Infrastructure

46

First Drive: Citroën Ami

16 Tyre Performance

PUBLIC SECTOR

20

35 Road test -

Reinvented with crossover style, Richard Gooding discovers that DS’ only all-electric offering 
will appeal to those who desire a wellappointed, practical and luxurious compact EV

GreenFleet magazine

Sponsored by

40 News

Vauxhall unveils plug-in hydrogen electric van; World’s largest public access biomethane station to open; DAF introduces charging stations for electric trucks

46 Decarbonising Trucks

While there is no date yet, the government is consulting on when it would be feasible to ban the sales of diesel trucks. HGV operators will need to keep their eyes firmly on the ball on present and emerging low and zero emission technologies, as well as what they can do now to decarbonise their operations

48 Hydrogen

Hydrogen’s high energy content and its multiple zero carbon production pathways combine to make it a central pillar of any serious decarbonisation plan, writes Jo Bamford

51 Interview: FedEx

Electrification of FedEx’s parcel pickup and delivery fleet is a key part of the company’s goal to achieve carbon-neutral operations globally by 2040. Dave Canavan, chief operating officer at FedEx Express Europe, tells GreenFleet about what FedEx is doing in Europe to meet its carbon targets

54 Electric Vans

Recent enhancements in battery life and load capacity have made the use of electric vans more viable for many fleet operators. We take a look at some of the companies that are investing in electric vehicles, as well as the barriers to adoption

57 Last Mile Logistics

Faced with mounting challenges on urban congestion, cost pressures and environmental concerns – how should businesses adapt their delivery models to meet rocketing ecommerce orders?

59 Van Security

Vans are desirable to criminals for a variety of reasons. So what should van operators consider when protecting their vehicles?

www.greenfleet.net Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

5


Plug into the all-new Vauxhall electric range Car | SUV | MPV | LCV

0330 587 8222 | vauxhallfleet@vauxhall.co.uk Contact your local Fleet Sales Manager for more information on our exciting new electric range.

Fuel economy and CO2 results for the Vivaro-e range 100kW (136PS). Mpg (l/100km): N/A. CO2 emissions: 0g/km. Electric range up to 205 miles (WLTP). Fuel economy and CO2 results for the Combo-e Life range 100kW (136PS). Mpg (l/100km): N/A. CO2 emissions: 0g/km. Electric range up to 174 miles (WLTP Provisional data). Fuel economy and CO2 results for the Mokka-e range 100kW (136PS). Mpg (l/100km): N/A. CO2 emissions: 0g/km. Electric range up to 201 miles (WLTP). Fuel economy and CO2 results for the Corsa-e range 100kW (136PS). Mpg (l/100km): N/A. CO2 emissions: 0g/km. Electric range up to 209 miles (WLTP). The range and electric consumption figures mentioned comply with the WLTP test procedure, on the basis of which new vehicles are type approved from 1 September 2018. EV range assumes that the vehicle has been preconditioned prior to journey. They may vary depending on actual conditions of use and on different factors such as: vehicle load, accessories fitted (post registration), speed, thermal comfort on board the vehicle, driving style and outside temperature. Please contact your Vauxhall Retailer for further information. All figures quoted correct at time of going to press (May 2021).


News

ZERO EMISSION VEHICLES

Government zero-emission transition plans a ‘huge challenge’

The Public Accounts Committee has warned the government faces a ‘huge challenge’ to phase out new petrol and diesel cars by 2030 and for all new cars to be zero-emission from 2035. It says that with just 11 per cent of new car registrations for ultra-low emission cars in 2020, this ambition will require convincing

consumers of the affordability and practicality of zero-emission cars and addressing the current very uneven take-up across the UK. Additionally, while the number of charging points is increasing rapidly, many more will be required within a very short period of time to support the envisaged growth in electric cars in the UK, and the PAC is not convinced the government is on track with this crucial infrastructure. The committee says that the Department for Transport and Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will need to do much more to consider the practical application of this large societal change, and put consumers at the heart of it. Meg Hillier, chair of the committee, said: “The government has a mountain to climb to get to all new cars in the UK emitting zero carbon in the next 14 years: to convince

consumers and make the cars appealing, to make the car industry environmentally and socially compliant, to build the necessary infrastructure to support this radical shift and possibly biggest of all, to wean itself off carbon revenues. Yet once again what we’ve got is a government throwing up a few signs around base camp - and no let-up in demand for oversized, petrol- guzzling vehicles. “This isn’t about more targets with no plan behind them inevitably getting missed - it’s about averting the real-world challenges that are bearing down on all of us. The government needs to get the country behind it and lead the way in the global race against climate change.” READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/5f5kv96t

RENTAL

E-MOBILITY

Enterprise boosts electric rental feet with Renault ZOEs

Electric scooter hire schemes to be rolled out in London

Enterprise Rent-A-Car has unveiled 30 new electric Renault ZOE as part of its rental fleet in Scotland. The vehicles will be located at Enterprise RentA-Car branches in Dundee, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen. They are part of the company’s wider investment in offering sustainable motoring options in Scotland and across the UK. Enterprise already offers a range of low-emission vehicles and is rolling out a number of fully electric vans and working with Toyota to trial hydrogen cars with selected corporate customers. Police Scotland is one of a number of organisations that is renting the new Enterprise Renault ZOE fleet. The Renault ZOE is a fully electric vehicle, with a 52-kWh capacity with up to 245 miles of range. “We see rental as a way of facilitating change because it enables people to try out

A new electric scooter rental scheme will launch in London next month, where Londoners will be legally able to use e-scooters on public roads. The schemes will only operate in a few parts of central, south and west London as the capital prioritises safety. Three operators – Tier, Lime and Dott – have been chosen by TfL to run the service. The 12-month trial will run in Canary Wharf, the City of London and boroughs including Kensington and Chelsea, Ealing, Richmond upon Thames and Hammersmith. Between 60 and 120 scooters will be available in each borough at the start of the trial. To ensure safety, the e-scooters will be limited to a maximum of 12.5mph, 3mph slower than schemes in other parts of the UK, when rental scheme trials start on 7 June. As well as having a lower speed limit, users will have to complete a safety lesson before their first rental, whilst the scooters will also have lights permanently on, and use geofencing to prevent them being used in areas including the royal parks. Helen Sharp, TfL’s e-scooter trial lead, said: “We’re doing all we can to support London’s safe and sustainable recovery from the coronavirus pandemic and it’s clear that e-scooters could act as an innovative, greener alternative to car trips. “Safety remains our number one priority and we will work closely with the e-scooter operators, London Councils and the boroughs to ensure rigorous standards are consistently met.”

zero-emission electric vehicles for a short period of time,” said Diane Mulholland, General Manager for Enterprise Scotland. “We will be using our new ZOE fleet to ensure our employees are familiar with EV technology and act as experts to help customers understand the benefits of these vehicles and overcome any concerns they may have. “We are planning to encourage all our customers to try EVs. That means replacement customers who get a car from their insurance company when their vehicle is being repaired will have an EV option, as well as our business and leisure customers as lockdown eases.” READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/ye2uzdb7

READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/zb8dm3e3

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

7


News EV INFRASTRUCTURE

Connected Kerb to deliver EV charging in hard-to-reach communities Connected Kerb is working with Kent County Council on a project to deliver sustainable, affordable and accessible EV infrastructure to hard-to-reach UK communities. In the project’s first phase, Connected Kerb is installing 40 charging units across 20 Kent Parish sites to improve accessibility for EV motorists and encourage a wider shift to EVs. All income from the chargers goes to the local community or is used to support the roll out and maintenance of more chargers, creating a long-term revenue stream for those involved. Chris Pateman-Jones, CEO of Connected Kerb, said: “Access to charging infrastructure is one of the biggest barriers to the uptake of EVs. Although demand for chargers is higher in dense urban areas, the lack of infrastructure in out-of-town communities leaves people concerned about switching to EVs. It is vital that access to public charging is equitable across the entire country and we bring an end to the EV charging postcode lottery.

“Nobody should be left behind by the EV revolution because of where they live. Our partnership with Kent County Council shows that the economics of installing EV charging in non-urban areas is much more favourable than many believe. This is a recipe for success for local authorities across the UK.” Installing public charging infrastructure outside of busy urban areas has typically been a challenge for the industry. Lower grid capacity and fewer connections increase upfront cost, with lower footfall compounding the challenge by extending the return-on-investment period. With some rapid chargers costing upwards of £100,000 to install, and with lifespans of between 5-10 years, the economics rarely add up. Connected Kerb’s charging infrastructure is located below ground and installed once, with passive chargers that can be easily ‘switched on’ by adding the above ground charge point to match consumer demand.

READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/czsuz8xs

AIR QUALITY

PUBLIC SECTOR

Re-elected Sadiq Khan recommits to expanding London ULEZ

Newham Council to replace fleet with greener vehicles

Sadiq Khan has recommitted to expanding London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) in October as one of his first acts as re-elected Mayor of London. The expanded ULEZ will cover an area 18 times larger than the central London Ultra Low Emission Zone and will affect older, more polluting vehicles that don’t comply with strict emission standards. Although around 80 per cent of cars are already thought to be compliant, it is estimated that 100,000 cars, 35,000 vans and 3,000 lorries could be affected by the expanded zone and tighter standards every day. London’s air quality measures, including the central London ULEZ, has already cut the number of state schools with illegal levels of pollution by 97 per cent – from 455 schools in 2016 to just 14 in 2019, prior to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The ULEZ expansion is not only vital to achieving compliance with legal limits for air pollution but is also a key step towards meeting the more stringent health-driven World Health Organization guidelines for toxic particulate pollution by 2030. Other action includes cleaning up London’s bus and taxi fleet, reducing emissions from construction and action to promote the uptake of zero emission vehicles. Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: “I pledge to be the greenest Mayor London’s ever had with a mandate from Londoners to put the environment and climate policies at the heart of my second term in office and I am reaffirming my commitment to speed up the cleaning of London’s toxic air. “In central London, the Ultra Low Emission Zone has already helped cut toxic roadside nitrogen dioxide pollution by nearly half and led to reductions that are five times greater than the national average. But pollution isn’t just a central London problem, which is why expanding the ULEZ later this year will benefit Londoners across the whole of the city and is a crucial step in London’s green recovery. There is no time to waste. We know pollution hits the poorest Londoners the hardest which is why I’m doing everything I can to improve the health for all Londoners.” READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/55a5nwjs

8

The chargers also feature additional smart capabilities that can facilitate air quality monitoring, parking management, CCTV, road sensors, 5G connection, autonomous vehicles, route planning and power demand forecasting. These features, plus the long lifespan, make EV charging infrastructure much more cost effective and create a business case for installing it in hard-to-reach areas. This long-term approach means Kent County Council and the Parish, will have access to a long-term revenue stream to help maintain and expand the charger network. This substantially improves the economics of this type of project, making EV charging affordable to install, ultimately reducing the cost for drivers and creating cleaner, quieter communities.

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

Newham Council has approved plans to replace the first wave of 210 council vehicles with greener models to meet their promises in their Air Quality Action Plan. Seeking to become carbon neutral by 2030 and carbon zero by 2050, the authority will begin to replace their fleet with 170 new vans and 40 mini-buses that are all either fully electric, mild hybrid or Euro 6 gas-to-liquid fuelled. The new vehicles will ensure the Council meet the legal standards required by the Ultra-Low Emission Zone due in October this year. This follows a council decision in October last year to make a £20 million investment in green fleet over the next five years. James Asser, cabinet lead for Environment, Highways and Sustainable Transport said: “The replacement vehicles offer positive benefits to air quality in the borough, they will consume less fuel and create less pollution. “As a council we’re committed to delivering our Air Quality Action plan to improve the health of residents and the environment of the borough, and are aiming for a fully green fleet by 2030. The cost of the new vehicles is in line with the current leasing arrangements and with a high number of our vehicle leases expiring this year now is the right time to begin the changes. We will be looking for further opportunities to invest in new greener vehicles as they become available as well as reducing vehicle use and moving to alternatives where possible.” READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/x8awc32e


News

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

SSE adds Renault Zoe Vans to its fleet in Scotland Utility provider SSE has introduced four Zoe Vans into its commercial vehicle fleet which will be used by its supervisors and team leaders to visit the company’s operational sites and developments throughout Scotland. The Zoe Van has a range of up to 245 miles on a single charge enables SSE’s personnel to visit more remote areas, particular in the north west of the country, where the charging infrastructure can be limited. At the same time, the dedicated load area allows operatives to easily transport the specialised tools, wet weather clothing and PPE they require for their roles. The Zoe Van were converted to SSE’s specification by Renault-accredited converter, Qi, which added details including a hygiene station and fire extinguisher. Neil Chamberlain, National EV Manager, SSE, said: “As an EV100 company that is committed to switching its fleet to electric, and with our focus on renewable energy and making

a significant contribution to building low-carbon electricity systems fit for the future, introducing the Zoe Van to our operations fits perfectly with our strategy and ethos. The range of electric LCVs has always been a bit of an issue in the past for the roles that these vehicles are used for, so that of the Zoe Van now gives us the option to make the transition and look at other areas where a van is traditionally used but there isn’t a need for a high payload. The comfort is a big benefit to our operatives and, for those that are negotiating the narrower, more demanding roads of the Highlands, the compact dimensions are another welcome bonus. With the Zoe Van we’re further lowering our environmental impact at no detriment to our operational costs or effectiveness.” SSE is set to take delivery of a further eight Renault Zoe Vans, with more in the pipeline. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/3hp83er8

UK CAR MARKET

Sales of alternatively fuelled cars over took diesels in 2020 Sales of alternatively fuelled cars overtook diesels for the first time in 2020, Department for Transport data showed. 338,000 new alternatively fuelled cars were registered in Britain in 2020 compared with only 295,000 diesels. Alternatively fuelled cars — mostly pure electric models and hybrids — saw an 87 per cent year-on-year rise in sales. Purely electric cars accounted for 107,000 sales alone, representing a 184 per cent annual increase. Meanwhile the sale of diesels dropped by 51 per cent in 2020. Rod Dennis, spokesman for the RAC, said: “With ever-more electrified models available, it’s looking increasingly likely that sales of diesel cars may now never recover to previous levels, which will help improve the air quality in towns and cities.” He added: “With more than a

quarter of a million cars declared off-road at the end of last year, it remains to be seen just how people’s mobility choices are affected by the pandemic in the longer term and how many of these cars will come back.” The DfT figures showed that 2.1 million new vehicles were registered for the first time in Britain during 2020, which was 27 per cent down on 2019. By the end of 2020 there were a total of 38.6 million licensed vehicles in Britain, down by 0.3 per cent overall. Petrol was still the most popular type of new car fuel, with 987,000 vehicles being sold, although this was down by 35 per cent year-on-year. There were 338,000 alternatively fuelled cars and 295,000 diesels.

Zemo Partnership’s Jonathan Murray

Buying an EV is just the start! A report published by the Carbon Trust says that we can save nearly £17bn on our energy bills and slash the cost of the energy transition if we can successfully “embed flexibility” across power, heat and transport. I agree! As Zemo Partnership’s coordinator of the multi-stakeholder Electric Vehicle Energy Taskforce I have glimpsed first-hand how great the rewards can be if we work closely together, across sectors to manage the electrification transition in road transport. The EV Energy Taskforce was set up under government auspices in 2018 and has, since its inception, engaged with more than 350 organisations from the energy, automotive and related sectors, many of them leading household names. Initially the Taskforce identified 21 proposals to maximise the benefits, and minimise the challenges, to the electricity networks and EV users as UK road transport is electrified. The proposals fell into three categories and showed the urgency of developing standards and codes of practice to enable interoperability and the sharing of data within the EV sector and with the electricity system. It also showed the need for effective local and national planning and coordination to enable efficient investment. The taskforce also identified the criticality of smart charging; underpinned by a resilient network and clear market signals, to reduce the cost of supplying power to millions of EVs. The Taskforce has now been asked by government to drill down into the proposals and turn them into actionable plans. And as the transport electrification agenda is ramping up very fast, the Taskforce is about to enter a new phase with raised ambition and a wider remit. Why not join us and play your part in the transition (see below). But what does all this mean for EV users now and in the future? The key principle, underpinning the EV Energy Taskforce’s proposals, is that the transition is best served by aligning with the best outcome for the customer; typically the EVdriver. If we can’t create a positive experience for drivers, the development of the market will be compromised. This means that EV users can expect to see – and should otherwise demand – higher standards of convenience and inter-operability when using public charge point facilities. It means finding the right charger in the right place. It means easy and convenient payment systems. It means a fully functioning and optimally regulated market for organisations delivering charging and related services. For the user with home charging it means making available the opportunity to reduce fuel costs by offering time of use tariffs for charging, which has been available to many fleets and businesses charging on-site. Increasingly, it will mean an opportunity to play a role in the energy system by enabling energy stored in EV batteries to supply the home, grid or other facilities. This could mean significant revenue for some and the chance of lower energy costs for all and, crucially, with greatly reduced carbon impacts. So, for individuals and fleets, buying an EV is just the start and will increasingly open up of a world of energy opportunities! Any organisations interested in finding out more and/or contributing to the work of the EV Energy Taskforce should contact: info@evenergytaskforce.com FURTHER INFORMATION

READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/kjb3d6uv

www.zemo.org.uk

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

9


News ENVIRONMENT

Ford calls for co-ordinated action to achieve 2030 target Ford is calling on policymakers, energy providers, local authorities, consumers and the auto industry to join forces on a nationwide electrification strategy to achieving its 2030 target to ban ICE vehicles. Since February, Ford has announced investments into electrification, committing its entire passenger vehicle range to be all electric by 2030, and to the majority of its commercial vehicles sales to be all-electric or plug-in hybrid in the same timeframe. But the company says that individual actions are not enough and that a coordinated effort is needed to help consumers move to an electrified future. “At Ford, we’re putting our plan into action. In the UK, the electrification transition is underway, but we will not achieve the government’s 2030 target organically. We need a plan, supporting the rollout of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles, in operation ahead of November’s critical COP26 climate summit,” said Stuart Rowley, president, Ford of Europe.

one in five say they have no intention of buying an electric vehicle, while a further fifth said they would not buy an electric vehicle until they have no other option. Ford’s research also suggests that consumer acceptance is a key obstacle to overcome, with the Go Electric report pointing to an apparent lack of information around EV technology. A majority of drivers – 61 per cent – surveyed for the report said they did not feel they have enough information to make an informed decision on purchasing an electric vehicle. When asked how confident they were about electric vehicle technology, more than half said they did not know the difference between electrified vehicle types, while four out of five said they would not be comfortable explaining electric vehicles to a friend. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/b37nrws2

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

AIR QUALITY

Polestar opens Milton Keynes test drive hub & plans further pop-ups

Clean Air Zone Scrappage Scheme in Birmingham goes live

Polestar UK has opened a new test drive hub in Milton Keynes for motorists to experience the Polestar 2. Supplementing the recently re-opened Polestar London and Polestar Manchester Spaces, along with other test drive activity planned for 2021, the hub will facilitate will have eight vehicles – each purely for demonstration purposes, for customers to take on unaccompanied test drives. Jonathan Goodman, CEO of Polestar UK said “We saw such huge demand in 2020 for test drives, it was clear we needed to deliver more opportunity for consumers to experience our fully-electric Polestar 2 firsthand. But it had to be done in a high-quality way befitting the Polestar brand and be easy to book and access, and so Milton Keynes was an obvious choice. Excellent transport links, great test drive routes and a reputation as the foremost technological centre of the

10

“The scale of the challenge requires a partnership between all the key stakeholders – government, auto industry, energy providers, local authorities and consumers – and focusing on accelerating the development of the charging infrastructure at home, in the workplace and in public locations. It also should encourage consumers to purchase all-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles through stronger incentives.” Ford’s announcement comes as the first in its series of quarterly consumer sentiment reports, Go Electric, reveals widespread lack of awareness and hesitancy towards electrified vehicles and their ecosystems among much of the UK population. While the report shows appetite for electric vehicles is increasing – 28 per cent of respondents said they plan to buy an electric vehicle within the next five years – a substantial proportion of drivers still have reservations. More than

UK ensure it’s the perfect location for us.” Polestar UK will also deliver a series of other semi-permanent test-drive hubs – in Daventry, Cambridge and Harrogate for example – over the summer. More locations will be announced in due course. A series of pop-up events at other locations for shorter periods of time will also support this activity, ensuring UK consumers can access the opportunity to test-drive a Polestar with maximum ease and convenience. Many will be supported by well-known public charging firm Instavolt while a large-scale event was hosted at Gridserve’s Essex electric forecourt in Braintree earlier in May. The Polestar 2 is available to buy at Polestar.com priced from £39,900 OTR. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/5a5wvfmy

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

Birmingham’s Clean Air Zone Vehicle Scrappage and Travel Scheme has gone live. People who work in the zone and earn less than £30,000 per annum will now be able to scrap their vehicle with Motorpoint In exchange, they will receive £2,000 credit towards a compliant vehicle from Motorpoint or £2,000 in a ‘mobility’ credit to use on public transport via Swift Card with Transport for West Midlands (TfWM). The Birmingham’s Clean Air Zone goes live on June 1, 2021. From this date the owners of vehicles that do not meet the emission standards of the Clean Air Zone will be subject to a daily fee of £8 to enter the zone. Kevin Cartwright, General Manager of Motorpoint Birmingham and Oldbury, said: “Motorpoint has hundreds of low mileage, nearly new vehicles all under warranty available at its branches across the city – every one of which is Clean Air Zone compliant. Plus, with our Sameday Driveaway service, people can choose, test drive and buy, all in the space of a couple of hours. We would definitely recommend anyone thinking of taking advantage of the scheme to go online and start their car buying journey at motorpoint.co.uk or alternatively pop into their nearest Motorpoint branch.” READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/4xbbe68c


News

FINANCE

New Coalition for the Decarbonisation of Road Transport launched The Green Finance Institute has launched the Coalition for the Decarbonisation of Road Transport, with a focus to unlock the level of private finance necessary for transport decarbonisation, co-creating financing solutions required to support the transition to zero emission vehicles. Analysis undertaken by the Green Finance Institute, with support from KPMG’s Future Mobility Team, estimates that more than £150 billion of gross capital investment may be required to decarbonise the UK road transport sector between 2021 and 2030, requiring a significant acceleration in the rate of investment into zero-carbon transport solutions. The Coalition for the Decarbonisation of Road Transport will focus on developing finance solutions initially in three core areas: consumer finance and leasing;

EV charging infrastructure; and the commercialisation of battery technology. Financial innovation is needed to help consumers overcome the barriers to choosing electric over fossil-fuel vehicles, the coalition believes. Key to the approach will be mechanisms to mitigate the upfront costs of EVs and accelerate the maturity of the used EV market. The private sector has an instrumental role to play, including in providing affordable finance solutions to consumers and small businesses. The Green Finance Institute estimates that to meet growing demand more than 6.7 million chargers are required, at a total cost of over £20 billion. Public and private sector collaboration will be needed to unlock the finance for a national charging infrastructure roll-out. The Green Finance Institute also believes the UK urgently needs to scale up current levels

of investment into battery manufacturing to build a globally competitive battery sector. A capacity of up to 60 GWh P.a. may be needed by 2030, requiring at least three UK gigafactories and more than £5 billion in investment. Other issues to be addressed include safe and sustainable battery disposal, as well as the creation of a sustainable supply chain. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/zmf2drx6

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

EV INFRASTRUCTURE

Market for used plug-in vehicles stays strong in first quarter of 2021

Shell launches European EV mobility hub in Paris

Demand for used plug-in vehicles grew in the first quarter of 2021, with a 37.9% rise in transactions, the SMMT has shown. Hybrid vehicles rose 16.6% to 27,694 units, while plug-in hybrid saw a 32.1% uplift to 10,534 units, and battery electric surged 48.3% to 6,564 sales. However, the combined number of plug-in vehicles traded still represented only 1.0% of the market, up from 0.7% in Q1 2020. This illustrates the scale of the challenge ahead to transition the entire used car arena away from traditional fuels. Petrol and diesel powertrains combined represented 97.1% of all first quarter activity at 1,638,536 units. Overall, the UK’s used car market declined -8.9% in the

first quarter of 2021. Some 1,687,755 transactions took place, with the overall decline driven by large falls in January and February, of -27.1% and -19.4% respectively, as lockdown measures depressed demand and again closed car showrooms nationwide. March saw the market show signs of recovery with a 32.2% year-on-year rise, amounting to 638,570 cars changing hands, although this compares with a weak March 2020 when the UK entered its first lockdown partway through the month. Compared with 2019, March was still down, -8.4%, and Q1 by -16.5% or 332,389 fewer transactions.

Shell has launched its first European electric vehicle (EV) Mobility hub in Paris, which is aimed at car sharing, ride hailing and last mile delivery companies. The mobility hubs will provide drivers with electric vehicle charging services in the centre of the city and beyond. The first hub, consisting of eight rapid chargers, is now open in central Paris, at Paris City Hall car park. It marks the introduction of Shell’s retail business in Paris – and the launch of Shell Recharge in France. The second hub, near Charles de Gaulle Airport, will be operational by the end of 2021. Charge point availability is central to the

uptake of EVs and this hub helps address infrastructure challenges for drivers. This pilot will also serve as a blueprint for Shell’s future installation activities. Businesses, such as fleets, taxi drivers and commercial vehicle operators will be able to sign up to use the facilities. Shell will also be trialling a range of new services and customer offers which will be introduced in phases. These include options to pre-book charging points, refreshment and car care services. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/2chc6ua3

READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/3x5fzzy8

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

11


12 MONTHS FOR THE PRICE OF 10

Track us right to your side

We’ll handle everything

Keep your business moving

0747

Ts&Cs apply. Automobile Association Insurance Services Limited is an insurance intermediary authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Registered office: Fanum House, Basing View, Basingstoke, Hampshire RG21 4EA. England and Wales. Company registration number 2414212.


Written by Charlie Gilbert, Partner at Field Dynamics

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

Electric Vehicles

The reality for transitioning fleets

How will the switch to EVs affect the day to day operations? Fleet transition impacts all areas of your business, but an area we believe that is sometimes overlooked is across operational delivery. In addition to the key area of driver re-training, there is the overall design of your service operating model that that might need to be tweaked and adjusted to manage your EV fleet. Some The pressure is on for fleet operators to move away from diesel and organisations have not fully appreciated petrol vehicles. But careful consideration needs to be given before a this yet, as in pilot phases they provide vehicles to drivers in areas of the business full-scale switch to electric vehicles can occur. Charlie Gilbert, shares where there is very little impact of change. some lessons learned on fleet electrification Even without the EV question, business as usual transformation is sometimes complex and time consuming – we have worked with Whilst size and scale of your fleet are clearly What stages do you see organisations helping them model impacts key factors, its more about the diversity organisations at with their EV to their depot mix and locations, changes of your fleet where the real complexity is fleet transition journey? to working patterns or redesign of their introduced. There is a lot of data to collate There is a real mix out there, with various operating patches for many years – it can from multiple systems to understand stages of adoption. There are those who are be complex, covering people, process and current operating footprint and scenarios still in their infancy and considering pilots to technology and requires detailed consultation to play out to ensure the transition will those who are now well advanced, and highly with your workforce – EV fleet transition proceed smoothly. All this needs to be timed sophisticated in their thinking and approach. is no different and engagement is key. with vehicle and estates leasing cycles. Centrica have made great progress on It’s also more than looking at the range Fleets that service a multitude of customer their objective to fully electrify their fleet of vehicles and considering a like-for-like needs will have the biggest challenges – by 2025. The development of some leaders bringing out their own advisory services handling regular planned maintenance work replacement – let’s play out a scenario to help others follow in their footsteps whilst also managing more unpredictable for a return to home fleet. According to (such as Mitie with their Plan Zero service) reactive workloads is challenging enough our research, 34.8 per cent of households is symptomatic of the desire and appetite with an ICE fleet. Throw the opportunities don’t have access to off street charging to learn and get it right first time. and constraints of EV into the mix and and only 10 per cent of these homes are It’s crucial that we take the learnings it adds another tier of logic you need within a five-minute walk of a charger. from the early adopters who have made to manage. In these scenarios, fleet mix We estimate that up to 50 per ent of the switch and disseminate what went contains everything from technicians who their drivers have an on-street challenge, well, and where the key challenges are. park and charge at home, through and there needs to be a solution here. Transitioning at scale needs detailed to plant and machinery Nearby slower on-street charging is one thinking, with multiple stakeholders being housed in depots. There sensible option, where charging It’s involved in the process (fleet, operations, is then the provision can be undertaken overnight – finance, strategy, estates, sustainability, of other factors to providing you can get regular crucial exec). Different objectives also need consider, such access to the charger of course. that we to be managed, such as productivity, as resupply and Rapid hubs like Gridserve l e a r n from th TCO, strategy, brand and service. the services to (who plan to install 100 EV EV ado e early With many organisations under pressure your directly forecourts) and the wider to state that they will have a fully electric employed electrification of the fuel dissemi pters and n a fleet by a set date, there will also be a workforce, as forecourt network may also t e w w ent we need to track progress as each stage of well as how help, but many services will ll, and what your transition is undertaken, especially you service need a guaranteed charge on the cha llenges hat a regular basis and need to start after the initial easier areas of the your outsourced were operation to electrify are complete. entities. the day with full batteries. E

13


WORKSHOP ESSENTIALS AVAILABLE TO BUY ONLINE

Tall & Short Support stands

Transmission Jacks Trolley Jacks

Bottle Jacks

At Totalkare we combine world class lifting and testing products, industry leading support, flexible financial packages and CPD certified competency training to ensure that you always have the right support.

CALL VISIT

Pit Jacks

SERVICE & CALIBRATION ONLINE TRAINING MOBILE COLUMN LIFTS FOUR POST & TWO POST LIFTS Y-MECH LIFTS HEAVY DUTY BRAKE TESTERS VEHICLE INSPECTION PITS HEADLAMP TESTERS SMOKE METERS AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT OIL MANAGEMENT ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT

Air Conditioning Equipment

0121 585 2724 WWW.TOTALKARE.CO.UK/SHOP

Access Steps

YEARS 1980 - 2020

OF COLUMN LIFTS

VISIT OUR WEBSITES...

GREENFLEET AND COMMERCIAL GREENFLEET featuring all the latest news, features, events and resources visit:

WWW.GREENFLEET.NET AND WWW.GREENFLEET.NET/COMMERCIAL 14

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


Electric Vehicles

 If you are going to provide EVs to drivers who don’t have the capability to charge off street at home, then what do you do? Do you provide additional charging to them at a nearby depot and site? Can you find partners to works with? Even if you need to move the vehicle to a new location where it can be charged you will see operational impacts. Commutes might increase. Working patterns might need to be adjusted. Scheduling systems reconfigured. All these changes need to be captured, measured and assessed. What other factors do you need to consider? This depends on some key elements. At a high level, the closer your operation of today reflects the range and specification of tomorrow the easier the transition, but delve deeper and its more nuanced than this. I would break this down into these key areas – fleet mix, charging concurrency, power requirements and wider changes to your operating model. Regarding fleet mix, with larger fleets in particular, its almost certain you won’t be able to make a wholesale switch, so the question is what areas do you switch and by when. By patch? By function? By depot or by return to home? Do you look at a hybrid approach? Even for return to home fleet drivers who can charge at home there is the question of how to recharge and claim. There are some great solutions out there already, but for those who can’t there are a number of option to consider and scenario planning is key – there is simply no point in designing a new way of working if it’s just not practical to work that way. Regarding charging concurrency, as we are seeing with residential charging hotspots, there is no point having access to charging if there is never any availability. The same goes for a depot – it’s important to understand the level of concurrency of charge that is needed, especially in a time-critical operation. If you can’t charge the vehicles to fit in with their current operating patterns, such as to starting shifts on full batteries or meeting SLAs, you again may need to make changes to the operation to accommodate this or

Fleets that service a multitude of customer needs will have the biggest challenges – handling regular planned maintenance work whilst also managing more unpredictable reactive workloads is challenging enough with an ICE fleet. Throw the opportunities and constraints of EV into the mix and it adds another tier of logic you need to manage changes to your estates and infrastructure to manage the power demand. Regarding power requirements, though it’s becoming easier to obtain information from DNOs about connection costs, the price can vary significantly depending on a range of factors and you may need to consider other ways to charge or power your sites with generation on-site. If you are looking to secure new contracts, acquiring or merging with new entities or changing your wider operating model, it is worth thinking about EVs and future-proofing your planning. What future developments and innovations do you foresee? Most leasing providers and telematics companies are building out solutions and bolt-ons to existing fleet management toolsets to help with the core elements of EV fleet transition – such as vehicle mileage, TCO, emissions and even what models are suitable to switch to. But further ahead, I am confident there will be new solutions to address fleet drivers which will help with the wider operating model questions, which will need to integrate into back-office systems and data will need to be joined up. We are already seeing significant interest and funding opportunities for innovation

in this area. In the last three months, £85 million of funding from DfT and OZEV has been made available for the decarbonisation of transport in new competitions run by Innovate UK, Driving the Electric Revolution and the Niche Vehicle Network, and their launch events have attracted over 2,500 attendees indicating the interest in this topic. There will be new partnerships and new service models to broker. One of the areas we have been exploring is the concept of the virtual depot, where large car parks in areas where there is a guaranteed overnight charging need from on-street drivers. We are already seeing this from the car park vendors who are offering the space and now the charger as a managed service. This trajectory will continue – but supply will be made available at some new, non-conventional locations. L

Charlie Gilbert has over 15 years of experience working with a range of field service functions across the service and utility sectors, helping clients to redesign and restructure their operations to improve productivity. Charlie also leads on Field Dynamics net zero and EV Transition work. FURTHER INFORMATION www.field-dynamics.co.uk

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

15


Tyre Performance

The new tyre label explained A new tyre performance label and digital viewing system was introduced on 1 May 2021 to help motorists understand how well tyres perform, especially for fuel efficiency and grip. Here’s what’s changed According to a survey of the European Tyre and Rubber Manufacturers’ Association and Lizeo Group, just one per cent of tyres in the market are ‘A’ rated for both efficiency and wet grip. This suggests that vehicle owners are not aware of the significant differences between the highest and lowest rated tyres displayed on the outgoing label. While other factors influence the low number of the best performing tyres being sold, awareness of the ratings is a primary concern. This has led TyreSafe to rethink the tyre label, as well as how it is shown to motorists. Previously, the label was fixed to each tyre. However, the customer visiting an outlet rarely saw it because the tyres were typically taken from the stock room and fitted straight to the vehicle while the customer waits in reception. If the label and the tyre options weren’t discussed before the customer made their selection, there’s a high probability they would have left without seeing a label at all. Equally, retailers may not have had easy access on their computers to the labels to pass on this information. A new digital solution addresses this issue. As of 1 May, tyre label ratings are being made available to retailers through their computers and they will be obliged to provide the information to customers. This information is drawn from a European database holding the ratings of every tyre on sale, which will be made accessible to the public.

16

There will be an ‘interim’ period before the as domestic appliances. ‘A’ is rated as being old label completely disappears. All tyres in the best and ‘E’ is the worst. If the tyre is stockrooms will have the old label applied classified as suitable for use on snow, it will to them and until these have been sold and have the Alpine peaks symbol. A symbol for replaced, customers may still see the old tyres classified as suitable for ice (known label. Meanwhile, customers are likely to as ‘Nordic tyres’) is also available. The tyre only see the new tyre labelling information noise section now has an A-C rating, to digitally via the retailer or online. help give context to the decibel figure. Stuart Jackson, TyreSafe Chair, said: “The key point of tyre labelling is to help those Tyre checks choosing a tyre to make an informed decision. Of course, once tyres are purchased, it There is concern that owners typically is important they are examined only consider cost and don’t to spot any issues caused appreciate there may be tyres by wear and tear. Fuel that are more suitable and TyreSafe advises that tyres e f ficiency offer better value but are examined frequently, braking , perhaps at a higher price. removing stones or other perform “It’s in the interest of embedded objects from vehicle owners to make the tread. If the tyre the we ance in themselves aware has lumps or bulges it noise re t and road of the information must be examined by main th informa e core contained on the a tyre specialist since tion on new tyre label to cut these could indicate n e w tyre lab the costs in fuel, as well as internal damage. Oil or el improve their safety.” grease should be removed with a suitable diluted What’s changed? detergent, and professional help A tyre’s fuel efficiency, braking should be sought if you are unsure performance in the wet and the amount about any aspect of a tyre’s condition. of road noise it generates remain the Current UK law states that tyre tread core information of the label. on cars must be at a minimum of 1.6mm However, in the new tyre label, the number across the central three quarters of the of ratings has dropped to five (from seven), tread, around its entire circumference. This in-line with other consumer products such can easily checked with the use of a 20p

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


Tyre Performance

coin, advises TyreSafe. This involves placing a 20p coin into the main tread grooves of the tyre. If the outer band of the 20p coin is obscured when it is inserted, then your tread is above the legal limit. If the outer band of the coin is visible, then your tyres may be illegal and unsafe and should be checked immediately by a qualified tyre professional. When taking the test, remember to check at least three locations around each tyre. Old tyres in lorries and buses Tyres aged ten years and older are now banned from lorries, buses and coaches on roads in England, Scotland and Wales, following research which showed that aged tyres suffer corrosion which could cause them to fail. The passing of the law makes it illegal to fit tyres aged 10 years or older to the front wheels of lorries, buses and coaches, and all wheels of minibuses. Re-treaded tyres are subject to the same requirement as first-life tyres. The date of retreading, instead of date of first manufacture, will be used to determine the tyre age. Tyres are required to have their date of manufacture marked on the sidewall. This date is shown as a four-digit number; the first two digits indicate the week number in which the tyre was manufactured and the last two digits the year. Presence of a tyre aged more than tenyears is classed as a dangerous defect. This will lead to refusal of a roadworthiness certificate at annual inspection. However, if this defect is identified elsewhere, for example at roadside, it will attract a prohibition. HGV tyre safety technology trial A Highways England trial to monitor tyre pressures, tread depth and the axle weight of HGVs has been praised for its effectiveness, and there are now plans to roll the system out at strategic route locations across the country. The trial has proved successful with one in 12 of 100,000 tyres checked found to be underinflated and 5,000 overweight vehicles found a month. Highways England’s Commercial Vehicle Incident Prevention Team (CVIPT) backed a pilot of the sophisticated WheelRight quartz senor system at Keele Services on the M6 before running year-long trials with John Lewis at Milton Keynes, AW Jenkinson Transport at Penrith, and the DVSA check site at Cuerden, on the M62. The system comprises a set of high-intensity strobe lights, all-weather cameras and driveover pressure instruments – all collecting huge amounts of data within seconds which allows for adjustments to be made to ensure that tyres are compliant with safety standards. This data is analysed to provide results instantly and reports include: tyre pressures (pass or fail based on predetermined levels); tread depths (pass or fail based on specified levels); tyre temperatures (early identification of problem tyres or wheels); tyre condition (via a 360o photographic image of the tread); and Weigh in Motion data/axle weights. CVIPT, who championed the system along with a host of other commercial vehicle safety initiatives, scooped Highways

In the new tyre label, the number of ratings has dropped to five, in-line with other consumer products such as domestic appliances. ‘A’ is rated as being the best and ‘E’ is rated as being the worst

England Chairman’s Award and the Excellence in Safety Innovation Award. The team was one of 30 winners rewarded at the third Highways England Awards, designed to recognise activities which further the company’s imperatives of safety,

customer service and delivery. This year the award ceremony was held online. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.tyresafe.org

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

17


Advertisement Feature

Driving towards a zero-emission future: How are companies doing? With the target date for stopping the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans brought forward to 2030, what are fleet operators doing to prepare for a greener future?

When the Government announced last November it was bringing forward its ban on the sale of new cars and vans powered wholly by petrol and diesel it came as no great surprise. Having been muted in the press for some time the statement simply confirmed that all businesses must now start planning the introduction of electric vehicles onto their fleets. There is a slight reprieve in that some hybrids will still be allowed beyond that date. But the reality is that during the next nine years it’s going to become increasingly expensive to drive combustion engine vehicles, more restrictive as clean air zones come into play, and companies not committing to the green agenda could find themselves being penalised in tenders. It’s for this reason that 2030 should be viewed as a final cut off rather than a target date. How are businesses responding? According to Lee Brown who heads up the Grosvenor Group’s award-winning 0Zone solution, the answer is ‘very well’. “There may be talk about range anxiety, worries about charging infrastructure and the suitability of electric vehicles,” said Lee. “Yet almost 50 per cent of all new vehicles we’re delivering to our contract hire and fleet management customers are now either fully electric or ultra-low emission. “Customers such as Weetabix, Tata Steel, Glenmorangie Whisky and many others have a clear roadmap to convert their fleet to zero emission and our 0zone team has never been busier, advising companies on their ULEV and EV policies.” Having won the Green Fleet award in December 2020 for ‘Best Leasing

18

Company’, The Grosvenor Group, which comprises Grosvenor Leasing and Interactive Fleet Management, has been leading the way in driving down emissions for its customers for many years. Celebrating 40 years of vehicle funding and fleet management in 2021, Grosvenor works with companies large and small to contract hire and manage their cars and light commercial vehicles. Its service portfolio is also designed to cater for a company’s complete mobility needs, whether that be corporate contract hire, specialist fleet management, personal contract hire (for employees opting out of the company scheme and choosing a cash allowance) and salary sacrifice. Its 0Zone solution, which helps companies make the smooth transition to ultra-low emission and electric vehicles, was ahead of its time when launched in 2017. With hands-on support from green fleet specialists, companies enjoy an assessment of their fleet’s environmental impact and a clear pathway to convert their fleet, over time, towards the ultimate goal of zero emissions. This includes green vehicle strategies, EV and ULEV budgeting, future proof vehicle policies, and support with the cultural shift to alternative fuels. Since its launch, 0Zone has grown into an intrinsic part of Grosvenor’s proposition and is made up of 3 key areas; environmental, financial and operational. “We adopt a very practical, straightforward and transparent approach so that companies with cars and light commercial vehicles are very clear about how we are going to move them towards a zero-emission future and what potential hurdles they face

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

along the way,” continued Lee. “As part of the environmental aspect of our support, we look at how to drive down CO2 levels as part of a zeroemission goal. Then operationally we look at how ULEVs and EVs fit into their current operational requirements and business needs, and as part of a financial analysis we consider the cost implications of moving to alternative fuels, including whole life costs, taxation, national insurance and other key considerations. “Companies looking to go green also benefit from an assessment of their environmental impact and because our role is to encourage drivers into alternative fuels, we also offer some innovative thinking as well as practical advice. “A good example is our ultra-low emission transition scheme. This enables drivers to try out alternative fuel vehicles on short term contracts so that they can grow accustomed to new technology, overcoming the hesitancy of change. “Salary sacrifice is also a very good option. This is financially attractive to both employer and employee for ULEVs and EVs, which is why uptake has been growing. “We can also offer workshops with drivers to answer all of their questions on electric vehicles, which goes a long way to facilitating the transition. “Between now and 2030, every time a driver chooses a traditional petrol or diesel engine it commits their employer to that car for another three to four years, which is why it’s important to offer a range of measures and support to expedite the process.” L FURTHER INFORMATION www.thegrosvenorgroup.co.uk


PUBLIC SECTOR

Special

Helping the public sector with its environmental commitments Brought to you by

GreenFleet

20 Charging Infrastructure To support the successful transition to electric vehicles, public sector organisations need a clear strategy in relation to their charging. Lorraine Chiu, decarbonisation commercial lead at Crown Commercial Service discusses workplace and home charging considerations, as well as how local authorities can support the public in the uptake of electric vehicles

22 Charging Infrastructure The Energy Saving Trust looks at some of the lessons learnt from each of the cities involved in the Go Ultra Low Cities scheme

25 Air Quality Clean Air Zones seek to restrict the most polluting vehicles from entering parts of towns and cities suffering from poor air quality. Andrea Lee from environmental law charity ClientEarth gives an update on the progress being made on these essential schemes

29 Grey Fleet With local authorities under scrutiny over their participation in national net zero ambitions, and many under financial pressure, the use of grey fleet is no longer practical or sensible. But how can it be tackled? James Lancaster, chair of the Urban Mobility Partnership, shares his views


Public Sector Special Written by Lorraine Chiu, decarbonisation commercial lead at Crown Commercial Service

20

CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE

What you need to know about electric vehicle charging infrastructure To support the successful transition to electric vehicles, public sector organisations need a clear strategy in relation to their charging. Lorraine Chiu, decarbonisation commercial lead at Crown Commercial Service, discusses workplace and home charging considerations, as well as how local authorities can support the public in the uptake of electric vehicles In December 2020 the Prime Minister announced ambitious new emissions targets setting the UK on the path to net zero by 2050. The plan aims for at least 78 per cent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by the end of the decade, compared to 1990 levels. Transport is the largest single contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the UK, and over 75 per cent of District, County,

Unitary and Metropolitan Councils have declared a ‘climate emergency’. An organisation’s fleet and transport policy provides a key opportunity to reduce emissions, improve air quality, and make a huge positive impact as the public sector to builds back greener. pu

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

The importance of charging infrastructure Electric vehicles are becoming more prevalent across operational fleets, with transition to fully electric Local buses beginning in cities across authori the UK such as Coventry and ties London, while fully electric will nee refuse collection vehicles suppor d are being trialled in Oxford. t th

e blic w transitioith their EV well-sit n through chargin ed public g facilit ies


Understanding your requirements The fleet profile is shaped by an organisation’s operational requirements and this dependency will flow down to the charging infrastructure strategy in order to ensure that operational vehicles are powered and ready to use when required. Whilst some fleets may be used solely for operational purposes, others will include a mix of business and private usage, with the uptake of green vehicle salary sacrifice schemes

Integrating back office solutions and software is often an overlooked element of vehicle charging infrastructure though it’s one of the most important aspects increasing considerably over the last 12 months. Local authority fleets are often made up of all these options as they seek to serve the needs of their regional citizens and support access to sustainable transport solutions. Vehicles that return to “depot” each night can be charged over a longer period and optimise the lower electricity tariffs, whilst for those vehicles that are required 24 hours per day consideration will need to be given for access to rapid charging facilities or charge points that can charge more than one vehicle at a time. It is also important to consider the EV battery capabilities of your existing and future vehicles as this will impact your chargepoint needs and avoid paying for charge points that cannot be maximised by your fleet profile. Sometimes the simplest vehicles to tackle first are those which go home with employees overnight, whether they be business related or part of a vehicle salary sacrifice scheme. Home charging solutions are tried and tested and can be easily incorporated into the vehicle’s lease agreement. Funding options Once you’ve understood your fleet profile and the high-level condition of your estate, you will need to consider which funding model best suits your needs. Firstly, how is your organisation going to fund the overall infrastructure? Is it a traditional purchase or leasing arrangement, with ongoing subscription fees? Do you want to generate an income or explore a supplier funded model, whereby you are commissioning a supplier to cover the costs themselves, in return for profit made on the actual cost of charging? There are a myriad of ways in which infrastructure contracts can be constructed and these should be considered against your overall strategy. In all cases it is important to check out what grant funding may be available and that you are aligned to the requirements. A full end-to-end solution Even to the most experienced fleet manager or commercial professional, contracting for vehicle charging is likely to be a new topic to consider. There are a number of elements available in a full end-to-end solution, from initial scoping and feasibility studies, through to project management of the design, installation and management, including data capture. One option is a single contract for the entire solution, which can gain cost-efficiencies via a prime contractor managing each element. Alternatively, you can split out these areas of work into discrete projects and let contracts within each area, taking advantage of niche specialisms across the industry.

Public Sector Special

To support successful transition to electric vehicles, organisations need a clear strategy in relation to their charging. How much can public and home-based charging be utilised and what restrictions are in place for installation of workplace charging? Where work-based parking is provided, organisations will also have to factor in how they can support the staff commute and visitors who travel by car. Alongside this, local authorities will also need to consider how they support the public with their transition to zero emission vehicles through the provision of well-sited public charging facilities. The market is still relatively new and fast developing with innovative solutions. This can make it challenging for buyers, with so many inputs and variables to consider.

Don’t forget the readiness assessment A primary assessment of your sites ensures their suitability and can also help you identify the most cost-effective, convenient and overall safest place to install your vehicle charging infrastructure. This independent advice can help you determine the optimum financial construct for your infrastructure, balancing all of the demands for power you may have. Undergoing feasibility studies can help you avoid the unnecessary additional costs of ongoing upgrades and repairs down the line, as well as supporting your cohesive travel strategy. Accessing the industry experts can help you navigate the technical issues too, such as groundworks and civil engineering, as well as liaison with the relevant Distribution Network Operators (DNO), to better understand local electricity transmission and demand. Behind the scenes Integrating back office solutions and software is often an overlooked element of vehicle charging infrastructure though it’s one of the most important aspects. The back office solution connects you to the charge points on your network, tracking usage to be able to determine their effectiveness. Software can automatically identify and report faults meaning you can remotely diagnose, maintain or upgrade the charge points and software to resolve problems as quickly as possible. Software can also help you integrate a payment solution into your infrastructure so you gain control over tariff prices as well as visibility in real time on costs and carbon savings through a single dashboard. Compliance with the latest Open Charge Point Protocols (OCCP) with capability to support multiple currencies and languages as well as interoperability of other networks ensures your system is not only future proof but also provides improved accessibility for users. CCS can help the transition to greener fleets CCS is here to support you, wherever you are on the journey to a more sustainable fleet. For more information on total fleet solutions, including vehicle charging infrastructure solutions, or to speak to one of CCS’ experts, visit the website. If you’re interested in receiving similar content, sign up for CCS’ Fleet Newsletter, where it shares its latest news and insights. FURTHER INFORMATION www.crowncommercial.gov.uk

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

21


Public Sector Special

CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE

The Go Ultra Low Cities Scheme The Energy Saving Trust looks at some of the lessons learnt from each of the cities involved in the Go Ultra Low Cities scheme Following the government’s commitment on 18 November 2020, to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030, we will see electric vehicles (EVs) become increasingly mainstream in the next few years. Therefore, local authorities are considering how they will support the transition to electric vehicles. Transport Minister Rachel Maclean comments: “Councils have an integral role to play in our transition to zero-emission vehicles. We have so far committed £1.3 billion to rolling out charging infrastructure, including £20m in the coming financial year, to support local authorities to install infrastructure for residents without off-street parking. We are working with councils to tackle any barriers they may face in accessing this support and I would urge councils that they must use the funding we have made available to ensure their residents can charge their cars quickly and easily.

22

(OZEV) four years ago. The scheme’s aim was to create a cohort of eight exemplar cities or regions, to lead the way in promoting electric vehicles, tackling air quality, and reducing carbon emissions. The Go Ultra Low Cities were Oxford, Milton Keynes, Nottingham, York, Dundee, London, the West of England, and the North East. Energy Saving Trust assisted OZEV to showcase each of the Go Ultra Low Cities projects by hosting an informative webinar series of events in 2020. Some key themes and lessons were learnt from this series, to inform and help other local authorities to learn and develop their own projects in the future.

“We have already supported the installation of more than 150,000 residential and almost 21,000 public chargepoints. This includes One size doesn’t fit all support to 145 local authorities to install almost Each local authority will have unique 4,000 chargepoints and with further funding challenges and require different charging announced last month, even more people are solutions to help solve issues including set to benefit from better chargepoint access.” providing for residents who do not There are many considerations in the roll have access to off street parking. out of electric vehicles and local authorities One on-street charging approach was seen are finding themselves navigating a new in Oxford, where a mixture of technologies and at times complex area of work. Lessons were trialled, including lamp post can be learned from those charging, bollards and home local authorities that have chargers with cable gullies. more mature plans There Alternatively, Milton for the transition. are ma Keynes and London looked at The Go Ultra Low conside ny a community hubs solution, Cities scheme was the roll rations in where chargepoints are launched by the o and loc ut of EVs provided in car parks Office for Zero al auth near residential areas. Emission Vehicles or ha

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

ities ve to new an navigate a d area of complex work


Leadership and political buy-in Dundee felt that leadership from the very top of the council was key to allowing the city to innovate in this area of work. The city’s council leader owns an electric vehicle (EV) and is an advocate for making the switch to electric. Nottingham also had political buy-in, which it found invaluable. The city’s deputy leader, also an EV driver, was an electric champion throughout the project, helping Nottingham to navigate through any stumbling blocks. Partnership working In London, partnership working between the key stakeholders – Transport for London (TfL), 32 London boroughs and Highways England – enabled the project to progress

Each local authority will have unique challenges and require different charging solutions to help solve issues including providing for residents who do not have access to off street parking successfully. The individual boroughs had limited resources to work on this project themselves, however, collaborating with TfL and Highways England allowed them to draw on additional knowledge and expertise. London also set up a stakeholder taskforce to discuss problems, possible solutions and to develop a delivery plan. The taskforce’s key partners included the Federation of Small Businesses, Ofgem, UK Power Networks, RAC Foundation and the British Retail Consortium. Both Dundee and Nottingham found that working with their chargepoint supplier was essential for a successful chargepoint installation. The chargepoint operators have excellent technical expertise, while the councils were able to provide local knowledge. Each of the Go Ultra Low Cities found it helpful and important to share ideas and knowledge, to avoid issues or mistakes others had made. Lloyd Allen, Go Ultra Low West, said: “I was really grateful to have the ear of other Go Ultra Low Cities when developing our approach. Sharing information between local authorities is usually common currency. It really has been invaluable for us.” Identifying internal resources A dedicated officer was required to research and understand the EV charging market in the West of England region, to inform and make decisions on the procurement strategy. In many cases, this area of work plays just a small part of an officer’s role and it can be challenging to invest the time required. Oxford made use of existing technical knowledge and expertise in other council departments. The city worked closely with colleagues in the highways department, who had wealth of experience from working on other projects which required managing and maintaining infrastructure on highways. York made changes to its council structure to allow EV developments to be prioritised, including creating a dedicated EV strategy officer and a project management role to help deliver infrastructure projects. Engaging your audience Milton Keynes saw the benefit of running a behaviour change programme to facilitate the switch to electric vehicles. The project included promotion and marketing, as well as installing infrastructure. The city felt it was important to understand customer’s needs, and introduced an EV experience centre offering myth busting EV expert advice, vehicle displays and test drives. Dundee delivered a local marketing campaign after the city realised that residents

Public Sector Special

In London, these chargepoints can also be used by businesses during the day. Dundee focused on the rapid charging hub model, installing three hubs with a fourth planned. These hubs include six rapid chargers, three 22kW chargers and battery storage. The city struggled with an on-street solution, as lamp posts are located at the back of the footway, however, it has been trialling pop up chargers, similar to those tested in Oxford. York is looking to ensure it has a mixture of charging types and sufficient infrastructure in the right places, such as council-owned car parks. The city is focusing on fast charging in council car parks and hyper hubs on the outskirts of the city.

did not know what the EV charging hubs in the city were. The local authority organised focus groups looking at barriers and issues with local infrastructure, before developing a Drive Dundee Electric campaign. The Drive Dundee Electric Campaign has since hosted several events, including a ‘Chat and Charge’ event, which saw Dundee Council meet electric vehicle drivers and members of the public at the EV hub to exchange knowledge and encourage the uptake of electric vehicles. Feedback from local businesses in Nottingham found that most preferred to learn from their peers, with business to business engagement proving more powerful and persuasive than information from council officers. Other sustainable travel modes Electric vehicles are not the only solution in the transition to low carbon transport in our towns and cities. EVs should be placed within a wider travel hierarchy that prioritises active travel and public transport journeys first and promotes trips by car only when there are no alternatives. Oxford was keen to avoid installing install EV charging infrastructure in workplaces and shopping centres or supermarkets, as the city prefers to promote active travel and public transport to make journeys to these destinations, rather than risk ‘locking in’ car use. Milton Keynes is continuing to focus on the wider sustainable travel picture by investing in electric buses, car clubs and demand responsive services, as well as EV infrastructure. Dundee is installing micro hubs that not only provide EV charging, but also car sharing bays and electric bikes. Each city is still very much at the start of their transition journey into providing EV charging infrastructure and all have learned valuable lessons from the work carried out in the last four years. If you would like to find out more about any of the Go Ultra Low Cities, all webinar recordings can be found on the Local Government Support Programme advice web page. Energy Saving Trust’s Local Government Support Programme is funded by the DfT and helps councils in England make better sense of their EV options. Its advice is free, independent, and tailored to different stages of implementing an EV strategy. FURTHER INFORMATION www.energysavingtrust.org.uk

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

23


Public Sector Special

EXPERT OPINION

A holistic approach to meeting climate targets With the ban on new ICE vehicles brought forward to 2030, the pressure is on public sector fleets to make the switch to electric and other alternatively fuelled vehicles. But it’s not just about the vehicles purchased. Calum Slowther from vehicle movement specialist Engineius shares how the public sector can take a holistic approach to carbon reduction With the ban on new ICE vehicles brought forward to 2030, the pressure is on public sector fleets to make the switch to electric and other alternatively fuelled vehicles. What should they consider before making the switch? As the old saying goes: Fail to prepare and prepare to fail. A lot of preparation is needed and can be done before electric vehicles actually arrive in the car park or on driveways for the first time. In the delivery process, we often find preparation has not been done and it results in delays to the EV roll out programme. Practical actions include surveying staff to find out which have charge points already installed, or good access to public ones (and who wants an EV the most!). Fleet operators can also begin installing charge points well ahead of delivery, as well as create training materials for staff on how to use EVs. These can be put online so people can easily access them and read at their own speed. EVs, in particular, are in short supply right now. Taking proactive actions prior to switching will ensure that public sector fleets are ready to adopt EVs as soon as they are available. The public sector is expected to lead the way when it comes to sustainability. How can they be creative in meeting their climate targets, looking beyond just vehicles? The closest place to look is their vehicle supply chain. Vehicle movement providers, for example, vary greatly in their carbon footprints. Those using chaser vehicles to drop off and collect drivers are driving more than double the necessary miles. Our work with one of the largest fleets in the country in 2019 suggested they were driving 24 miles for every 10 miles of necessary vehicle movement, purely through ferrying drivers for servicing visits. At Engineius, on the other hand, our drivers organise their own travel using public transport. Beyond that, eat plants and continue to do meetings on Zoom! In what ways can the government accelerate the adoption of zero emission transport? First and foremost, the government needs to ensure that 100 per cent of electricity is

24

To be creative in meeting carbon targets, the public sector should look at their vehicle supply chain. Vehicle movement providers vary greatly in their carbon footprints. Those using chaser vehicles to drop off and collect drivers are driving more than double the necessary miles generated from renewable energy sources. This dictates how environmentally friendly EVs actually are (as well as other electricity-using devices). In Germany, for example, much of the electricity supply is still generated by coal power, meaning EVs are less environmentally friendly. To encourage usage, it is key that governments make it cheap and convenient to use zero emission transport. If they do that, adoption will look after itself as consumers will naturally make choices in the environment’s interest as well as their own. Regarding vehicle movement specifically, do not get your new EV delivered on a transporter. This quickly gives your zero emission vehicle a carbon footprint before you have driven it a mile. A significant amount of business travel in the public sector is undertaken by drivers in their own vehicles. But with ‘grey fleet’ vehicles generally being older, more polluting and potentially more dangerous, what can the public sector do to manage the issue This is clearly a difficult area that is not easily solved. Our advice to public sector fleets would be to measure grey fleet usage and its carbon footprint. At Engineius, we are firm believers that you cannot manage what you don’t measure. The numbers might not immediately say what you want them to, but they give you a starting point and impetus for change, as well as information on what you need to do to bring about change. One really practical example of the power of data in helping the environment is our work with one of the biggest dealer groups in the country. They have over 50 sites across England and were transporting nearly 60 per cent of inter-dealer transfers on transporters.

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

By playing back these figures to senior management, they took the decision to ban all transported movements (much worse for the environment than driven movements) for used vehicles. Transported movements now account for only 30 per cent of movements. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.engineius.co.uk

Calum Slowther, commercial director, Engineius Calum Slowther is Engineius’ commercial director. He joined the company as employee number one in March 2017. Since designing the company’s go to market strategy and proposition, he has been responsible for scaling the business. He is now also responsible for ESG at Engineius, ensuring business is done responsibly.


Clean Air Zones: State of the nation Air pollution has been in the spotlight recently to take them to court three times over following the inquest into the death of Ella the last ten years. This has resulted in 63 Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, a nine-year-old girl who local authorities across England and Wales lived in London and suffered a fatal asthma being ordered to identify local proposals attack in 2013. For the first time, a coroner to tackle illegal levels of pollution in their concluded that air pollution was an official areas in the shortest possible time. factor in someone’s death and recommended Road transport, in particular diesel vehicles, the adoption of stricter air pollution laws. is the biggest source of illegal levels of The decision recognises the dangerous nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution direct and fatal damage that in towns and cities across the UK, exposure to pollution can responsible for up to 80 per cent of After wreak on a person’s the problem where illegal levels it went life. Unfortunately, are recorded, according to the on 15 M live poor air quality government’s own analysis. affects the lives To deal with this Bath be arch, of hundreds of first city came the thousands more Air Zon with a Clean people in the e outsid UK who have L ondon e of no choice but to breathe dangerously dirty air – in particular the young, older people and other vulnerable members of society. But in spite of everything we know about the danger, 75 per cent of air quality reporting zones are still charting illegal levels of air pollution.

CAZs and business: what’s the impact? CAZs do not ban vehicles: they only affect those vehicles that do not meet the minimum emission standards. They only have an effect once they are implemented but they also provide a strong signal to drivers and fleet managers, encouraging the purchase of cleaner vehicles before they even come into force. This is vital for business planning. In response to a survey last year, 76 per cent of businesses said they will replace vehicles to meet CAZ and ULEZ standards – in turn, E

Written by Andrea Lee, clean air campaigns manager, ClientEarth

Clean Air Zones seek to restrict the most polluting vehicles from entering parts of towns and cities suffering from poor air quality. Andrea Lee from environmental law charity ClientEarth gives an update on the progress being made on these essential schemes

problem, Clean Air Zones (CAZs) are a good starting point: they seek to restrict the most polluting vehicles from entering the most polluted parts of towns and cities. The government identified CAZs as the most effective way to meet legal limits for NO2 in the shortest time possible. And we know they work: London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) reduced NO2 pollution levels by 37 per cent in the first two months of 2020 before the pandemic struck.

Public Sector Special

AIR QUALITY

Clean Air Zones: taking stock and looking forward The UK Government’s lack of action to cut air pollution has forced ClientEarth

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

25


GreenFleet Talks

Electric Fleets GreenFleet

TALKS with LeasePlan’s Matt Walters

GreenFleet’s Kate Armitage and LeasePlan’s Matt Walters discuss fleets transitioning to EVs, government policies and incentives

GF Driving e-Mobility 26

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


Public Sector Special

 it’s a reputational boost for those companies. In London, according to analysis by the Greater London Authority, there was a 55 per cent increase in compliant vehicles over the two years running up to the implementation of the ULEZ in April 2019. UK CAZs: state of the nation After delays and backtracking, we are starting to see long-awaited progress on these essential schemes. Bath became the first city with a Clean Air Zone outside of London, after its CAZ went live on 15 March. Their CAZ does not include restrictions on private passenger cars but is a crucial step in protecting people’s health in the city. Next is Birmingham, which is preparing to deliver a Class D Clean Air Zone that applies to all vehicle classes on 1 June 2021. This will be followed by Bristol, whose City Council has formally approved a plan for a Class D Clean Air Zone. It will restrict the most polluting of all vehicle classes from the city centre and is scheduled to go live by October 2021. Bradford Council also recently approved a Class C Clean Air Zone set to be introduced in January 2022. Greater Manchester meanwhile has reconfirmed its commitment to introduce a Clean Air Zone in Spring 2022, subject to a number of exemptions, but is being slow in finalising its plans. In March, London tightened the emission standards for its city-wide Low Emission Zone, affecting buses, lorries, coaches and some vans. This brings it in line with the ULEZ, which applies to all vehicles classes and will be expanding from the city centre to cover all of inner London on 25 October. Help needed from government While these commitments are cause for optimism, we need to see all businesses, big and small, adopting cleaner vehicles in order to tackle the air quality crisis. But for this to happen, much more is needed from government, both in terms of regulatory certainty around the approval of CAZs and financial support. Without these, planning becomes difficult for both large and small businesses.

CAZs do not ban vehicles: they only affect those vehicles that do not meet the minimum emission standards. They only have an effect once they are implemented but they also provide a strong signal to drivers and fleet managers, encouraging the purchase of cleaner vehicles before they even come into force Businesses urgently need to know what is going to happen at a local level, but we also need to see a clearer long-term vision for how the UK will transition to a zero emission transport system, matched with interim milestones and targeted funding. Financial support for businesses developing the technologies that support a zero emission transport system will give the UK a real stake in the future of automotive manufacturing and create high-quality jobs that are distributed across the country. In addition, a long-term plan for delivering charging infrastructure is also essential to provide clarity and support for commercial fleet charging infrastructure. This will help unlock the private sector investment necessary to help shape the UK’s electric vehicle market. The announcement earlier this year from the Department for Transport that the electric vehicle Workplace Charging Scheme will be opened up to small to medium enterprises was welcomed. However, this was later contrasted in the budget by an unexpected reduction to the government’s plug-in car grant scheme for electric cars, vans and lorries. The trend towards a cleaner and healthier zero emission transport system is not only underway but is accelerating. We have a huge opportunity for this to deliver economic as well as health and environmental benefits. It is time for government to walk the talk. Only half the story? Tackling illegal NO2 pollution is a major priority – but many parts of the UK also

report levels of particulate matter (PM) – another toxic pollutant – that, while within current legal limits, are well over the levels recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). A significant proportion of PM pollution also comes from brake, tyre, clutch and road surface wear which means that even zero exhaust emission vehicles still produce pollution. With the forthcoming Environment Bill – the country’s flagship piece of environmental legislation now that we have left the European Union – the government has a golden opportunity to show its level of ambition. That’s why it needs to adopt stronger legal limits that drive action to better protect people’s health and make sure that no part of the country exceeds the levels recommended by the WHO. The coroner in Ella’s case agrees that this would prevent future deaths. ClientEarth, alongside the WHO itself and other UK health organisations, believes that this must be achieved by 2030 at the very latest. Toxic air is clearly not going to disappear on its own. Solutions are at our fingertips and with the will of businesses and most importantly government, we can turn the situation around. L

Andrea Lee is clean air campaigns manager at environmental law charity ClientEarth. FURTHER INFORMATION www.clientearth.org

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

27


Zwings is a community-first micro-mobility operator and is widely considered to be the leading British e-scooter and bike sharing company for local authorities. Zwings strives to help millions of people to reimagine the way they travel in cities, towns and on campuses. Through the use of safety focussed vehicles and technology, Zwings is paving the way in Britain to bring sustainable, convenient and innovative transport to communities across the UK. We have maintained a very low incident in all of our city operations due to our hyper focus on rider education and rule enforcement. We welcome you to get in touch with us if you are interested in a micromobilty service for your community.

www.zwings.co.uk Community@zwings.co.uk 020 3882 0611

@Zwingsmobility

@Zwingsmobility

@ZwingsmobilityUK

@Zwings

From car-club to full mobility solution phasing out petrol cars in favour of petrol electric hybrids and are migrating even more of our fleet over to full EVs. We are also innovating with new ways of delivering EVs – such as in Dundee where EVs do not need a full time charger and fixed bay but operate in a geofenced zone using top ups from rapid chargers. There are exciting times ahead for Co Wheels, as we announce new offers and innovations for our business customer we will be announcing them on our LinkedIn page – so why not follow us. For further information check out our new website below. Co Wheels is changing – you may have noticed our new branding on our vehicles, our website and social media – but it is an even bigger change for us. Our rebranding marks the start of us moving on from just being a car club to a full featured mobility solution provider. Initially you will notice our fresh new branding and our totally new website. But over the coming year you will see more improvements to our booking system and mobile app as we make improvements in response to customer requests.

28

We will also be expanding our fleet offer to businesses who want to cut their CO2 output on business mileage as well as still providing competitive on street PAYG solutions for smaller businesses and private users looking to replace owning a car. It is our intention to offer a broader range of mobility services and collaborations to make it even easier to give up owning a car and using different forms of mobility instead. And even though we already have one of the greenest mixed fuel car share fleets in the UK, we are already

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

FURTHER INFORMATION www.co-wheels.org.uk/corporate info@co-wheels.org.uk tel 0191 375 1050


Changing the ‘grey fleet’ mindset With local authorities under scrutiny over their participation in national net zero ambitions, and many under financial pressure, the use of grey fleet is no longer practical or sensible. But how can it be tackled? James Lancaster, chair of the Urban Mobility Partnership, shares his views Solutions to tackle grey fleet almost no justification for this, but it does There are solutions to address grey fleet and act as a further incentive for employees to alternatives to the use of these vehicles. use their own vehicle for business travel. Now is an opportune moment to effectively In this regard, there needs to be a address business travel practice. We have change in mindset and an establishment of had a year where, for many public sector environmental concerns as a priority for local organisations, business travel will have authorities. There must be a move away from been limited due to the Covid-19 pandemic. the mentality where the use of grey fleet is Whilst the rapid change in many working effectively used as a salary bump, cultures, leading to increased working as this only serves to make from home and the widespread senior management and Unless use of video conferencing, will staff reluctant to move we bro have undoubtedly changed to more sustainable incentiv adly many business practices and cost-effective for the long term, there modes of travel. transpo ise shared r will inevitably always be Environmental t s olu there is some need for business concerns should be a real ri tions, travel, particularly at the forefront of sk that people will retu in public services. public sector minds t o using rn With the successful and addressing owned privately vaccination programme, grey fleet should vehicles there is a sense amongst be no different. everyone that we will begin to Analysis conducted return to our normal lives and this by the Urban Mobility will inevitably include business travel. Partnership found that across Therefore, this is the moment for public 400 councils in Great Britain over sector bodies to take a real lead on moving to 200 million miles were conducted using sustainable transport solutions and ensuring grey fleet vehicles. Some local authorities that there is not a return to grey fleet conducting more than 10 million miles usage. Public sector bodies can offer a clear using grey fleet vehicles. Given that some example to the wider population that it is of this data covers the introduction of safe to return to public and shared transport working from home as a result of Covidand there needs to be clear messages from 19,this is a staggeringly high number of national government in this regard. If we miles to have been conducted by some of allow people to return to relying on private E the most polluting vehicles on the road.

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

Written by James Lancaster, Chair of the Urban Mobility Partnership

Grey fleet vehicles have been widely used in the public sector for a long time. The policy of allowing employees to use their own privately owned vehicles for business travel and be reimbursed for the miles they drive has been seen as simple and convenient by organisations of all sizes. However, with local authorities under scrutiny over supporting national net zero ambitions and many under financial pressure, the use of grey fleet is no longer practical or sensible. Unfortunately, the use of grey fleet has become part and parcel of public sector bodies’ business practice and is rarely addressed or seen as a major issue. With privately owned vehicles on UK roads having an average age of 8.5 years, the use of grey fleet flies in the face of national and local policy objectives to decarbonise transport. Given that a number of areas across the UK are having to implement clean air zones due to poor air quality, it is remarkable that the public sector continues to incentivise the use of some of the most polluting forms of transport. Yet there are reasons behind this. The way mileage reimbursement works, it is often the case that the use of a privately owned vehicle for business travel is not just due for convenience but also a financial incentive for many employees. Despite the Approved Mileage Allowance Payments (AMAP) system stating that employees should be reimbursed up to 45p per mile for grey fleet usage, many public sector bodies have been found to pay even more than the suggested rate. There is

Public Sector Special

GREY FLEET

29


GreenFleet Talks

Electric Futures GreenFleet

TALKS with LeasePlan’s Matt Walters

GreenFleet’s Kate Armitage and LeasePlan’s Matt Walters discuss meeting the 2030 ICE ban, EV charging infrastructure requirements and the role of Hydrogen

GF Driving e-Mobility 30

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


Imperial College London, Enterprise Rent-A-Car and Brompton Bike Hire have partnered to launch a mobility hub at Imperial’s South Kensington campus. This is part of a four-month academic trial that will assess whether staff travel can be transformed by giving people more choices for sustainable and active transport.

Public Sector Special

Mobility hub to assess greener staff travel

The hub will feature two Enterprise Car Club vehicles, one electric and one hydrogen powered, plus 25 Brompton folding bikes, including five electric bikes. Staff who register for the trial will receive free membership of the Enterprise Car Club and both cars and bikes will be booked through Enterprise’s Car Club app. Access to the cars and bikes will be free for the duration of the pilot. The hub will enable academic research to see how commuting patterns and day-to-day travel can be changed from relying on owning the means of transport to using shared transport. Surveys will be carried out to identify changes in travel behaviour and attitudes towards the use of shared resources. The research team aims to build on the study’s conclusion with further research into the future of urban mobility.

Analysis conducted by the Urban Mobility Partnership found that across 400 councils in Great Britain over 200 million miles were conducted using grey fleet vehicles  car use for business travel, it will inevitably entrench these behaviours and will become even more challenging to address. As a result, we will fail to improve air quality across the UK and reach wider policy objectives. With new administrations after the local and combined authority elections, grey fleet reduction should be a key part of clean air and transport plans of all local and combined authorities, and they should work with all public sector bodies within their area to ensure they are also seeking to tackle grey fleet. Public sector bodies need to work with operators to develop solutions which make use of all types of shared and public transport including public transport, bike hire and bike share and daily rental and car club schemes. It has been shown that utilising just one of these types of solutions can have a significant impact on carbon emissions. A partnership between Enterprise Car Club and Highlands

Council to move away from grey fleet use had a dramatic impact on the council’s carbon emissions. Emissions through grey fleet use were estimated to exceed 2,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide every year and, given that the council was unable to provide specific data on the types of vehicles used for business travel, the true levels of emissions could have been much higher. The change in practice to using new cleaner and more efficient Enterprise Car Club vehicles for necessary business travel led to a reduction of more than 825,000 in miles conducted by council employees. The carbon footprint from business travel was also reduced by approximately 377 tonnes of carbon dioxide. This represents a reduction in the council’s environmental impact of 19 per cent. Getting all stakeholders onboard This dramatic change in policy and its subsequent environmental benefits

demonstrates that it is possible to find alternatives to grey fleet in any situation. But in order to achieve this, it is vital that there is a commitment to do so from all stakeholders and collaboration between operators and public sector bodies. Beyond addressing the emissions produced by grey fleet travel, changing business travel policies and ensuring employees make use of shared and public transport will ultimately have an impact on the way employees commute to and from work and may in turn change the way they move around in their own time. As we come out of Covid-19, there is a real opportunity to change the way we move around as a society. The pandemic has seen positive trends, such as the uptake of active travel, but unless we broadly incentivise shared transport solutions, there is a real risk that people will return to using privately owned vehicles. Addressing grey fleet policies is a fundamental starting point for the public sector to demonstrate leadership in reducing emissions and supporting net zero ambitions. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.ump.org.uk

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

31


Road Test Written by Richard Gooding

ROAD TEST

Vauxhall Corsa-e Elite Nav 11kW Vauxhall’s first all-electric car, Richard Gooding discovers the Vauxhall Corsa-e’s efficient and ease-of-use personality should win it many fleet friends

What is it? Now part of the Stellantis group, Vauxhall can rely on electrification technology developed by other brands to power its models. The Corsa-e is based on the ‘e-Common Modular Platform’ (e-CMP) also shared with the Peugeot e-208 and DS 3 Crossback E-Tense, and is now joined by the Mokka-e SUV and a range of electric light commercials. What range does it have? The Corsa-e’s 100kW/134bhp electric motor and 50kWh lithium-ion battery are good for a quoted 209 miles of range. In real-world conditions, we recorded a 178-mile maximum range in, admittedly colder weather conditions, but after also testing the electric 208 and DS 3 Crossback, the Corsa-e was the car that came closest to its quoted range. How long does it take to charge? The Corsa-e comes with a choice of 7.4kW or 11kW on-board chargers. This means while the 7 hours and 30-minute charge time on a 7kW home wallbox doesn’t change, the 15-80 per cent charge time is reduced from 5 hours to 3 hours and 20 minutes on a 22kW point if you choose the more powerful chargerequipped car. The respective 45 and 30 minutes the 7.4kW-spec and 11kW-spec cars take to charge from 15-80 per cent capacity on 50kW and 100kw rapid chargers are also the same. On a three-pin domestic 2.3kW/10A supply, the Corsa-e takes just over 24 hours to charge from 0-100 per cent capacity. How does it drive? More stylish than previous Corsas, Vauxhall’s latest small car is a nicely styled machine. A black roof on SRi Nav Premium models and above gives a more personalised appearance, and if you choose the optional £550 Voltaic Blue or £650 Power Orange paint, the Corsa-e is even more distinctive. The cabin is typically Vauxhall, with cautious and sensible styling, but that’s not to detract from its usability. The seven-inch digital instrument display gives a wealth of

32

information pertaining to range and economy, and as opposed to some other small cars, Vauxhall has resisted the urge to bury the climate controls in the cental touchscreen menus, a bank of physical controls sited underneath the infotainment system. Material quality is improved over previous Corsas, too. The Corsa-e’s 192lb ft/260Nm of torque gives it a brisk feeling and it nips in and out of city traffic with ease. Direct steering and a helpful agility mean piloting the Corsa-e is very easy, and the car has a much quieter ride than its Peugeot relative, resulting in a more refined feel on the move. Three driving modes – Normal, Eco and Sport – tailor the driving experience and two-stage regenerative braking allows for near-one pedal operation. A gear lever sprouting from the centre console just needs a gentle tap back to activate the more severe ‘B’ mode, another thing in keeping with the electric Vauxhall’s ease of use nature. What does it cost? Vauxhall has kept the Corsa-e range quite simple, with just three trim levels to choose from. After the Government Plug-in Car Grant (PiCG), the entry level SE Nav Premium model costs £27,140 and comes with 16inch alloy wheels, auto lights and wipers, climate control, cruise control, LED headlights, keyless start, a seven-inch digital instrument cluster and a colour touchscreen infotainment system of the same size. The SRi Nav Premium models begin from £28,390 and adds 17-inch alloy wheels, LED tail lights, sports seats, rear privacy glass, a black roof and black A-pillars. As tested here, the range-topping Corsa-e Elite Nav Premium is priced from £30,545, our car being the 11kW version at £31,395. Standard equipment includes LED Matrix headlights, part-leather trim, a rear view camera, as well as a 10-inch colour infotainment touchscreen system. How much does it cost to tax? In common will all EVs, Vauxhall’s electric supermini is exempt from VED charges, both in

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

the first and following years. The zero-emission Corsa also attracts a one per cent Benefit in Kind (BIK) rate for 2021-2022, rising to two per cent in 2022-2023 and 2023-2024. Why does my fleet need one? It might share technology with other cars in the Stellantis empire, but that’s not to take away the job that Vauxhall has done with the Corsa-e. A wholly resolved and good to drive machine, its ease of use and relative ‘normality’ shouldn’t put off fleet drivers who aren’t used to driving electric. Its interior might be lacking some of the pizazz of its Peugeot e-208 stablemate, but its simpler style will benefit those same new EV drivers. Cheaper than both its Peugeot and DS in-house rivals, the small electric Vauxhall will attract drivers wanting a fuss-free and efficient EV package from a trusted and wellrespected brand. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.vauxhall.co.uk

Vauxhall Corsa e Elite Nav Premium ENGINE:

100kW/134bhp electric motor and 50kWh lithium-ion battery

RANGE (WLTP):

209 miles

EFFICIENCY (Combined, WLTP): 3.7 miles/kWh GF EFFICIENCY:

4.0 miles/kWh

CO2:

0g/km

VED:

£0 first-year, £0 thereafter

BIK:

1%

PRICE (OTR):

£31,395 (including government PiCG, £31,945 as tested)


Vauxhall has embraced electrification, adding the allelectric Mokka-e SUV and Combo-e Life, and plug-in hybrid Grandland X Hybrid4 to its passenger car range. A brace of zero-emission light commercials are also available now or on their way.

Road Test

Charge of the Light Brigade

Pure electric versions of the mid-sized Vivaro are already here, and use the same 100kW motor as the Corsa-e. Starting from £29,028.33 excluding VAT once the Government PiVG has been deducted, the Vivaro-e is available with a choice of 50kWh or 75kWh batteries. The official range is 143 miles for the 50kWh version, rising to 205 miles for the 75kWh van. The Vauxhall commercial supports 100kW rapid charging, an 80 per cent charge taking as little as 30 minutes for the 50kWh models. Maximum volume is 6.6m3, with a 1,226kg payload. Vauxhall has already received customer fleet orders for its new electric LCV star. British Gas has placed an order for 2,000 Vivaro-es, and the company has already secured fleet deals with Openreach, fruit and vegetable box supplier Riverford. Electric long-wheelbase versions of the passenger-carrying Vivaro Life are open for order, too, the 50kWh Vivaro-e Life priced from £32,495. Order books for the smaller Combo-e are set to open in autumn 2021, the allelectric panel van promising to deliver a single charge range of up to 171 miles, and rapid charging of its 50kWh battery to 80 per cent capacity in just 30 minutes. Boasting a 4.4m3 load volume and an 800kg maximum payload, the Combo-e comes in two wheelbase lengths, using the 100kW motor shared with the Vivaro-e, Corsa-e and Mokka-e.

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

33


Road Test

ROAD TEST

DS 3 Crossback E-Tense Ultra Prestige

What is it? Based on the same Stellantis ‘e-Common Modular Platform’ (e-CMP) also found under the Peugeot e-208 and e-2008 as well as the Vauxhall Corsa-e, the DS 3 Crossback E-Tense is the all-electric version of DS’ smallest car. Re-invented as a supermini-sized crossover, the latest DS 3 is joined by plug-in hybrid versions of the DS 7 and DS 9 – the DS 4 follows – as the marque pivots to a more upmarket brand with a prominent electrification strategy. What range does it have? Using the same 100kW/134bhp electric motor and 50kWh lithium-ion battery as the other small electric cars in the Stellantis group, DS quotes the 3 Crossback E-Tense as having a zero-emissions range of between 191 and 206 miles. The Ultra Prestige tested here has an official 198-mile distance, although during realworld testing, we recorded a 149-mile maximum range in changeable weather conditions. How long does it take to charge? With a fast-charge capability, the DS 3 Crossback E-Tense’s battery can be refilled from flat to 80 per cent capacity in 30 minutes from a 100kW chargepoint. The electric DS 3 can be specified with a 7.4kW or 11kW on-board charger, the highest rated unit bringing down the 0-100 per cent refilling times on public 11kW and 22kW points to just over five hours. Connected to a 2.3kW/10A electricity supply, the DS 3 E-Tense takes around 24 hours to fully refill its battery. How does it drive? A smart looker, the reinvigorated DS 3’s elevated stance and five-door body make it a more practical proposition. Traditional DS 3 styling motifs such as the ‘shark fin’ B-pillar are still present, joined by a chrome grille and LED rear lights, while Tesla-like pop-out electric door handles are very cool for a small car.

Inside, the electric DS breaks away from its Stellantis platform siblings in quite dramatic style. The cabin is very avantgarde, the dashboard trimmed in luxurious materials. In practice, it’s a little over-designed, with haptic feedback diamond-shaped buttons and no physical heating or ventilation buttons, making adjustment of the air conditioning a dive into the touchscreen menus. The electric window switches are mounted on the centre console as the doors feature large air vents, but the console aluminium switches themselves are a triumph. With 192lb ft/260Nm of torque from its 100kW motor, the DS 3 Crossback E-Tense feels quick, made more brisk by choosing the Sport driving mode. Relatively athletic for a highrider, the small DS rides well and is refined. An Eco driving mode and two-stage regenerative braking setup allows more energy harvesting to top up the batteries under motion, the more intense ‘B’ mode chosen by tapping the gear lever back. What does it cost? The DS 3 Crossback E-Tense range starts at £31,500 (including the Government’s Plug-in Car Grant, PiCG) for the Prestige model. Equipment includes 17-inch ‘Madrid’ alloy wheels, automatic wipers, electrically folding door mirrors and rear parking sensors. Move up to the £31,900 Performance Line and aluminium sports pedals and alcantara trim become standard. The £37,400 Performance Line+ gains 18-inch ‘Monza’ alloy wheels, LED matrix headlights and LED rear lights, keyless entry, and a 10-inch connected navigation infotainment system. The design-led £38,400 Ines de la Fressange gets special Ink Blue metallic paint, a black roof, and red exterior highlights, while the top-spec £38,6000 Ultra Prestige model as tested here adds leather seats, a reversing camera and an advanced safety pack.

How much does it cost to tax? DS’ only pure electric model is currently exempt from all VED charges, in the first year of registration and subsequent years. Charged one per cent Benefit in Kind (BIK) rate for 2021-2022, the DS 3 E-Tense’s rate rises to two per cent in 2022-2023 and 2023-2024. Why does my fleet need one? Certainly a more specialised and unique proposition than its Stellantis group stablemates, the DS 3 Crossback E-Tense is an interesting if slighty flawed proposition. Its interior is a notch above its relatives in both quality and design, if ultimately over-designed in terms of usability. However, whichever way you cut it, the electric DS 3 is a smart-looking machine with a luxurious interior, and those strengths alone will appeal to fleet drivers who want a more prestige and elevated small car packed with technology. There is also quite literal price to pay in the fact that the electric DS costs more than either of its in-house electric Peugeot or Vauxhall rivals, and is a little less efficient. However, the drivers DS is seeking will likely look past these factors and will investigate the electric DS 3 based on its upmarket image and feel, qualities it very much possesses. Combined with its zero-emission drivetrain, many will find appeal here. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.dsautomobiles.co.uk

DS 3 Crossback E-Tense Ulta Prestige ENGINE: 100kW/134bhp electric motor and 50kWh lithium-ion battery RANGE (WLTP):

191-206 miles

EFFICIENCY (combined, WLTP): 3.5 miles/kWh GF EFFICIENCY:

3.3 miles/kWh

CO2:

0g/km

VED:

£0 first-year, £0 thereafter

BIK:

1%

PRICE (OTR): £38,600 (including government PiCG, £39,650 as tested)

34

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

Written by Richard Gooding

Written by Richard Gooding

Reinvented with crossover style, Richard Gooding discovers that DS’ only all-electric offering will appeal to those who desire a well-appointed, practical and luxurious compact EV


Road Test

FIRST DRIVE

Written by Richard Gooding

Citroën Ami Trading on a name from years gone by, Richard Gooding finds that everything about Citroën’s new all-electric city star owes nothing to the past What is it? Discovering its electrification mojo, Citroën has embraced the arrival of electric and plug-in hybrid cars with great speed. As well as introducing products to capture more mainstream markets such as the new e-C4 and C5 Aircross PHEV, it has, true to its heritage, created something a little more individualistic with the Ami. A city car that’s technically not a car at all, the Ami is a light quadricyle which can be either bought or rented by drivers as young as 14-years-old without a driving licence. Already on sale in France, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Portugal and Germany, the green light is yet to be given for the UK, but if the tiny Citroën was to arrive on British streets, drivers would need to be 16-years-old and be content to sit on the ‘wrong’ side to drive, as there would be no right-hand drive version. Providing strong competition for Renault’s Twizy, a commercial version is on sale from June. What range does it have? Powered by a 6kW electric motor and 5.5kWh lithium-ion battery as tiny as its exterior dimensions, the Ami can travel up to 44 miles on a single charge. How long does it take to charge? With its integral domestic plug tucked into one of its door apertures, the Ami takes three hours to charge from a 220V socket. Citroën states that it can also be plugged into a public chargepoint or wallbox. How does it drive? Striking enough in how it looks, the Ami is also arresting in its tiny size. Just 2.41m long, 1.39m wide and 1.52m high, the little ‘car’ is like nothing else on the road. Its plastic body keeps the Ami light (485kg with battery) and to reduce build costs, the doors are identical on both sides – the driver’s door opens from the rear, the passenger’s has a conventional rearhinged opening. Full of quirky details, the front

and rear panels are the same, too, with only the lights differentiating them, and fold-up windows echo those on that other Citroën mass mobility icon, the 2CV. Inside, while there’s no escaping the Ami’s utilitarian roots with a largely plastic interior, there is some style. Different brightly coloured dashboard inserts, accessories, door straps and pockets bring colour to the cabin, and a smartphone cradle and USB port are practical touches. The My Citroën mobile app can be accessed via the car’s DAT@MI connected box and shows information such as range, battery status and time remaining for a 100 per cent charge. Nearby public charging stations can also be located. The Ami may be classed as a quadricyle like the Renault Twizy, but it feels much more like a car, due to its more conventional car-like structure, doors, and the fact that two people can sit side-by-side. With 50 per cent of the total body surface being glass, the Ami can get very hot, but the 6kW motor gives good pace, and possessed of an agility that makes it a hoot to drive, the Ami certainly attracts attention. A tight 7.20m turning circle is ideal for scooting about the city, the natural home for a vehicle like this. What does it cost? Drivers can choose to buy or rent the Ami in the European countries where it is already on sale. In France, the Citroën is available to buy from €6,000 including VAT, which translates to an approximate UK price of £6,000. Longterm rental starts at €19.99 per month for a 10,000km (6,200 miles) contract, with an initial payment of €2,644 including VAT needed, too. The Ami is also available on the Stellantis Free2Move car-sharing scheme, currently priced from €0.26/min (subject to a monthly subscription of €9.90 with no commitment). Four Ami models are offered, beginning with the Ami Ami. More exterior and interior style is added with the Ami Orange, Ami Khaki, Ami

Grey and Ami Blue, with further personalisation offered with the Ami Pop and Ami Vibe. Available from €6,490 in France (including the €900 Government ecological bonus deduction), the Ami Cargo can be rented from €24.18 per month, after a deposit of €250.43. With a payload of up to 140kg, and a maximum load capacity of 400 litres, the Ami Cargo light commercial features a sevenpart cargo module, a folding table and secure smartphone storage, as well as a driver/cargo partition, and an adjustable floor. Why does my fleet need one? Appealing to goods and services fleets operating in cities, as well as drivers who don’t need to own a car, we can see applications where Citroën’s new city star would work very well, especially in Ami Cargo guise. Ideal for last-mile delivery and shuttle services, the tiny, cheeky Citroën would also win many friends on municipal, resort, and ecological organisation fleets where its zero-emission range would be enough and charging would be easy. Small in stature but big on personality, Citroën UK is taking expressions of interest for the Ami at bit.ly/3yqfrXV. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.citroen.co.uk

Citroën Ami ENGINE: 6kW/8bhp electric motor and 5.5kWh lithium-ion battery RANGE (WLTP): CO2:

44 miles 0g/km

PRICE: €6,000 (France, including VAT, or €19.99 per month rental)

Issue 133 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

35


Road Test Written by Richard Gooding

FIRST DRIVE

Kia Sorento 2 PHEV Packed with hybrid technology, Richard Gooding finds the first plug-in version of its Sorento SUV offers impressive and spacious zero-emissions-capable practicality What is it? Since the launch of the first Sorento in 2002, Kia has taken massive strides in the UK. Now encompassing a 12-strong core model family, the South Korean company is more firmly focusing on its electrification strategy. Seven models already offer hybrid, plug-in hybrid or full electric powertrains, and will be joined by the flagship EV6 later in 2021. The Sorento PHEV is the most powerful and lowest-emitting model in the brand-new fourth-generation Sorento range, as well as the first-ever plug-in version – a ‘selfcharging’ hybrid (HEV) has been available since late 2020. The largest car Kia currently builds, all new Sorentos have seven-seats and four-wheel-drive as standard. What range does it have? Kia quotes an official all-electric range of up to 35 miles on the WLTP combined economy test cycle. How does it drive? At nearly five metres long, the latest Sorento is a big beast. But, there’s a reason for that – a seven-seater, its large footprint means the big Kia a very practical proposition. With the rearmost row of seats folded down, there’s 604 litres of luggage space, just four litres fewer than the self-charging hybrid model. Fold all the rear seats down, and that volume increases to 1,988 litres, just eight litres fewer than the HEV. Up front, the Sorento offers an elegantly styled dashboard with a nice choice of finishes and an impressive level of quality. The eight-inch colour touchscreen infotainment system and 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster work well and are clear, with crisp, sharp graphics and easy to use menus. The weights of the controls are well-judged, too, and seven years of connected services are available with Kia’s UVO Connect system. With all-wheel-drive, the plug-in Sorento is very stable on the road, the three driving modes – Eco, Smart and Sport – allowing

36

drivers to tailor the experience to their mood or needs. Surprisingly given its 2,680kg weight, the electric assistance from the 67kW electric motor is easily felt on take-off, and along with the 178bhp ‘Smartstream’ turbocharged petrol engine – which regulates the duration that the intake valves open and close depending on driving conditions giving different combustion cycles to optimise engine performance and efficiency – gives the Sorento PHEV a decent turn of speed. However, press the accelerator a little too vigorously, and the Kia is a little too quick to fire up its petrol engine. All-electric running can be prioritised, though, by a press of the ‘HEV/EV’ button. Three terrain modes – Snow, Mud and Sand – are adjusted by a rotary dial on the centre console, and hint at the Kia’s off-road prowess. Similarly, the six-speed shift-by-wire automatic gearbox is also controlled by a rotary dial or by tactile paddle shifters behind the steering wheel. On the move, the plug-in Sorento is very refined, the ride firm but comfortable. What does it cost? Available in three trims, the Sorento ‘2’ PHEV kicks off the range at £44,995. Poised to be the fleet favourite grade, it offers 17-inch alloy wheels, air conditioning in the third row of seats, an eight-inch colour touchscreen infotainment system, heated seats and steering wheel, LED lighting, rear parking sensors and smart cruise control. Priced from £48,895, the Sorento ‘3’ PHEV adds a 10.25-inch infotainment system, 19inch wheels, leather power-adjustable seats, privacy glass, rear self-levelling suspension and a powered tailgate. The range-topping Sorento ‘4’ PHEV niceties include a 12-speaker Bose sound system, a customisable head-up display, a panoramic sunroof, and ventilated front seats. Kia currently offers the Sorento PHEV with a Business Contract Hire (BCH) rate of £385 per month for a three-year/30,000 mile agreement, and expects a 60/40 fleet/retail split.

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

How much does it cost to tax? As it generates a low 38g/km of CO2 emissions, the Sorento PHEV is exempt from VED charges in the first year of registration. However, after this period, it attracts the highest annual ‘Premium’ rate charge of £480. Benefit in Kind (BIK) is pegged at 11 per cent for 2021-2022, rising to 12 per cent in 2022-2023 and 2023-2024. Why does my fleet need one? A handsome, very spacious, and well-made SUV, the Kia Sorento PHEV will appeal to fleet drivers who favour practicality with the benefits of low emission vehicle running costs. Well-equipped, enjoyable to drive, and safe, too, it is pricey, and those reduced running cost advantages will only materialise if it’s plugged in as often as possible. If used as intended, though, the Sorento PHEV is an impressively likeable and welcome entrant to the plug-in SUV club. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.kia.com/uk Kia Sorento 2 PHEV ENGINE: 1,598cc four-cylinder petrol engine, 67kW electric motor, 13.8kWh lithium-ion battery, 261bhp system output ELECTRIC RANGE (WLTP): MPG (combined, WLTP):

35 miles 176.6

CO2:

38g/km

VED:

£0 first-year, £480 thereafter

BIK: PRICE (OTR):

11% £44,995 (including VAT)


MAY 2021

Sponsored by

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER COMMERCIAL FLEETS

COMMERCIAL VEHICLES

DECARBONISING TRUCKS

HYDROGEN

INTERVIEW

ELECTRIC VANS

THE ROAD TO ZERO Making zero-emission trucks and vans a reality in the UK


RANG E | S P EC I F I C AT I O N | WA

M AXU S GOI N G TH E EX T R A

All new eDELIVER 9 and eDELIVER 3 www.saicmaxus.co.uk | Call us on 0800 246 5888


ARRA NT I E S | AF TERC A R E

A M ILE

3 available to order now. | maxusfleet@saicmaxus.co.uk


Commercial Vehicle News

HYDROGEN

Vauxhall unveils plug-in hydrogen electric van

Vauxhall has unveiled a plug-in hydrogen version of its Vivaro van, which has a hydrogen range of up to 249 miles, and an electric range of 30 miles. Vauxhall expects right-hand drive Vivaro-e HYDROGEN vehicles to arrive in 2023 while sister brand Opel plans to start delivering the first left-hand drive vehicles to fleet customers in autumn/winter 2021. Paul Willcox, Managing Director, Vauxhall, said: “Vauxhall is already leading the way with an all-electric van range, and now we are set to add hydrogen to the line-up as an efficient energy system of

the future. Vauxhall-Opel has more than 20 years of experience in developing hydrogen fuel technology which offers zero emissions-in-use, a long driving range and ultra-fast refuelling. We are already in contact with UK fleet operators that want to go the extra mile on sustainability and we look forward to bringing Vivaro-e HYDROGEN to the UK soon.” The new fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) is based on the existing battery electric Vivaro-e with two sliding side-doors. The plug-in fuel cell concept of the Vivaro-e HYDROGEN enables the integration of the whole fuel

cell system with the existing traction motor under the bonnet of the production vehicle. In addition, the battery of the Vivaro-e BEV is replaced by three 700- bar hydrogen tanks. The carbon-fibre cylinders can be filled in just three minutes, giving a range of 249 miles. Thanks to the smart packaging, the battery electric version becomes a fuel cell electric LCV without any modifications to the body and with no impact on the 5.3m3 to 6.1 m3 of cargo space, while the payload increases to 1,100kg. The Vivaro-e HYDROGEN with its 45kW fuel cell is capable of generating enough power for continuous motorway driving, while the 10.5kWh lithium-ion battery, located under the front seats, provides dynamic peak power when required – for example, at start-up and under acceleration. Since the battery covers power needs in such situations, the fuel cell can run at optimum operating conditions. The battery also enables regenerative braking, while the plug-in capability offers the opportunity to recharge the battery externally if necessary, such as at a public charging station, providing 31 miles of pure battery electric range. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/up6jbjpz

CF ELECTRIC

Extended E-range Go 200 kilometres! DAF’s latest CF Electric truck extends fully electric driving to an unprecedented range of 200 km. With a powerful e-motor, high-performance battery pack and fast charging time, it’s ideal for high-payload distribution in urban areas. And with zero emissions and low noise, the CF Electric meets both environmental regulations and the demands of your business. Visit www.daf.com/cf-electric

A PACCAR COMPANY DRIVEN BY QUALITY

40

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER COMMERCIAL FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


ALTERNATIVE FUELS

ELECTRIC TRUCKS

World’s largest public access biomethane station to open

Volta to launch four electric commercial vehicles by 2025

CNG Fuels will open what is reported to be the world’s largest public access biomethane refuelling station for HGVs by the end of the year. Construction has begun on the Avonmouth station, near Bristol, and will serve the busiest freight routes in the UK. It will be capable of refuelling 80 HGVs an hour from 14 high speed dispensers and joins six existing refuelling stations already operational across the UK, enabling fleet operators to deploy low-carbon deliveries from Inverness all the way down to Cornwall. CNG Fuels expects to open a further 14 stations by the end of 2022 in response to growing demand from household brands. The fuel supplied by CNG Fuels is renewable and sustainable biomethane, approved under the Department

for Transport’s Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) scheme. Renewable biomethane is the lowest carbon, most cost-effective alternative to diesel for HGVs – it is 35-40 per cent cheaper and cuts greenhouse gas emissions by 85 - 90 per cent. From next year, CNG Fuels will dispense fully carbon neutral fuel by sourcing biomethane from manure. The gas is currently sourced from waste feedstocks, such as food waste. The station will be located in the heart of the main logistics hub in Avonmouth on the outskirts of Bristol, connecting the Midlands and London to Cornwall, Devon and South Wales. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/3t2b3dh6

Volta Trucks has announced its Road-to-Zero Emissions strategy, with plans to launched four full-electric commercial vehicles by 2025. Building upon the success of the Volta Zero, Volta Trucks plans to expand its product portfolio with 7.5-tonne, 12-tonne, 16-tonne and 19tonne weight categories. The 16-tonne Volta Zero will be the first vehicle delivered, with pilot trucks built by the end of 2021, and series production starting around 12 months afterwards. This vehicle is currently in the engineering development phase, with early prototype testing due to start shortly.

Commercial Vehicle News

Sponsored by

Production of the 16-tonne vehicle will be closely followed by the largest 19-tonne and midsize 12-tonne variants in 2023. A pilot fleet of the smaller 7.5tonne vehicles is expected to be launched for customer trials in the same year, with production commencing in late 2024. These later vehicles are currently in the early design development phase. Given the strength of market demand for the 16-tonne Volta Zero, Volta Trucks will accelerate its market entry with a Europe-first strategy, followed by US and Asian cities. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/kc5de45k

Supported by

41


Vivaro-electrifying British business

Winner of International Van of the Year 2021 New all-electric Vivaro-e

Carries British business

Fuel economy and CO2 results for the New Vivaro-e Elite L1 3100 100kW (136PS) – 75kWh battery. Mpg (l/100km): N/A. CO2 emissions: 0g/km. Electric range up to 205 miles (WLTP). The New Vivaro-e is a battery electric vehicle requiring mains electricity for charging. Range data given has been determined according to WLTP test procedure methodology. The figures shown are intended for comparability purposes only and should only be compared to other cars tested to the same technical standard. The range you achieve under real world driving conditions will depend upon a number of factors, including but not limited to: the accessories fitted (pre and post registration); charging frequency; personal driving style; vehicle payload and route characteristics; variations in weather; heating/air conditioning; pre-conditioning and battery condition. Please note, EV range assumes that vehicle has been pre-conditioned prior to journey. WLTP figure includes 50% payload. Please note, EV range is achieved in ‘normal’ mode. ‘Power’ mode will decrease range and ‘Eco’ mode will extend range although power, torque and climate control are limited. For more information, contact your local Vauxhall Retailer.


Logistics UK’s Denise Beedell

EV CHARGING

DAF introduces charging stations for electric trucks DAF Trucks has launched charging stations for its LF Electric and CF electric trucks. Power levels on the PACCAR chargers range from 20 kW to 360 kW, while mobile chargers with power levels from 24 kW to 40 kW are also available. The 20 kW to 50 kW PACCAR chargers support the daily operations of an individual truck that can be charged during the evening or at night. Designed for fast charging, the 120 kW and 180 kW PACCAR chargers are suited for fleets operating electric vehicles on multiple routes or in multiple shifts. The 180 kW unit provides the power to charge most truck types in less than three hours. The most powerful version is

the 350 kW PACCAR charger, an ultra-fast solution that can charge vehicles at full rated power in less than two hours or fast charge two vehicles simultaneously. The mobile chargers are ideal for road side assistance or in workshops, where maximum flexibility is needed in the charging infrastructure. Customers can purchase the PACCAR chargers from DAF dealers and TRP store locations. The complete range of electric vehicle charging stations is backed by a two-year warranty. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/9y3mpksu

MOBILITY SOLUTIONS

Citroën launches LCV version of its electric AMI two-seater Citroën has launched an LCV version of its compact, electric AMI two-seater mobility vehicle, which is designed for lastmile delivery service providers and other organisations operating in urban areas. The interior has been redesigned, with the main change being the removal of the passenger seat, which has been replaced by a seven-part polypropylene module that can hold up to 260-litres and 140kg of cargo or goods. Coupled with the interior storage already present on-board, MY AMI CARGO is able to offer a total load capacity of 400-litres. Also included is a vertical, separating partition between the driver and cargo area. This has been positioned to provide optimum space between the driver and the cargo, ensuring the driver is protected and can enjoy driving in comfort. A cleverly designed recess in the separating partition gives the driver sufficient space to operate the handbrake without any obstructions. A secondary shelf unit can hold up to 40kg and has been designed to work either as a

Commercial Vehicle News

Sponsored by

storage unit or as a mobile desk. It also features an A4 size cut-out that can hold forms or other items of paperwork firmly in place. The shelf is adjustable and can be moved towards the driver for better access, or tilted towards the passenger door if required. The shelf can also be removed completely, to maximise the storage space available. The cargo floor in new MY AMI CARGO can be raised and locked vertically, so as not to obstruct the cargo zone, or lowered into a horizontal position to match the level of the vehicle floor. This latter position allows the user to carry longer objects with a maximum length of 1.20m. Cargo retainers are provided to secure fragile items. New MY AMI CARGO features the same 5.5kWh lithium battery pack found in AMI and can be fully charged from a standard domestic socket in just three hours, giving it a range of 47 miles. READ MORE https://tinyurl.com/4rsx9ztf

The use of Biomethane for HGVS With the government’s deadline to achieve net-zero transport emissions set for 2050, and a current gap in the market for mass market zero emission heavier vehicle alternatives, biomethane is becoming an increasingly popular choice for this vehicle class and may play a vital role towards decarbonising road freight. The Low Emission Freight and Logistics Trial (LEFT) is currently taking place to enable operators to trial and assess new and emerging technologies and has been key in demonstrating that dedicated gas vehicles are reliable, have no methane slips and offer a viable alternative to diesel. Furthermore, renewable biomethane is a cost effective, low-carbon alternative to diesel for HGVs; it is estimated to be 35-40% cheaper and its use can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 85%. Produced from organic waste feedstocks, using anaerobic digestion of wastes or gasification to remove any CO2, biomethane is compatible for use in natural gas vehicles. HGVs using this renewable natural gas operate on a mileage range of around 300-500 miles, depending on the model. And, with the majority of England and Wales within a 300-mile round trip of a biomethane refuelling station and construction started on another near Glasgow, Logistics UK members such as Warburtons, Hermes, John Lewis and Asda have also recognised the benefits and have adopted its use. It is encouraging to see such progress being made, and Logistics UK is urging the government to introduce long-term grants and better support all operators looking to purchase low carbon vehicles and fuels. While developments continue to be made, the business group is also calling on government to include gas vehicles and biomethane within the eagerly awaited Transport Decarbonisation Plan, set to be released by government in the next few weeks. The industry is keen to play its role in meeting decarbonisation targets, but this must be supported by the government. Logistics UK is one of the UK’s leading business groups, representing logistics businesses which are vital to keeping the UK trading, and more than seven million people directly employed in the making, selling and moving of goods. With COVID-19, Brexit, new technology and other disruptive forces driving change in the way goods move across borders and through the supply chain, logistics has never been more important to UK plc. Logistics UK supports, shapes and stands up for safe and efficient logistics, and is the only business group which represents the whole industry, with members from the road, rail, sea and air industries, as well as the buyers of freight services such as retailers and manufacturers whose businesses depend on the efficient movement of goods. FURTHER INFORMATION For more information about the organisation and its work, including its ground-breaking research into the impacts of COVID-19 on the whole supply chain, please visit logistics.org.uk Denise Beedell, policy manager for vans and urban, Logistics UK

Supported by

43


RANGE | SPECIFICATION | WARRANTIES | AFTERCA R E

MAXU S GOING THE EX T R A M IL E All new eDELIVER 9 and eDELIVER 3 available to order now. www.saicmaxus.co.uk | Call us on 0800 246 5888 | maxusfleet@saicmaxus.co.uk


Having launched its first electric LCV more than five years ago, Harris MAXUS is proud to once again join forces with GreenFleet in a shared goal to achieve a carbon neutral motoring industry through education and by supporting the switch to greener fleets MAXUS, which is manufactured by SAIC and distributed in the UK by Harris MAXUS, is a market leading EV brand and the one customers can trust to always go the extra mile. Innovation Last year, LDV rebranded to MAXUS, aligning the UK and all other right hand drive markets with the globally recognised brand name. This was followed by the launch of two brand new platform EVs, the eDELIVER 3 and eDELIVER 9, backed by an ongoing £2 billion innovation investment by SAIC. Both models have reaped the benefits of this investment and feature the latest in lithium battery technology and cutting-edge design. Designed from the ground-up for electric power only, the eDELIVER 3 is a small van that can clock up to 198 miles on a single charge. With a 92KW motor, there are two battery options from which to choose: 35kWh and 52.5kWH. Using a DC fast charger can top up the batteries in as little as 40 minutes. Available in a number of variants with several battery and wheelbase options, the eDELIVER 3 is a fantastically versatile vehicle that suits a wide range of business needs. Its bigger brother, the eDELIVER 9 has it all in terms of spec and space and it too is 100 per cent electric. The eDELIVER 9 perfectly illustrates MAXUS’ focus on

innovation, customisation and greener motoring, with no compromises. Everything about this van is of superior quality and showcases the very best in EV engineering. Available in two size options, this van offers a remarkable range, clocking up to 219 miles on a single charge and operating with a high power 150KW low energy motor. The vehicle offers three battery options 51.5Kwh, 72Kwh and 88.55 Kwh (LH) with various battery cooling methods, which reduce charging time (DC 45mins (5-80 per cent), as well as extending battery life and increasing the operating range. Disappointment as EV grant drops Earlier this year, the government announced a lowering of the OLEV plug-in grant, which, according to general manager of Harris MAXUS, Mark Barrett was a retrograde step. “Despite the exponential increase in sales of EV vehicles, the market is still at an early stage of adoption and incentives are vital to encouraging drivers and fleet buyers to make the switch to greener motoring,” he said. “If we are to move to a zero-emission market, significant government supports are needed given the current higher cost of EV vehicles. A lower EV grant has the potential to stall the good progress being made in meeting the lower emission targets, so the timing was really unfortunate,” said Mark.

Sponsor’s Comment

Maxus – going the extra mile Notwithstanding the government’s announcement, MAXUS has committed to doing all it can through innovation, education and choice, to support people who want to make the switch and understand not only the benefits, but also the real TCO (total cost of ownership) of buying and running an EV van. New UK HQ As part of The Harris Group’s commitment to the market, a new HQ at Birchwood Park, Warrington in February was unveiled in February, affording the business added capacity to increase its existing operations in the region. The 24,239 sq. ft Birchwood Park HQ now houses MAXUS’ UK-based employees as well as a distribution centre for Harris CAS, the company’s spare parts division. It will also include an EV technical centre to supplement the new MAXUS training academy that was established in HQ in Dublin. The strong network links surrounding Warrington was a key decision in Harris MAXUS’ choice of location, with the headquarters situated close to the M6 and M62 motorway interchange, providing excellent links to the surrounding region and beyond. Mark Barrett said: “The acquisition of a UK HQ was an important step for our business activities. MAXUS has become a recognised leader in the electric vehicle sector, and we are well positioned for growth as electric vehicles become more and more popular. We are currently forecasting growth of between 200 to 300 per cent in 2021/22 and have plans to expand our network of dealers right across the UK.” As the sole distributor for the MAXUS range of vehicles in the UK and righthand drive markets in Europe, The Harris Group delivers a significant number of vehicles every week to an extensive network of dealers across the UK. Up until now, all operations for MAXUS UK had been overseen from Harris’ Global Headquarters in Ireland. Harris MAXUS is one of the few OEM manufacturers in the UK that can offer a full fleet of EVs right now and invites anyone interested in making the switch, or learning more about how to make the switch, to get in touch with their local MAXUS EV dealer who will always go the extra mile. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.saicmaxus.co.uk

May 2021 | COMMERCIAL GREENFLEET

45


Decarbonising Trucks Written by Brian Robinson, Zemo Partnership

ROAD TO ZERO

Accelerating the transition to zero in UK freight still leave the UK “a long way short” of what is required, the CCC says. The policy ‘gap’ will, we hope, be at least partly filled with the imminent publication of a new Transport Decarbonisation Plan. Electrification of transport in all its forms, will be front and centre of the Plan and, though there are many doubters about the prospects for electrifying some freight applications, recent studies have been bullish In April this year, the Government raised the about the chances of technical advances and stakes again in agreeing with the watchdog cost reductions leading to inroads into Committee on Climate Change’s targets every area of the truck sector. for the Sixth Carbon Budget. A new A new report from legally-binding commitment the US Dept of Energy’s to cut greenhouse gas Freight Lawrence Berkeley (GHG) emissions by 78 operato National Laboratory per cent by 2035 is r s c an’t fai and the University expected to be backed l to be aware t of California, for by Parliament in July. h a sales of t a ban on example, says that diesel t zero emission freight Keeping check r i ucks s being vehicles are becoming of reality st an increasingly realistic Freight operators can’t mootedrongly a prospect due to dramatic fail to be aware that policy s declines in battery a ban on sales of diesel prices and improvements trucks is being strongly in their energy density. mooted as policy to follow The report says that at the 2030/5 phase-out of petrol current global average battery pack prices and diesel IC-engines in light vehicles of $135 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) (realizable and will be the subject of a consultation. when procured at scale), a Class 8 electric However, many have pointed out that the truck with 375-mile range and operated 300 rhetoric is running way ahead of the policy miles per day when compared to a diesel truck and practical reality. The Government’s offers about 13 per cent lower total cost of own figures show that current plans

While there is no date yet, the government is consulting on when it would be feasible to ban the sales of diesel trucks. HGV operators will need to keep their eyes firmly on the ball on present and emerging low and zero emission technologies, as well as what they can do now to decarbonise their operations When, two years ago, the UK became the first major economy to pass a law requiring the UK to bring all greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050 it was clear that aiming for ‘low carbon’ was no longer ambitious enough. In the subsequent ‘Ten Point Plan’ the implications for road transport became clearer with the signalling of a rapid move to zero tailpipe emission vehicles and clean energy to power them. One, amongst several, responses of the, then, Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership was to begin steps to change the name and brand to a moniker that better reflected where we’re heading in road transport. So, LowCVP became Zemo Partnership, the new name intended to help convey the sense of urgency with which we need to transition to zero emissions in transport. While much of the media focus has been on the phase out of petrol and diesel in cars and vans, the critical role of commercial vehicles is also now receiving much attention. There’s been no sense of the pace of change slowing either; rather the opposite.

46

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER COMMERCIAL FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


ownership (TCO) per mile, leading to a threeyear payback. Battery prices are projected to decline to about $60 per kWh by 2030. The study says, however, that strong policy support will be needed to see these prospects realised soon. Researchers make the case for prioritising public policy, including early-adopter subsidies, to help electrify long-haul trucking, which they say, would deliver huge emissions reductions. Some significant electric trucks are on the market already. Scania, Renault and Volvo have recently launched a range of medium and large electric trucks and more are promised from these and several other manufacturers. Tesla’s Semi is expected to go into production in the US later this year and new entrant Volta Trucks has just launched four fully electric trucks up to 19 tonnes. Low emission freight trials Zemo Partnership (as LowCVP) was a leading partner in the Low Emission Freight and Logistics Trials (LEFT) which reported last autumn. LEFT was a £20 million government-funded programme (20172020) to cut emissions and improve air quality by focusing on emissions-busting technologies for trucks and vans (and their fuels). An additional £12m was contributed by private sector trial participants. In these industry-led trials, everything from renewable hydrogen fuel and battery electric trucks through to biomethane fuel, kinetic energy recovery systems and even lightweight and aerodynamic trailers were put through their paces. They’ve been trialled in all driving operations to show how low and zero emission alternative technologies can make a difference both now and in the future, in UK fleets. The report categorised each technology as ‘Revolution’, ‘Transition’ or ‘Evolution’ depending on the potential contribution to the net zero agenda. Revolution technologies included battery electric vehicles, while transition technologies were range-extended electric vehicles (REEV), dedicated gas vehicles and those powered by hydrogen/

A report has shown that zero emission freight vehicles are becoming an increasingly realistic prospect due to dramatic declines in battery prices and improvements in their energy density gas dual fuel. Evolution technologies included lightweight & aerodynamic trailers and kinetic energy recovery systems (KERS) The trials found that a wide range of all these categories of technology and alternative fuels can all help to decarbonise commercial vehicles and road freight both in the next few years and further, to 2050. The report showed that there is an acceleration in the rate of innovation towards lower emissions in the freight sector but there’s still a long way to go and we’re still working on developing our understanding of the best technical options for different uses. The LEFT programme has significantly added to our understanding of the different options and shines a light for fleet managers on the directions they can take now to cut emissions from their fleets. For many, the ‘revolutionary’ technologies are not yet perceived to be a viable option, especially for long-haul and heavier trucks. For this reason, Zemo Partnership has been working with Government on developing the trials of future zero emission truck technologies but also to raise awareness about how, in the short to medium-term, significant emissions cuts can be achieved through the adoption of renewable fuels for freight uses. Renewable fuels Renewable fuels can realise greenhouse gas well-to-wheel emissions reductions of over 80 per cent and help to ensure that the UK meets the legal nearer-term targets such as the UK’s Fourth and Fifth Carbon Budgets. A study recently published by Zemo Partnership shows the range of

Decarbonising Trucks

Sponsored by

high blend renewable fuels (HBRF) available to the HDV sector. To provide operators with better information about the fuels they’re using and to support the HBRF report, Zemo Partnership recently also launched a new Renewable Fuels Assurance Scheme (RFAS) for high blend renewable fuels. The scheme gives fleet operators robust information about the GHG and wider sustainability performance of renewable fuels supplied in the UK. The RFAS approves companies supplying high blend renewable fuels based on meeting three key performance criteria, with evidence verified by an independent auditor complementing the safeguards included in the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO). As well as the challenge of decarbonisation, many operators need to tackle air pollution and are faced, in particular, by the introduction of clean air regulations in various cities around the UK. Retrofit technology Zemo Partnership recently published an updated Clean Vehicle Retrofit Technology Guide to highlight the role that various retrofit technologies can play in improving air quality by cleaning up the existing vehicle fleet. The new guide gives vehicle operators and local authorities an understanding of national frameworks for improving air quality, providing case studies of a range of accredited retrofit technologies that achieve Euro VI-equivalent levels of emissions through the Clean Vehicle Retrofit Accreditation Scheme (CVRAS). It’s clear that the freight sector will continue to come under increasing pressure to move to zero emission solutions but where electric or other options are not yet available, by using renewable fuels and Euro VI level retrofit emission controls, operators can dramatically decarbonise and cut locally polluting emissions in their current operations and vehicles. Electric – and, potentially, hydrogen – solutions are coming down the track (are even here today in some incarnations) and will increasingly vie for operators’ attention. Operators will need to keep their eyes, more than ever before, firmly on the ball and to accelerate the introduction of the most suitable low and zero emission technologies for their particular operating profile. L Zemo Partnership is a membership organisation working with government and focused on delivering the transition to zero emission in road transport. FURTHER INFORMATION www.zemo.org.uk

Supported by

47


Hydrogen

ROAD TO ZERO

Why hydrogen is key to zero-emission goals Hydrogen’s high energy content and its multiple zero carbon production pathways combine to make it a central pillar of any serious decarbonisation plan, writes Jo Bamford Hydrogen fuel cell technology is ready to be rolled out now in the commercial sector. The UK government’s target to reach carbon neutrality can provide the foundation for the country’s economic recovery as we emerge from the pandemic. Interestingly, the transport sector which has been majorly impacted by lockdowns and lower passenger demand is ripe for uptake of newer business models involving lower upfront capital expenditure whilst delivering on local air quality and carbon free travel solutions. Hydrogen’s high energy content and its multiple zero carbon production pathways combine to make it a central pillar of any serious decarbonisation plan. The everdecreasing price of wind and solar power has created the perfect ecosystem for large scale production of green hydrogen in the UK. From a geopolitical standpoint, we have a remarkable opportunity to set up long lasting infrastructure for energy self-sufficiency. Key advantages of hydrogen as a transport fuel Hydrogen has high energy density – which means it is suited to even challenging applications such as heavy use vehicles (e.g. taxis) and in particular heavier vehicles such as buses, trucks and trains. Hydrogen vehicles can be fuelled rapidly. As a gas, hydrogen can be pumped onto a vehicle in roughly the same time it takes to refuel a conventional vehicle – this makes it particularly suitable for customers who prefer rapid refuelling as compared to a battery electric vehicle and government should ensure that the market can provide this choice.

48

confidence to begin to transition their fleets What’s more, hydrogen can be generated from to zero emission models. Until there is clear multiple zero carbon sources. These include evidence of this, orders for diesel buses are renewable electricity (thereby encouraging likely to prevail over new zero emission models. renewable energy deployment by improving At the same time as introducing regulation business cases), any hydrocarbon coupled on the sale of new diesel buses, investment with carbon capture and storage, (leading to must begin in the necessary infrastructure. In neutral or even negative emissions), and even many cases, the roll out of new hydrogen from nuclear sources, all of which lead to buses in the UK is being held up an essentially zero carbon fuel. by the lead time required for Hydrogen is also affordable – a The refuelling infrastructure – up recent study by the Hydrogen decreas to two years in some cases. Council of leading global in price of g Refuelling infrastructure companies with an interest wind and sola must be developed in in hydrogen demonstrates r p o parallel and even in that, by 2030, w e created r has advance of the roll out “Commercial vehicles, t h e perfect ecosyst of hydrogen buses for trains, and long-range e operators to be able transport applications scale pr m for large oductio to place order for new will compete with lown of green h buses with confidence. carbon alternatives” y d r o g e It is known that zero due to reductions in cost n in the U emission propulsion systems driven by scaling up the K are more expensive today. To hydrogen mobility sector. unlock tomorrow’s pricing today, the entire value chain on the supply Allowing progress to happen and demand side will be required to take At this critical juncture when the international an integrated approach. By committing to a community is taking firm steps to address defined roadmap for transition of entire bus climate action, several small adjustments at the fleets, bus operators will provide necessary local and national levels, particularly in the short demand signals to enable infrastructure term, will be imperative for driving investment players to build production and refuelling in hydrogen based zero emission transport. For facilities to meet future fuelling demands. This example, in the UK potential reform to the Bus will also give the bus manufacturers better Service Operators Grant (BSOG) and Renewable leverage over their supply chain partners Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) should support through longer term procurement deals. green technologies rather than diesel fuel. As the UK economy begins to turn the corner, Significant hydrogen refuelling infrastructure new business models will emerge. A case in needs to be built to give operators the

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER COMMERCIAL FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


SPONSOR’S COMMENT point is the model suggested by the CPT, which is working with major bus operators such as Wrightbus - alongside private financiers to pioneer an innovative bus leasing model which would significantly reduce the financial burden of transitioning to zero emission buses. This model will enable operators to lease new zero emission buses on a monthly basis, rather than having to purchase buses outright, thereby reducing upfront costs and improving cash flow whilst passenger numbers remain low. Such an approach could accelerate the transition to a zero-emission bus network in the UK, increasing orders for zero emission buses, and supporting bus manufacturers in turn. Finally, as a catalyst for change, the government should set a clear and ambitious trajectory for the whole bus network in the UK to reach zero emissions by 2050. Zero emission buses must start to be rolled out now if the UK is to stand a chance of replacing the whole fleet of buses in the UK – approximately 40,000 buses in total. At present, only around 500 of these buses are zero emission models. L

The role of hydrogen in meeting the UK’s transport climate targets

Hydrogen

Sponsored by

Green entrepreneur Jo Bamford is one of Britain’s most significant business leaders, ensuring zero-emission transport is at the top of the political and consumer agenda. Jo rescued Wrightbus from administration in 2019 and turned it into one of the most innovative bus manufacturers anywhere in the world, creating the planet’s first hydrogen double-decker bus and generating orders from London to Aberdeen. FURTHER INFORMATION www.wrightbus.com

The Hydrogen Strategy Now campaign The Hydrogen Strategy Now campaign has been established by a group of leading businesses operating in the UK, united in the belief that the Government must establish a UK-wide hydrogen strategy. Developing a clear, strategic plan such as this will unlock significant private investment in hydrogen technologies and manufacturing across the country, driving growth and creating green jobs. As a collective, the campaign partners employ a combined total of around 100,000 people in the UK, and have a value of £100bn. They stand ready to invest up to £1.5bn in hydrogen projects and create thousands of jobs across the country.

Tom Chicken, CTO Fuel Cell Systems Ltd

At Fuel Cell Systems Ltd (FCSL), we believe that hydrogen and fuel cells will play a key role in achieving our climate objectives in the transport sector over the next decades. In a recent government briefing to launch the UK’s first ever hydrogen transport hub in the Tees Valley, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps MP stated that the project will “establish the UK as a global leader in hydrogen technology, paving the way for its use across all transport modes and propelling us towards our net-zero goals.” It sounds like a strong commitment and we hope it is backed up by an equal commitment to delivering the infrastructure needed by the transport sector to meet its emissions goals. A major stumbling block in the progress of hydrogen for transport has been the lack of an effective refuelling infrastructure. FCSL has been involved in hydrogen and fuel cells since 2003 and we have responded to this gap by developing a range of affordable refuelling products for the UK and European markets (read more in our feature). We have delivered refuelling systems and services for a wide range of companies including vehicle manufacturers, the Met Police, the ZeroAvia passenger plane project, HydroLEX ( the first hydrogen powered passenger train in the UK) and most recently the Milford Haven Energy Kingdom. We have helped to accelerate research, development and promotional activities that would not have been possible were it not for the availability of our innovative refuelling solutions. Overall, we would like to see a fairer distribution of investment and support in the battery electric and fuel cell electric vehicle markets. Both will play a key role in the future of transport. In the meantime FCSL is continuing to facilitate practical applications of hydrogen-powered transport. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.fuelcellsystems.co.uk

Supported by

49


Advertisement Feature

Making hydrogen-fuelled vehicles accessible Fuel Cell Systems delivers flexible hydrogen refuelling, helping companies trial and introduce hydrogen powered commercial vehicles In the year the UN Climate Change Conference, COP26, will be hosted by the UK government and the target of achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2050 is reinforced with tough interim goals for 2030, commercial fleets are committed to reducing emissions. However, they need support and some confidence that the infrastructure will be in place to help them achieve this goal. Whilst different solutions will be suitable for different companies, government investment in hydrogen technology is beginning to increase, with £54 million of funding for three projects to develop hydrogen powertrain technology for commercial vehicles and buses. Electric drivetrains powered by hydrogen fuel cells have an increased range, and a quick fill time compared to their battery equivalents, making them ideal for heavier vehicles and fleet operations. The most recent Carbon Budget Report from the UK Climate Change Committee (December 2020) states: “Hydrogen offers the closest user experience to current diesel operations. Given sufficient hydrogen refuelling infrastructure, fleet operators would be able to fill up vehicles either

in-depot or from filling stations en route as currently, or both. Hydrogen is also a particularly attractive solution for vehicles requiring longer independent range.” Yet despite the increase in investment, this does not extend to refuelling infrastructure which remains a major limiting factor for the take up and even trialling of hydrogen powered solutions for transport. There are only 11 publicly available hydrogen refuelling stations in the UK. Analysis by Ricardo expects that around 500-600 hydrogen refuelling stations would be required by 2050 to support the use of hydrogen by larger HGVs only. If smaller vehicles were to use hydrogen in preference to electrification, this could increase to around 1,000. Addressing the refuelling issue At Fuel Cell Systems Ltd (FCSL) we have been working with fuel cells and hydrogen since 2003. Tom Chicken, CTO at FCSL commented “We kept coming across the problem of where do you get your hydrogen from? So, we decided to do something about it. With our background in the fuel cells, we already knew how to use hydrogen and all the safety measures

you need to put into place and how to write control systems. We put all of that together and we’ve developed a range of low-cost hydrogen refuelling solutions.” Our objective is only to deploy the equipment to meet the hydrogen need, enabling customers to trial hydrogen on a small scale first, at a suitable location or their own depot. We deliver hydrogen in the correct quantity, purity, pressure and location to fulfil our customers’ requirement. Our newest product, HyQube, is modular and redeployable, so customers can start small if they need to, but with the opportunity to scale up over time. All solutions don’t need to be large scale, full refuelling stations. We can provide everything from a low cost, direct boost system through to a full 700 bar station with chilling. We manufacture the products ourselves, ready for shipping, reducing what can be unworkable lead times across the industry. There’s been huge interest across Europe and we are exporting units from our manufacturing premises in the UK to meet demand. Our other refuelling products include HyTruck, a hydrogen refuelling station in the back of a 7.5 tonne truck, which has been in constant use since 2016, to provide mobile refuelling for customers in the UK and Europe. It has recently returned from Sweden where it was used to enable winter testing of a new hydrogen fuel cell powered vehicle. Tom Chicken added: “Our refuelling products are suitable for all types of transport, so we’re continuing to provide refuelling services for planes, trains and automobiles and we have two new projects in the marine market as well. “One of our current UK projects is supporting development of the Milford Haven Energy Kingdom - a £4.5 million project exploring the vital role hydrogen could play in a decarbonised energy future, including the integration of heat, power and transport. We are busy delivering our refuelling products to customers across Europe and looking to expand the range of equipment we offer. Refuelling is sometimes an afterthought in the development of hydrogen-powered transport products and our quick and agile approach to product development means we can respond to our customers to fit their timescales and requirements.” L FURTHER INFORMATION www.fuelcellsystems.co.uk

50

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER COMMERCIAL FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net/commercial


ROAD TO ZERO

FedEx: Aiming for carbon-neutral operations Electrification of FedEx’s parcel pickup and delivery fleet is a key part of the company’s goal to achieve carbon-neutral operations globally by 2040. Dave Canavan, chief operating officer at FedEx Express Europe, tells GreenFleet about what the company is doing in Europe to meet its carbon targets In Europe, what is the target for electrifying FedEx’s fleet? The sustainability agenda in Europe is moving fast and there is a growing desire to make our cities less polluted, less congested, and to promote healthier and safer forms of mobility in order to tackle emissions. The electrification of our owned pick-up and delivery vehicle fleet will be critical to achieving our sustainability goals and to playing our part in this significant collective effort. We have set a global target for 50 per cent of all new pick-up and delivery vehicles to be electric by 2025 and 100 per cent of newly procured vehicles to be electric by 2030. Electrification of our owned parcel delivery fleet will be a major milestone on our journey to net zero. We already have a number of zero-emission electric delivery vehicles and e-bikes serving FedEx routes in London, Frankfurt, and Paris, and we are excited about expanding our sustainable fleet in the future. How many electric vehicles do you currently have globally? By the end of FY20, we had advanced our global fleet of alternative fuels vehicles, reaching a total of 4,091 vehicles on the

roads, with our electric fleet alone amounting to 3,078 vehicles.

of our cities. For decades, ‘logistics sprawl’ has been driven by land scarcity and the search for economies of scale, with warehouses moving further away from city centres. This might be counterproductive, as greater distances mean more vehicle miles on the road and higher emissions. The past year has proved the essential role of logistics, and we should use this opportunity to encourage stronger collaboration between those designing our future cities.

Interview

Sponsored by

What is your charging infrastructure like and what are the future plans for it? We are constantly analysing our operations, evaluating available infrastructure and solutions, to develop our roadmap to delivering in the zero emissions cities of the future. We plan to overcome grid constraints by using a variety of charging infrastructure options, including multiple EV charging station options, energy storage, and clean power generation, using the options that best meet each site’s needs. We also expect to leverage smart charging and load management options to save on energy costs and avoid costly infrastructure upgrades.

In terms of electrifying FedEx’s ground fleet, what barriers do you anticipate and how can they be overcome? We have made great strides in reducing both ground and aircraft emissions, but two main challenges remain, and we have to continue working collaboratively across industry and government to address these. Part of FedEx’s carbon One challenge is the availability of neutral plans are to invest in appropriate charging infrastructure alternative fuels to reduce to support the mass rollout of electric emissions. What alternative vehicles. Addressing this requires fuels are you using, aside from collaboration across both the private electric power? and public sectors, as well as significant Almost half of the emissions investment. As governments emerge generated by road transport from the pandemic and look in Europe come from to ‘build back greener’, freight transportation, we are seeing more Electrifi so we recognise there and more momentum c a t of our o ion is room to make a in this space. big impact if we can Another challenge parcel d wned adopt zero emission is the historic e l i v fleet w solutions as soon movement of logistics ill be a ery major milesto as possible. E infrastructure out

ne journeyon our net zeroto

Supported by

51


SCRT® Retrofit Exhaust Technology Reduce Emissions to Euro VI Standards

Upgrade Emissions from EURO III, IV & V EURO VI ULEZ and CAZ compliant Cost effective and efficient solution Available for a range of applications Certified at Millbrook Proving Ground CVRAS approved VCA approved The HJS Real Blue SCRT® System – OEM quality retrofit emission reduction technologies

www.hjs.com/uk

UK Office: Phone: 01344 566050 / 07733 227889 Email: mark.cooper@hjs.com

WORKSHOP ESSENTIALS AVAILABLE TO BUY ONLINE

Tall & Short Support stands

Transmission Jacks Trolley Jacks

At Totalkare we combine world class lifting and testing products, industry leading support, flexible financial packages and CPD certified competency training to ensure that you always have the right support.

CALL VISIT

0121 585 2724 WWW.TOTALKARE.CO.UK/SHOP

Pit Jacks

Bottle Jacks

Air Conditioning Equipment Access Steps

YEARS 1980 - 2020

OF COLUMN LIFTS

52

SERVICE & CALIBRATION ONLINE TRAINING MOBILE COLUMN LIFTS FOUR POST & TWO POST LIFTS Y-MECH LIFTS HEAVY DUTY BRAKE TESTERS VEHICLE INSPECTION PITS HEADLAMP TESTERS SMOKE METERS AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT OIL MANAGEMENT ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER COMMERCIAL FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net/commercial


We have set a global target for 50 per cent of all new pick-up and delivery vehicles to be electric by 2025 and for all newly procured vehicles to be electric by 2030  At the end of FY20, the FedEx global alternative vehicles fleet comprised of 4,091 vehicles using hybrid, electric, LNG, CNG, Propane and hydrogen fuel cell powered powertrains. Alongside the alternative fuels already in use in our fleet, electric and hydrogen promise to play a key part in driving down emissions in the short term. To reduce the impact of our aviation fleet, we will continue to retire our older aircraft and replace them with the most environmentally friendly and fuel-efficient alternatives, while continuing to invest in sustainable aviation fuel (SAF). In 2015, we made a purchasing commitment to procure SAF from Red Rock Biofuels to indicate demand and help viable solutions for sustainable fuels to reach the market. In 2018, a Boeing 777F was loaned by FedEx Express to participate in a 6-month long Eco Demonstrator program. This became the first aircraft to fly with both engines using a 30 per cent blend of SAF. Another part of the plan is to offer carbon-neutral shipping offerings. Could you explain what this means? Our carbon neutral shipping offering will aim to provide a fully sustainable supply chain from collection to transportation, fulfilment, and delivery. We will work to offer end-to-

end sustainability solutions throughout our supply chain with carbon-neutral shipping offerings and sustainable packaging solutions. What advice would you give to other companies looking to decarbonise their fleet? Our advice to companies is to start planning for decarbonisation now and to establish key partnerships. In the field of city logistics, for example, we believe stronger collaboration between logistics providers and those planning and building our urban spaces is crucial to reaching our goals. At FedEx, we are focussing not just on our own operations, but building the partnerships and alliances needed to address the climate crisis. For example, we recently announced an exciting $100m investment in the Yale School of the Environment. This funding will establish the Yale Center for Natural Carbon Capture, which will undertake scientific research to accelerate solutions for natural carbon storage, with a primary focus on the aviation sector. In Europe, FedEx Express has also developed a programme together with the Global Alliance of NGOs for Road Safety. Now in its third year, it will help European cities in Spain, Italy and Poland promote cycling – and in particular,

Interview

Sponsored by

the use of cargo bicycles - as a means of safer and more sustainable mobility for citizens. Lastly, FedEx Express Europe, alongside Natuur & Milieu (Nature & Environment), announced a collaboration with the aim to pave the way for a more sustainable transport sector. The charitable funding from FedEx will enable Natuur & Milieu to release three sub projects aiming to realise sustainable solutions that drive down carbon emissions across road, logistics distribution facilities and aviation. As an enterprise approaching its 50th year of operations, we are in a fortunate position of being able to invest in these ways. Whatever the level of investment, companies should focus their energy on building partnerships, learning from other thought leaders about the journey to net zero operations and applying that knowledge to transform their business. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.fedex.com

Dave Canavan, chief operating officer, FedEx Express Europe

Supported by

53


Electric Vans

ROAD TO ZERO

The move to zero emission van fleets Recent enhancements in battery life and load capacity have made the use of electric vans more viable for many fleet operators. We take a look at some of the companies that are investing in electric vehicles, as well as the barriers to adoption Vans contribute to 30 per cent of UK road transport’s nitrogen dioxide emissions, according to the Clean Van Commitment Campaign, ran by charity Global Action Plan. What’s more, the annual health cost to the NHS and wider society from older diesel vans is £2.2 billion. But many van drivers are keen to switch to cleaner vehicles; according to a survey of 500 van drivers by Fiat Professional, more than a third are considering the switch to electric vehicles. Indeed, with the ban on new diesel and petrol vans coming into effect on 2030, van operators are no doubt considering their future options when it comes to vehicle choice. While sales of electric vans only make up a small amount of the market, there is a growing number of fleet operators already on their electric journey, and many that have committed to making the move in the near future. Reaching a milestone Facilities management and professional services company Mitie has reached the milestone of 1,000 electric vehicles on its fleet after the recent purchase of 655 Vauxhall Vivaro-e vans. While Mitie began its electric vehicle transition in mid-2019, this was with a focus on cars and small vans, as there was no viable alternative for its large diesel vans with an adequate range to manage the heavy load often carried by mobile engineering teams. But now the market is expanding, with larger vans meeting range and cargo requirements, Mitie has been able to make further progress. Simon King, director of sustainability and social value at Mitie, said: “When we began our EV journey 18 months ago we thought switching our big vans would be one of our biggest challenges. However, with Vauxhall helping us overcome this hurdle, we’re very pleased to be marking our milestone 1,000th zero emission vehicle with the delivery of this Vivaro-e.” Overall, Mitie has committed to reaching net zero operational carbon emissions by

2025. At the start of the year, it planned to have at least 2,021 pure electric vehicles in its fleet by the end of 2021. “With over 600 more set to join our fleet this year, we’re making great progress towards our target of 2,021 EVs in 2021 and helping even more Mitie fleet drivers switch to electric,” added Simon. Mitie’s electric vehicles have been well received by employees, with 91 per cent of EV drivers saying they’re glad they switched. To help others make the switch to electric, Mitie has launched a Plan Zero Fleet Transition Service. This uses Mitie’s experience in managing its own electric vehicle rollout and charge point installation programme to support others in their EV journey. No more ICE vehicles British Gas meanwhile has said it will never purchase another combustion engine vehicle. Centrica, owner of British Gas, has committed to electrifying its 12,000 strong operational fleet by 2025, five years earlier than originally planned, as well as making its 1,500 company cars EV only. Taking it towards this goal, British Gas has recently ordered 2,000 new electric Vauxhall Vivaro-e vans, while 1,000 were purchased last Summer. All 3,000 electric vehicles will be on the road by 2022. While engineers can volunteer to have the new vans during the rollout, the company is prioritising high pollution areas to help lower emissions. British Gas engineers will install all chargers at engineer homes and is accelerating EV adoption in the UK for homes and businesses with charger installs and innovative EV tariffs. The company is currently increasing the EV engineer workforce through training existing engineers, recruiting new engineers, and creating 1,000 new engineering apprenticeships by the end of 2022. Chris O’Shea, chief executive of Centrica, said: “Everyone needs to act now to lower carbon emissions and help the UK reach net zero. We are leading from the front by not U-Build has taken delivery of an electric van to visit customers and transport materials

54

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER COMMERCIAL FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net/commercial

only lowering emissions for our customers and our communities, but by lowering our own emissions, and by increasing the speed at which we do this. Fully electrifying our fleet will make a big difference. “At the same time, we are helping our customers make the switch to electric and working with motor manufacturers such as Vauxhall on services and solutions for their EV customers such as charge points, infrastructure and innovative EV tariffs with cheaper charging at night and free EV miles. “We look forward to continuing to work in partnership with the Government to create the new jobs our country needs as we all seek to build back greener.” Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said: “It’s encouraging to see that one of Britain’s best-known brands is leading the way with the largest commercial EV fleet in the UK. “This is a huge step as we build back greener, lower our carbon footprint and deliver better air quality up and down the country – with more zero-emission models of cars and vans on the market than ever before, there has never been a better time for drivers and businesses to make the switch.” Electric deliveries DHL Parcel has recently launched 14 new electric courier vans across London as the start of a national electric roll-out. The vans will operate out of DHL’s Docklands depot, where they will be charged overnight using onsite facilities to serve central London. The Renault ZE Masters vans have a range of 75 miles, allowing them to make deliveries in urban areas. Scott Laird, VP of operations at DHL Parcel said: “Bringing down emissions from commercial vehicles is crucial if we want to make a difference to air quality and the environment. The launch of these vehicles in London is an important step towards our target of zero logistics-related carbon emissions by 2050. “Recent enhancements in battery life and load capacity have made the use of electric vehicles in urban areas a reality and we’re committed to extending the roll-out in other parts of the country.” Charging facilities have been installed in a number of DHL Parcel depots in readiness for more electric vehicles and all plans for future upgrades and new builds, have charging facilities planned as standard. Scott Laird, continues: “As electric technology continues to advance, we have every intention of investing in future models that can serve larger, more rural areas.” EVs for a start-up business Sustainable flat-pack building company U-Build has taken delivery of an electric Mercedes eSprinter to visit customers and transport materials. The fact that it produces zero tailpipe emissions means the eSprinter is exempt from the London Congestion Charge. The eSprinter’s four parallel batteries can be charged from ten to 80 per cent of maximum capacity in a couple of hours, using the 20kW DC fast-charging system supplied as standard. However, U-Build chose the optionally available


80 kW alternative, which does the same job in just 30 minutes. Company director Nick Newman is currently the van’s sole driver and uses publicly available facilities for recharging. Once Coronavirus restrictions have been lifted, however, the eSprinter will become a pool vehicle so available to colleagues as well, and U-Build will install a 7.4 kW (AC) wall box charger at its base in Hackney Wick, east London. Nick explained: “As an environmental building specialist U-Build is committed to promoting sustainability and delighted therefore to be acting as an early ambassador for the latest zero-emission technology from Mercedes-Benz. “I’m using our new eSprinter to travel between customer locations, which are all over London and beyond and will often be carrying timber sections, as well as other materials and tools. The van is the perfect size, just the job in fact, while in terms of range it’s doing exactly as we were promised.” The eSprinter can travel 95 miles (combined WLTP with 80 km/h speed limiter) on a single charge.

Riverford’s electric van fleet

Enhancing a green reputation Organic fruit and vegetable supplier Riverford has taken on ten Vauxhall Vivaro-e vans which will be used by the company to make deliveries in and around its first fully-electric hub in Bristol. Riverford aims to turn all of its national fleet electric by the end of 2025. The ten zero emission vans are estimated to help save more than 68 tonnes of CO2 per year. Jason Holt, Riverford’s head of logistics said: “We chose Bristol as the site of our first fully-electric delivery hub because of its green reputation and commitment to climate change. We know customers there will be thrilled that their veg boxes will now be delivered emission-free, and we’re looking forward to expanding our electric van fleet across the country.” “Electric vehicles are an absolute nobrainer for all delivery businesses, especially Riverford where we pride ourselves on being environmentally conscious.”

Mitie’s electric van fleet

Overcoming barriers Key barriers to electric vehicle take up include the limited public charging infrastructure – both on-street residential and rapid chargers – and the lack of availability of larger vans. The cost of electric vehicle also remains prohibitive to many companies. In Mitie’s survey of its electric vehicle drivers, despite the overwhelmingly positive feedback, 48 per cent highlighted that issues with public charging, such as a lack of charge points in areas where there’s no off-street parking and problems finding rapid chargers, are a concern. As part of the government’s ten point plan for a Green Industrial Revolution, £1.3 billion was announced to accelerate the rollout of chargepoints in homes, streets and on motorways across England. Simon King from Mitie commented: “With the biggest barrier to our EV rollout being a lack of on street charge points, this further investment will help us go further, faster and give our drivers peace of mind that they can plug in and charge wherever, and whenever, they need to. We look forward to significant future announcements and funding to ensure that on street charging points are available to all drivers without off street parking, so no-one is left behind the zero carbon mobility transition.” L

Electric Vans

Sponsored by

FURTHER INFORMATION www.globalactionplan.org.uk

100% ELECTRIC, ZERO EMISSIONS, NO RESTRICTIONS GOUPIL ELECTRIC LIGHT COMMERCIAL ROAD VEHICLES WWW.BRADSHAWEV.COM/GOUPIL-ROAD-VEHICLES

Supported by

55


PerformanceLine

PerformanceLine

PerformanceLine

PerformanceLine PerformanceLine

PerformanceLine

PerformanceLine

PerformanceLine

EPOWERED BY


ROAD TO ZERO

Delivering on the last mile challenge

Supported by

Written by Louisa Hosegood, digital and strategy director at Bis Henderson Consulting

The network of physical space behind final mile is often forgotten in the race to find cheaper, faster wheels to deliver the parcels. Short leadtimes necessitate close proximity to customers, but finding local warehouse space for sorting and consolidating consignments for last mile deliveries is difficult – even harder than sourcing larger fulfilment facilities. There is considerable scope for automation Faced with mounting challenges on urban congestion, cost and IT systems, and simple changes in working pressures and environmental concerns – how should businesses practices, to improve the use of resources adapt their delivery models to meet rocketing ecommerce orders? – labour, space, and energy, in particular. In the future, Last mile is likely to involve parcels picked from a variety of locations Ecommerce has grown massively, and of ‘final mile’ to be addressed in a more - from big distribution centres, to shops or probably permanently, during the pandemic holistic way in order to rebalance costs. former shop premises converted to ‘dark to 30 per cent or more of retail trade. An additional factor, as yet barely stores’. And that’s even before we consider The performance of many home delivery addressed, is the need in an eCommerce the concept of urban logistics centres. operations during the COVID crisis has been economy for pick-ups as well as The next significant trend, especially truly impressive; ramping up capacity at deliveries – not just of returns, but also for fashion and general merchandise, is break-neck speed, running continuously at of consignments from a growing array of inter-retailer collaboration on deliveries, peak levels, or for some new entrants being micro-businesses and home workers. principally to drive down parcel costs, truly creative with “emergency models”. but also to offer consumers a single, However, the traditional ‘last mile’ delivery Solutions at every scale timely delivery instead of three or four. model – from distribution centre to home To create an economically and Greater collaboration is the route to creating addresses, collection points, ‘click and collect’ environmentally intelligent approach a more comprehensive urban logistics model. stores, locker systems and the like – is under to fulfilment, many partial solutions for With the right foresight and local authority huge pressure to serve more customers individual firms are available and more support, we could see schemes like and greater volumes, and many existing are in development. Let’s consider those popular in Japan, South approaches are simply not sustainable in some key elements of future Korea and Singapore where economic, environmental and social terms. ‘last mile’ solutions. Greene r a multi-storey warehouse Currently, last mile delivery using ICE An obvious starting f u el optio with vehicle access at vehicles generates significant CO2 and point is vehicles. With are gain ns all levels is sited on the noxious emissions, and raises many other advances in engineering ing traction periphery of a major environmental and social problems, including and creative design, conurbation. These noise, health issues and congestion – options for delivery fuel cell , with EVs, techno facilities could push the particularly in dense urban areas. With vehicles are changing logy, cargo b boundaries of multi-use increasingly stringent emissions regulations – for example carbon ik pedestr es and to maximise efficient and planned urban area vehicle restrictions, fibre bodies like ia operations by housing a there is now an urgent need to create a those being adopted part of ns being variety of interconnected ‘sustainability plan’ for the fast-expanding by AO and Asda are the mix local area services from fleet of vans that is rapidly replacing the old much lighter, reducing ecommerce deliveries, C&C regime of large trucks delivering to stores. emissions and increasing point, shop replenishment or top payload capacities. Greener up, supplier cross dock, inter-store The physical space fuel options are gaining traction, stock rebalancing, returns and collections The expansion of ecommerce has also such as electric and fuel cell technology, from customers and returns, and all whilst placed great demands on physical space, and electric and pedal powered cargo running a local green fuel multi-vehicle fleet. whether it be fulfilment centres or sorting, bikes and pedestrians may also be part This approach works well with a consolidation and delivery hubs, and of the mix. There may be autonomous collaborating consortium of up to eight this has become a contentious issue. As delivery ‘robots’, as being trialled in Milton or ten manufacturers or retailers. The consumers demand ever faster deliveries, Keynes, and, less probably, drones. environmental and economic benefits of more localised fulfilment models are required. Transport arrangements too will vary. As wider collaboration could be considerable, Yet these same consumers, as residents, the market matures it will become evident but success depends on a supportive oppose plans for industrial development in that not all deliveries need to be same-day approach from local transport and planning conurbations, as seen by the recent rejection and on-demand, allowing for some degree authorities, as is being offered by the Mayor of Ocado’s fulfilment centre expansion in of rationalisation and consolidation. On the of London and Transport for London. Islington. Many logistics property experts other hand, increasingly sophisticated, and In the current economic climate, suggest that local government bodies are affordable, IT systems are becoming available substantial public investment in such being slow to realise the mounting urban that will further redefine route planning comprehensive schemes is unlikely. But warehousing challenge heading their way. and scheduling, optimising operations in there is much that can be achieved by What’s more, current models are real-time around criteria of time, mileage, individual businesses and through close economically moribund. Consumers expect emissions or a combination thereof. collaboration with other organisations and ‘free’ delivery, but eCommerce is hungry for Indeed, many of the solutions for last mile local authorities. Importantly, not every resources – warehousing, vehicles, order delivery will be data driven, and much of the initiative requires significant new money: pickers and drivers – which have to be paid required data already exists or could readily much can be achieved through intelligent for and, as in the case of warehousing and be made available. Dynamic systems can decisions in the normal renewal cycle, labour, are in short supply. Meanwhile, the balance options, offering consumers greater and by repurposing existing assets. L push for speed of deliveries means that many visibility and maximum flexibility, such as delivery trips operate ‘on demand’ and at well changing destination at short notice, with below capacity. For omni-channel retailers greater operational efficiencies of reducing FURTHER INFORMATION the switch in emphasis to online sales failed or re-deliveries. Systems will provide For more information, visit fundamentally challenges the cost structure a platform for greater collaboration by www.bis-henderson.com of the business, requiring the challenges enabling easier consolidation of deliveries.

Last Mile Logistics

Sponsored by

57


Established in 2004, we offer a wide range of vehicle security locks including HookLocks, DeadLocks, SlamLocks, Heavy Duty locks and protection plates to name a few. Our expert team of in-house lock fitters can install durable quality locking systems to any type of vehicle, including vans, 4x4's, motor homes, pick up trucks and HGV lorries amongst many others. Whether you work for yourself or your company requires it's fleet to be fitted with security locks, we will be able to fit the type of lock that is best suited to your needs. Our unique Hooklock is one of the most secure locks available on the current market today, offering a clear visual deterent and a robust, effective defence. Ed-Lock founder Ed Colford recognised the weaknesses in the mordern DeadLock and early HookLock and spent over a year developing our HookLock. Unlike other suppliers we don't fasten the lock with rivets, Ed-Lock are the only company that inserts an internal plate into the door then bolts the lock onto the plate. The keeps and brackets have been specifically designed and tailored to each type of van, achieving maximum security in the event of an attack.

www.ed-lock.com | 03301 289987 | enquiries@ed-lock.com


May 2021 | COMMERCIAL GREENFLEET

Van Security

Van security: what to think about?

peaking in 2018 before dropping in 2019 by 4.8 per cent. The number of content thefts also fell by 10.0 per cent over the same period. The reason for this remains unclear. While some van operators suggested the reduction was due to increased additional security measures, such as locks, or driver training and awareness, it could also be a consequence of issues with reporting Logistics UK is calling on the Home Office Vans are desirable to criminals for a variety of reasons. So what to allocate a national crime reporting code should van operators consider when protecting their vehicles? for all commercial van thefts and thefts from vans, to allow better understanding of the scale and reach of this crime and to support There were 11,729 recorded incidents of the impact on operators is significant with better allocation of police resource. Currently, contents theft from vans in the first six 58 per cent of survey respondents also individual police forces decide whether to months of 2020, according to Logistics reporting productivity loss. The additional record commercial van thefts separately UK’s latest Van Security Report. time needed to sort replacement vehicles, from those of private cars, resulting in an To inform the report, Logistics UK conducted equipment, file police reports and insurance incomplete picture of the extent of this type a van security survey last year to investigate claims reduces operational efficiency. A of crime. Logistics UK also wants to see a UKthe nature and scale of the issue. The survey worrying 61 per cent of respondents reported wide standard reporting mechanism, ideally results suggest that thieves target locations contents thefts having a negative impact on online, for van operators to report van crime. where they know vans are kept overnight drivers and even more worrying, was that To enhance van security beyond alarms with 47.8 per cent of respondents citing in almost one in eight contents thefts, the and immobilisers, there are plenty of a drivers’ home driveway as the most driver, or an employee, was threatened. physical security add-ons that can be used common location for a van to be stolen. such as upgraded deadlocks, slam locks, This contrasts to van contents thefts, where Van crime reporting steering lock or pedal box protector, or the most common location was on-street The Logistics UK report showed that hand brake lock. And of course GPS parking near the driver’s home - perhaps the number of vans stolen in trackers improves the chances suggesting more of an opportunistic crime. 2019 fell by 5.0 per cent of recovering a vehicle if it is The survey found that very few contents compared to 2018, There’s stolen, with some systems thefts were as a result of a van being left despite the number of even alerting the police. unlocked or open, instead thieves mostly new vans registered been a Indeed, van operators broke into vans by smashing windows or in 2019 increasing marked are keen to address the using cutting equipment to gain access to by 2.4 per cent and theft of rise in issue of van crime, with the load compartment as quickly as possible. the population c a convert talytic 80 per cent saying they And unfortunately, almost 65 per cent of of licensed vans e the star rs since would pay extra for those who experienced van-related crime said increasing by t of the additional factory-fitted their vehicles sustained significant damage. 2.6 per cent. l o ckdown first security measures. E Van content theft has cost businesses Van thefts increased £4,250 on average over 12 months, and annually from 2014,

59


Van Security

 Catalytic converter theft Ageas Insurance says it has seen a marked rise in theft of catalytic converters since the start of the first lockdown just over a year ago, with this type of crime now accounting for three-in-10 of all theft claims reported. Before the lockdown catalytic converter theft only accounted for around one-in-five. Catalytic converters are valuable because they contain a honeycomb coated with precious metals such as platinum, palladium and rhodium which help to filter harmful gases from the vehicles’ exhaust systems. The RAC says that when the global value of these metals increase it usually leads to a spike in thefts. Prices of rhodium hit record highs earlier this year, up more than 200 per cent since March 2020. Robin Challand, claims director at Ageas, says: “While catalytic converters are just one component of a car, their theft can often result in a driver’s car being written off which is the last thing we want for our customers. We hope that by shining a spotlight on this type of crime, we can arm motorists with the information they need to protect their vehicles.” Toyota has announced it is working with police and Smartwater to covertly mark the catalytic converters on more than 100,000 cars in an attempt to deter thieves. The initiative is costing the car maker more than £1m and will be provided to existing Toyota owners for free. Thieves are targeting the catalytic converters in older hybrid models, like the Toyota Prius, because the catalyst in a hybrid has a lower work load than in a non-electrified vehicle, meaning it is in better condition. Toyota is offering the Smartwater marking free to all Toyota and Lexus owners, who simply need to call their local Toyota or Lexus retailer to arrange a visit. It has also issued 20,000 Smartwater kits to police to support their local anticatalyst theft initiatives. The company is also working with the AA so its patrols can point customers to where they can get a free kit. Theft of EV charging cables With the growing number of plug-in vans on the roads, drivers are also being urged to take measures against charging cables theft. Rubbish removal company Divert.co.uk have warned that charging cables can be sold for up to £200, and that they are also attractive to scrap metal thieves. Company spokesperson Mark Hall said: “Car chargers are particularly appealing to thieves because they can be sold for up to £200 and they are selling them everywhere, eBay, Facebook, and to dodgy scrap dealers. And they can be pretty costly and inconvenient for you to replace, so it’s best to keep it locked away from the crooks.” Although many electric vehicles have systems in place that lock the charger into position, these security measures aren’t always fool-proof. Tesla owners for example noticed this winter that the locking mechanism wouldn’t work due to the freezing weather, causing cables to become detached from their vehicles which made them easier to steal. This prompted Tesla

60

The survey found that very few contents thefts were as a result of a van being left unlocked or open, instead thieves mostly broke into vans by smashing windows or using cutting equipment to release a ‘cold weather improvements’ software update to counteract the problem. Mark Hall recommends padlocking the cable to the vehicle while charging it at home or out and about, similarly to how you would secure a bike with a bike lock. He advises that chargers are locked when they are not in use too, and ideally that they are kept out of sight. The use of commercial vehicles as weapons A somewhat surprising area of commercial vehicle security comes in the form of preventing them from being used in terror attacks Attacks on the public involving vehicles, which have been targeted due to their size and potential impact, have had tragic consequences in recent years, including in the Westminster and London Bridge attacks of 2017. This has led the government to publish new guidance to prevent commercial vehicles, including vans, lorries, buses, coaches and even cranes, from being used as weapons in acts of terrorism. The standard, which has been published by the British Standards Institution (BSI) and sponsored by the Department for Transport, sets out a raft of security measures to prevent criminals and terrorists from accessing commercial vehicles. To meet the new requirements, operators must develop a security management plan, assess risk exposure, put in place

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER COMMERCIAL FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net/commercial

management and accountability for security, as well as improve their knowledge of potential risks to their business. Other requirements will include checks of drivers’ references and previous employment history and also regular visual checks of vehicles for signs of tampering. To ensure this new standard is met, the government is working with the industry to develop accreditation and certification schemes for commercial vehicle firms, with further details to be announced. Nick Fleming, head of mobility and transport standards at BSI, said: “This new standard, developed with operators of commercial vehicles, encourages good practice in the managing of security risks that may help to reduce the threat of vehicles being used in acts that may cause intentional harm to the public or for organised crime. “The standard highlights the growing importance of physical vehicle security measures to help prevent such criminal acts taking place.” The new standard has been developed by transport, safety and crime experts, and is targeted at operators of light and heavy goods vehicles, as well as those of public service vehicles and mobile plant, such as cranes and tip trucks. L FURTHER INFORMATION Find the van security report from Logistics UK at logistics.org.uk


Whilst fleet operators are increasingly taking steps to mitigate the impact of cargo crime, often there is little consideration afforded to the role of access control

It is widely acknowledged that the most vulnerable part of the supply chain is when goods are in transit. Ominously that risk has never been greater. Cargo crime is on the rise, between 2018 and 2019, the Transported Asset Protection Association (TAPA) reported a 114 per cent increase in the number of cargo crime incidents captured across the EMEA region. Even during the enforced lockdowns throughout 2020, these trends have shown little sign of reversing and as restrictions begin to ease, there are stark warnings over a pending cargo crime spike. Whilst it may be easy to assume that it is mostly high value cargo at risk, statistics actually reveal that the classification of goods being targeted is hugely varied, with Organised Criminal Gangs (OCG’s) more inclined to seek ‘theft attractive’ products that are more difficult to trace or identify, such as food and drink or perfumes. Whilst fleet operators are increasingly taking steps to mitigate the impact of cargo crime by employing more robust physical security solutions on their vehicles, often there is little consideration afforded to the role of access control and how such systems are managed in the field. Commercial vehicle security specialist, Maple, work closely with their clients to identify the right fit for their own logistics operation, support a flexible range of access control solutions that focus on efficiency and ease of implementation. Here we take a look at a range of options available for Maple’s high security locking applications.

Access control in fleet security When looking at how to prevent unauthorised access to vehicles, commercial vehicle security specialist, Maple, suggest that the most important consideration is not simply the physical lock itself, essential though it is, but the method of access control and how this is implemented across fleet operations. Traditional methods of access control such as mechanical keys, whilst suitable for certain applications do have limitations and are largely unsuitable for a modern logistics fleet. For large fleets where flexibility is important, operators should consider how access to large numbers of different vehicles is facilitated and what the impact is in the event of lost or missing keys. Advances in technology permit greater sophistication in maintaining control and integrity of goods in transit operations. Maple are able to offer a large portfolio of locking applications and crucially support a flexible range of access control solutions that focus on efficiency and ease of implementation. Fob validation Fob validation offers a particularly effective approach where a large number of users or drivers require access to multiple vehicles/ trailers. The system allows users to ‘validate’ their access fob for a pre-defined period of time (e.g. Duration of a shift, 24 hours etc) by presenting their fob to a validation unit. Once the time period expires, access for the user is disabled until they initiate the BDI Integritas from Maple offers a modern approach to vehicle security

Advertisement Feature

Access control: the key to combatting the worrying rise in cargo crime procedure once more (i.e at the beginning of their next shift). This option provides a simple and efficient way to manage access to vehicles, ensuring any lost or missing fobs are quickly taken out of circulation, preserving security and providing simple, hassle free access control management. Challenge response This option enables operators to remove the need for access keys or fobs completely. Using the electronic seal number generated by the locking device, authorised users can obtain single use access codes via a secure web portal, which are used to gain access to a vehicles load area. Remote access control For high security operations, Maple locking applications can be integrated with third party telematics solutions to provide an enhanced level of control. This powerful option provides you with the ability to lockdown vehicles remotely from anywhere in the world, ensuring access cannot be gained during transit and maintaining the integrity of your cargo. Once the vehicle arrives at the correct destination and its location is verified in realtime, access can be granted to authorised personnel. For a fully connected and intelligent system, users can even opt to integrate with real-time CCTV and live monitoring for an ultra-secure goods in transit solution. Insightful data The Maple access control platform captures all activity as part of a comprehensive audit trail, providing previously unobtainable information about goods in transit operations. Each and every door event is logged, detailing who accessed your vehicles and when, removing any ambiguity during road transport operations, by providing a clear, indisputable chain of custody. The system reinforces individuals responsibilities and assigns accountability for assets under their control, in the event of stock discrepancies it also absolves innocent parties of any involvement. The data captured provides you with the unique ability to prove the security of your cargo hasn’t been compromised. The automatic tamper proof electronic seal number and concise audit reports, allows you to provide detailed information on the integrity of your assets, which has even been used as evidence in criminal cases and by border officials conducting clandestine investigation. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.maplefleetservices.co.uk

May 2021 | COMMERCIAL GREENFLEET

61


VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR YOUR FREE SUBSCRIPTION AND TO RECEIVE THE LATEST ISSUE AND NEWSLETTER DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX

WWW.GREENFLEET.NET

ADVERTISERS INDEX The publishers accept no responsibility for errors or omissions in this free service BP 4 Bradshae Electric vehicles

55

Commercial Vehicle show

IBC

Co-Wheels 28 DAF 40,41 Ed-Lock 58 Engineius 24 Fuel Cell Systems

49,50

Grosvenor 18 HJS Emmission Tech

52

Ison Distribution

56

Maple Fleet Services

61

Maxus 38-39,44 The AA Totalkare Heavy Duty Vauxhall Motors

12 14,52 6,42

Volkswagen IFC Zwings 28

62

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


KEEPING BRITAIN MOVING

REGISTER FREE TODAY Discover how innovation can assist businesses big and small to increase efficiency and service delivery. With all the latest technology in commercial vehicles, trailers and equipment on display, this year’s CV Show is even more unmissable than ever.

REGISTER at cvshow.com @TheCVShow


0Zone is The Grosvenor Group’s innovative and multi-award winning solution to help companies navigate their way smoothly towards ultra-low emission (ULEV) and electric vehicles (EV).

Our team of experts will help you drive down your CO2 levels and move towards a Zero emission future through a well-structured ultra low emission and electric vehicle fleet policy.

Through our operational review, we will look at the current suitability of ULEVs and EVs for your business, and the measures that need to be in place for alternative fuels to become an effective part of your fleet strategy.

What are the real financial implications of moving to alternative fuels? Our 0Zone team will provide a clear and transparent analysis based on whole life costs, taxation, NI and other key considerations

For an initial, no obligation and free consultation with a member of our award winning 0Zone team, we would be delighted to hear from you.