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PROMENADE

PROMENADE About New York since 1934

NYLUXURY.COM

SUMMER 2009

■ Madison Avenue ■ Lincoln Center at 50 ■ Elegant Jewelry and Timepieces ■ Fine Dining ■

shopping

a NewYork City

summer theatre dining

®

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SUMMER 2009

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Bloomingdale’s has everything you need for a beautiful NYC day! Find the hottest looks for the whole family, plus great gifts and goods for the home, all from your favorite designers † like LOUIS VUITTON, CHANEL, JUICY COUTURE, TORY BURCH, UGG AUSTRALIA, MARC BY MARC JACOBS, THEORY, RALPH LAUREN, BACCARAT, BURBERRY, PRATESI, DAVID YURMAN, and so much more!

Six Designers Share Their Secret

At 59th Street, don’t forget to indulge your craving with our world-famous foods: FORTY CARROTS • DAVID BURKE • MARTINE’S HANDMADE GOURMET CHOCOLATES

RECEIVE A

For top-notch furniture, lighting, art and objets, savvy designers shop at Center44. With over 75 international antiques and modern dealers in 25,000 square feet, Center44 is open

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ways to shop: a block-long showroom in the heart

WHEN YOU SPEND 200.00 OR MORE.

of Manhattan and online at center44.com. Pass it on…

Bring this ad and your same-day receipts to Visitors Center on 1, 59th Street and Lexington Avenue or Customer Service on 2, Soho, 504 Broadway.

Center44

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*One per customer, while supplies last. †Not in all stores.

222 East 44th Street, New York, NY 10017 • 212-450-7988

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Clockwise, from top left, Sandi Berman featured an amorphous table by Joseph Urban found at Center44 e60sky@aol.com • Margaret Wilson installed this fantastic Zsolt Boldoni painting from Center44 margaretwilsoninteriordesign.com • Marshall Watson adorned an entry with a Victorian iron clock face from Center44. mwinyc.com • Martin Potter and Jon Hattaway of MJ Berries found all of the seating and the vintage chandelier for these rooms at Center44. mjberriesdesign.com • Bob Pierce of BP/AD used a vintage Curtis Jere metal wall sculpture from Center44. 347-407-8787 • Susan Lawton completed an eclectic setting with a Chippendale sofa from Center44. susanlawton.com

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HOTEL WALDORF-ASTORIA 301 PARK AVENUE 212-751-9824 509 MADISON AVENUE AT 53RD STREET 212-888-0505 NEW YORK, NY 10022 TOLL-FREE: 800-CELLINI www.CelliniJewelers.com

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TAKE HER BREATH AWAY MAGNIFICENT DIAMOND RINGS FROM OUR EXCLUSIVE COLLECTION

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PUBLISHER’SLETTER

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Summer 2009

Jewelry

The Charles Engelhard Court at the Metropolitan Museum

Theatre

SUMMER IN

PROMENADE

ot town…summer in the city. And so much to do – like visiting the best addresses on Madison Avenue for some warm-weather indulging. Our style editor offers a variety of must-have looks for you, stunning shoes to compliment toned bare legs, chic bijoux for finishing touches, and elegant accessories for the home. Don’t miss the latest in exclusive timepieces from the Basel and Geneva exhibitions. And for a little more summer fun, see our selection of flowers…crafted for ears, wrists and neck of emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds. Lincoln Center is celebrating its 50th anniversary and we talk with one of the architects who is transforming New York’s great performing arts center. At the theatre this summer, you’ll find a host of big names – like Faith Prince joining The Little Mermaid and Phylicia Rashad in August, Osage County, plus Anne Hathaway in Twelfth Night at Shakespeare in the Park. The American Ballet Theatre’s dance season is in full swing at the Metropolitan Opera and another Metropolitan – the museum – offers its newly reopened American Wing, with renovated historic rooms and a private collection of vessels and vases made by some of the most famous American potters. To go with the heat, we feature Latin sizzle on our dining pages….eight excellent choices for the best in Mexican and Spanish cuisines that New York has to offer. And meet Michael Lomonaco, chef/owner of Porter House New York, a fine steakhouse that he runs, American- grill style. If a getaway is on your mind, our travel pages can help you plan for a luxurious cruise on the Queen Mary 2, where you will be lavishly pampered and delightfully entertained. And as always in Promenade, our up-to-date guides for shopping, dining, theatre, museums, galleries, performing arts, sightseeing and spas will help your summer in the city be spectacular. For more luxury information and things to do, visit our new website: nyluxury.com. Enjoy!

H Shopping

Dining

David L. Miller Publisher PROMENADE I

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Performing Arts

DEDICATED TO THE AFFLUENT NEW YORK CITY VISITOR


HOTEL WALDORF-ASTORIA 301 PARK AVENUE 212-751-9824 509 MADISON AVENUE AT 53RD STREET 212-888-0505 NEW YORK, NY 10022 TOLL-FREE: 800-CELLINI www.CelliniJewelers.com

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HIGH-WATT WONDERS TAKE HER BANGLES BREATHWITH AWAY ROUND BRILLIANT MAGNIFICENT DIAMONDS DIAMOND IN 18-KARAT RINGSROSE, FROM WHITE OUR EXCLUSIVE OR YELLOW COLLECTION GOLD

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About New York since 1934

PROMENADE

nyluxury.com Summer 2009

Shopping New York Bejeweled in flowers

Flower Power Summer blooms in rubies, sapphires, diamonds and emeralds. Page 12 Time Stands Still The latest timepieces from Basel and Geneva. Page 16 Madison Avenue The best addresses for warm weather indulgences. Page 18 timeless watches

Complexion Perfection: Four very different facials for a fabulous summer face. Page 24

jenna’s collection

shopping madison style

on the cover Clockwise from top left: From Carlisle Collection’s PerSe line; De Beers’ “Wildflower” chandelier earrings; a Vacheron Constantin timepiece at Cellini; Chandra Wilson, who will star in Chicago; the dining room at David Burke’s Fishtail; Union porcelain at the Met’s new American Wing.

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The Style Interview: Jenna Lyons As creative director, she has helped shape J.Crew’s Collection, the firm’s upscale line. Page 28 Our List of the Best Places Great suggestions for successful shopping. Page 30

sumptuous skin


Aaron Basha Boutique

680 Madison Avenue

New York

212 935 1960

neman marcus • Saks Fifth avenue nyc

www.aaronbasha.com


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About New York since 1934

PROMENADE

nyluxury.com Summer 2009 James White

On the Town THEATRE

Divine Faith Faith Prince, one of New York theatre’s most celebrated stars, is back on Broadway, creating havoc under the sea. Page 44 Summer Theatre Anne Hathaway joins Twelfth Night at the Delacorte, Grey’s Anatomy’s Chandra Wilson (Dr. Bailey) comes to Chicago and some of spring’s biggest stars stay on. Page 47 hathaway in the park lincoln center transformed

PERFORMING ARTS

Lincoln Center at 50: The architect explains it all. Page 56 DANCE

From Russia, with Passion Becoming a principal dancer for ABT was a long time coming for the glamorous Veronika Part. Page 60 ART

glamour from russia

Renovating The Met’s American Wing A new flow to the historic rooms and objects, a courtyard transformed and a never before-seen-public exhibit provide a delightful journey through the American collection. Page 66 REAL ESTATE

Living near Lincoln Center... ...Where the world-class performing artists and the people who love them are neighbors. Page 78 TRAVEL

On the Queen Mary2 History, luxury, culture and advanced computer classes. Page 80

tea for the Queen Mary 2

DINING

Latin Sizzle 8 hot spots for a great dining experience. Page 88

inside porter house

The Restaurant Interview Michael Lomonaco of Porter House New York–A steak house, American-grill style. Page 98

THE MOST UP-TO-DATE GUIDES:

the met renovates the american wing 8

Theatre....................... Page 48 Performing Arts.......... Page 62 Museums.................... Page 70 Galleries...................... Page 74 Sights in the City ....... Page 84 Dining........................ Page 92


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About New York since 1934

PROMENADE Summer 2009

PUBLISHER David L. Miller CO-PUBLISHER Eli Marcus DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Lisa Ben-Isvy SALES & MARKETING

VP Sales & Marketing Vincent Timpone VP Community Relations Janet Z. Barbash Senior Account Manager Fred Moskowitz EDITORIAL

Editor Listings Editor Style Editor Theatre Editor Assistant Editor

Phyllis Singer Colin Carlson Ruth J. Katz Griffin Miller Christine Tarulli

Contributing Editors Kristopher Carpenter Sylviane Gold Aileen Jacobson Karin Lipson Diane Mehta Marla J. Wasserman Art Director Jiyon Son PUBLISHING OPERATIONS

General Manager Thomas K. Hanlon Administrative Jennifer Morel Frank Kirsner Denise Marcovitch Traffic Heather Gambaro Rebecca Stolcz FINANCE

Credit Manager Elizabeth Teagarden Shaquon Cates Curtis Chaffin Diedra Smith Bookkeeper Fran Giovinco Assistant Bookkeeper Socehira David

PROMENADE | DEDICATED TO THE AFFLUENT NEW YORK CITY VISITOR

Published by Davler Media Group LLC 1440 Broadway, 5th Floor New York, NY 10018 P: 212.315.0800 F: 212.271.2239 www.nyluxury.com www.davlermedia.com

Chief Executive Officer: David L. Miller

Quarterly circulation is audited by BPA Worldwide NO PORTION OF THIS MAGAZINE, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ARTICLES, LISTINGS, MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISION OF THE PUBLISHERS. Copyright: 2009 by Davler Media Group LLC. 212.315.0800.

Subscriptions are $60 in US and $80 overseas For circulation inquiries, call Thomas K. Hanlon, 646.736.3604

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All rights reserved.


Advertiser:

bochic

Deadline:

05/8/09 PROMENADE MAGAZINE

Contact Information:

jill malek 718.207.9587 jill@jillmalek.com


EDITOR’S PICKS

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flower

6

power

What better way to engage a green thumb and enjoy a fleur or two well beyond summer—in fact, forever—than to have your blooms crafted in diamonds, rubies, sapphires, and emeralds? They never wilt and they will always catch the eye of an admiring gardener. Here are some of summer’s freshest buds for wrists, necks, and ears. By Ruth J. Katz

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1 De Beers’ “Wildflower” chandelier earrings,

3.95 cts. of diamonds, set in white gold. $22,000 De Beers, 703 Fifth Avenue (55th Street); 212-906-0001, 800-929-0889; debeers.com

3

2 “Royal Garden” ring, from Gílan, accented by flowers formed from pear-shaped diamonds,

set in white gold, on bands of pink gold set with pink sapphires. Price upon request. Gílan, 743 Fifth Avenue (57th/58th Streets); 212-949-4350; gilan.com 3 “Sunflower Vine” bangle bracelet, from Reinstein Ross, in a buttery-toned 20-kt. peach gold,

set with yellow sapphires and diamonds. $28,000. Reinstein Ross, 29 East 73rd Street (Fifth/Madison Avenues); 212-772-1901; 122 Prince Street (Greene/Wooster Streets); 212-226-4513; reinsteinross.com 4 One-of-a-kind, 18-kt. gold bracelet, embellished with coral, diamonds, and a pink enameled

flower from Bochic, specialists in vintage and unique jewelry. $39,500 Bochic, 12 W. 57th Street (Fifth/Sixth Avenues; across from Bergdorf Goodman), Eighth Floor; 212-659-7743; bochic.com 5 A trio of Cellini necklaces, each with a single bud, featuring a diamond center, and all set in

18-kt. gold: ruby, $4,050; blue sapphire, $3,600; yellow sapphire, $3,275. Cellini, Hotel Waldorf-Astoria (East Lobby), 301 Park Avenue (49th/50th Streets); 212-751-9824; 509 Madison Avenue (52nd/53rd Streets); 212-888-0505; cellinijewelers.com 6 Two versions of the Georg Jensen “Daisy” earrings: [left] in yellow enamel on sterling silver, $180; and

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[right] in white enamel and 18-kt. yellow gold, with diamond centers, $2,030. Georg Jensen, 687 Madison Avenue (61st/62nd Streets); 212-759-6457; 125 Wooster Street (Prince Street); 212-343-9000, 800-546-5253; georgjensenstore.com


Advertiser:

bochic

Deadline:

05/8/09 PROMENADE MAGAZINE

Contact Information:

jill malek 718.207.9587 jill@jillmalek.com


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Limited edition of 516 pieces

For a limited time, Xezo is offering the Architect limited-edition watch for just $665.00 (shipping is free within the U.S.). To order this finely handcrafted timepiece, visit the manufacturer’s Website at www.Xezo.com, or call 800-779-0102.

The Swiss-made, automatic Architect by Xezo - as unique as your environment Crocodile leather Surgical steel curved case Size: 48mm x 35mm x 8mm Luminous hands and markers 50m/165ft water-resistant C A S E B A C K

ETA 2000-1 SELF-WINDING AUTOMATIC MOVEMENT WITH SHOCK ABSORBER • STOP SECOND DEVICE • SAPPHIRE CRYSTAL GLASS FRONT & BACK

www.xezo.com

V I E W

Time Evolves ™

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SHOPPINGNEW YORK

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time stands still: the latest from Basel and Geneva

The Olympics of timepiece exhibits––BaselWorld, the Watch and Jewellery Show––was held in April. Prior to that in January, the SIHH, or Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie was staged in Geneva. Time seems to stand still for these shows, where watch companies unveil their latest masterful creations for some 100,000 viewers from every segment of the market—collectors, store buyers, dealers, and the curious. And no sooner do the exhibitions end, when…tick tock, tick tock…everyone starts counting the days until the next shows are mounted. But in the meantime, here are a few noteworthy timekeepers that are new to the market. By Ruth J. Katz

women’s wear... Piaget’s “Altiplano,” [right] features a colorful enameled orchid motif in white gold with diamonds. $96,000. Piaget, 730 Fifth Avenue (56th/57th Street); 212-246-5555, 877-8PIAGET; piaget.com

Above: Just reintroduced to the Vacheron Constantin line, the “American 1921” is part of the “Historiques” collection. $24,900. Cellini, Hotel WaldorfAstoria (East Lobby), 301 Park Avenue (49th/50th Streets); 212-751-9824; cellinijewelers.com

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The “Chronometerwerk,” in 18-kt.yellow gold with brilliant-cut pavé diamonds. $27,950. Wempe, 700 Fifth Avenue (55th/56th Streets); 212-397-9000; 800-513-1131; wempe.com


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Parmigiani’s “Tonda Skeleton” watch in 18-kt. white gold, produced in a limited edition of ten pieces worldwide. $42,000. Cellini, Hotel Waldorf-Astoria (East Lobby), 301 Park Avenue (49th/50th Streets); 212-751-9824; 509 Madison Avenue (52nd/53rd Streets); 212-888-0505; cellinijewelers.com

The TX 800 Series Linear Chronograph is the world’s only quartz analog timepiece to show the chronograph minutes on a vertical scale. $695. Barneys New York, 660 Madison Avenue (60th/61st Street); 212-826-8900; barneys.com

A mere 300 pieces of Audemar Piguet’s stainless steel Royal Oak Offshore “Montauk Highway” are being produced. $20,500. Audemars Piguet, 40 East 57th Street (Madison/Park Avenues); 212-688-6644; audemarspiguet.com

The second edition of the “Martin Baker” watch, the “MB2,” from Bremont, is being produced in a very limited quantity, from the relatively new Bremont Watch Company. $5,500. Tourneau Time Machine, 12 East 57th Street (Madison Avenue); 212-758-7300; bremont.com

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“The Architect 2001 BA,” by Xezo features bold styling and immaculate craftsmanship to create an elegant original built to last; a stainless steel case, crocodile bracelet and black guilloche face complete its striking impression. For a limited time, inquire about special price. Xezo, xezo.com

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SHOPPINGNEW YORK

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Ready-to-write and bespoke stationery. Wren Press, 575 Madison Avenue (56th/57th Streets), 10th Floor; 212-832-7011

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“Armless Occasional Chair” from the Calvin Klein Home Curator. $1,250. Calvin Klein, 654 Madison Avenue (60th Street); 212-292-9000; calvinkleinhome.com

680 “Anémone” Belle Époque extra-large Champagne cooler. $61,630. “Anémone” Belle Époque water pitcher. $730 Christofle Pavillon, 680 Madison Avenue (62nd Street); 212-308-9390; christofle.com

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Crystal dog biscuit. $300. (engraving additional) Steuben Glass, 667 Madison Avenue (61st Street); 800-300-1531; steuben.com


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madison avenue the best addresses

Madison Avenue is a majestic strolling and shopping destination, home to a multiplicity of alluring boutiques, sharing a chic street address where the casual browser and the intrepid shopper can find lavish, tempting goods—from the write stuff (at the Wren Press, which holds two Royal Warrants, and supplies über-elegant stationery to HM the Queen and HRH the Prince of Wales), to all the right stuff, offered tantalizingly in more than 50 jewelry boutiques, well over 150 designer flagships, and in a plethora of confectionery wonderlands, beauty/skincare salons and spas, eyeglass emporia, and close to 100 galleries. On the following pages, a sampling of some of the street’s luxurious offerings, just waiting to be whisked back to your address. By Ruth J. Katz

692 “Paxton” clutch in cornflower crocodile. $8,900. Lambertson Truex, 692 Madison Avenue (62nd Street); 212-750-4895; lambertsontruex.com

691 Extra-wide enamel bracelets from the “Balcon du Guadalquivir” collection. $640 each. Hermès, 691 Madison Avenue (62nd Street); 212-751-3181, 800-441-4488; hermes.com

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804 Custom-crafted, hand-embroidered pillow and blanket cover in “Geraniums” pattern. Léron, 804 Madison Avenue (67th/68th Streets); 212-753-6700; leron.com

737 Pink resin and metal cuff. $1,545. Chanel, 737 Madison Avenue (64th/65th Street); 212-535-5505, 800-550-0005; chanel.com

720 Multi-colored, ruched-leather handbag. $3,335. ETRO, 720 Madison Avenue (63rd/64th Streets); 212-317-9096; etro.com

819 A sexy, slinky frock from the current collection. $2,195. Donna Karan, 819 Madison Avenue (68th/69th Streets); 212-861-1001; donnakaran.com

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madison avenue... the best addresses

824 “Gypsy” earrings, with fuchsia, pink, and orange sapphires, and diamonds. $32,300. de Grisogono, 824 Madison Avenue (69th Street); 212-439-4220; degrisogono.com

840 “New Jackie” handbag in coral leather, with bamboo tassel and gold hardware. $3,100. Gucci, 840 Madison Avenue (69th/70th Streets); 212-717-2619; gucci.com

849 Crystal and crystal-and-metal bangles. $340 to $440 each. Sonia Rykiel, 849 Madison Avenue (70th/71st Streets); 212-396-3060; soniarykiel.com

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SHOPPINGNEW YORK

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965 “Carnaval” satin d’Orsay pump with peep toe and petal embellishment. $1,665. Christian Louboutin, 965 Madison Avenue (75th/76th Street); 212-396-1884; christianlouboutin.com

867 “Karly” jelly sandals. $195. Ralph Lauren, 867 Madison Avenue (72nd Street); 212-606-2100; ralphlauren.com

850 “Sally” shoulder bag in grained calfskin. $1,995. Chloé, 850 Madison Avenue (70th Street); 212-717-8220; chloe.com

853 Hammered blue glass vase. $1,200. Asprey, 853 Madison Avenue (70th/71st Streets); 212-688-1811; asprey.com

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madison avenue... the best addresses

970 Onyx and carnelian Art Deco bracelet in 18-kt. gold. $25,000. Stephen Russell, 970 Madison Avenue (76th Street); 212-570-6900; stephenrussell.com

946

From the new, limited edition Kohdo Wood Collection, Dark Amber & Ginger Lily cologne. $55, 1 fl. oz., $100, 3.4 fl. oz. Jo Malone, 946 Madison Avenue (74th/75th Streets); 212-472-0074, 866-305-4706; jomalone.com

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Sequined obi belts. $650 each. Missoni, 1009 Madison Avenue (78th Street); 212-517-9339; missoni.com

1018 “Andalousie” boxed chocolates, 30 pieces. $56. “Soledane” chocolate dessert. 4-6 servings, $35.00; individual petite size, $7.50 La Maison du Chocolat, 1018 Madison Avenue (78th/79th Streets); 212-744-7117, 800-988-5632; lamaisonduchocolat.com

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BEAUTYNEW YORK

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Complexion Perfection: Four very different facials for a fabulous summer face There are facials and then there are Facials, with a capital F. Facials where you not merely experience a routine cleansing, exfoliation, extraction, and hydration, but rather undergo a somewhat transformative procedure— whether it’s the extent of the pampering; the rigors of boot-camp-like extraction (yes, a fancy word for removing all the imperfections); or the luxury of a super-hydrating final process that leaves your skin positively gorgeous and glowing. We road-tested four types of facial experiences in the city, and the results are in: For the last three months, our dee-vine dermis has been ravishingly radiant. By Ruth J. Katz

In Tune with Ajune Ajune is exactly what a neighborhood day spa should be— convenient, calming, and complete. There is a knowledgeable and caring staff, a selection of retail “goodies” for the face and body (over a dozen brands, ranging from popular names like Malin + Goetz and SkinCeuticals to harder-to-find products from Natura Bissé and Neocutis), and a well-equipped arsenal of services. Of course there are all the expected facials, including some not so “regular,” like the Ajune Glow for Men. There are also treats and treatments like a “clinical pedicure” ($160) to laser hair removal to the application of “Xtreme” eye lashes. And there are countless body treatments, massages, and wraps, among which is the Godiva Chocolate Body Wrap—mixed with rejuvenating and detoxifying muds—that is an exclusive to the spa.

[ The Ajune retail area ]

Ajune 1294 Third Avenue (74th/75th Streets); 212-628-0044; ajune.com.

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But most importantly, for harried visitors who want to do one-stop shopping, Ajune is also a medical day spa, with its co-founder and medical director the board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. Mauro C. Romita (whose daughter cofounded the spa over ten years ago) in residence two nights a week. Hence, there are nearly two dozen procedures on the “clinical” roster of services (like injections of Botox and fillers), as well as procedures that are crossovers, like the “Eyes Wide Open” package that includes brow-shaping, the application of lashes, and Botox around the crow’s feet areas. Ajune has been lauded periodically by New York magazine for specific treatments (the Glow Facial and the Body Facial), and has most significantly been singled out by Day Spa magazine in 2005 as the best medical day spa in the city. I found the ambience quite soothing and peaceful, and Angela Salerno who administered my “Brighten and Tighten” 90-minute treatment ($250), had a gentle touch. This is a high tech anti-aging facial that combines a light chemical peel and ultrasonic microdermabrasion to exfoliate. Deep cleansing extractions are preceded by a treatment from a GentleWaves LED hand-held light (which emits low-level pulsating lights proven to stimulate collagen production and slow down collagen breakdown). As if that were not enough, there is also a micro-current treatment (stimulating collagen and elastin), that I found a little jolting. Light suction lifted off dead skin and topical collagen serum was applied, using Ultrasound. Salerno ended with a collagen mask that was cooling and beautifying. I relaxed with hot mittens (hands slathered in a rich cream), and during the treatment, Salerno also does a shoulder and neck massage.


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I Sing for Ling! If the folks from Desilu Productions were still around, they’d assuredly be mounting a show called I Love Ling, set in a shrine to beauty, and starring Ling Chan (the name behind Ling Skin Care), who sure knows how to deliver a mighty fine facial. “We’re not about manicures and pedicures here; we’re all about results for the skin, for the face,” she tells me when I meet her. “We focus on skin care, education, and helping our clients achieve healthy skin.” Indeed, 95% of the services offered here (there are three venues in the city), are facial treatments. In fact, you cannot even get a manicure or pedicure. The Hong Kong-born skin guru has been fascinated by what makes for good skin since she was a teenager. In her youth, in an effort to develop a facial mask, she used to harvest stuck-to-the-bottom-of-the-pot cooked rice, mix it with lemon juice, and then work it into a paste, creating a mask—that she says actually helped to hydrate the skin, kill bacteria, and even out pigmentation! [ A treatment room ]

Emigrating from the Far East to the States in her 20s, she landed a job at an Upper East Side salon and it wasn’t long until she was studying and creating potions for the face. She had always been fascinated by Eastern remedies and today uses herbs and botanicals—combined with state-of-the-art science—in her current upscale, sought-after product line, which is stocked in some of the toniest spas and hotels around the country. By the early 70s, she opened her own salon at the chic intersection of Fifth Avenue and 57th Street and within a short time, Barneys asked her to offer her services in its destination emporium—the first skincare salon/spa at the store. In the mid-80s, she debuted the current Ling Skin Care day spa, where she counts among her clients the likes of super model Agyness Deyn and stars like Helen Hunt. She is maniacal about clean pores, and admonishes, “If you don’t have clean pores, no treatment product can get into your skin to perform, to enhance, to hydrate, to actually do something.” The salon offers at least a dozen different treatments for the skin, but her most oft requested is the Signature Ginseng Herbal Facial with a Triple Peel ($185; $205 for the first visit).

Her various treatments combine cleansing, exfoliating, hydrating, and what Ling calls “medication” (for example, Vitamin K to treat broken capillaries or hibiscus flowers in a peel that treats acne). I had the Signature Triple Peel Facial with Vitamin K with Ultrasound ($280; $300 for the first visit), which left my skin positively luminous. My experience was a restful one, cosseted under a vibrant-red Chinese silk quilt, happily reclining on an S-curved table. Ling wanted very much for me to experience her very popular non-invasive AntiGravity Face-Lift Facial, which can be performed over a weekend, on three successive days. She maintains it will take ten years (if only temporarily!) off my face, by, among other things, re-educating facial muscles, diminishing fine lines, enhancing collagen and elastin production, and by stimulating blood and lymph circulation. (I will try this procedure in the next month or two, and will report the results.) “Ling Skin Care is about results,” she reminds me, and if, after my treatment with Ling, the admiring compliments I received about my skin are any barometer, I sure got them. Yes, I do love Ling.

[ The retail/reception area at the Union Square spa ]

Ling Skin Care 12 East 16th Street (Fifth Avenue/Union Square West); 212-989-8833; also in SoHo and the Upper West Side; lingskincare.com

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BEAUTYNEW YORK

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[ The retail/reception area Part of the Chin face care line ]

Christine Chin Spa 82 Orchard Street (Grand/Broome Streets); 212-353-0503; christinechin.com

Chin’s Up! “I can see you’re going to be a really big project,” is how the well-known Malaysia-born and Hong Kong-reared Christine Chin greeted me at her Lower East Side spa, Christine Chin Spa. “Yes” she reiterated, when I was her captive on her table under the bright examination light and the 5X magnification lens. “A big project, indeed.” And so I was. Two hours’ worth. Chin relishes in telling me that some of her clients have dubbed her “Mean Christine,” alluding to the gusto with which she attacks skin “situations.” Some of those “issues” could be the “plaque and fungus that have settled over time and [which] refuse to budge,” according to materials released by the company. After some initial cleansing and prep, the serious part of my facial began with two different glycolic peels, one with a 510% solution, and the second one with a 10-15% solution. After that came an intense, but not painful, microdermabrasion with a machine that Chin had fitted with a specially created diamond head. She then asked if I wanted her to attack the extraction of nasty “donuts,” as she calls them, and she showed me with a mirror as she went after one. The fee for these types of extractions (Chin uses a lancet for this work) is $50 per “donut.” I had no idea what I was in for, but I quickly understood the reasoning behind the adjective “mean.” As she worked on my face (which she said was covered with fairly decent skin), I imagined Hilary Swank, Rachel Weisz, and Penelope Cruz going through this tribulation; their glamorous visages were smiling down on me, from pictures on the wall—all signed and dedicated to Chin, with love, with appreciation, with gratitude. (And her roster of big-time celebs only starts there, with a list that includes Marc Jacobs, Gisele Bundchen, Gwyneth Paltrow, and on and on.) Like a marauding lioness, Chin stalks the savanna of your skin, looking for any “donut” to gobble up. After an hour of her meticulous prodding, I was just about ready to send up a white flag. I had been warned to expect that my face would be a little “mucked up” if she did these deeper extractions; let’s just say I looked like I had the measles. My facial ended with two calming masks, the Soothing Hydrating Mask and the Green Tea Mask. (The basic fees are $250 for the facial and $250 for the microdermabrasion; deployment of “donuts” is additional.) After a week or so, my chicken pox dried up and my skin was beaming; I received compliments a-plenty. It’s easy to understand that, despite being in a not-so-accessible nabe, and shielded behind six-foot-tall bamboo stalks in the windows, this is the chi-chi, go-to spot for the glitterati. This place is all about skin, and as Chin says, “Nothing on your face should protrude, except your nose.”

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Guerlain Spa at the Waldorf-Astoria 301 Park Avenue (49th/50th Streets); 212-872-7200; guerlainspa.com

Getting the Gold If you’re looking to unwind and drift off to a dream state during your facial, there is very little that an appletini could do you for you that you won’t experience when you undergo a facial treatment at the nine-month-old Guerlain Spa on the 19th floor of the Waldorf-Astoria. The 14,000 square feet handsomely sculpted into an airy aerie, are palatial: The marble walls appear to be flecked with veins of precious metals; opulent sconces adorn the walls and gleaming chandeliers with glittering crystals hang from the ceiling; rich textiles are used to upholster the banquettes and the sedan chairs in the relaxation room (where you begin your Guerlain journey with hot tea) and diaphanous fabrics cascade from the ceiling, providing textural counterpoint. The décor is a visually peaceful mix of frosty white and grays, with accents of celadon. Harp music whispers in the background. The 16 treatment rooms are equally extravagant (clothing closets, even safes for valuables), each with its own massive, marble-clad bathroom, stocked with every amenity you could want after a treatment (except for that appletini). The wet rooms (for hydrotherapy and Vichy showers) are gloriously appointed, as well, and for pedicures, there are private nooks as well as a communal room (swell for parties), where the footbaths appear to rise from the floor on hydraulic lifts.

what intensity, relaxing or revitalizing? Once you pick, your facialist will custom-scent all the treatment products that are used for you. My facial was the company’s Complete Facial ($385), which actually started out in the Footbath Room. In fact, every treatment here starts out with a 15-minute relaxing footbath…aaaah. Next, it was back to my private suite for the 90minute procedure, which also includes, should you need/want them: facial waxing, eyebrow tinting, a hand treatment (I had the hot paraffin wraps), lymphatic facial drainage, a neck and shoulder massage, and two masks. Lauren Grace Williamson, my aesthetician, warned me that she was a gentle “monster” when it comes to extractions, but after “Mean” Christine, any noodling around on my face was child’s play. She finished off my facial with emollient treatment creams from the company’s Orchidée skincare line, the brand's luxurious and potent anti-aging secret weapon. I looked (and felt) sublime.

You start your treatment—any treatment—by selecting the fragrance you want for your products. I chose Insolence, a Guerlain scent. Bold or soothing? And

This is the place for the ultimate experience, a wonderful facial flight into another dimension. Guerlain even has a make-up room with almost all its beauty products, so you can do a make-up touch-up before you come down from your celestial perch, just in case you need to be somewhere where glowing skin isn’t glamour enough.

[ The waiting area ]

[ A hydrotherapy treatment room Top: A treatment product from the company’s Orchidée Impériale line ]

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talking with Jenna Lyons As creative director of the company everyone is talking about, she has shaped J.Crew’s Collection, the firm’s upscale line By Marla J. Wasserman

[ Opposite page Top: From the Crewcuts line, coming soon to Madison Avenue Bottom: Styles from the spring Collection ]

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ong before Michelle Obama catapulted J.Crew’s popularity into the stratosphere, Jenna Lyons intimately understood the brand’s allure. For the past two decades, Lyons has been part of J.Crew’s design team and now reigns as the brand’s Creative Director. With her all-American model look and athletic physique, Lyons epitomizes the classic, chic style synonymous with J.Crew and easily relates to the consumer’s desires. Two years ago, Lyons helped spearhead the launch of J.Crew Collection recognizing that a market exists for a couture-quality splurge now and again. Despite a hectic schedule – including helping to outfit Sasha and Malia – we recently got Lyons to share the inside scoop on the hottest summer items, where the brand is headed and how you can soon outfit your kids in Crewcuts, when a new city store debuts this summer.


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Q: For those who aren’t familiar with J. Crew Collection, what is it? J. Crew Collection is a pricier set of designs that bears its own black label. The Collection came about as a natural extension of J.Crew. As designers, we love to push the envelope and try new fabrics and mills that we never used before. We quickly found we had a following for the more special and unique items. We see the Collection as a part of J.Crew, not as a standalone item. Q: What are some of the hottest Collection pieces for the summer? Our best-selling Collection item has been an all-over sequin skirt in cognac and Capri flip-flops. Most women are pairing it with a t-shirt (which we love)! I just love to see people mix the brand with everything from casual tees to Valentino and Issey Miyake. Q: Are Collection items sold in their own stores? Collection pieces can be found in some of our boutique-style stores such as the one at Madison Avenue and 79th Street. We love the way this store looks and feels and have designed a similar store in Malibu. We also have a store that sells Collection pieces in East Hampton and on Prince Street. Plus, Collection pieces can be purchased on our web site. Q: What has the reception been to the fancier boutiques? Amazing. The store at 1035 Madison has been met with huge enthusiasm. People love the elevated service and the store’s décor. The service goes above and beyond what most people expect. Between the service, the mix of product and the ambiance of the store, the response has been overwhelming. While the Collection boutiques feel a bit more upscale than a traditional J.Crew store, they are all warm and approachable. Q: Everyone knows that the First Lady is a big fan of the brand! Is she wearing Collection pieces and how does it feel that she chose the brand you design? The excitement and pride we feel regarding Michelle wearing our clothes is immeasurable. She has worn a mix of our pieces from the Collection and J.Crew. We are thrilled and honored to be a part of her day in some small way! In addition, having her girls wear Crewcuts is a major bonus. Q: The Obama girls have made Crewcuts a must-have for all fashionable

kids – tell us when our city will have its own Crewcuts store? While it won’t be the first free-standing Crewcuts, come this August, the Upper East Side will get a store at 1200 Madison Avenue. This new store will carry the full assortment of the line: shoes, accessories, even party clothes. We are so excited to be coming to such a beautiful neighborhood. Q: If the women have Collection and the kids have Crewcuts, what is there for men? Obviously, J.Crew has a huge male following and we have amazing clothes for men. In fact, we opened our first ever Men's Shop at the former Liquor Store Bar in Tribeca (235 West Broadway) where we also carry specialty items for the men. For the shop, we pulled together the best of our men's collection and combined that with limited edition product and rare vintage finds. Whether it is a Mackintosh coat, Alden shoes, a great suit or amazing Globe Trotter luggage, we have it all. Q: Given the new economic reality our country faces, is J.Crew at the right price point to look fashionable without breaking the bank? We certainly think so! Whether you’re buying an $800 coat or a $98 blouse or an $18 t-shirt, we have it all and we don’t want to alienate anyone who simply likes great style and design, regardless of price. Q: With J.Crew’s current popularity, do you ever worry about sustaining the excitement? We feel incredibly lucky to be in the spot we’re in right now! I’m a bit superstitious so I don’t want to say too much! We can only hope that customers continue to appreciate what we’re doing. Marla J. Wasserman has written for many magazines in New York. Her last interview for Promenade was with fashion designer Catherine Malandrino.

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Aaron Basha, the luxury jeweler celebrated worldwide for its array of whimsical and unique designs, has just introduced its “Play Ball” collection (left). The inspiration for the playful collection is rooted in the world of sports with athletic-inspired designs in beautifully crafted enamel with 18K gold and diamond bejeweled charms. Available in both yellow and white gold, the sparkling styles include the brawny baseball hung from a dazzling diamond bail, and a modern rendition of the Magic 8 Ball in black and white enamel. Other designs include fancy footballs, shiny soccer balls, golden tennis balls, bright orange enamel basketballs and adorable miniature golf ball charms. Below is a new addition to the signature Aaron Basha Charm Collection, a pink enamel hat with dia heart and pavé bail. 680 Madison Ave. (61st St.), 212-935-1960; aaronbasha.com

SHOPPINGNEW YORK ART AND ANTIQUES Antiquarium Fine Ancient Arts Gallery, Ltd. – This gallery specializes in authentic, museumquality Greek, Roman, Etruscan, Egyptian, Sumerian, Mesopotamian and other Near Eastern antiquities, including ancient glass, jewelry, marble and stone sculpture, bronzes, pottery, coins and seals and wearable ancient jewelry. Special appointments arranged. 948 Madison Ave. (75th St.), 212-734-9776 Center44 – A unique and dramatic shopping experience with 70 extraordinary international antiques dealers featured in a block-long showroom of open-room settings, with aisles of antiquities (from ancient to the 19th century), 20th-century design—including Deco, Modernism, and Futurism—and unique contemporary art and objects. On-site skilled artisans provide furniture and art restoration, as well as traditional upholstery. 222 E. 44th St. (Second-Third Aves.), 212-450-7988; center44.com

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Fanelli Antique Timepieces – Antique timepieces, watches, mantle clocks, skeleton

clocks, grandfather clocks, three-piece clock sets, and wall clocks drawing both the likes of Sotheby’s, Christie’s, and Tiffany, as well as novice and sophisticated decorators. 790 Madison Ave. (66th St.), Ste. 202, 212-517-2300

of art, including blue and white, Celadon, Famille Verte, and Famille Rose and Monochrome wares and objects from the Ming and Qing Dynasties. 790 Madison Ave. (66th-67th Sts.), 3rd floor, 212-717-5383

Flying Cranes Antiques Ltd. – Novice and seasoned collectors alike can appreciate the wide selection of Japanese arts of the 18th and 19th centuries. Known for its collection of Imari, Satsuma, bronzes, ikebana baskets, furniture, swords, and other exceptional works. Manhattan Art & Antiques Center (Galleries 55, 56 & 58), 1050 Second Ave. (56th St.), 212-223-4600; flyingcranesantiques.com

James Robinson Inc. – Top-quality antique jewelry, silver, porcelain, and glass, along with handmade sterling silver flatware, coffee sets, trays, and candlesticks. Gentlemen will appreciate such treasures as cuff links, glass decanters, tankards, mugs, and other silver-crafted items. 480 Park Ave. (58th St.), 212-752-6166

Gem Antiques – Antique and fine contemporary paperweights from the U.S., France, and Scotland, and American and European decorative pottery and porcelain, from the 18th-20th centuries. Brands include Baccarat, St. Louis, Clichy, New England Glass Co., Boston & Sandwich Glass Co., and others. 1088 Madison Ave. (82nd St.), 212-535-7399

Manhattan Arts & Antiques Center – The country’s oldest and largest indoor antiques collective features 104 dealers offering 18th- to 20th-century American, English, Continental, and Oriental furniture, porcelain, silver, decorations, and clocks. Also available are Tiffany glass, Oriental rugs and tapestries, Japanese ivory and lacquer objects, enamel jewelry, marble statuary, and folk art. 1050 Second Ave. (55th-56th Sts.), 212-355-4400; the-maac.com

Imperial Oriental Art – Specializing in the finest examples of Chinese porcelain and works

Showplace Antique Center – Over 250 galleries located on 4 spacious floors featuring


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SHOPPING SPOTLIGHT

JEWELRY p.36

FASHION p.32

Art Deco, Art Nouveau, mid-century Modern, bronze, silver, jewelry, vintage clothing & accessories, ceramics, art glass, antiquities, period furniture & lighting. Don’t miss the 3rd floor featuring designer room settings and over 50 showcases filled with an eclectic range of decoratives and collectibles. Mon.-Fri, 10am6pm; Sat.-Sun., 8:30am-5:30pm. Silversmith, Espresso Bar & Café on the premises. Monthly live online auctions. 40 W. 25th St., 212-633-6063; nyshowplace.com

CHINA, GLASS, SILVER AND PORCELAIN Baccarat, New York – Illustrious French highend crystal stemware, giftware, and decorative items, from heart pendants to major works of contemporary sculpture and glorious chandeliers. Home to the finest in French tabletop. 625 Madison Ave. (59th St.), 212-826-4100; baccarat.com Bernardaud – Fine dinnerware, crystal, flatware, barware, and giftware, in styles ranging from classic to contemporary, renowned for its excellent craftsmanship and elegance. Family-owned and-operated since 1863,the leading manufacturer of Limoges porcelain, also carrying Baccarat, Puiforcat, and Christofle. 499 Park Ave. (59th St.), 212-371-4300; bernardaud.com Daum – For over 130 years, Daum has been recognized for its creativity, innovative styling, and masterful craftsmanship, and has been a leader in art glass. They offer decorative objects and tableware, special gifts and collectibles, handcrafted furniture, lighting, and objets d’art in Pâte de Verre—an ancient technique performed only by the company’s master craftsmen that uses crystal as the base material, giving the products both a sculptural dimension and a distinctive brilliance and translucency. Daum is the only crystal maker in the world that manufactures this exceptional substance with a quality of production and a capacity that can satisfy international demand. Featuring designs specially created by such avant-garde artists as Dan Dailey, Jean Cocteau, Salvador Dali, Hilton McConnico, Christophe Pillet, Aman, Sosno, Philippe Starck, Andre Dubreuil, and Franck Evennou. 694 Madison Ave. (62nd-63rd Sts.), 212-355-2060

Simon Pearce – This shop features everything you need to set the table and entertain—dinnerware, hand-blown glassware, flatware, linens, vases, and more—showcased in simple wooden cupboards and actual table settings. Wedding/gift registry, personalized engraving, hand painting. 500 Park Ave. (59th St.), 212-421-8801; simonpearce.com Steuben – “The world’s purest crystal,” renowned for exquisite craftsmanship, unmatched quality standards, and peerless material. Many new products are added each year to an extensive collection that includes bowls, vases, and candlesticks, desk and office accessories, their signature animals, and major copper-wheel engraved sculptural works. 667 Madison Ave. (61st St.), 800-424-4240; steuben.com

LINENS Frette – Since 1860, this Italian manufacturer of household linens has been offering some of the world’s most luxurious classic and contemporary bed-and-bath fashions. 799 Madison Ave. (68th St.), 212-988-5221; ABC Carpet & Home, 888 Broadway (19th St.), 212-473-3000 x723 Pratesi – Indulge in the finest in silk, cotton, and linen from a line-up of luxurious linens for the home and body. Snuggle up in the men’s and women’s line of robes, in several prints, with matching slippers for him and decorative scalloping and embroidery for her. 829 Madison Ave. (69th St.), 212-288-2315

FINE RUGS AND TAPESTRIES The Nemati Collection – For over 40 years, Nemati has represented expertise in the world of magnificent textile art, providing connoisseurs with a source for some of the finest antique and contemporary carpets of artistic merit. The antique collection is extensive, and the contemporary collection unique. They offer consultations, restoration, and appraisals. Art & Design Building, 1059 Third Ave. (62nd-63rd Sts.), 3rd Floor, 212-486-6900; nematicollection.com

LUGGAGE AND LEATHER GOODS p.40

INDEX 30

Art and Antiques

31

China, Glass, Silver and Porcelain

31

Linens

31

Fine Rugs and Tapestries

32

Home Furnishings

32

Department and Specialty Stores

32

Fashion and Accessories (Men and Women)

36

Jewelry and Watches

38

Shoes (Men and Women)

39

Maternity Wear

39

Kidstuff

40

Luggage and Leather Goods

40

Electronics and Photo

41

Art Supplies

41

Musical Instruments

41

Sporting Attire and Equipment

41

Stationers and Writing Instruments

41

Bookstores

42

Dentistry

42

Opticians and Eyewear

42

Services

43

Spas

(Unless otherwise indicated, the area code is (212), and should be dialed before the number.)

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SHOPPINGNEWYORK

HOME FURNISHINGS ABC Carpet & Home – A NYC treasure in two landmark buildings in the Flatiron district, this home-goods bazaar offers a spectacular selection of unique furniture, elegant linens, unusual lighting, thousands of rugs, and miles of broadloom. 881 Broadway (18th-19th Sts.), 212-473-3000 Asprey – Exclusive British luxury products for women, men, and the home. Known for fine jewelry, stones, watches, and clocks, the inventory also includes handbags, leather goods, accessories, scarves, a cashmere bar, shoes, cuff links, fragrances, luggage, rare and fine books, and silver gift items. 853 Madison Ave. (70th St.), 212-688-1811; asprey.com Design Within Reach – Modern design classics for the home including kitchen, living room, bedroom, and workspace furniture, an impressive array of lighting options, kitchen and bath accessories, and much more. Their Tools for Living store (142 Wooster St., 212-471-0280) is their first cash-and-carry location. 903 Broadway (20th St.), 212-477-1155; 341 Columbus Ave. (76th St.), 212-799-5900; 27 E. 62nd St., 212-888-4539; 124 Hudson St. (Moore St.), 212-219-2217; 408 W. 14th St., 212-242-9449

DEPARTMENT AND SPECIALTY STORES Barneys New York – Long identified with NY chic and sophistication, Barneys features international men’s and women’s fashion designers ranging from the classically understated to the flamboyantly avant garde. Accessories, formal wear, cosmetics, and shoes are also offered in a variety of styles. 660 Madison Ave. (61st St.), 212-826-8900; barneys.com Bergdorf Goodman – Among the nation’s most prestigious shops, featuring women’s fashion designs from Armani, Chanel, Versace and Ferre, to Tyler, Galliano, and Westwood. 754 Fifth Ave. (57th-58th Sts.), 212-753-7300; The men’s store is located at 745 Fifth Ave. (58th St.), 212-339-3310; bergdorfgoodman.com Bloomingdale’s – One of the world’s most famous landmark department stores. The

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best international fashions and home furnishings are brought together under a single Art Deco roof, in a store that encompasses a full city block and more than 500 departments. 1000 Third Ave. (59th-60th Sts.), 212-705-2000; The SoHo branch is located at 504 Broadway (Spring-Broome Sts.), 212-729-5900; bloomingdales.com Century 21 Department Store – “New York’s Best-Kept Secret” with high-quality European and American designer merchandise at 40-70% off retail prices. 22 Cortlandt St. (Church St.-Broadway), 212-227-9092; c21stores.com Henri Bendel – This ultra-chic, elegant Fifth Avenue retailer features Lalique windows, instore Lalique history and displays, and multiple dramatic spiral staircases. It makes for a wonderful backdrop for the high-end goods, including top women’s labels. 712 Fifth Ave. (56th St.), 212-247-1100; henribendel.com Lord & Taylor – Generations have shopped year-round at this, their flagship store, established in 1914, attracted by their focus on the American look and American designers, offering a vast selection of reasonably priced sportswear in all sizes, and particularly fine high-quality, shoes and accessories. 424 Fifth Ave. (39th St.), 212-391-3344; lordandtaylor.com Macy’s – “The world’s largest store,” and one of NYC’s most visited landmark attractions. The world’s first department store maintains a huge stock of everything from sofas to caviar, clothing, and everything in between. Broadway & 34th St., 212-695-4400; macys.com Saks Fifth Avenue – This venerated symbol of class and elegance began in 1924 as the brainchild of Horace Saks and Bernard Gimbel. Their flagship “dream store,” a New York City landmark since 1985, features nine floors of grand luxury, stocked with exclusive items for men and women. 611 Fifth Ave. (49th-50th Sts.), 212-753-4000; saksfifthavenue.com Takashimaya – The New York department store is modernized, with a Japanese spin. Products include time and travel accoutrements, men’s and women’s fashions, jewelry, scarves and accessories, home accents, bedding, skin care,

cosmetics, and specialty items for babies. 693 Fifth Ave. (54th St.), 212-350-0100; takashimaya-ny.com

FASHION AND ACCESSORIES ADAM – Fashion designer Adam Lippes’ outpost, featuring luxurious fashion apparel for men and women, including runway designs and daytime basics. Polka dots and flowy, embroidered tops and dresses for women, and lightweight striped sweaters for men are in this season. 678 Hudson St. (14th St.), 212-229-2838; shopadam.com BCBG Max Azria – Modern and chic suits, separates, jeans, coats, dresses, handbags, and accessories for fashion-forward women. Printed dresses, harem pants and dressy jumpsuits hit the stores this summer. 770 Madison Ave. (66th St.), 212-717-4225; 120 Wooster St. (Prince St.), 212-625-2723; 168 5th Ave. (22nd St.), 212-989-7307; 461 5th Ave. (40th St.), 212-991-9777; bcbg.com Brooks Brothers – Classically modern business and casual clothing for fashionable men and women, including dress shirts, ties, pants, sweaters, and polos. 1 Liberty Plaza (Broadway), 212-267-2400; 346 Madison Ave. (44th St.), 212-682-8800; 1934 Broadway (65th St.), 212-362-2374. brooksbrothers.com Burberry – This luxury brand, synonymous with its signature house check–the camel, black, red, and white pattern–offers men’s, women’s, children’s, and babywear lines, fragrances, golf, eyewear, and home collections. Their made-to-order coat service has customized style and color options. Women should look out for trendy cropped rain jackets and trench capes. 9 E. 57th St., 212-371-5010; 131 Spring St. (Greene St.), 212-925-9300; burberry.com Calvin Klein Collection – This monument to elegant modernity showcases its selection of women’s and men’s clothing, shoes, and accessories, and the home collection, including china, flatware, glassware, and linens, plus exclusive gift items. Men and women can find everything in prints, tie-dye and ombre in stores this summer. 654 Madison Ave. (60th St.), 212-292-9000; calvinklein.com

Davidoff of Geneva is one of the most popular cigar and accessories shop in America, with two warm and welcoming top-of-the-line shops in Manhattan, and the most comfortable smokers lounges in the city. Davidoff products—which include lighters, cigar cutters, ashtrays, humidors, cigar cases, and pipes—unite craftsmanship, dedication, and understanding, culminating in elegant, innovative, and functional pieces. Davidoff’s glass-walled walk-in humidor also features the best cigars and cigarillos available anywhere—over 1,000 varieties from more than fifty different brands including Davidoff, Winston Churchill, Zino Platinum, AVO, The Griffin’s, Super Selection, Zino, Private Stock, Alec Bradley, Ashton, and many others. 535 Madison Ave. (54th St.), 212-751-9060; The Shops at Columbus Circle, 10 Columbus Cir. (59th St.), 212-823-6383; davidoffnewyork.com


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Calypso – Feminine, flowing dresses, ultrasoft sweaters, swimwear, and other brightly colored fashions that mix “urban vintage” with “tropical exoticism.” 815 Madison Ave. (68th St.), 212-585-0310; 935 Madison Ave. (74th St.), 212-535-4100; 280 Mott St. (Houston St.), 212-965-0990; 654 Hudson St. (Gansevoort St.), 646-638-3000; 191 Lafayette St. (Broome St.), 212-941-6512; 137 West Broadway (Duane St.), 212-608-2222. calypso-celle.com Carolina Herrera – Elegant, ultra-feminine, upto-the-minute women’s dresses and fragrances. Structured masculine tailoring for the day paired with soft evening gowns for night define this season’s collection. 954 Madison Ave. (75th St.), 212-249-6552; carolinaherrera.com Catherine Malandrino – High-end couture fashions that blend the energy of Manhattan and the romance of Paris, and are a favorite among celebrities. The summer is all about printed and embellished dresses in muted colors SoHo: 468 Broome St. (Greene St.), 212-925-6765; Meatpacking District: 652 Hudson St. (13th St.), 212-929-8710; catherinemalandrino.com Celine – Luxury women’s fashions including timeless ready-to-wear, leather bags and handbags, shoes, and sunglasses. Inspirations for

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the summer collection comes from tribal traditions. 667 Madison Ave. (61st St.), 212-486-9700; celine.com

embellishments are in the stores this summer. 874 Washington St. (14th St.), 646-486-4800; dvf.com

Chanel Boutique – Featuring the classic décor elements of Coco Chanel’s renowned style, showcasing luxurious handbags, accessories, shoes, cosmetics, fragrances, and ready-to-wear by Karl Lagerfeld. 15 E. 57th St., 212-355-5050; 139 Spring St. (Wooster St.), 212-334-0055; chanel.com

DKNY – Lifestyle clothing, accessories, and more embracing the fun and “real” styles of New York from Donna Karan. Simple cotton and linen tanks and dresses in white, poppy and lapis for women, button-downs and tees in earth tones for men define this season. 420 West Broadway (Spring St.), 646-613-1100; 655 Madison Ave. (60th St.), 212-223-3569; dkny.com

Claudine – Casual and formal women’s clothing from up-and-coming designers, featuring many one-of-a-kind pieces. 19 Christopher St. (Gay St.), 212-414-4234 Davide Cenci – The women’s collection features luxurious Italian-made cashmere sweaters, shirts, dress suits, and slacks in various styles and colors, an assortment of outerwear and accessories tailored with unmistakable flair. The men’s collection features impeccably detailed, comfortable Italian-made suits, sport coats, pants, shirts, and accessories. 801 Madison Ave. (68th St.), 212-628-5910; davidecenci.com Diane Von Furstenberg – Signature wrap dresses to flirty sportswear, swimwear, accessories, and more from the fashion icon. Breezy chiffon tops, long flowy dresses, prints and

Dolce & Gabbana – Ultra-modern Italian fashions, including men’s formalwear and more adventurous women’s fashions. 825 Madison Ave. (69th St.), 212-249-4100; dolcegabbana.com Donna Karan –This three-story home to the famed designer’s timeless collection is where simplicity meets glamour. This season’s collection, named “Liquid Assets,” celebrates the short and sexy sillhouette. 819 Madison Ave. (68th St.), 866-240-4700; donnakaran.com Dooney & Bourke – Designer handbags and small leathergoods featuring trendy animal prints, soft suede, and their trademark logo. Look for seersucker and sport patterns in stores. 20 E. 60th St. (Madison-Park Aves.), 212-223-7444; dooney.com

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Eileen Fisher – Classic women’s fashions promoting simplicity, versatility, beauty, and creativity. 395 West Broadway, 212-431-4567; 521 Madison Ave. (53rd-54th Sts.), 212-759-9888; 341 Columbus Ave. (76th St.), 212-362-3000; 10 Columbus Circle, 212-823-9575; 1039 Madison Ave. (79th-80th Sts.), 212-879-7799; 166 Fifth Ave. (21-22 Sts.), 212-924-4777; eileenfisher.com Elie Tahari – Women’s ready-to-wear fashions and accessories, including suits, cutting-edge sportswear and dresses. Women can have their pick of floral-printed dresses and jumpsuits, and skirts and jackets in trendy animal prints this season. 417 West Broadway (Spring St.), 212-334-4441; elietahari.com Emilio Pucci – Women’s clothing, hats, and shoes featuring brightly colored, often psychedelic, ultra-mod prints. 24 E. 64th St., 212-752-4777; 701 Fifth Ave. (54th St.), 212-230-1135; emiliopucci.com Eryn brinié – Inspired by “French chic and urban spirit,” this collection of clothing, shoes, and handbags for women merges refined, sophisticated silhouettes with modern sensibility. 501 Broadway (Broome St.,), 212-308-6134; erynbrinie.com Etro – Offbeat, intricate and bold Italian fashions, accessories, and shoes. The runways have been hit with a sense of “ease”—loose blazers, slouchy jumpsuits and baggy shorts—for women’s fashion, while the men’s collection embraces paisley. 720 Madison Ave. (64th St.), 212-317-9096; etro.com Façonnable – Creating timeless fashions since 1950. Designed in France and influenced by its roots in the French Riviera, Façonnable offers classic men’s and women’s clothing and accessories made with exclusive fabrications and impeccable craftsmanship. 636 Fifth Ave. (51st St.), 212-319-0111; faconnable.com Fogal of Switzerland – 150 styles of hosiery available in 80 colors ranging from Lycras to luxurious cashmere tights and bodysuits. 515 Madison Ave. (53rd St.), 212-355-3254; fogal.com Giorgio Armani – The Italian designer’s four-level flagship features understated suits, elegant sportswear, outerwear, and exquisite evening wear for men and women. 760 Madison Ave. (65th St.), 212-988-9191; giorgioarmani.com Gucci – A name synonymous with haute couture and classic sophistication, the Italian luxury-goods company’s flagship store features five floors of cowhide sling-back chairs, up-to-the-minute handbags, signature jewelry, and men’s and women’s shoes and apparel. 685 Fifth Ave. (54th St.), 212-826-2600; 840 Madison Ave. (70th St.), 212-717-2619; gucci.com

Hickey Freeman – Tailored clothing for men, including formalwear, men’s dress furnishings, and sportswear, and the hickey line for the younger set. Top-of-the-line fabrics, superior craftsmanship, and total uniqueness make this collection one of a kind. 666 Fifth Ave. (53rd St.), 212-586-6481; 111 Broadway (Pine St.), 212-233-2363; hickeyfreeman.com Huminska – A charming East Village boutique and home to the Huminska line of classic "flirty little dresses" inspired by the likes of Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, and Greta Garbo. 315 E. 9th St., 212-677-3458; huminska.com inca – Year-round resortwear, including “boho sophisticate” bags, sexy and fun swimwear, beach towels, home accessories, and more. 976 Lexington Ave. (71st St.), 212-327-3007 Intermix – Cutting-edge American and European women’s styles and accessories, from big labels to up-and-coming designers. 125 Fifth Ave. (20th St.), 212-533-9720; 1003 Madison Ave. (77th St.), 212-249-7858; 210 Columbus Ave. (69th St.), 212-769-9116; 365 Bleecker St. (Charles St.), 212-929-7180; 98 Prince St. (Mercer St.), 212-966-5303; intermixonline.com Jack Olive – Italian-made preppy menswear inspired by the sport of cricket. 87 Mercer St. (Spring St.), 212-966-9692; jackolive.com John Varvatos – Home to the Varvatos lifestyle collection, including men’s designer suits, shoes, bags, belts, cologne, and more. 315 Bowery (Bleecker St.), 212-358-0315; 122 Spring St. (Greene St.), 212-965-0700; johnvarvatos.com Joseph – British variations on women’s pants. 816 Madison Ave. (68th-69th Sts.), 212-570-0077; 106 Greene St. (Prince-Spring Sts.), 212-343-7071 Krizia – Superbly tailored Italian clothing for men and women, including suits, knitwear, ties, shirts, gowns, handbags, shoes, pants, skirts for day and evening, and fragrances. 769 Madison Ave. (66th St.), 212-879-1211; krizia.net Lambertson Truex – The luxury-accessory brand known for its modern vision of classic opulence offers Madison Avenue shoppers a full retail experience. 692 Madison Ave. (62nd St.), 212-750-4895; lambertsontruex.com Loro Piana – For over a century, this luxury-clothing manufacturer has produced the finest fabrics and sportswear/leisurewear—exquisite vicuna, cashmere, ready-to-wear, and custom-made apparel for men, women, and children. 821 Madison Ave. (68th St.), 212-980-7961; loropiana.com

Philip Kingsley has been a trichologist for nearly fifty years. A “trick-what?” you ask. A trichologist, a researcher-practitioner in the branch of medical science that deals with the study of the health of the hair and the scalp. Having said that, you won’t spot only balding geriatrics at his Gotham treatment salon, the Philip Kingsley Trichological Centre. He counts among his loyal clients the likes of Cher, Barbara Streisand, and Kate Winslet (to name drop just a little from his roster of bold-face named clients)— and if Kingsley had been around when Rapunzel was busy spinning hair, she, too, might have used his services. So, in other words, it’s a hot spot for both men and women who want to keep their hair healthy and lush. He first opened his doors in London nearly 50 years ago, and then came stateside in ’77; in the early ’90s, he opened a branch at Harrods, as well. Expect a solid, clinical consultation about your hair/scalp; Kingsley’s expert team will recommend a series of custom-crafted treatments to correct medical/cosmetic issues with your hair. They will not only address hair loss and chemical-damage problems, but will also undertake corrective measures for difficult, dull, lifeless, limp—whatever—hair. Kingsley makes a wide range of products for at-home use and the staff can personalize a program for you, as well. 16 E. 52nd St., Suite 901; 212-753-9600; philipkingsley.com –– RJK

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Louis Vuitton – A showcase for the timeless elegance of the famed line of classic men’s and women’s fashions, handbags, watches and jewelry, and shoes. Short skirts and dresses in silk and satin define the ready-to-wear summer collection. 1 E. 57th St., 212-758-8877; 116 Greene St. (Prince St.), 212-274-9090; louisvuitton.com Malo – Italian sportswear for men and women, with an emphasis on cashmere. 814 Madison Ave. (68th St.), 212-396-4721; malo.it Marc Jacobs – Casual-chic must-have fashions for men and women including simple dresses, classic tailored suits, and formal wear. Tea-length dresses and skirts in dark hues and bold prints are offset by men’s light, casual suits and cut-off pants. 163 Mercer St. (Houston-Prince Sts.), 212-343-1490; 385 Bleecker St. (Perry St.), 212-924-6126; marcjacobs.com Michael Kors – Polished, classic-chic sportswear and accessories for men and women. Women will find classic, linear suits and shift dresses, while the men’s line boast sporty polos and plaid shorts this summer. 974 Madison Ave. (76th St.), 212-452-4685; 101 Prince St. (Greene St.), 212-965-0401; michaelkors.com Moschino – This recently opened flagship store offers an array of notions, shoes, and accessories from their Moschino, Moschino Cheap and Chic, Love Moschino, and Moschino Uomo lines. 401 W. 14th St. (Ninth Ave.), 212-243-8600; moschino.com Mulberry – British luxury bags, womenswear, menswear, and interior design. This season, women can shop short, flirty dresses, while men can find casually layered tees, knits tees and jackets. 605 Madison Ave. (58th St.); 387 Bleecker St. (Perry St.), 212-835-4700; mulberry.com Nicole Miller – Unique in style, color, print, and fabric, these women’s fashions, including dresses, evening wear, and classic cuts, are often inspired by film imagery and exotic cultures. Dresses in all lengths have been touched with floral and tribal prints, silk, satin and/or a bit of lurex for the summer months. 780 Madison Ave. (67th St.), 212-288-9779; 77 Greene St. (Broome-Spring Sts.), 212-219-1825; nicolemiller.com Opening Ceremony – Men’s and women’s clothing and shoes from both emerging American talent, and young and established designers and artists from abroad. 35 Howard St. (Broadway), 212-219-2688; openingceremony.us Paul Stuart – Men’s and women’s clothing exclusively designed with superior quality, style, and a distinctly American viewpoint, as well as outerwear, furnishings, shoes, and made-to-measure apparel. Madison Ave. & 45th St., 212-682-0320; paulstuart.com Peter Elliot – High-end tailored men’s clothing from formalwear to cashmere sweaters geared toward power-lunching businessmen. The cufflink department is a must-stop. 1070 Madison Ave. (81st St.), 212-570-2300 Polo/Ralph Lauren, Madison Avenue – This dramatic showcase for Ralph Lauren styles is the jewel in the crown of the more than 145 stores worldwide, with authentic antique furniture, men’s and women’s wear, accessories, footwear, leather goods, home furnishings, and antiques. Chic meets safari, as the women’s summer collection is all about khaki, beige and brown; for the men, plaid and gingham shorts add the right touch of sporty. 888 Madison Ave. (72nd St.), 212-434-8000; ralphlauren.com Prada – This specialist in minimalist fashion offers a complete range of men’s and women’s ready-to-wear, shoes, bags, small leather goods, and furnishings, as well as other exclusive products. 841 Madison Ave. (70th St.), 212-327-4200; 45 E. 57th St., 212-308-2332; 724 Fifth Ave. (56th St.), 212-664-0010; 575 Broadway (Prince St.), 212-334-8888; prada.com Roberto Cavalli – A boutique with “funky, sexy stuff ” from the Italian designer that is always fresh, dramatic, and innovative. Mini and maxi dresses in bold floral patterns is the hot trend this summer. The more economical Just Cavalli is located at 665 Fifth Ave. (53rd St.). 711 Madison Ave. (63rd St.), 212-755-7722; robertocavalli.com

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Scoop –The “ultimate closet,” featuring designer shoes, clothing, and accessories from Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Stella McCartney, and others. 473 Broadway (Grand St.), 212-925-3539; 1275 Third Ave. (73rd St.), 212-535-5577; 430 W. 14th St. (Washington St.), 212-929-1244; scoopnyc.com Searle –Best known for shearlings, classic coats and luxurious leathers, Searle offers many designer labels appealing to fashion-forward women, from the latest in accessories and apparel to swimwear and beauty. 1051 Third Ave. (62nd St.), 212-838-5990; 1142 Third Ave. (67th St.), 212-988-8361; 635 Madison Ave. (60th St.), 212-750-5153; 156 Fifth Ave. (20th-21st Sts.), 212-924-4330; 805 Madison Ave. (68th St.), 212-668-6665; 1296 Third Ave. (74th St.), 212-717-5200; 1124 Madison Ave. (84th St.), 212-988-7318 Stella McCartney –The trendy boutique featuring au courant, animalfriendly fashions for women. This season’s collection features short, breezy dresses in pastels and tropical prints. 429 W. 14th St., 212-255-1556; stellamccartney.com Stuart Weitzman – Elegant, high-fashion shoes and handbags for women. Also a wide selection of bridal and casual footwear. Shops at Columbus Circle, 212-823-9560; 625 Madison Ave. (59th St.), 212-750-2555; stuartweitzman.com Theory – Hip—but classic—work-friendly attire for men and women. 40 Gansevoort St. (Greenwich-Hudson Sts.), 212-524-6790; 151 Spring St. (W. B’way-Wooster St.), 212-226-3691; 230 Columbus Ave. (70th-71st Sts.), 212-362-3676; theory.com Thomas Pink – This premium UK shirt company’s core product is a hand-made Jermyn Street shirt for both gentlemen and ladies, made of the finest two-fold 100-percent Egyptian cotton. 520 Madison Ave. (53rd St.), 212-838-1928; 1155 Sixth Ave. (44th St.), 212-840-9663; Shops at Columbus Circle, 212-823-9650; thomaspink.com 3.1 philip lim –The designer’s flagship store, featuring fashion-forward essentials—including pants, dresscoats, trenches, dresses, and accessories— for women and men. They also feature a kids line and organic collection. 115 Mercer St. (Spring St.), 212-334-1160; 31philliplim.com TSE – All things cashmere, for men and women. Sleek and sophisticated, the collection has an urban flair. Women can shop watercolor florals and broken geometric prints, while the guys can pick up light, earth-tone suits and knits for the summer. 120 Wooster St. (Prince St.), 212-925-2520; tsecashmere.com

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Vera Wang – A matrimonial must, featuring some of the finest bridal gowns in the world. 991 Madison Ave. (77th St.), 212-628-3400; 158 Mercer St. (Prince St.), 212-382-2184; verawang.com Victoria’s Secret – Sexy, reasonably priced lingerie and sleepwear. 722 Lexington Ave. (58th St.), 212-230-1647; 901 Sixth Ave. (33rd St.), 646-473-0950; 1240 Third Ave. (71st St.), 212-717-7035; 165 E. 86th St., 646-672-9183; 2333 Broadway (85th St.), 212-595-7861; 34 E. 57th St., 212-758-5592; South Street Seaport, 19 Fulton St., 212-962-8122; 565 Broadway (Prince St.), 212-274-9519; 115 Fifth Ave. (19th St.), 212-477-4118; 1328 Broadway, (34th St.), 212-356-8380; victoriassecret.com Yves St. Laurent – Refined, modern, elegant, and upscale men’s and women’s apparel, from tailored suits to refined knits. Dresses for every occasion for women, and light, casual suits for men—both in refined wool and silk crepe—are in for summer ’09. 3 E. 57th St., 212-980-2970; ysl.com Zero + Maria Cornejo – The NYC-based Chilean designer features elegant, minimalist designs for women. Lightweight belted jackets and cardigans, and simple patterns graced the runway this season. 33 Bleecker (Lafayette & Bowery), 212-925-3849; 807 Greenwich St. (Jane St.), 212-620-0460; zeromariacornejo.com

JEWELRY AND WATCHES Aaron Basha - A family-owned and -run Madison Avenue staple, Aaron Basha has made its name with high-fashion jewelry pieces, most notably their distinctive jeweled baby shoes and assortment of baby charms (including frogs, ladybugs, flowers, teddy bears, you name it). They feature heirloom-quality jewelry as well, including bracelets, clasps, cuff links, chains, and much more. 680 Madison Ave. (61st St.), 212-935-1960; aaronbasha.com Astro Gallery of Gems - One of the world’s most recognized gem and mineral galleries, with a 10,000-square-foot showroom packed with thousands of minerals, gems, fossils, and pieces of rare and unusual jewelry on display. 185 Madison Ave. (34th St.), 212-889-9000 bochìc - Faraway cultures meet modern luxury with bochìc’s irresistible fine jewelry collection, a staple on the streets of downtown NYC and the red carpets of LA. Working with the bochìc woman in mind—someone “confident, adventurous...possessing a keen sense of style”—designers Miriam Salat and David Joseph create fine pieces that are sensual, distinctive, and enduring—a perfect match for the women who wear them. 730 Fifth Ave. (56th-57th Sts.), 9th Floor, 212-659-7743; bochic.com

Christo, of the eponymous Christo Fifth Avenue Salon, which opened in 2002, is usually one step ahead of his posse. The whirling dervish of a stylist has to be, given that he’s off to Paris twice a year (for the collections, to “do” hair at several runway shows); given that he has developed and sells a line of superior haircare products, many of which are geared toward curly hair, his specialty; given that he writes a regular column for his homeland’s Cyprus Mail; and given that he has a roster of celeb clients who demand his time and focus. (Just look at his website and there he is with Marcia Gay Harden, Rosanna Arquette, Mary McCormack, Brittany Murphy, and on and on.) However, the man who describes himself less as a stylist and more as a designer has managed to find time to create a line of stunning, precious-metal cufflinks. So while he attends to the tresses of the female boldface-name set, he also has designs that can be spotted on the wrists of male A-listers. His men’s cufflinks are worked in 18-kt. gold and other precious metals and are often studded with rubies, sapphires, and other gems. They are available at the salon, starting from as little $300 and escalating up to nearly $5,000. 574 Fifth Avenue (46th-47th Sts.), 5th Floor; 212-997-8800; christonyc.com –– RJK


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Cartier - A name synonymous with jewelry since 1847. Peruse the coveted classic gold jewelry, innovative new boutique pieces and the complete range of watches, clocks, leather goods, china, and crystal. 828 Madison Ave. (69th St.), 212-472-6400; 653 Fifth Ave. (52nd St.), 212-753-0111; cartier.com Cellini - Rare, one-of-a-kind jewelry and legendary collection of the world’s finest watches. Its reputation goes far and wide with watch connoisseurs, who also know it as a resource for limited edition timepieces. The window displays inside the Waldorf=Astoria flagship have long been one of NYC’s most beautiful fixtures. 301 Park Ave. (49th St.), 212-751-9824; 509 Madison Ave. (53rd St.), 212-888-0505 Chanel Fine Jewelry - The international luxury-goods company’s standalone shop for jewelry, which carries the core line of the collection. Take a peek at a modern interpretation of the screens in Coco Chanel’s Parisian apartment. 733 Madison Ave. (64th St.), 212-535-5828; chanel.com David Yurman Boutique - Classic, contemporary, and beautifully crafted, David Yurman’s designs, with their distinctive trademark cable motif, have made him one of the preeminent American names in the world of fine jewelry. The store also offers belts, accessories, men’s jewelry and custom-designed home décor items. 729 Madison Ave. (64th St.), 212-752-4255; davidyurman.com De Beers - One of the world’s most famous diamond companies, with experts steeped in a diamond tradition unparalleled anywhere in the world. De Beers diamonds are cut for beauty, and crafted by artisans into stunning pieces of diamond jewelry. 703 Fifth Ave. (55th St.), 212-906-0001; debeers.com

caslon-photo.com

Georg Jensen - Trendsetting, luxury jewelry and watches, faithful to the unique Danish design language and committed to high quality and craftsmanship. The collection focuses on gold and sterling silver jewelry. The new store attempts to redefine the retail shopping experience. 685 Madison Ave. (62nd St.), 212-759-6457; 125 Wooster St. (Prince St.), 212-343-9000; georgjensen.com Gevril - Gevril pours years of effort and ingenuity into the design and manufacturing of its rare and enduring timepiece collections. Their limited-editions bear the signatory markings of rich history, technical innovation, and timeless beauty. Call 845-425-9882 or visit gevril.com for retail locations Harry Winston - America’s premier jeweler and one of the world’s largest and most prestigious jewelry empires, famous for huge diamonds, emeralds, rubies, and sapphires of the highest quality in hand-made platinum settings. 718 Fifth Ave. (56th St.), 212-245-2000; harrywinston.com Jeri Cohen Fine Jewelry - Jeri Cohen presides over her upscale boutique (formerly Cipriani), greeting her clientele with a warmth and friendliness to match the shop’s charming distinction and relaxed, yet luxurious atmosphere. Her upscale boutique imports exquisite, reasonably priced Italian designs, from traditional to trendy. Diamond earrings, necklaces, pendants, and rings that utilize the finest stones and unique settings, as well as Cohen’s own signature collection. 1036 Third Ave. (61st-62nd Sts.), 212-750-3172; jericohenjewelry.com Judith Ripka - The award-winning jeweler makes pieces of uncompromising quality and design. Serving understated elegant women with impeccable taste, Ripka uses the finest diamonds, colored precious gemstones, pearls, and unique one-of-a-kind stones, often set in 18-karat gold. 777 Madison Ave. (66th St.), 212-517-8200; 673 Madison Ave. (61 St.), 212-355-8300; judithripka.com Marisa Perry Atelier - Each individual piece in this exceptional collection of elegant fine jewelry is unique and complete—boldly designed, exquisitely detailed, and finely worked. Fashioned in gold, silver, and platinum, and set with precious and semi-precious stones, the jewelry for women and men—including rings, necklaces, bracelets, earrings,

Center44, the Midtown antiques and Modernism marketplace, is proud to present acrylic sculpture by Norman Mercer (American, 1914-2008). Mercer began his career designing plastic handles for cutlery in 1936; after retiring in 1979, he applied the same methodical approach to art as he had in industry. In 1981 he began to make unique acrylic sculpture always utilizing geometric shapes, creating over 200 one-of-a-kind pieces and participating in nearly 50 group and a dozen solo shows before he passed away in 2008. He developed special light-resistant dyes, so his colorful works are as brilliant today as they were when he created them. The two shown here are, left, a 14”-diameter sphere and, right, a 24”-high geometric piece. They are presented by Skyscraper at Center44, 222 E. 44th St., 212-450-8988; center44.com

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engagement rings, cuff links and belt buckles—evokes strength, beauty, and sensuality. 154 Prince St. (West Broadway), 212-566-8977; marisaperry.com Mikimoto - This Japanese company, renowned as the originator of cultured pearls for over a century, maintains high standards of quality, craftsmanship, and design. Along with its signature Japanese Akoya pearls, the store houses an important collection of the larger South Sea pearls. 730 Fifth Ave. (57th St.), 212-457-4600; mikimotoamerica.com

Kiton: A Family Business for Influential Men…and Women Fine Italian clothier Kiton made its Manhattan debut in October, 2003 at their midtown boutique. Soon after, the famed luxury brand was featured in a Forbes article about the most expensive men’s offthe-rack suits in New York���at that time, Kiton was in the $6,000 range. Their newest line of bespoke suits premiered at Saks Fifth Avenue in March, 2009—starting at $7,000 and their most expensive suit, The K-50, takes 50 hours to produce, has a price tag of $50,000 and must be custom-ordered. According to U.S president Antonio Paone, what sets Kiton apart from other luxury brands is simply “the quality.” Paone has had his hands in the family business since he was 18 and has always known this is where he would be. “I’ve always enjoyed being around all of the beautiful fabrics, and now, I’m involved in all aspects—from design, to the selection of our boutique spaces and making deals with the retailers that we feel should carry our brand.” Anyone who walks into Kiton’s New York flagship store can see class and sophistication that greets visitors with dual, glass-encased displays: to the left, the dress shirt collection, and to the right, a festival of their unique Neapolitan “seven fold” ties. The surrounding tones are pale gray, white, and bronze—relaxing yet undeniably posh. During Paone’s tenure in the family business, there has been great growth, with 22 stores worldwide generating $135 million in 2008. “My uncle, Ciro Paone, was 4th generation in the clothing industry. He founded CI.PA in Naples, which became Kiton in 1968. It’s still a private company, and Kiton also owns all three of their manufacturing facilities, bolstering the quality and allowing us complete control of the line,” said Paone. “We’ve seen a huge increase in our women’s wear section since it started in 1995,” he added. “Last year alone, the women’s line grew by 50% and it now accounts for 15-20% of our overall revenue.” Increased American brand awareness is also in their growth plans with their bold stroke this year of bringing their line to Saks. With Kiton’s continued expansion into the closets of discerning customers, the family business should keep Antonio Paone and his cousin, the CEO of the company, Antonio De Matteis, busy providing their unique brand of Neapolitan flair to the world’s most influential men and women. 4 E. 54th St. (Fifth Ave.) 212-813-0272; kiton.it –– Kristopher Carpenter

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Reinstein/Ross - Pairing vibrant precious stones and classical goldsmithing techniques, Reinstein/Ross jewelry is designed and hand-fabricated in New York City, in their Madison Avenue shop. Reinstein/Ross jewelry is distinctly contemporary, but reminiscent of Entruscan, Indian and Egyptian jewelry and art, and has a timeless quality. Often featured in magazines, movies and fashion events, the work of Reinstein/Ross has influenced an entire generation of jewelry designers. Custom orders are welcome, including setting your stones in their signature style. Visit them in Soho or on Madison Avenue. 122 Prince St. (Wooster St.), 212-226-4513; 29 E. 73rd St. (Madison Ave.), 212-772-1901; reinsteinross.com Tiffany & Co. - The renowned jewelry store offers luxurious merchandise with the tradition of quality, showcasing a wide variety of jewelry including diamonds, rubies, emeralds, sapphires, pearls, and the gold and silver signature collections. Other items include china, crystal, silver, watches and clocks, and fragrances. 727 Fifth Ave. (56th St.), 212-755-8000; tiffany.com Tourneau - America’s leading luxury-watch store features over 8,000 styles from more than 100 world-famous brands. You can even trade in your old watch for a new one. The TimeMachine on 57th St. is a state-of-the-art watch emporium. The Shops at Columbus Circle, 212-823-9425; 12 E. 57th St., 212-758-7300; 200 W. 34th St., 212-563-6880; 500 Madison Ave. (52nd St.), 212-758-6098; tourneau.com Van Cleef & Arpels - The venerable Van Cleef & Arpels atelier was founded in the early 20th century, an outgrowth of the love story and marriage between Estelle Arpels and Alfred Van Cleef. Today, the esteemed maison is sought out by sophisticated and fashionable women the world over. Renowned for its glorious style and master craftsmanship, the house produces stunning bijoux—both modern and classic—that utilize the finest quality gems and semiprecious stones, set meticulously in precious metals by talented artisans. 744 Fifth Ave. (57th St.), 212-644-9500; vancleef-arpels.com Verdura - This illustrious line has been a favorite of Hollywood royalty, and New York high society, designing such specialty items as Night and Day cuff links for Cole Porter, and Maltese Cross cuffs for Coco Chanel. The collection includes luxury cuff links, ear clips, bracelets, necklaces, rings, and brooches. 745 Fifth Ave. (57th St.), Suite 1205, 212-758-3388; verdura.com Wempe Jewelers - An impressive selection of fine timepieces and clocks, exquisite 18-karat gold and diamond jewelry, cuff links, and watch straps. Among the brands in its European-style salon are Patek Philippe, A. Lange and Söhne, Cartier, and Jaeger-LeCoultre. 700 Fifth Ave. (55th St.), 212-397-9000; wempe.com Wendy Mink - High-quality, innovative designs inspired by the jewelry and textiles of Nepal and Tibet. Materials used include sterling, 22K gold, and semi-precious stones. 72 Orchard St. (Grand St.), 212-260-8758; wendyminkjewelry.com

SHOES Bally - Leather products featuring old-world artistry blended with modern design, including footwear, handbags, executive cases, luggage,


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and small leather goods. 628 Madison Ave. (59th St.), 212-751-9082; bally.com Christian Louboutin - High-end Parisian shoes for women, including an extensive bridal selection. 59 Horatio St. (Greenwich St.), 212-255-1910; christianlouboutin.com

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Custom orthotic lab on premises; custom shoe department also. Open seven days. 140 E. 55th St., 212-753-5151; comfortableshoes-etc.com

MATERNITY WEAR

Church’s English Shoes - Quality and craftsmanship are this British company’s distinguishing hallmarks. Each pair is handmade with the time-honored Goodyear Welted process, using the finest leathers and hand-finishes. Well-dressed gents will find the complete lines of shoes, dress, casual, and leather accessories. 689 Madison Ave. (62nd St.), 212-758-5200

Destination Maternity - Upscale maternity wear from Mimi Maternity, A Pea in the Pod, Motherhood Plus, and others. 28 E. 57th St., 212-588-0220; destinationmaternity.com

Giuseppe Zanotti - A company of international renown offering sleek Italian shoes for men and women, including an extensive bridal selection. 806 Madison Ave. (67th St.), 212-650-0455

Veronique - All the collections—imported from Paris and Milan—are exclusive, from functional pieces to comfortable sportswear and elegant evening wear. 1321 Madison Ave. (93rd St.), 212-831-7800; veroniquematernity.com

Hogan - High-quality footwear and bags, from sporty to glamorous. 134 Spring St. (Wooster St.), 212-343-3039; hoganworld.com Jimmy Choo - Favored by movie stars, celebrities, and elegant women in the know, the Jimmy Choo shoe lines include house, evening, bridal, sandals, and more, as well as matching handbags in equally sumptuous leathers and unique stylings. 716 Madison Ave. (63rd-64th Sts.), 212-759-7078; 645 Fifth Ave. (51st St.), 212-593-0800; jimmychoo.com J.M. Weston - Devotees of this 150-year-old French cobbler head straight for the handcrafted quality and comfort of its elegant men’s and women’s footwear—from tame, high-grade cowhide to more exotic alligator, ostrich, and sharkskin. 812 Madison Ave. (68th St.), 212-535-2100; jmweston.com Manolo Blahnik – One of the world’s most influential int’l footwear designers. 31 W. 54th St., 212-582-3007; manoloblahnik.com Roger Vivier - From timeless and classic to trendy and innovative, luxury shoes, bags, and accessories from the inventor of the stiletto heel. 750 Madison Ave. (65th St.), 212-861-5371; rogervivier.com Salvatore Ferragamo - A fine mix of men’s and women’s shoes crafted from superb leathers, from classic business and formal footwear to casual styles with a European flair. 655 Fifth Ave. (52nd-53rd Sts.), 212-759-3822 Yorke Fashion Comfort Centre - Featuring a collection of fashion shoes, sandals, and boots handcrafted in Europe, designed with comfort in mind and orthopedic support features. “Proven Classics for Problem Feet” leather-lined and hand-crafted in Italy, France, and Germany. Women’s sizes from 3-13 N-WW; men’s 5-16, available in all widths. Shoes designed to accommodate orthotics.

Liz Lange Maternity - Luxurious pants, sweaters, and accessories for expectant, fashionable mothers. 958 Madison Ave. (75th-76th Sts.), 212-879-2191; lizlange.com

KIDSTUFF Build-A-Bear Workshop - The biggest Build-A-Bear Workshop store in the world. Have furry fun making your own stuffed animal friends and personalizing them with hundreds of fashions and accessories. 565 Fifth Ave. (46th St.), 877-789-BEAR; buildabear.com FAO Schwarz - Their famed NY flagship is just steps away from Central Park, and is the ultimate destination for children and their families. The toys are amazing and FAO Schwarz has their own ice cream parlor with sundaes that you can design yourself. Guests can also see and play on the giant piano that was featured in the Tom Hanks movie, Big. 767 Fifth Ave. (58th St.), 212-644-9400; fao.com M&Ms World New York - Visit this Times Square retail-entertainment destination dedicated to the colorful fun of M&M’S Brand Chocolate Candies. This 25,000-square-foot, three-story sensory immersion into the world of M&M'S comes equipped with an interactive kids area, full-size #38 Ford Fusion NASCAR, and the largest display of M&M’S in the world. 48th St. & Broadway, 212-295-3850; mmsworld.com Petit Bateau - The recently opened new concept store from the French designer of clothing for babies and children, including daywear, underwear, the famous tees, bibs, footies, bonnets, and more. They also have a women’s collection that features sweaters, wraps, coats, and underwear. 1094 Madison Ave. (82nd St.), 212-988-8884; petit-bateau.com Toys“R”Us Times Square - The giant toy store features a 60-foot indoor Ferris Wheel, a 4,000-square-foot Barbie dollhouse, a 20-foot animatronic T-Rex dinosaur & more. 1514 Broadway (44th St.), 800-869-7787; toysrustimessquare.com

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SHOPPINGNEWYORK LUGGAGE AND LEATHER GOODS T. Anthony, Ltd. - This family business has been supplying heads of state and celebrities with its understated, elegant luggage—made from industrialstrength cotton duck trimmed in cowhide—since 1946. High-end items include alligator attaché cases, briefcases, wallets, and desk sets. 445 Park Ave. (56th St.), 212-750-9797; tanthony.com Bally - Leather products featuring old-world artistry blended with modern design, including footwear, handbags, executive cases, luggage, and small leather goods. 628 Madison Ave. (59th St.), 212-751-9082; bally.com Bottega Veneta – The gold standard in leather bags, with their signature woven leather products and top-of-the-line handbags in an array of textures, styles and colors. 697 Fifth Ave. (54th-55th Sts.), 212-371-5511; bottegaveneta.com

Established in New York City in 1848, Hammacher Schlemmer is America’s longest-running catalog, offering unique products that solve problems, further their customers’ lifestyle, or represent the only one of their kind. Their landmark store in the heart of Midtown’s shopping district features many of the items sold in their catalog. Pictured here is a rugged and sturdy carpenter-style bag made with full-grain rawhide, large enough for a weekend trip or for use as a convenient carry-on bag. 147 E. 57th St., 212-421-9002; hammacher.com

Coach - Fine-quality leather goods and accessories for men and women, including handbags, briefcases, attaches, luggage, and small leather goods, diaries, and planners. Shops at Columbus Circle, 212-581-4115; 342 Madison Ave. (44th St.), 212-599-4777; 595 Madison Ave. (57th St.), 212-754-0041; 79 Fifth Ave. (16th St.), 212-675-6403; 2321 Broadway (84th St.), 212-799-1624; 35 E. 85th St., 212-879-9391; 620 Fifth Ave. (50th St.), 212-245-4148; 445 West Broadway (Prince St.), 212-473-6925; South Street Seaport, 193 Front St. (Fulton St.), 212-425-4350; coach.com Ghurka - Premium leather products of enduring quality and timeless style, including handbags, alligator gifts, travel bags for the entire family, and custom-made furniture. 683 Madison Ave. (61st-62nd Sts.), 212-826-8300; Plaza Hotel, 1 W. 58th St., 212-826-8300; ghurka.com

ELECTRONICS/PHOTO Adorama - Adorama is a world leader in photography and video equipment, and the perfect place to send your guests, both amateur and professional photographers, if they need new or additional equipment and supplies, because they service photographers, both well known and well intentioned, who create works both famous and anonymous. Founded in 1978, Adorama has grown into one of the world’s largest photography and video equipment dealers, and the secret to their success, and die-hard customer base, has always been dedication, hard work and proven customer satisfaction. 42 W. 18th St., 212-741-0052; adorama.com The Apple Store - Your home to all things Apple, from the latest iMacs, iPhones, iPods and other hardware to printers, software, and more. If you need advice, insight, or hands-on technical support, head straight to the Genius Bar. The Fifth Avenue location is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. 767 Fifth Ave. (59th St.), 212-336-1440; 103 Prince St. (Greene St.), 212-226-3126; apple.com Bang & Olufsen New York - Since 1925, B&O has remained committed to a balance of technology and design, specializing in unique entertainment systems designed to simplify, but with uncompromised performance. The focus is on music and home-theater systems, custom installation, and pre-wiring. 952 Madison Ave. (75th St.), 212-879-6161; 927 Broadway (21st St.), 212-388-9792; 330 Columbus Ave. (76th St.), 212-501-0926; bang-olufsen.com

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At Manhattan Saddlery, old-world craftsmanship meets modern design in handmade custom, semi-custom, or stock boots that fulfill the needs of the well-dressed equestrian. Pictured above are Der Dau Contour Field and Dress Boots. Field or dress styles are offered with fulllength zipper for comfort in any discipline and contoured at the ankle for a sleek look. Available in ladies’ and mens’ foot sizes ranging from 5 to 12 and calf sizes 13” to 17”. Contact Manhattan Saddlery for recommendations and measurements at 212-673-1400 or info@manhattansaddlery.com.

B&H - The camera and video super store, servicing professionals and everyday consumers for three decades. With an expert staff and a full line of still, digital, video, home and portable entertainment, pro audio equipment, computers and accessories, it’s the professional’s source. They have unique interactive multimedia displays and in-store demo rooms. There are over 130,000 items in the store, and this enormous inventory contains every brand and product imaginable. Worldwide shipping; professional and multilingual staff. 420 Ninth Ave. (34th St.), 212-444-6615; bhphotovideo.com DataVision - NYC’s largest computer and video retailer with 3 levels and 30,000 square feet of savings. They feature a full selection of computers, software, peripherals, digital cameras, camcorders, MP3 players, DVDs, and more. 445 Fifth Ave. (39th St.), 212-689-1111; datavis.com


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J&R Music and Computer World - One of the city’s largest selections and low prices on audio, video, digital, SLR & professional cameras, computers & software, PDAs, iPods & MP3 players, kitchen essentials, housewares, CDs, DVDS, and more. Park Row (across from City Hall), 212-238-9000; jr.com Sony Style - High-tech meets high-touch in this flagship store for sophisticated electronics. In the Home Entertainment Lounge, relax in individual seating areas while sales counselors wheel customized entertainment systems to you. The Showcase area displays smaller electronics, as well as the latest in interactive technology. 550 Madison Ave. (55th-56th Sts.), 212-833-8800; sonystyle.com

ART SUPPLIES Lee’s Art Shop - “The Department Store for the Artist,” with 40,000 square feet of space over four stories offering Midtown’s largest selection of supplies for arts and crafts, graphic arts, and fine arts, as well as an unmatched selection of frames—with expert picture framing performed on premises—and a stationery department that provides experienced, courteous printing and engraving assistance for wedding invitations, party and birthday invitations, and brand name stationery. 220 W. 57th St. (Broadway-Seventh Ave.), 212-247-0110; leesartshop.com

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Matt Umanov Guitars - One of NY’s oldest (more than 35 years), most respected guitar stores, it remains the favorite choice of collectors, professionals, and discerning shoppers. Choose from hundreds of new and vintage guitars, including Fender, Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, & Paul Reed Smith. Amps and effects pedals are also well-represented. The store also features NYC’s most complete service center. Worldwide shipping. 273 Bleecker St. (Sixth-Seventh Aves.), 212-675-2157; umanovguitars.com

SPORTING ATTIRE AND EQUIPMENT Manhattan Saddlery - The only tack shop in New York City. Everything for the horse and rider, with only the finest and most diverse equestrian products—keeping up with the latest fashions but still maintaining a long tradition of riding excellence—and a very knowledgeable staff. 117 E. 24th St., 212-673-1400; manhattansaddlery.com New York Golf Center - Manhattan’s premier golf shop, committed to providing golf enthusiasts with everything they need, on and off the course. With over 13,000 square feet of space, carrying the most comprehensive selection of golf equipment, accessories, clothing and shoes

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for men, women and children. 131 W. 35th St., 212-564-2255; nygolfcenter.com The Orvis Company - A shop for urban enthusiasts, featuring an enormous selection of flyfishing tools. Choose from rods, reels, flies, and accessories for outfitting the ace fisherman to outdoor fashions for men and women. 522 Fifth Ave. (44th St.), 212-697-3133; orvis.com Paragon Sports - From basketballs and climbing equipment to lacrosse sticks and swimming goggles, this emporium will sort out all your sporting-goods needs. 867 Broadway (18th-19th Sts.), 212-255-8036; paragonsports.com

STATIONERS AND WRITING INSTRUMENTS Art Brown International Pen Shop Experience one of the largest selections of fine writing instruments in the world. They have been in business since 1924 with a staff that will help you find the right pen for your need. Whether for yourself, a gift or for corporate giving, they can meet your needs. They also carry a full line of stationery and greeting cards which can be personalized. 2 W. 45 St., 800-772-PENS; artbrown.com Kate’s Paperie - The top resource for exotic papers and paper accoutrements, featuring an assortment of gifts, over 4,000 papers from more than 40 countries, and more than 1,500 couturequality ribbons from around the world. 72 Spring St. (Crosby St.), 212-941-9816; 8 W. 13th St., 212-633-0570; 1282 Third Ave. (74th St.), 212-396-3670; 140 W. 57th St., 212-459-0700; katespaperie.com Mrs. John L. Strong - Setting the standard for exquisite hand-engraved stationery since 1929. The enduring quality and beauty of their luxury papers and products continue to draw discerning clients who seek the very best, from world leaders and royal families to society’s prominent personalities and celebrities. 699 Madison Ave. (62nd St.), 5th floor, 212-838-3775; mrsstrong.com

BOOKSTORES Argosy Book Store – The city’s oldest purveyor of antiquarian books, autographs, maps, posters, and prints, focusing on the areas of Americana, history of science and medicine, and art. Highlights include a 1685 edition of Shakespeare, Babe Ruth’s signature on a $2 bill, the editorial copy of Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls, and a first edition of Twain’s Innocents Abroad, inscribed by the author. 116 E. 59th St. (Park-Lexington Aves.), 212-753-4455; argosybooks.com/ Barnes and Noble – New York’s favorite bookstore has multiple Manhattan locations.

Showplace Antique & Design Center is a premier destination for antiques, decorative and fine art. Featuring over 250 galleries, showcases and room settings on four spacious floors filled with art deco, art nouveau and mid-century modern, bronze, silver, jewelry, vintage clothing and accessories, ceramics, art glass, period furniture, lighting, and much more. Pictured above are items from their eclectic array of decoratives. Silversmith and an espresso bar and cafe are on the premises. 40 W 25th St., 212-633-6063; nyshowplace.com

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SHOPPINGNEWYORK

Their store at Broadway and 82nd is multi-leveled and features a café as well as a children’s area. 2289 Broadway (82nd St.), 212-362-8835; 396 Sixth Ave. (8th St.); 555 Fifth Ave. (46th St.); bn.com J.N. Bartfield Books – Bartfield specializes in leather-bound sets and single volumes, color-plate books, natural history, old atlases, rare books, fore-edge paintings, sporting books, and more. 30 W. 57th St., 3rd flr., 212-245-8890 Imperial Fine Books – Decorative leather-bound sets, fine bindings, children’s, illustrated, first editions, and rare books. They also do custom bookbinding and appraisals. They will help you build an entire library and assist you with suggestions. 790 Madison Ave. (66th-67th Sts.), 2nd floor, 212-861-6620; imperialfinebooks.com Midtown Comics – Come visit their spacious, friendly NY locations, where everything related to comics can be found. From mainstream titles to alternative press, all the latest titles as well as a huge selection of back issues await you. They also carry a comprehensive selection of books, action figures, statues, movies and so much more. The courteous, knowledgeable staff is always on hand to help. 459 Lexington Ave. (45th St.), 212-302-8192; 200 W. 40th St.; midtowncomics.com Shakespeare & Company – One of the city’s most popular independent bookstores specializing in literature, lit criticism, poetry, drama, philosophy, and travel. 716 Broadway (Washington Pl.), 212-529-1330; 939 Lexington Ave. (69th St.), 212-570-0201; 1 Whitehall St. (Stone St.), 212-742-7025; 137 E. 23rd St., 212-505-2021; shakeandco.com The Strand – With 8 miles of shelves and some two-million books, the biggest used-book store in the world. All items are discounted and include review copies, coffee-table books, used hardcovers, remaindered books, and paperbacks. 828 Broadway (12th St.), 212-473-1452; strandbooks.com

DENTISTRY Jan Linhart, D.D.S., P.C. - Cosmetic dentist Dr. Jan Linhart has been listed as one of America’s top dentists by Castle Connolly Consumer Guide and by the Consumers’ Research Council of America. Dr. Linhart has mastered the various modern cosmetic dental techniques and procedures that can transform your smile, giving you a renewed sense of self-confidence and well-being. 230 Park Ave. (46th St.), 212-682-5180; drlinhart.com

OPTICIANS AND EYEWEAR

At the Carlisle Collection showroom, busy stylish women make appointments for an exclusive and personalized shopping experience with couture-quality clothing that can’t be found in stores. Within its sumptuous confines high above 52nd Street, women are introduced to a private viewing of the collections in an elegant, un-rushed, and intimate environment while accompanied by a personalized stylist. From power suits for the executive office to elegant dresses for the evening the Carlisle Showroom will fill your every need. Make an appointment with them today and discover how some of the best-dressed women in the world look wonderful season after season. 16 E. 52nd St. 16th Floor, (bet. Madison and Fifth Aves.), 212-751-6490; showroom@carlisleny.com; carlislecollection.com

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Oliver Peoples - The luxury eyewear and sunglasses house, founded in 1987, features retro-inspired looks and innovative designs favored by trendsetting celebrities and power players. They are the exclusive global licensee for Paul Smith Eyewear, which combines whimsical yet classic designs and attention to detail. Their new flagship store is located at 755 Madison Ave. (65th St.), 212-585-3433; 366 West Broadway (Broome St.), 212-925-5400; oliverpeoples.com Solstice - A wide array of luxury eyewear for women and men by such designers as Gucci, Dior, Dior Homme, Kate Spade, Valentino, Giorgio and Emporio Armani, Marc Jacobs, Bottega Veneta, Chanel, Maui Jim and Ray Ban. The Shops at Columbus Circle, 212-823-9590; 500 Fifth Ave. (42nd St.), 212-730-2500; 107 Spring St. (Mercer St.), 212-219-3940; solsticestores.com

SERVICES Madame Paulette - A dry cleaner that can help you around the clock. In business over 50 years and with third-generation cleaning specialist John Mahdessian at the controls, they’ve been lauded in the press and by myriad customers, from major department and specialty stores to designers such as Vera Wang, Carolina Herrera, Christian Dior, and Roberto Cavalli. 1255 Second Ave. (65th-66th Sts.), 347-689-7010; madamepaulette.com


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spas

...Find your bliss when temperatures soar By Griffin Miller

Back in the mid-1980s when Billy Crystal hobnobbed with guest stars on Saturday Night Live as Latino talk show host Fernando, his catch phrase was “You look mahvelous!” – and his mantra was “It’s better to look good than to feel good.” Funny words to live by once upon a time, but in 2009 looking and feeling “mahvelous” are a matched set and happily, this is New York, home to a myriad of specialty spas willing to gently ease us into our healthy, beautiful place with style.

To Unwind And Rejuvinate… La Prairie Day Spa at The Ritz-Carlton, New York (Central Park) No matter what you request at the Ritz-Carlton the answer is always “our pleasure.” However, there’s no question that when the subject turns to their midtown La Prairie Spa, the pleasure is, in fact, all yours. Accurately described as “an escape” from the world outside, this all-pampering-all-the-time retreat is as much a state of tranquility as it is a beautifully laid out spa. It offers everything from jet lag therapy to facials to an exquisite menu of massage and specialty treatments, like the unique “retexturizing” Neck and Decollete Firming and Refining Treatment. Particularly interesting for those of us who take our summer shimmer seriously (while simultaneously shying away from the sun) is one of their newest offerings, their Bask in the Glow treatment: an energizing salt scrub followed by an all-over application of La Prairie’s Cellular Self Tan for the Face and Body. (Bonus: any remaining formulation is set aside for you to take home and use for what La Prairie refers to as a “deeper body glow.”) And finally, the spa has recently introduced what may well be the most deliciously decadent spa treatment of all time, their 2 ½ hour “Wrapped in Luxury” – an hour of Caviar Massage topped off by a 90-minute Caviar Firming Facial. Bring on the champagne! 50 Central Park South (Fifth & Sixth Aves.); 212-308-9100; ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/CentralPark/Spa

[ Ladies Lounge, The Ritz-Carlton ]

To Detox And Soothe…. Beljankski Wellness Center According to Sylvie Beljanski, daughter of the late biochemist Mirko Beljanski, Ph.D. and founder of “America’s first wellness center wholly focused on an integrative approach to attaining optimum mental health,” the Center’s operative words are prevention, detoxification and repair. Fairly unglamorous when juxtaposed against more conventional spa terms like “pampering” and “luxury.” But don’t be fooled by the vocabulary, the Beljanski Center offers an upscale French Provençal environment and charming staff (including physicians) to guide you through a wellness regimen that also includes French Secret, a new all-natural line of skincare and mineral makeup designed to promote gloriously healthy-looking skin. For many, the Center represents the future of spas – that is the evolution from treatments that are exclusively beauty-oriented to those that include overall health – and preventive health – measures. Here, not only are clients privy to top-of-the-line facials and soothing detoxification wraps, but nutrition and medical consultations, colonics and chelation therapy as well. 150 E. 55th St., 6th Floor (Lexington & Third Aves.); 212-832-6800; beljanskiwellness.com.

To Repair And Restore… Physical Advantage Massage Studio Not a day spa per se, this is the place to go in Manhattan when you pull a muscle or need re-alignment tout de suite. Still, the fabulous art collection in the lobby, strains of jazz music and penthouse cachet make it one of New York’s foremost massage venues. Founded by former bodybuilder Laurie Towers, this discreet oasis visited on a regular basis by professional athletes and dancers (numerous high profile sports figures and ballerinas have Towers on their speed-dial), is staffed by therapists who are as skilled at post-injury rehabilitation as they are in relieving stress through kneading. And because her client list is extremely hush hush, you can be assured of complete anonymity and privacy as her first-rate professionals accelerate the healing process and leave you somewhere in that nirvana space between energized and totally relaxed. 139 E. 57th St. (at Lexington Ave., penthouse); 212-460-1879; Physical-knead.com.

2009 SPA TRENDS Each year ISPA, known to spa aficionados and professionals as “the voice of the spa industry,” releases their list of the hottest spa-related trends. Here is an edited sampling of their findings for 2009: • Customized Treatments: In addition to 30-minute facials and massages, spas are becoming more open to the demands and desires of their customers and

creating personalized spa experiences. It’s recommended you be open with your spa about your lifestyle and how they can accommodate your needs. • Mind, Body & Spirit: Many spas are increasing self-discovery services like ropes courses, art classes and other learning activities that help consumers to stop,

be still, and focus on themselves. • Family-friendly Resort Spas: Spas are responding to the need for families to communicate and spend time together, whether it's flying through the air on a

trapeze or attending a family yoga class. • Organic Spas: Increasing numbers of spas are offering environmentally friendly products and services, eco-friendly facilities, outdoor experiences and treat-

ments that highlight plants which are indigenous to the local environment. • Tried and True: Consumers are getting back to basics, focusing on core spa services like deep tissue massage and clarifying facials. • Increased Spa Amenities: Rather than booking a 60-minute service, clients are now spending entire afternoons at the spa, utilizing other amenities, such as

pools, Jacuzzis saunas and specialty showers. In short, loitering is encouraged.

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divine faith Faith Prince, one of New York theatre’s most celebrated stars is back on Broadway, creating havoc under the sea By Griffin Miller onths before she took the stage in The Little Mermaid, enfolded in a humongous cape sprouting the collection of leviathan tentacles that transform her from lovable human into shape-shifting sea witch, Faith Prince was on the receiving end of some serious praise from the life force behind the sea-centric Broadway musical. “She is that glorious creature - a leading lady in the great Broadway tradition,” said producer and president of Disney Theatrical Productions, Thomas Shumacher. “She’s a perfect match for the role of Ursula, one of Disney's most uproarious villains.” Certainly Prince, who won a Tony Award for her portrayal of Nathan Detroit’s matrimonially

M [ Above: Faith Prince as Ursula in The Little Mermaid Opposite: Harvey Fierstein, Tom Wopat, Faith Prince (as Aggie), Leslie Kritzer and Matt Cavenaugh in A Catered Affair ]

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challenged girlfriend, Miss Adelaide, in the 1992 revival of Guys and Dolls, is everything one could hope for in the role of the glam cephalopod with nothing but revenge and absolute power on her mind. “I was doing a play in Philadelphia when my agent told me they were looking for a new Ursula and suggested I take a look at it,” says Prince. “And I’m so glad I did because it turns out the character is delicious – Cruella De Vil mixed with Judy Dench!” A gifted musical theatre star with a staunch and ever-growing fan base, Prince’s extensive Broadway credits speak for themselves – a list that includes Noises Off, Bells Are Ringing, James Joyce's The Dead, Little Me and The King and I. Yet, she admits, it was a couple of guest spots on


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TV playing homicidal wives that helped her zero in on what she calls her “bi-polar, good-girl-gone-bad, off-her-medication” Ursula persona. Her first murderous femme was a food stylist who off-ed her husband on the popular 1980s series Remington Steele. More recently she appeared on USA Network’s Monk, starring Tony Shaloub as the germophobic detective who nailed her character for electrocuting her oblivious fisherman spouse in the bathtub. Definitely, Prince is infatuated by the unorthodox – a trait she has passed on to her 14-year old son, Henry, who shares her dry sense of humor, love of music, and formidable comic timing. And while she makes it clear she has no intention of pushing him into the business of show – although she did start taking him to the theatre when he was only one and a half – she won’t stand in his way if he decides to follow her trajectory. And according to Prince, it could happen. “He enjoys sitting backstage – and his taste is incredible. He picks up on things I don’t and he does his own thing. He totally loved that I was playing the villain in Little Mermaid,” she continues, quoting him as saying, “You’re the bad girl and get to die – pretty cool, Mom.” For the record, Ursula, whose plot to undermine Ariel (the lovely red-haired mermaid heroine), fails miserably and she meets her dramatic end by being sucked into an underwater sinkhole. It’s Prince’s favorite moment in the show: “I love the demise and love dying – it’s something I’ve not done before.” Which, when you do a quick scan of her resume, is probably one of the few things she hasn’t tackled. Certainly she’s played her share of quirky characters. On Broadway the list ranges from Adelaide to Ella Petersen in Bells are Ringing and Belle in Little Me. Also in that category are her two most iconic TV roles: Claudia (Richard Kind’s significant other on Spin City) and a few years later, Kelly Knippers, Oliver Platt’s pregnant love interest on Showtime’s Huff. Incidently, Prince’s role on Huff started out as a one-shot deal and, thanks to equal parts talent and fate, Kelly turned into a recurring regular. In the spirit of Broadway trivia, Platt is starring as Nathan Detroit in the current Guys and Dolls revival, while Nathan Lane, who played the role opposite Prince, is appearing alongside Bill Irwin in Waiting for Godot.

What Prince calls “a 360 degree difference” for her, however, was her Tony-nominated turn in last season’s dramatic musical, A Catered Affair, in which she played Aggie, a working-class housewife and mother determined to give her only daughter an impressive wedding. And while the production received mixed reviews, her performance was pretty much lauded across the board, with the New York Time’s Ben Brantley observing, “Ms. Prince… scrubs down to raw-skinned plainness here. Her performance is tight, disciplined and at times quite affecting, never more so than when Aggie looks silently at some distant horizon of missed opportunities.” Regarding this role, Prince herself admits, “It was hard to live there, but at the same time it was wonderful.” But then, the actress in her is always on the lookout for a challenge. Hence, Ursula, a bad seed to be sure, but also a voluptuous crowd pleaser. “No matter what you’re working on, audiences think you are that person. It’s amazing and addicting,” she concludes. “I became an actor because I wanted to become different people—I love being diversified.”

PRINCELY TRIVIA  Born in Augusta, Georgia, she grew up in Lynchburg, Virginia.  Married musician (trumpeter) Larry Lunetta in 1986.  Received her first Tony nomination (Best Actress – Featured Role) in 1989 for multiple roles in Jerome Robbins’ Broadway.  Guys and Dolls was her next Tony nomination (1992) for which she took home the trophy.  Other nominations in Best Actress in a Musical category: Bells are Ringing (2001); A Catered Affair (2008).  Film credits include Material Girls (with Hilary and Haylie Duff), Our Very Own (with Allison Janney and Cheryl Hines), Picture Perfect (with Jennifer Aniston, Jay Mohr, and Kevin Bacon), and Dave (with Kevin Kline).  Performed with The Boston Pops, the Utah Symphony and the Cincinnati Pops.  Last year she spent three weeks in Australia touring her show Moving On to stellar reviews.  A live recording of her award-winning show A Leap of Faith is available on DRG records.  On April 7, 2009 Prince took over the role of Ursula (originated by Sherie Rene Scott) in The Little Mermaid. Her newest costar is Drew Seeley, who assumed the role of Prince Eric on June 9th.  Official website: faithprince.com

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brian dennehy on o’neill, acting and a little sports

earing a baseball cap and a bemused expression, Brian Dennehy leans in, oblivious to everything around him. He is, as it happens, lost in conversation with the last journalist to grab his ear in a long afternoon of pre-preview interviews about his latest Broadway adventure: playing the aging patriarch in Desire Under the Elms. And Dennehy is in his element, talking eloquently on a subject he grasps completely: the drama of Eugene O’Neill. For Dennehy, the show which opened at Broadway’s St. James Theatre on April 27th and closed on May 24th, after debuting to stellar reviews at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre, is his fifth major O’Neill production and the first on Broadway since winning a Tony Award in 2003 as James Tyrone in Long Day’s Journey Into Night. He’d already picked up a Best Leading Man Tony in 1999 for his portrayal of Willie Loman in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. The veteran actor, considered one of the foremost interpreters of O’Neill’s work, refers to the playwright as The American Shakespeare, noting that: “He never shied from anything – he was a driven, dedicated artist. He understood that the 800-pound gorilla in the room was his writing and that everyone and everything had to be sacrificed for it – including himself.” Without question, Desire was one O’Neill’s more controversial experimental works thanks to its Freudian overtones and plot generously lifted from Greek mythology’s Phaedra-Hippolytus story that focused on the love affair of a stepmother and stepson. In O’Neill’s version, set in 1850 New England, Dennehy’s autocratic character (Ephraim Cabot) brings his new young bride home to a bleak homestead where she seduces his youngest son – an act that leads to a volatile love triangle which results in horrific tragedy. “When it was done in Los Angeles in 1924,” Dennehy says, “the cast was arrested on opening night because of the famous seduction scene. Even today, audiences are shocked, and O’Neill loved

Liz Lauren

The veteran actor and Tony winner, who just finished his Broadway run in Desire Under the Elms is considered the foremost interpreter of the playwright’s work. And he’s a Yankee fan too.

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[ Dennehy as Ephraim Cabot in Desire Under the Elms ]

that. He never took mercy on the audience.” At 70 – he turns 71 on July 9th – Dennehy remains a powerful character actor with solid working class Irish roots who likes to joke that the Dennehys were the only peasants in Ireland. “Every other Irish family seems to have Irish kings in their family tree.” Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, he grew up in Mineola, New York where he was inspired to pursue acting in high school by his mentor/ teacher/football coach, Chris Sweeney, with whom he still keeps in touch. His first major role was playing a teenaged Macbeth opposite a male Lady Macbeth. “But you get in front of an audience and you get this buzz,” he says. “I thought, ‘This is interesting.’” So interesting that after serving in the Marines, driving a cab, majoring in history and playing football at Columbia he went on to study drama at Yale. Still, he admits, it wasn’t a simple leap into acting. “I have no idea why I decided to act. Why the hell

would you want to be an actor – what does it have to do with anything?” Eventually, however, Dennehy came to recognize that it was acting that made him happy, and his subsequent (and highly successful) career in film, television and on the stage proves his instincts were correct. Prolific, versatile and reliable, he is frequently able to use his brawniness (he was an offensive and defensive lineman in college), to underscore his personal authority, often in roles as cops, politicians or military men. His work is frequently described as titanic, majestic or poignant. “Acting,” he contends, “is emotion on cue.” And, he says, he finds that emotion easier to conjure once he understands his characters. “I spend a lot of time trying to figure out what makes characters human,” he said. “It takes me a while now. Maybe it’s age.” He said that he was able to grasp Tyrone and Loman’s humanity, at least initially, more than Ephraim Cabot’s. Which is where his history with Desire Under the Elms director, Robert Falls, came into play. “Bob and I have this huge relationship. We met in the early ‘80s when he was the art director of a small theatre in Chicago. “At the time we talked about long-range ambitions – something I’d never had –and we set as our ambition to do things we weren’t sure we could pull off, “ says Dennehy. When Falls took over the Goodman, the two knew instinctively Desire was both a beautiful and difficult play – perfect to fulfill their early dreams. Yet as volatile Ephraim and other characters he’s played have been, Dennehy says he has no problem leaving them behind once the curtain comes down. “People think you can’t help but be affected by the parts you play – and some actors pay a terrible price – but I’m not one of them,” he notes. “I can leave, watch sports – I’m a sports and baseball fanatic. I was originally a Brooklyn Dodgers fan, but I guess you could say I’ve gone over to the dark side: I come off the stage and ask ‘Who’s pitching for the Yankees?’” –– Griffin Miller


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[ Anne Hathaway ]

NEW YORK SUMMER FESTIVALS 2009 Through June 26 Marathon 2009 ensemblestudiotheatre.org/ coming_up.htm Through June 14 Festival of Jewish Theater & Ideas untitledtheater.com June 4-14 The Ultimate Latina Theater Festival ultimate.latinoflavored.com June 4-28 12th Annual Black Box New Play Festival galleryplayers.com

[ Samantha Harris ]

[ Phylicia Rashad ]

summer theatre

June 7- 27 Clubbed Thumb Summerworks 2009 ClubbedThumb.org June 11-28 Planet Connections Theatre Festivity planetconnectionsfestivity.com

June, July and August – when Broadway’s drawing cards tend to be the shows and stars that danced off with the most Tony Awards. But as you compile your summer 2009 wish list, don’t forget to leave room for such seasonal stage delights as new stars entering established hit shows, Shakespeare in the Park and New York’s annual sample sale of creativity: Theatre Festivals! the shows

the stars

the summertime scoop

August, Osage County

Phylicia Rashad

The arrival of Tony-winner Rashad, as Violet Weston, Broadway’s current queen of monster matriarchs, offers the perfect excuse for re-visiting 2008’s Tony-winning play. She’ll be with the show through 8/23. FYI: Original cast member Amy Morton is also back in the dysfunctional family circle joining Tony-winner Elizabeth Ashley, who’s last Broadway success was as the feisty materfamilias, Stella, in 2008’s Dividing the Estate by Horton Foote.

The Bacchae

Philip Glass

At press time no cast had been announced, but the inclusion of a choral score by composer Glass on its own is too good to resist. Another plus: the great outdoors setting and the Delacorte’s Greek amphitheatre ambiance. Euripides would be thrilled. FYI: At the helm is award-winning director JoAnne Akalaitis, founder of the acclaimed avant-garde theatre company Mabou Mines.

Chicago

Chandra Wilson Samantha Harris

Grey’s Anatomy’s Dr. Miranda Bailey, Chandra Wilson, will be one hot “Mama” (Morton, that is) in the Fosse hit with attitude to spare (June 8th through July 5th) while Samantha Harris (The Insider, Dancing with the Stars) will step into Roxie Hart’s bad-girl shoes from July 7 through August 16. FYI: Harris cut her teeth as a correspondent and fill-in anchor for E! News.

Twelfth Night

Anne Hathaway Audra McDonald Julie White Michael Cumpsty Raul Esparza David Pittu Jay O. Sanders

Film-star Anne Hathaway plays Viola, the lynchpin ingénue, in Shakespeare’s comedy of mistaken identities and wonderfully-etched characters. And while Hathaway won’t be wearing Prada (breeches are more Viola’s style), she will be sharing the stage with a most extraordinary collection of actors, including mutli-Tony Award winner Audra McDonald. FYI: With so much star power attached, this production may well rival last summer’s pre-Broadway revival of Hair in terms of ticket demand. Act fast.

Ashanti LaChanze Orlando Jones

Hold on to your broomstick, Wicked Witch of the West, the multi-talented Ashanti will be clicking her ruby slippers when she stars as Dorothy in the New York City Center Encores! Summer Stars production of The Wiz. She shares the stage with Tony-winner LaChanze (Glinda) and one of the busiest actors on TV, Orlando Jones (The Wiz). FYI: don’t be surprised if all three get upstaged by Nigel, the Cairn Terrier playing Toto – it’s his stage debut!

(Shakespeare in the Park’s 2nd 2009 production: 8/11 thru 9/30)

June 15-28 TeatroStageFest 2009 teatrostagefest.org July 7-22 Lincoln Center Festival: 2009 Summer Theatre Works lincolncenter.org/lcfestival/ July 13-Aug 2 Midtown International Theatre Festival midtownfestival.org

(Shakespeare in the Park’s 1st 2009 production: 6/10 thru 7/12)

July 14-19 34th Annual Samuel French, Inc. Off-Off Broadway Short Play Festival samuelfrench.com/oobfestival. July 20-Aug 9 International CringeFest '09: Bad Plays - Bad Musicals Bad Films nyartists.org. Aug 14-30 The New York International Fringe Festival fringeNYC.org.

[ Chandra Wilson ]

(What’s New; Who’s Who – Plus a Feast of Fests)

June 4-28 Shortened Attention Span One Act Festival shortenedattentionspan.com June 5-July 4 The Antidepressant Festival bricktheater.com

[ Ashanti ] Joan Marcus

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The Wiz (6/12-7/5)

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ON THE TOWN

THEATRE

Joan Marcus

NEW YORK

ACTING GODS

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It’s almost too good to be true: Hollywood heavyweights Jeff Daniels, James Gandolfini, Marcia Gay Harden, and Hope Davis all on one stage. Don’t pinch yourself; just head over to the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre to catch a once-in-a-lifetime performance of God of Carnage, Tony winner Yasmina Reza’s “comedy without manners” about the parental aftermath of a playground altercation. Call 212-239-6200 for tickets.


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ON THE TOWN SPOTLIGHT

PERFORMING ARTS p.62

Please call the box offices for showtimes. All listings subject to change BROADWAY Accent on Youth - (Play) Manhattan Theater Club presents Samson Raphaelson’s rollicking salute to love’s possibilities. Starring Tony and Emmy Award winner David Hyde Pierce as a playwright about to abandon his latest script until his young secretary offers him inspiration. Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., 212-239-6200; mtc-nyc.org August: Osage County - (Play) Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer- and Tony-winning portrait of a Midwestern family dealing with the disappearance of its patriarch while steeped in a morass of maternal spite and sibling rivalry. Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St., 212-239-6200; augustonbroadway.com Avenue Q - (Musical) In 2004’s Tony-winning musical, which began life Off-Broadway, singing puppets and their human neighbors are the residents of a fictional NYC street where a collection of twenty-somethings struggle to find their way in the world. John Golden Theatre, 252 W. 45th St., 212-239-6200; avenueq.com Billy Elliot: The Musical - (Musical) Based on the film about a working-class British boy with dreams that run contrary to family expectations, the London smash-hit is now a Broadway blockbuster as well. Set against the backdrop of a struggling English coal-mining town, the show—a celebration of a young boy’s dream to follow his passion for dance despite all odds—is a study in inspirational and entertaining musical theatre. Peter Darling choreographs, Sir Elton John wrote the score, and three young talents alternate in the title role. Imperial Theatre, 249 W. 45th St., 212-239-6200; billyelliotbroadway.com Blithe Spirit - (Play) Angela Lansbury, Christine Ebersole and Rupert Everett head the cast of this off-the-wall Noel Coward fantasy, written in 1941, about a séance gone terribly wrong. To whit, the spirit of a man’s mischievous first wife is conjured and decides it will be fun to stick around and sabotage his second marriage. Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St., 212-239-6200; blitheonbroadway.com Chicago - (Musical) Kander and Ebb’s longrunning “musical vaudeville” follows murderous vixen Roxie Hart, who gains notoriety from prison and locks horns with prison diva Velma

MUSEUMS p.70

Kelly when they both vie for the attentions of the hottest lawyer in town: Billy Flynn. Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St., 212-239-6200; chicagothemusical.com Exit the King - (Play) Oscar winners Geoffrey Rush and Susan Sarandon star in Eugene Ionesco’s play about a megalomaniacal ruler, who refuses to relinquish control of his devastated country even after being told he has only 90 minutes to live. Also in the cast: Andrea Martin and Lauren Ambrose. Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 243 W. 47th St., 212-239-6200 (Through 6/14) God of Carnage - (Play) Jeff Daniels, James Gandolfini, Marcia Gay Harden, and Hope Davis star in this “comedy without manners” by Tonywinning playwright Yasmina Reza centering on the parental aftermath of a playground altercation. Bernard Jacobs Theatre, 242 W. 45th St., 212-239-6200; godofcarnage.com Guys and Dolls - (Musical) Tony Award nominee Oliver Platt (Shining City) stars as gambling entrepreneur Nathan Detroit and Lauren Graham (Gilmore Girls) as his favorite “doll,” the matrimonially stifled Miss Adelaide, in this new revival of the beloved Damon Runyonesque musical comedy. Also starring Craig Bierko (The Music Man) as Sky Masterson. Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., 212-307-4100; guysanddollsbroadway.com Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical - (Musical) The revival of the groundbreaking musical—a stunning success during last summer’s run at Central Park’s Delacorte Theatre—has made the move to Broadway with Gavin Creel (Thoroughly Modern Millie) in the role of Claude. Looks like it’s the “Dawning of the Age of Aquarius” again. Peace, man! Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 302 W. 45th St., 212-239-6200; hairbroadway.com In the Heights - (Musical) 2007’s Tony-winning Best Musical about two days in the life of Manhattan’s vibrant and tight-knit neighborhood of Washington Heights. The story follows the hopes and dreams of three generations as they struggle to forge an identity in a neighborhood on the brink of transition. The production is the brainchild of Lin-Manuel Miranda, who wrote the music and lyrics and plays the lead role of Usnavi. Richard Rodgers Theatre, 226 W. 46th St., 212-221-1211; intheheightsthemusical.com Irena’s Vow - (Play) Four-time Tony Award nominee Tovah Feldshuh brings her amazing performance in Dan Gordon’s critically acclaimed play to Broadway. The riveting story line homes in on a courageous and unsung heroine of WWII: a

SIGHTSEEING p.84

housekeeper for a German major who risked her life to save 12 Jewish refugees. Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th St., 212-239-6200 Jersey Boys - (Musical) Based on the life story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, this musical chronicles the rise to superstardom of a group of blue-collar kids from the wrong side of the tracks during the 1960s. Filled with just about every major Four Seasons hit from “Sherry” and “Rag Doll” to “You’re Just Too Good To Be True.” August Wilson Theatre, 245 W. 52nd St., 212-239-6200; jerseyboysbroadway.com Joe Turner’s Come and Gone - (Play) Part of the great August Wilson’s ten-play “Century Cycle,” Joe Turner tells the story of Herald Loomis who, after serving seven years hard labor, heads north with his young daughter to a Pittsburgh boarding house filled with memorable characters who aid him in his search for his inner freedom. Belasco Theatre, 111 W. 44th St., 212-239-6200; lct.org The Lion King - (Musical) The Tony- and Olivier Award-winning stage version of Disney’s celebrated animated feature follows the lion cub Simba as he struggles to accept the responsibilities of adulthood and his destined role of king of the jungle. Filled with colorful characters and Grammy-winning numbers by Elton John and Tim Rice. Directed by Julie Taymor. The Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St., 212-307-4100; disneyonbroadway.com The Little Mermaid - (Musical) In a magical kingdom beneath the sea, a beautiful young mermaid longs to leave her ocean home to live in the world above. But first she must defy her kingof-the-sea father, escape an evil sea witch, and convince a prince that she’s the girl with the perfect voice. Based on Disney’s Oscar-winning animated film and the beloved fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, 205 W. 46th St., 212-307-4747; disneyonbroadway.com Mamma Mia! - (Musical) Set on a Greek isle, this clever hit musical romance incorporates 22 ABBA songs (“Dancing Queen,” “Knowing Me, Knowing You”) into a story about a single mother and her daughter on the eve of the daughter’s wedding—and three men who could be the bride’s father. Winter Garden Theatre, 1634 Broadway (50th St.), 212-563-5544; mamma-mia.com Mary Poppins - (Musical) Based on the P.L. Travers stories and the Oscar-winning film, this fast-paced, heartwarming musical about the world’s most famous nanny boasts numbers from both the original film (“Chim Chim Cher-ee,” “The Perfect Nanny”) as well as new songs by

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George Stiles and Anthony Drewe. New Amsterdam Theatre, 214 W. 42nd St., 212-307-4747; disneyonbroadway.com Mary Stuart - (Play) Written by Friedrich Schiller in 1800, this play—which plays like a modernday political drama—is a thrilling account of the extraordinary relationship between England’s Elizabeth I (Harriet Walter) and her rival cousin, Mary Queen of Scots (Janet McTeer). Notably, this same production enjoyed a sold-out run at London’s acclaimed Donmar Warehouse. Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W. 44th St., 212-307-4747; marystuartonbroadway.com (Through 8/16) Next to Normal - (Musical) This intimate sixperson production explores how a suburban household copes with crisis. Featuring a contemporary rock score of more than 30 songs. Longacre Theatre, 222 W. 28th St., 212-239-6200; nexttonormal.com

ROCK OF LOVE Following fellow American Idol alums Frenchie Davis, Clay Aiken, and Fantasia Barrino, among others, sixth-place finisher on the fourth season Constantine Maroulis (pictured here, center) has made the leap to Broadway in the surprise hit new musical Rock of Ages, earning a Tony nomination in the process. Set in 1987, the show features songs from such hair-metal stalwarts as Journey, Bon Jovi, Twisted Sister, Poison, and Whitesnake. Call 212-307-4100 for tickets.

Joan Marcus

9 to 5: The Musical - (Musical) Allison Janney (The West Wing) and Marc Kudisch (The Apple Tree) join Wicked alumni Stephanie J. Block and Megan Hilty in this new stage musical based on the film of the same name about a trio of office workers who turn the tables on their sexist, egotistical boss. Featuring new songs written by Dolly Parton. Marquis Theatre, 1535 Broadway (45th St.), 212-307-4100; 9to5themusical.com

AFTER GODOT While the amazing revival of Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot at Studio 54 is set to end its limited run on July 12th, you won’t have to wait long to see three of its four stars—all past Tony winners—return to Broadway. John Glover (Lucky) will be moving into the role of Herbert Dean in the Manhattan Theatre Club’s production of The Royal Family (previews begin 9/15 for a 10/8 opening at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre). His costars include Rosemary Harris, Stephen Collins, Tony Roberts, Jan Maxwell and Reg Rogers. Meanwhile Bill Irwin (Vladimir) will be teaming up with John Stamos and Gina Gershon for a revival of the 1960s musical Bye Bye Birdie. Irwin will be playing frazzled dad Harry McAfee, a role originated by Paul Lynde. The preview curtain rises on 9/10 for a 10/15 opening at the new “green” Broadway venue: Henry Miller’s Theatre in the Bank of America Tower. Finally, a newly mustachioed Nathan Lane will be starring as Gomez in the new musical The Addams Family (previews 3/4; opens 4/8). His Morticia? Bebe Neuwirth. The upshot, of course, is that now it’s audiences who are waiting. Fortunately, unlike Godot, it looks like none of the above will be a no-show. –– GM

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The Norman Conquests - (Trilogy of Comedies) Alan Ayckbourn’s collection of three full-length plays—Table Manners, Living Together and Round and Round the Garden—arrives on Broadway following its sold-out run at the Old Vic Theatre with the original London cast. Written to be seen individually or as a trilogy in any order, the plays are being performed in repertory. The action follows assistant librarian Norman’s lothario attempts to charm several female family members over the course of a weekend of eating, drinking and misunderstandings. Circle in the Square Theatre, 235 W. 50th St., 212-239-6200; normanconquestsonbroadway.com (Through 7/25) The Phantom of the Opera - (Musical) After myriad film versions, Gaston Leroux’s famous period thriller now reigns as Broadway’s most legendary grand dame, having broken countless records as it continues to thrill new generations of theatregoers. Featuring the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber, Phantom has achieved the kind of reputation and following most shows only dream of. Majestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St., 212-239-6200; thephantomoftheopera.com The Philanthropist - (Play) Matthew Broderick (The Producers) stars in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of Christopher Hampton’s biting bourgeois comedy (written as a response to Molière’s The Misanthrope) examining the empty, insular lives of college intellectuals. Broderick plays a professor who seems almost absurdly removed from the political turmoil surrounding him. American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., 212-719-1300; roundabouttheatre.org (Through 6/28)


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ONTHETOWN

reasons to be pretty - (Play) Neil LaBute’s (Bash, The Shape of Things, In the Company of Men) comic drama about America’s obsession with physical beauty has transferred to Broadway after a smashing Off-Broadway run. The action revolves around a man’s tight-knit social circle, thrown into chaos following his offhanded remarks about a female coworker’s pretty face—and his girlfriend’s lack thereof. Lyceum Theatre, 149 W. 45th St., 212-239-6200; mcctheater.org

Wicked - (Musical) Set in Oz before the arrival of Dorothy, this knock-out production follows the friendship between two girls—one smart, misunderstood, with green skin; the other beautiful, popular, and ambitious—who grow up to become the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good Witch. Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St., 212-307-4100; wickedthemusical.com

OFF-BROADWAY ATLANTIC THEATER COMPANY - Make Me, a comedy written by Leslie Ayvazian (through 6/14) 336 W. 20th St., 212- 691-5919; atlantictheater.org The Awesome 80s Prom - This interactive comedy invites theatregoers to rediscover their

Rock of Ages - (Musical) Following a successful Off-Broadway run, this retro musical arrives on Broadway with a score made up of 1980s hits by Journey, Bon Jovi, Styx, REO Speedwagon, Pat Benatar, Twisted Sister, Poison, Asia and Whitesnake. Set at a Hollywood rock club, the show tracks an aspiring young rocker and a smalltown girl chasing her dreams. Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th St., 212-307-4100; rockofagesmusical.com Shrek the Musical - (Musical) The animated ogre with a heart of, well, green, has stepped off the big screen and onto the Broadway stage. Starring Brian d’Arcy James (Sweet Smell of Success) alongside Sutton Foster (Thoroughly Modern Millie) as Princess Fiona and Christopher Sieber as Lord Farquaad. A fairy-tale combination plate of both sophisticated and sophomoric humor with appeal for all ages. Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway (53rd St.), 212-239-6200; shrekthemusical.com South Pacific - (Musical) Bartlett Sher directs this critically acclaimed revival of the Pulitzer Prizewinning musical, starring three-time Tony nominee Kelli O’Hara. One of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s most celebrated musicals (based on James Michener’s Tales of the South Pacific), South Pacific centers on two love stories that unfold against the backdrop of WWII and the military serving in the Pacific. Vivian Beaumont Theater, 150 W. 65th St., 212-239-6200; lct.org The 39 Steps - (Play) Patrick Barlow’s comic adaptation of John Buchan’s classic spy thriller has been adapted into a hilarious spoof of the book and the Hitchcock film. The “unstageable” thriller set in the 1930s is staged with four cast members playing a minimum of 150 roles. Helen Hayes Theatre, 240 W. 44th St., 212-239-6200; love39steps.com Waiting for Godot - (Play) Tony winners Bill Irwin and Nathan Lane star in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of Samuel Beckett’s most iconic play. Filling out the cast are John Goodman (Roseanne) as Pozzo and John Glover as Lucky. Studio 54, 254 W. 54th St., 212-719-1300; roundabouttheatre.org (Through 7/12) West Side Story - (Musical) The landmark musical by Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, and Arthur Laurents transports Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to the turbulent streets of the Upper West Side in 1950s New York City. The star-crossed lovers find themselves caught between the rival street gangs: watch for new bilingual elements. Palace Theatre, 1564 Broadway (47th St.), 212-307-4100; broadwaywestsidestory.com

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favorite characters from the 1980s as everyone from the Captain of the Football team to the Asian Exchange Student compete for the titles of Prom King and Queen. ’80s fashions strongly encouraged. Village Nightclub, Webster Hall, 125 E. 11th St., 877-RAD-PROM; awesome80sprom.com; websterhall.com Blue Man Group - Best known for their wildly popular theatrical shows, the trio of post-modern clowns known as Blue Man Group combines music, comedy and multimedia theatrics to produce a totally unique form of entertainment. Astor Place Theatre, 434 Lafayette St. (so. of Astor Pl.), 212-254-4370; blueman.com BROOKLYN ACADEMY OF MUSIC Richard III: An Arab Tragedy, Kuwaiti director Sulayman Al-Bassam’s groundbreaking remake of Shakespeare’s Machiavellian masterpiece (6/9-12). BAM Harvey Theater, 651 Fulton St., 718-636-4100; bam.org Celebrity Autobiography: In Their Own Words - Created by Eugene Pack, this brilliant and hilarious concept show features a line-up of revolving performers who will interpret the actual words and stories written by the famous and the infamous, in both solo and ensemble pieces. Some of the “authors” recently featured include Ivana Trump, Vanna White, Sylvester Stallone, Burt Reynolds and Loni Anderson. Triad Theatre, 158 W. 72nd St., 212-868-4444; celebrityautobiography.com ENCORES! Summer Stars: The Wiz - Ashanti stars as Dorothy in the 1974 rock and soul musical based on the beloved L. Frank Baum story about Dorothy and her adventures in Oz, which won seven Tony Awards including Best Musical, Best Score and Best Choreography. New York City Center, W. 55th St., 212-581-1212; nycitycenter.org The Fantasticks - A romantic musical classic centered around the simple love story of a boy, a girl, two fathers, and a wall. The score includes “Try to Remember” and “Soon It’s Gonna Rain.” With book and lyrics by Tom Jones and music by Harvey Schmidt. Snapple Theater Center, 1627 Broadway, 212-307-4100; thefantasticks.com

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59E59 THEATRES - Americas Off Broadway features five critically acclaimed productions from theaters across the country: Shiloh Productions presents the Chester Theatre Company production of Morris Panych’s The Dishwashers, about the plight of men working in the lower depths of a high end restaurant (through 6/7); the Mixed Blood Theatre production of Pure Confidence, an exhilarating story of human triumph that explores the meaning of freedom against a backdrop of fast horses, gritty racetracks, and high stakes betting (through 7/3); Project Y Theatre Company’s FUBAR, a new play by the writer and story editor from Showtime’s hit series Dead Like Me exploring the ensuing ripple effect on the lives of a young couple after a random act of violence (6/11-28); and Waterwell’s #9, a dizzying new music theater piece about the


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technological tools we use and how they use us (6/5-28). 59 E. 59th St., 212-279-4200; 59e59.org FLEA THEATER - Even Maybe Tammy by Christopher Bayes and the Company (6/3-13); Twelfth Night presented by the Queens Shakespeare Company (6/17-27). 41 White St. (Broadway-Church St.), 212-226-2407; theflea.org Fuerza Bruta: Look Up - Breaking free from the confines of spoken language and theatrical convention, this new show from the creators of De La Guarda immerses performers and audience in an environment that floods the senses and makes the imagination soar. Daryl Roth Theatre, 20 Union Square E. (15th St.), 212-239-6200; fuerzabruta.net LINCOLN CENTER THEATRE - Happiness, choreographed and directed by Tony winner Susan Stroman (The Producers, Young Frankenstein) and featuring Hunter Foster (Little Shop of Horrors; Urinetown) and Joanna Gleason (Dirty Rotten Scoundrels) (through 6/7); Set in the insular Syrian-Jewish community in Midwood, Brooklyn Stunning, by David Adjml, tells the story of Lily, a teenager newly married to a much older man, whose sheltered life is disrupted when Blanche, an African-American housekeeper enters her life (6/1-27). 150 W. 65th St., 212-239-6200; lct.org Line - Israel Horovitz’s classic comedy about five people standing in line has been playing Off-Off Broadway for many years—in fact, it’s inching up on the 35-year mark and has become the longestrunning play in Off-Off Broadway history. 13th Street Repertory, 50 W. 13th St., 212-352-0255; 13thstreetrep.org LUCILLE LORTEL THEATRE (MCC Theatre Company) - Coraline, adapted from the truly terrifying children’s book by Neil Gaiman, this tale of menace and mayhem has been set to music by rock icon Stephin Merritt and features a book by David Greenspan (through 6/20). 121 Christopher St., 212-279-4200; www.mcctheater.org MANHATTAN THEATRE CLUB - Ruined, Lynn Nottage’s haunting play set in a small mining town in Democratic Republic of Congo starring Tony winner Adriane Lenox (Doubt) (through 6/28). 131 W. 55th St., 212-581-1212; mtc-nyc.org The Marvelous Wonderettes - An engaging new jukebox musical revue featuring such retro classics as “Stupid Cupid,” “Dream Lover,” and “It’s My Party.” The story follows singing sensation wannabes The Wonderettes as they take the stage at the 1958 Springfield High School prom. Westside Theatre, 407 W. 43rd St., 212-239-6200; marvelouswonderettes.com Marie Antoinette: The Color of Flesh Spanning 20 years during the dramatically charged build to the French Revolution, Joel Gross’s play is a fictionalized triangle between

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Queen Marie Antoinette, her portraitist, the renowned beauty Elisabeth Louise Vigee-Le Brun, and Count Alexis de Ligne, an aristocrat and political radical. St. Luke’s Theatre, 308 W. 46th St., 212-239-6200; stlukestheatre.com Murdered by the Mob - Interactive Theater. Join a private audience with the Don, mingle with mobsters and molls, and meet the new “Boss of Bosses.” It’s the party of the year celebrating the induction of the newest crime boss and everyone’s invited. Amo Dinner Theatre, 141 W. 38th St., 800-MURDER-INC; murdermysteryinc.com THE NEW GROUP - Groundswell, Ian Bruce’s psychological thriller about hunger and hope, and the glittering promises of a transforming society on the barren, diamond-diving coast of South Africa (through 6/27). 410 W. 42nd St., 212-279-4200, thenewgroup.org NEW WORLD STAGES - Just west of Broadway, this cutting-edge theatre complex is home to several of Off-Broadway’s most popular productions: Altar Boyz – A musical comedy about a struggling Christian boy band riding the wave of America’s fascination with religion (altarboyz.com); The Gazillion Bubble Show – Fan Yang’s irresistible and totally fabulous bubble show (gazillionbubbleshow.com); My First Time – True stories of first sexual encounters (myfirsttimetheplay.com); Naked Boys Singing – Hunky guys performing 90 minutes of musical numbers in the altogether (nakedboyssinging.com); The Toxic Avenger, a new musical based on the 1985 cult film classic (Urinetown); Flamingo Court follows the nosy and endearing residents of a South Florida apartment complex, each apartment revealing a new story and a new lesson: Sex lives after sixty (flamingocourt.com); and For Lovers Only (Love Songs Nothing But Love Songs), a new musical revue featuring nearly 100 of the 20th century's most beloved songs interspersed through a fast-paced evening. 340 W. 50th St., 212-239-6200; newworldstages.com Our Town - Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prizewinning play following the lives of the residents of the New England town of Grover’s Corners. In this new staging, the action takes place in, among and around the audience. Barrow Street Theatre, 27 Barrow St., 212-868-4444; ourtownoffbroadway.com Perfect Crime - This long-running hit psychological cat-and-mouse thriller is about a wealthy female psychiatrist who has returned to America where a bizarre murder has occurred. Enter the inspector who becomes obsessed with her, her patients and her home. Snapple Theater Center, 210 W. 50th St., 212-307-4100

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PLAYWRIGHTS HORIZONS - Our House is a cautionary tale ripped from today’s headlines by Theresa Rebeck, directed by Tony winner Michael Mayer (Spring Awakening) (through 6/21). 416 W. 42nd St., 212-279-4200; playwrightshorizons.org


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PRIMARY STAGES - A Lifetime Burning, Cusi Cram’s dark comedy about a trust fund darling who writes a deceptive memoir as though she had come from a less priveleged background (7/28-9/5). 59E59 Theaters, 59 E. 59th St., 212-279-4200; primarystages.org PUBLIC THEATER - Shakespeare in the Park - Twelfth Night directed by Daniel Sullivan and starring Anne Hathaway (6/10-7/12); The Bacchae by Euripides, directed by JoAnne Akalaitis and featuring a score by Philip Glass (8/11-30). Free tickets are distributed on the day of the performance beginning at 1pm at the Delacorte in Central Park (enter at 81st St. & Central Park West or 79th St. & Fifth Ave.). Visit website for more information. 425 Lafayette St., 212-260-2400; publictheater.org The Quantum Eye - In the tradition of Harry Houdini, Sam Eaton demonstrates a remarkable evening of old-world parlor mentalism brought into the 21st-century as he performs a succession of impossibilities: predicting behavior, reading minds, and revealing the unknowable. Snapple Theater Center, 210 W. 50th St., 212-321-7862; thequantumeye.com ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY In The Tin Pan Alley Rag, two of America's greatest composers, Irving Berlin and Scott Joplin, share an evening of fascinating stories and toe-tapping rhythms (6/12-9/6). Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for the Theatre, 111 W. 46th St., 212-719-1300; roundabouttheatre.org SECOND STAGE THEATRE - Sherie Rene Scott co-wrote (with Dick Scanlan) and stars in Everyday Rapture, the story of a young woman’s psycho-sexual-spiritual journey (through 6/13) Vanities, A New Musical, a funny and poignant look at three women who discover that, even in 30 years of rapidly changing times, the one thing they can rely on is each other (6/30-8/9); Wildflower, in which a woman and her troubled son look to escape their past in Crested Butte, a small town with its own share of secrets (7/138/8). 307 W. 43rd St., 212-246-4422; 2st.com Simon Lovell’s Strange and Unusual Hobbies World-famous magician Simon Lovell doing what he does best. SoHo Playhouse, 15 Vandam St., 212-691-1555; sohoplayhouse.com Stomp - Springing from Brit clubs and an urban aesthetic, this eight-member theatre of percussion has caused sensation after sensation at each of its international appearances—and what can only be called a big bang in the Big Apple. Orpheum Theatre, 126 Second Ave. (7th St.-St. Marks Pl.), 212-307-4100; stomponline.com Tony N’ Tina’s Wedding - Interactive Theatre. Tony has been marrying Tina since 1988 and will do so as long as there are family and friends ready to celebrate the occasion with live music, champagne, Italian food and cake. Vinnie Black’s Colliseum at the Edison Hotel, 221 W. 46th St., 212-352-3101; tonyandtinanewyork.com

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Lincoln Center at 50: the architect explains it all Elizabeth Diller and her company are helping to transform “the way that Lincoln Center meets the city’s edge.” Rendering by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in association with Beyer Blinder Bell

By Aileen Jacobson

[ Architectural rendering of the new Columbus Avenue approach to Lincoln Center, including new grand stair and entrance ramp with a glass canopy. The stairs’ risers will have LED displays of what is playing at the various theatres. Design: Diller Scofidio + Renfro ]

lizabeth Diller is happy to see people lounging on the pyramid of seats that she designed for the sidewalk just outside the newly renovated Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center. Diller, lead architect for the $1.2-billion makeover that the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts complex is undergoing, is standing inside the soaring glass-walled lobby she helped conceive. The sunlit area is abuzz with people having drinks or dinner in a newly-created café, at65. Some may attend a concert or show later, but many won’t. They can see the sidewalk loungers and passersby, who can peer back at them. “This was about democratizing Lincoln Center, about turning it inside out and making it less

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elitist,” she says. “A lot of our work went into transforming the way that Lincoln Center meets the city’s edge.” The original architecture for the 16-acre center, now celebrating its 50th anniversary, “turned its back on the city,” she says, and often seemed forbidding. She remembers having glimmers of that feeling when she went there as a child, though she never thought she’d be asked to change it. “It was like New York furniture.” Now in her 50s, Diller is a partner with her husband and another architect in Diller Scofidio + Renfro, which was selected to make sweeping changes, in association with other firms. The project won’t be complete until 2011, but alterations are already evident. Among them is the sleek new access to the main plaza where Lincoln Center’s iconic fountain bub-

bles. Before, visitors climbed steps, then crossed two lanes of traffic before stepping onto the plaza. Now a broad stairway rises gracefully and directly from sidewalk to plaza—no taxis to dodge. “The idea was to make it a really glamorous entrance,” Diller says. Cars will eventually be able to drive underneath to a concourse level. The stairs’ risers will soon have LED displays with information about what’s playing at which theater. “They’ll have soft, white lights, very gentle.” The rebuilt fountain, mostly complete, is designed with a ledge that seems to float and water that can be choreographed. “But it won’t be like the Bellagio. This is a cultural center,” Diller says with a laugh. Several groves of trees with seating are scattered throughout the center, inviting the public to linger. (By fall, a new visitor space across Columbus Av-


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Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with FXFOWLE Architects

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enue is scheduled to open.) A new restaurant on 65th Street, to open next year, will be sheathed in glass, like Alice Tully Hall. Unlike the hall, its gently sloping roof will sprout grass. “It’s a meadow,” Diller says, pointing to a rendering on her computer. “I can see people sunbathing. I can see Juilliard students relaxing or having a class.” The Juilliard School, a renowned conservatory for students in dance, drama and music, is across the street, its entrance already transformed by Diller and company. Part of the school is on floors above Tully Hall. The auditorium inside Tully is a wonder, too, sheathed throughout—including the stage—in a honey-toned veneer made from a single moabi tree from Africa that was shipped first to Japan to be

[ Architectural rendering of Diller Scofidio + Renfro's design of the infopeel with a pyramid on the side facing Alice Tully Hall ]

sliced paper-thin. Lights behind the walls make them glow. “The walls blush. They form a warm shell,” Diller says. It’s very different from the experience outside. Up in the air, cantilevered over the sidewalk near Diller’s beloved outdoor seats, is a glass-enclosed dance studio. The students who use it can pull a curtain, but she thinks they’ll like the interaction. Artists sometimes perform on the sidewalk beneath. It will largely be up to people who use the public parts of Lincoln Center to determine what goes on, Diller says: “They have to interpret the space.” Aileen Jacobson writes about the arts for The New York Times and other publications. A former arts and media writer for Newsday, she is also the author of two books. Her last piece for Promenade was on holiday gift books.

Diller Scofidio + Renfro

[ Conceptual design of the North Plaza, including the "morphing lawn," under which will be a new restaurant ]

[ Architects Ricardo Scofidio and Elizabeth Diller ]

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50th anniversary highlights • Artists in Tribute to Lincoln Center David O'Connor

PERFORMING ARTSNEW YORK

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At the Time Warner Center, Lincoln Center presents 30 rarely-seen works by Josef Albers, Chuck Close, Helen Frankenthaler, Sol Lewitt, Robert Rauschenberg, and Andy Warhol, among others from the Lincoln Center List Poster and Print Program, which commissions visual artists to create posters and prints in tribute to Lincoln Center. June 1-21, 2009. Second floor public gallery space, Time Warner Center, free and open to the public.

• The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma The Silk Road Ensemble with cellist Yo-Yo Ma inaugurates the newly-renovated Guggenheim Bandshell, which was originally built in 1969 and is newly restored for the 50th Anniversary. Opening concert as part of Live From Lincoln Center on PBS. June 9, 2009. Damrosch Park, free.

• Expanded Meet the Artist Library Series Lincoln Center’s Meet the Artist Series, which presents a wide range of performances by worldclass artists for young people to experience, travels to libraries in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island for the first time as part of the 50th Anniversary. July-Sept., 2009. The Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island, free and open to the public.

[ Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble ]

Stephanie Berger

• Midsummer Night Swing Midsummer Night Swing presents Chubby Checker in a Twist party celebrating 50 years of dancing to the beat. July 8, 2009. Damrosch Park.

• Shen Wei Dance Arts in Re– (I, II, III) Lincoln Center Festival presents Shen Wei Dance Arts in Re– (I, II, III), the first New York performance of the complete triptych. Part III, The New Silk Road, a New York premiere, was commissioned for the 50th Anniversary. July 9–11, 2009. Alice Tully Hall, Starr Theater.

• Lincoln Center Out of Doors Lincoln Center Out of Doors presents the world premiere of the Asphalt Orchestra in collaboration with Bang on a Can in a series of marching band performances. Aug. 5–9, 2009. On the Plazas of Lincoln Center. Free event.

[ Asphalt Orchestra at Lincoln Center Out of Doors ] Robbie Jack

• Mark Morris Dance Group Mark Morris Dance Group performs two newly-commissioned works for the Mostly Mozart Festival, with cellist Yo-Yo Ma and pianist Emanuel Ax performing Beethoven’s Cello Sonata in C major, Charles Ives’ Trio, and Schumann’s Piano Quintet in E-flat major. Aug. 19–22, 2009. Rose Theater.

• 50th Anniversary Exhibition Lincoln Center presents the first major exhibition to focus exclusively on the performing arts center’s origins, architecture, educational activities, innovative technology, artists and performances. Curated by Thomas Mellins, co-author of the book New York 1960, the exhibition features archival photographs, drawings, posters, costumes, set pieces, film and video, etc. Oct.15, 2009-Jan.16, 2010. New York Public Library for the Performing Arts – Donald and Nancy Oenslager Gallery. Free and open to the public.

• Target Free Thursdays The Visitor Space at Lincoln Center, which opens in November, presents weekly performances by break-out artists, student ensembles, community talent, and artists drawn from Lincoln Center’s resident organizations. Free and open to the public.

• Pictures Reframed Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes collaborates with internationally acclaimed video artist Robin Rhode to create “Pictures Reframed,” a new experience of Mussorgsky’s classic Pictures at an Exhibition. Nov. 13–14, 2009. Alice Tully Hall, Starr Theater. 58

[ Mark Morris Dance Group at the Mostly Mozart Festival ]


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Bob Serating

[ Clockwise from top left: Crowds at Lincoln Center groundbreaking ceremony, May 14, 1959

Bob Serating

Bob Serating

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A tour group in Avery Fisher Hall looks at the Lincoln Center model with the Metropolitan Opera House construction in the background, Jan. 20, 1964 Leonard Bernstein at the pre-opening of the New York Philharmonic in Philharmonic Hall. Sept. 17, 1962 Leontyne Price and Robert Merrill at the new Metropolitan Opera House, Jan. 20, 1964 ]

Backstage at Lincoln Center Once, when Maria Mansfield brought “15 ladies from Portugal” into a side room at the Metropolitan Opera House, the great tenor Pavarotti was sitting there on a plush sofa. “They started kissing and smooching him,” Mansfield tells today’s Lincoln Center tour group, a diverse band of eight. “I went over to apologize. But he said, ‘Will you always be here at 4:30?’” After that, Pavarotti sometimes showed up: “He liked the attention,” she says to our little group, as we rest on the same couch. Next we enter the main auditorium and Mansfield––Italian-born actress, wife of a New York Philharmonic violinist and guide for over 40 years—persuades a technician to slowly lower the majestic Swarovski crystal chandeliers in the near-empty house. Juicy stories, secret spectacles, dollops of history and facts—these are elements of a Lincoln Center guided tour. Each takes in up to three of the complex’s five theatres, depending on rehearsal schedules and the guide’s expertise, says Jennifer Berry, Lincoln Center’s director of visitor services. You may not meet a star, she says, but “wondrous things can happen en route.” The one-hour tours, which meet daily in the lobby of Avery Fisher Hall, on Columbus Avenue between 63rd and 65th Streets, cost $15 ($12 seniors and students, $8 children). Also originating there is a tour of Jazz at Lincoln Center, located a few blocks south at Columbus Circle. It can be taken alone ($10, $8 seniors/students, $5 children) or combined with the Lincoln Center tour ($20, $15, $10). Call 212-875-5350 for hours and reservations, or visit LincolnCenter.org. –– Aileen Jacobson 59


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Marty Sohl

DANCENEW YORK

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from Russia...with passion Becoming a principal dancer with ABT was a long time coming for the glamourous Veronika Part [ Veronika Part in Le Corsaire. ]

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stunning beauty who stands 5’8,” with broad shoulders, womanly curves, and a distinctly retro glamour, Veronika Part looks like she belongs in the movies – old-style movies, since critics keep likening her to Joan Crawford and Ava Gardner. Certainly she could never play one of the elfin women who populate most American ballet companies. But a glance at her feet tells rather a different story: long, tapered and extravagantly arched, they were made to dance in toe shoes. And that’s what they are doing at the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, where American Ballet Theatre is in residence until July 11. With appearances in “Swan Lake,” “La Sylphide,” and “Giselle” still to come this season, Part is finally coming into the high-visibility roles reserved for the company’s principal dancers, whose ranks she joined in May. Her promotion is a big deal in the strictly hierarchical world of ballet, and for her fans – vocal and devoted – it was a long-overdue tribute to her lush, passionate dancing. But her rise to the top tier of the company was a long time coming, and she’s had a rough ride since coming to ABT seven years ago from her native Russia. Part first caught the eye of New York’s ballet cognoscenti in July of 2002, when she performed at the Met with the renowned Kirov Ballet. As the bewitched swan maiden Odette (and her evil twin Odile) in “Swan Lake,” she set the balletomanes buzzing with what the New York Times’s Anna Kisselgoff called “an intriguing blend of languor and voluptuousness.” A month later, she had left the Kirov and signed on as a soloist with ABT, poised for a stellar career. A native of the Kirov’s home city of St. Petersburg, she started out not as a ballet brat but as a gymnast, entering the Kirov boot camp, the Vaganova Academy, at the age of 10. Eight years later, in 1996, she graduated right into the company and advanced quickly to the rank of soloist. Her rise at ABT was not so rapid. For one thing, not everyone responded favorably to her dancing – what advocates saw as gorgeous languor others saw as slackness. But she freely admits that the abrupt transition from the staid company culture of the Kirov to the more pressured atmosphere of American Ballet Theatre also caused her problems. “I kind of didn’t know where I am and what I have to do,” she says in her quite serviceable but not necessarily grammatical English. “Of course the language situation was hard for me. Even the style of working in a company like ABT – you have to understand how people are working there. In Russia, you always have more time to prepare. You have coaching, hours of rehearsal with the same partner.”

Rosalie O'Connor

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[ Veronika Part and Marcelo Gomes in Swan Lake ]

She continues: “Here it’s not the same. I found it challenging to do it fast, only six hours to rehearse all this stuff. It was really hard to adjust.” She’s also had to adjust to a changing array of partners, although now that she’s a principal, more regular pairings may come her way. For the moment, she gets to play the field, dancing one night with the up-and-coming American Cory Stearns, another with the Italian sensation Roberto Bolle. She’s been hoisted by dancers from Brazil and Russia, as well. The international array doesn’t faze her in the least. “Now that I am speaking better English,” she says, “it doesn’t matter if I am dancing with someone who is Russian or American. I don’t see or feel the differences.” It took her five years, she says, to settle in. “Now I know myself better. I know people around me. It’s much easier for me.” When she goes back to Russia, she feels that she is coming home – “my people, my language, everything,” she says. But she also senses an unmistakable exhilaration when she returns to New York. “Every time,” she says, “I feel like I want to be there. There is something special about energy in Manhattan. Only here can you feel it.” Back home, she says, friends and family have sometimes said, “Come back. What are you doing? Maybe it’s not good for you.” But, she says, “I never said to myself, ‘Maybe I shouldn’t do this. Maybe I should stay home and be safe and calm’.” For now, she’s commitAmerican Ballet Theatre ted to ABT, and hoping for 2009 Spring Season, through July 11, more juicy dramatic roles to Metropolitan Opera House, 64th Street and Columbus Avenue; 212-362-6000; abt.org. sink those toe shoes into. But when she thinks about the future – the far future – she sees herself in Russia. “Ballet takes a lot of time from life,” she says. “If you’re doing this, you’re doing only this. Ballet will finish for me in 10 years, if it’s good. In Russia, I can start something new, go to university for a future life. I’m so far from my home.” But she’s not far from the Metropolitan Opera House, and neither are you. Catch her while you can. Sylviane Gold has written about the arts for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Newsday and Dance Magazine. Her last piece for Promenade was on the Paul Taylor Dance Company.

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NEW YORK

Vincent Peters

PERFORMING ARTS CULTURAL CENTERS

THE STARS OF SUMMER Madison Square Garden has hosted a number of unforgettable shows, from Elvis in 1972 to John Lennon joining Elton John for his last-ever concert appearance in 1974. History could be made again as Beyonce (6/21-22) and John Legend (8/13) take the world’s most famous stage.

American Ballet Theatre – The 2009 Spring Season at the Metropolitan Opera House continues with the All-Prokofiev Celebration (6/1-6); Giselle (6/8-13); Airs/La Sylphide (6/15-20); Swan Lake (6/22-27); Sylvia (6/29-7/4); Romeo and Juliet (7/6-11). Amsterdam Ave. & 64th St., 212-362-6000; abt.org

Carnegie Hall – Ensemble ACJW The Academy—a program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and The Weill Music Institute (6/2, 13); Neighborhood Concert: Chris Washburne and the SYOTOS Band at the Langston Hughes Community Library & Cultural Center in Queens (6/20); Neighborhood Concert: Folklore Urbano at the Brooklyn Museum (6/21); Neighborhood Concert: Chris Washburne and the SYOTOS Band at Snug Harbor Cultural Center (6/28). 57th St. & Seventh Ave., 212-247-7800; carnegiehall.org

Beacon Theatre – Chris Botti (6/4); Ultimate Doo-Wop Show (6/6); PJ Harvey and John Parish (6/9); Elvis Costello and The Sugarcanes (6/10); Mo’Nique and Friends (6/28); Paul Potts (7/9); Tom Jones (7/21). 2124 Broadway (74th-75th Sts.), 212-465-6225; beacontheatrenyc.com

Dance Theater Workshop – Studio Series: Christine Elmo (6/5-6); Pam Tanowitz - Be in the Gray With Me (6/18-20); Studio Series: Johari Mayfield The Sea Inside (6/26-27); TAKE Dance Company (7/30-8/2). 219 W. 19th St., 212-924-0077; dancetheaterworkshop.org

Brooklyn Academy of Music – Dance: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at BAM (6/9-14). Music: Youssou N’Dour (6/5); Sufi Music Ensembles (6/6); Youssou N'Dour with I Bring What I Love (6/6); The Brahim Fribgane Project with zerobridge (6/12); Qawwali Gospel Creation (6/13); Adam Matta & Friends (6/13); Beres Hammond with Marcia Griffiths and Culture (7/17). 30 Lafayette Ave., 718-636-4100; bam.org

The Joyce Theater – Trey McIntyre Project (6/2-7); Jennifer Muller/The Works (6/9-14); PHILADANCO (6/16-21); KEIGWIN + COMPANY (6/23, 25, 27); Nicholas Leichter Dance (6/24, 26, 28); Umbilical Brothers (6/29-7/11); Pilobolus (7/13-8/8); Evening Stars: Merce Cunningham Dance Company (8/1-2); Tulsa Ballet (8/10-15). 175 Eighth Ave. (19th St.), 212-242-0800; joyce.org

Please call the box offices for showtimes. All listings subject to change.

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Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts – Great Performers: The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma (6/5-6). Lincoln Center Festival (7/7-26): Les Ephémères / Le Théâtre du Soleil (7/10-12, 15-17); Katona József Theatre - Ivanov (7/7-11); Shen Wei Dance Arts - Re- (I, II, III) (7/9-11); Narodowy Stary Teatr - Kalkwerk (7/14-18); Emanuel Gat Dance - Winter Variations / Silent Ballet (7/14, 1617); Idir / Najat Aatabou - A Night in the Maghreb (7/18); A Tribute to Wardell Quezergue Ponderosa Stomp @ Lincoln Center (7/19); Maly Drama Theatre - Life and Fate (7/21, 23-26); Justin Adams and Juldeh Camara/Issa Bagayogo - AfroBlues for the 21st Century (7/21); Béla Pintér and Company - Peasant Opera (7/21-26); Chekhov International Theatre Festival - Boris Godunov (7/22-26); Piccolo Teatro di Milano/Teatri Uniti di Napoli - Trilogia della villeggiatura (7/22-26); Dennis Russell Davies and Maki Namekawa - Two by Four with the Ruhr (7/25). Midsummer Night Swing (7/7-25): Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Singers (7/7); Chubby Checker (7/8); The Woody Herman Orchestra (7/9); Occidental Brothers Dance Band Intl. / Samba Mapangala & Virunga (7/10); Big 3 Palladium Orchestra (7/11); Melba Joyce & Her Big Band (7/14); Otros Aires (7/15); Ponderosa Stomp: The Get Down (7/16); Ponderosa Stomp: The Best Dance in Town (7/17); Kid’s Day / New Swing Sextet (7/18); Catherine Russell and Cat & the Hounds Swing Band (7/21); Big Bad Voodoo Daddy (7/22); La Excelencia (7/23); La Sonora Dinamita (7/24); Harlem Renaissance Orchestra with Houston Person (7/25). Mostly Mozart (7/28-8/22): Opening Night with the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra (7/28-29); A Little Night Music: Piotr Anderszewski (7/29); Piotr Anderszewski and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra (7/31-8/1); A Little Night Music: Claire-Marie Le Guay (8/1); Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra (8/4-5); Stefan Vladar and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra (8/7-8); A Little Night Music: Nicholas Angelich (8/7); A Little Night Music: Stefan Vladar (8/8); Pierre-Laurent Aimard and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe (8/9-10); Joshua Bell and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra (8/12-13); A Flowering Tree (New York Premiere), A New Opera by John Adams (8/13-14, 16); Osmo Vänskä and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra (8/14-15); Opera Jawa (8/15); Schola Cantorum de Venezuela (8/15); A Little Night Music: Simone Dinnerstein (8/15); Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (8/16); John Adams and the International Contemporary Ensemble (8/17); Jeffrey Kahane and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra (8/1819); A Little Night Music: Borromeo String Quartet (8/18); Mark Morris Dance Group Empire Garden, Visitation, and V (8/19-22); Emerson String Quartet (8/20); Closing Night: Haydn’s Creation (8/21-22). Columbus Ave. btw. 62nd & 65th Sts., 212-875-5000; lincolncenter.org Madison Square Garden – Fleetwood Mac (6/11); Earth, Wind & Fire / Chicago (6/17); Andrea Bocelli (6/18); Beyonce (6/21-22); Depeche Mode (8/3-4); Ricardo Arjona (8/7); John Legend (8/13); O.A.R. (8/15); Taylor Swift (8/27). 4 Pennsylvania Plaza (Seventh Ave. & 32nd St.), 212-465-5800; thegarden.com

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Chris Lee

Crackerfarm

PERFORMING ARTSNEWYORK

CLASSICS UNDER THE STARS— PLUS FIREWORKS! One of the city’s great musical traditions— 45 years!—continues this summer as the New York Philharmonic performs their annual Concerts in the Park Series. Not only are they free, they’re topped off with a spectacular fireworks display. See their listing below for the complete schedule.

Metropolitan Opera Company – The Met’s Summer Recital Series (7/13-8/14): Central Park SummerStage (7/13); Crotona Park (The Bronx) (7/17); Queensbridge Park (Queens) (7/24); East River Park (Manhattan) (7/31); Tappan Park (Staten Island) (8/7); Coffey Park (Brooklyn) (8/14). 212-362-6000; metoperafamily.org NY City Center – Encores! Summer Stars: The Wiz (6/12-7/5). 130 W. 56th St., 877-581-1212; nycitycenter.org New York City Opera – Looking Forward, a program in which the New York City Opera Orchestra and City Opera soloists perform in all five boroughs as the company’s home at Lincoln Center, the New York State Theater, undergoes major renovations in preparation for the arrival of new General Manager and Artistic Director, world-renowned opera visionary Gerard Mortier: The Magic Flute in Battery Park City at Rockefeller Park (6/25); La Navarraise at the World Financial Center (6/26); Opera on the Pier in Manhattan at the South Street Seaport (6/27). Check nycopera.com for schedule, tickets, and updates. New York State Theater, Columbus Ave. & 63rd St., 212-870-5570; nycopera.com

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New York Philharmonic – Summertime Classics (6/30-7/10): Russian Fest featuring Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini and Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture (6/30-7/2); Born on the Fourth of July

CUBA’S LIBRE The classically trained, Miami-based Cuban group Tiempo Libre—fresh off of two consecutive Grammy nominations and a new CD, Bach in Havana—bring their dynamic, highvoltage display of timba music (a combination of Latin jazz and traditional Cuban song) to Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, on Tuesday, June 30th, with shows at at 7:30 & 9:30pm. They’ll be performing songs from their new CD, which draws inspiration from the music of Bach and features guest such as Yosvany Terry and Paquito D’Rivera. $30; call 212-258-9595 or visit jalc.org/dccc for tickets and more information. Jazz at Lincoln Center, Frederick P. Rose Hall, 60th St. & Broadway, 5th Floor.

featuring Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue and works by Sousa (7/3-4); From the Danube to the Rhine featuring R. Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier Suite and Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 2 (7/7-8); Boléro and Other French Favorites featuring Ravel’s Boléro and highlights from Bizet’s Carmen (7/9-10). Concert in the Parks: Central Park, Manhattan (7/14); Prospect Park, Brooklyn (7/15); Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx (7/16); Central Park, Manhattan (7/17). Free Indoor Concerts: Center for the Arts, College of Staten Island/CUNY, Staten Island (7/18); Colden Auditorium, Queens College, Queens (7/20). Avery Fisher Hall, Broadway & W. 65th St., 212-875-5656; nyphil.org 92nd Street Y – Lyrics & Lyricists: Sunday in New York: Mel Tormé in Words and Music (6/6-8); 92nd Street Y Community Orchestra - Free Performance (6/7); Jazz Piano at the Y: Dave Brubeck Quartet (6/15); 11th Annual Kathryn W. Stein Memorial Concert (6/16); Jazz Piano Master Class (7/20); Sondheim & Styne (7/21); Piano Jam: With Respect to Oscar (7/23); The Gerry Mulligan Songbook (7/27); It's Jazz, Charlie Brown: The Music of Vince Guaraldi (7/28); Saxophone Summit (7/30). Lexington Ave. & 92nd St., 212-415-5500; 92y.org Radio City Music Hall – The Decemberists (6/10); Andrew Bird (6/18); Incubus (8/4-5); Brain Art Festival 2009 (8/15); Moody Blues (8/20). 1260 Sixth Ave. (50th St.), 212-307-7171; radiocity.com

Regina Opera Company – Faust (6/6, 7, 13, 14). 12th Ave. & 65th St., Brooklyn, 718-232-3555; reginaopera.org Symphony Space – Thalia Follies: Go Fight for City Hall (6/4-6); Frederick Delius 75th Anniversary: A Pagan Requiem (6/4); Tap City Youth Concert (6/6); Eccentrica-Project: Skin Dance Company (6/7); Rebecca J. Carda 2009 Student Piano Recital (6/7); Anthem: Original Hip Hop Music/Dance by NYC Youth (6/11); David Del Tredici’s Brother featuring John Kelly (6/12); Valentina Kozlova’s Dance Conservatory Spring Gala (6/13); Neo Bass Ensemble pays tribute to Jazz Composers (6/13); Rossini’s Il Viaggio a Reims (6/14, 28); ACA Festival: Elections, Transitions, and Refuge (6/17); ACA Festival: Work Songs, Blue States, and the Zukofsky Quartet (6/18); ACA Festival: Shake The Tree/The Kolot Ensemble (6/19); ACA Festival: Summer Suite: Rare Premieres (6/20); ACA Festival: Yizkor, Remembrance (6/20); A Brand New Day (6/20); Bellini’s I Puritani (7/8); Tap City Adult Student & Faculty Showcase (7/9); Tap Youth/Tap Future (7/9); Tap City 2009 (7/10); The Evasion of the Soul Super Hero “Charles Perry” (7/16); New York Choral Society Summer Sings (7/22, 7/29, 8/5, 12, 19, 26); Blaze the Stage Summer ’09 Invitational Showcase (8/8). 2537 Broadway (95th St.), 212-864-5400; symphonyspace.org


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The Town Hall – Spotlight on Tango (6/5); Enrico Macias (6/7); The National Yiddish Theatre - Folksbienne 2009 Annual Gala (6/8); Sandra Bernhard’s only NYC performance of “Without You I’m Nothing: 20th Anniversary” (6/10); The Fellas Live! (6/11); Free for All at Town Hall: Hilary Hahn (6/14); Broadway by the Year 1970 (6/15); Madeleine Peyroux with Bruce Cockburn (6/18); Bebel Gilberto (6/19); Free for All at Town Hall: Emerson String Quartet (6/21); Gordon Lightfoot (6/27); Summer Broadway Festival (7/13, 20, 27). 123 W. 43rd St. (Broadway-Sixth Ave.), 212-997-1003; the-townhall-nyc.org WaMu Theater at Madison Square Garden – Radio Vision Cristiana 25th Anniversary (6/19); Freestyle Extravaganza 4 (6/20); John Edward (7/12); Concierto de la Independencia de Colombia (7/18); CaribbeanFever.com Presents The Extravaganza (8/7); Heaven and Hell (8/25). 4 Pennsylvania Plaza (Seventh Ave. & 32nd St.), 212-465-5800; thegarden.com LIVE AND OUTDOORS! Summertime in New York City means big music in beautiful settings—and often for free. If the Metropolitan Opera or the New York Philharmonic in the park doesn’t do it for you, something here surely will. Here are some of the highlights as of press time; more acts will be announced throughout the summer at the festivals’ respective websites. Check ahead; all subject to change. Central Park SummerStage (Rumsey Playfield, 212-360-2777; summerstage.org): TV on the Radio/Dirty Projectors (6/5); Josh Ritter and The New York Pops (6/12); Smokie Norful/Tye Tribbett & G.A./Ruben Studdard (6/13); Indigo Girls/Matt Nathanson (6/16); Fête de la Musique Yannick Noah/Coralie Clément/Mayra Andrade (6/21); 311/Ziggy Marley/The Expendables (6/25); Istanbulive: The Sounds & Colors of Turkey (6/27); Ledisi/Esperanza Spalding/Jonathan Batiste (6/28); Explosions in the Sky/Constantines (6/30); Oumou Sangare, Les Nubians, Asa (7/5); Juana Molina/Curumin/El G (ZZK) (7/8); Matisyahu/Umphrey’s McGee (7/9); Los Fabulosos Cadillacs/Eric Bobo (7/11); Q-Tip/Chester French/Little Dragon/Benji B (7/18); Alpha Blondy & The Solar System/Lee “Scratch” Perry & Dubblestandart/Subatomic Sound System (7/19); Bettye LaVette/Budos Band/Rhythm Revue with Felix Hernandez (7/24); Jerry Rivera and special guests/N’Klabe (7/25); Ginuwine/Joe/Chico DeBarge (7/26); M. Ward/Mike Watt & Nels Cline (8/1); Béla Fleck/Toumani Diabaté (8/3); The Pedrito Martinez Project (8/5); Boys Noize/Drop the Lime and Special Guests (8/8); Jazmine Sullivan/Chrisette Michele/Jon B. (8/9). Celebrate Brooklyn! (Prospect Park Bandshell, briconline.org/celebrate): Opening Night Gala: David Byrne - “The Music of David Byrne and Brian Eno” (6/8); Goran Bregovic & his Wedding and Funeral Orchestra (6/11); David Rudder/Samantha Thornhill (6/19); Ethel/Gutbucket (6/20); Femi Kuti & Positive Force/Melvin Gibbs’ Elevated Entity (6/25); Blonde Redhead (6/26); Dr. Dog/Phosphorescent/These United States (6/27); MGMT (7/1); Obie Bermudez/Rebel Diaz/Cucu Diamantes (7/2); Streb (7/9); Los Amigos Invisibles/Aterciopelados (7/10); Ezra Jack Keats Family Concert - They Might Be Giants For Kids!/Reader: Claudia Marshall (7/11); Kronos Quartet (7/16); Robert Cray/The Sweet Divines (7/17); African Festival: King Sunny Ade, Mandingo Ambassadors, Abena Koomson, Sing Sing, Yasser Darwish (7/18); Jackson Browne (7/21); Stephen Petronio Co. (7/23); Buckwheat Zydeco/The Holmes Brothers (7/24); Kailash Kher/Electro Morocco (7/25); Burning Spear/Naomi Shelton & The Gospel Queens (7/30); Royal Family: John Scofield, Soulive, Christian Scott, Dumpstaphunk (7/31); Dean & Britta’s 13 Most Beautiful/Crystal Stilts (8/1); Purple Rain Screening & Sing-a-long/Escort (8/6); Grace Potter & The Nocturnals/Deer Tick/The London Souls (8/7); Big Daddy Kane (8/8); TV on the Radio (8/11); Bonnie Raitt & Taj Mahal (8/12); Animal Collective (8/14-15). Toyota Concert Series on “Today” (49th St. & Rockefeller Pl. Free. 6am suggested arrival.): The Dave Matthews Band (6/5); Black Eyed Peas (6/12); Jonas Brothers (6/19); The Fray (6/26); Rob Thomas (7/3); Rascal Flatts (7/10); The All American Rejects (7/17); Katy Perry (7/24); Kings of Leon (7/31); Jason Mraz (8/7); Flo Rida (8/14); Natasha Bedingfield (8/21).

FRUIT SALAD FOR THE SUMMER This is a different kind of fruit: It’s the Fresh Fruit Festival, now in its seventh year, and it has nothing to do with citrus compotes. It’s the nearly month-long (July 9-26) celebration of the arts and culture that champions the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community in song, theater, poetry, dance, and music. Taking place at various venues throughout the city, the festival will highlight an eclectic look at dance, featuring artist Ian ArcherWatters’ comedic rendition of The Swan, a jazz performance at Joe’s Pub, a series of plays and performances presented at the historic Hudson Guild Theater, a variety show at the Lincoln Center Barnes and Noble, and many more events. For additional information, visit freshfruitfestival.com –– RJK

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renovating...The American Wing

At the Met , a new flow to the historic rooms and objects, a courtyard transformed, and an exhibit never-before-seen in public, provide a delightful journey through the American collection. By Karin Lipson

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[ The Hart Room, ca. 1680 ]


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[ Clockwise from top: The Charles Engelhard Court in the process of installation in The New American Wing The Orientation Gallery, which leads to The Hart domicile and 18 other rooms The Verplanck room ]

B

y 17th-century standards, the Ipswich, Mass., tanner Samuel Hart and his family seem to have fared reasonably well: A low-ceilinged, combined cooking-dining-sleeping area—once a part of their circa-1680 home and now the earliest of the newly reopened historic rooms in the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art—includes a canopied bed, a cradle, a nifty chair whose hinged back converts to a tabletop, a large cooking hearth and, oh yes, an electronic touch-screen. That last item, which gives visitors a selection of easily-accessible accounts of the house, its inhabitants, its furniture and other information, was clearly not part of the original Hart probate inventory on which the furnishings are based. But it is certainly an engaging aspect (especially, it’s safe to predict, for children and teenagers) of the American Wing changes effected during a recently-con-

cluded two-year period of construction, renovation and reconfiguring. The second part of a three-phase, $100-million project had begun in 2002 to improve on nearly every section of the American Wing by 2011, the renovation has been, as much as anything, a matter of creating a logical flow of visitor traffic through the wing. “The biggest challenge was creating order, in a building that consisted of a 1924 core” surrounded by a “vast new addition in 1980,” said Morrison H. Heckscher, the chairman of the American Wing. With objects and rooms dispersed over multiple floors in the two structures, he said, visitors would often leave the American Wing after a stop in its lovely, glass-roofed Charles Engelhard Court (site of the famed Tiffany loggia and stained glass windows, and other architectural artifacts), oblivious to the American arts collections exhibited elsewhere.

From the courtyard, “there was no real, inviting view to suggest there was anything else to see,” Mr. Heckscher said. “They would tend to go down the corridor and into the Egyptian Wing.” “Nothing wrong with that,” he added in a Seinfeldian touch, “but that’s not what we want.” Cues to the variety and depth of the American collection now begin right in the courtyard. The greenery of its garden-courtyard days is gone. Large-scale sculptures have been repositioned and installed in freshly coherent groupings on the new, light-hued marble floor. “We transformed a garden court into a sculpture court,” Mr. Heckscher said. Looking up from the Engelhard Court, visitors see a glass-fronted balcony—previously behind a concrete parapet—as well as a newly-constructed mezzanine-level balcony whose own glass front hints at the hundreds of newly exhibited examples of American art pottery on view there. 67


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The 250 vessels, vases and other objects, made between 1876 and 1956, are the promised gift of a collector, Robert A. Ellison, Jr., and have never before been seen in public. Lovers of the field will recognize the names of the greatest American potters and studios (Rookwood and Newcomb, to name two) of the period. Among the highlights, for dedicated follower or curious neophyte alike: The 16 idiosyncratic vessels, with their unlikely folds, droops and pinches, by the famed Mississippian George Ohr (1857-1918), the so-called “Mad Potter of Biloxi.” The upper balcony teems with ceramics, glass, silver and pewter; once separated by medium, they are now all shown together, chronologically, to better trace the development of styles and themes

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from colonial times into the 20th century. There are any number of showstoppers. Just for samplers: the large, 1876 “Bryant vase,” a large silver urn by Tiffany & Company, commissioned by friends of the poet William Cullen Bryant and profusely adorned with decorative motifs, including medallions drawn from his life and works. As for those period rooms, once too-easily overlooked, a new, glass-enclosed elevator connects the first floor to the third, where an orientation gallery leads to the simple Hart domicile; from there, 18 other rooms (11 of them, along with the Hart room, newly renovated) spanning three floors of the wing, take the visitor through the story— newly arranged in historical sequence—of American domestic architecture. That story ends with an

early 20th-century room designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. A final room, from the Manhattan home of John D. Rockefeller, along with the American paintings and sculpture galleries (think Eakins, Sargent, Cassatt, among many others) won’t be on view for another two years But why quibble. Best to heed the words found on a little blue and yellow jar in the Ellison collection: “The world is so full of a number of things/I’m sure we should all be as happy as kings.” Karin Lipson, a former arts reporter and editor for Newsday, is a freelance journalist who writes frequently on the arts for The New York Times. Her last piece in Promenade was on the Valentina exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York.

The Metropolitan Museum 1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street 212-535-7710; metmuseum.org.

[ Left: Bryant Vase, by Tiffany & Company, 1876 Right: Frank Lloyd Wright, Windows for Coonley Playhouse ]

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the vases: [ 1. Gorham; 2. Union Porcelain, 1876; 3. Saturday Evening Girls, 1908; 4. Newcomb Pottery; 5. McLaughlin, 1902; 6. Grueby Faience Company; 7. Roseville, 1905-08; 8. Chelsea Keramic Art Works; 9. George E. Ohr, ca. 1897-1900 ]


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MUSEUMS

Fungus Vitreus Caerulens, Terhi Tolvanen, 2004. Collection of the artist

NEW YORK

BEST IN GLASS Glass and jewelry meet in surprising and inventive ways in the Museum of Arts and Design’s exhibition, GlassWear, featuring highly innovative glass creations by the world’s leading jewelry artists, including Linda MacNeil and Robert Ebendorf (United States), Giampaolo Babetto and Giorgio Vigna (Italy), Otto Künzli and Karl Fritsch (Germany), Terhi Tolvanen (pictured above), Mieke Groot and Ruudt Peters (the Netherlands). On view July 15th through Sept. 20th.

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ONTHETOWN All exhibits are subject to change

Main Building. Fort Tryon Park, 200th St., 212-923-3700; metmuseum.org

American Folk Art Museum – The Treasure of Ulysses Davis (through 9/6); Kaleidoscope Quilts: The Art of Paula Nadelstern (through 9/13); Up Close: Henry Darger (through 9/2009). Closed Mon. $9; students/seniors, $7; 12 & under, free. 45 W. 53rd St., 212-265-1040; folkartmuseum.org

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum – Fashioning Felt (through 9/7); Shahzia Sikander Selects: Works from the Permanent Collection (through 9/7); Design for a Living World (through 1/4); . $15; seniors/students, $10; under 12, free. 2 E. 91st St., 212-849-8400; cooperhewitt.org

American Museum of Natural History – Climate Change: The Threat to Life and A New Energy Future (through 8/16); Extreme Mammals: The Biggest, Smallest, and Most Amazing Mammals of All Time (through 1/3/2010); Frogs: A Chorus of Colors (through 1/3/2010). Open daily. $15; seniors/students, $11; children 2-12, $8.50. Central Park West at 79th St., 212-769-5100; amnh.org

The Drawing Center – FAX (through 7/23); Unica Zürn: Dark Spring (through 7/23). Closed Sun. & Mon. 35 Wooster St. (Grand-Broome Sts.), 212-219-2166; drawingcenter.org

Asia Society and Museum – Asian Journeys: Collecting Art in Post-war America (through 8/9); Yang Fudong: Seven Intellectuals in a Bamboo Forest (through 9/13). Closed Mon. $10; seniors, $7; students, $5. 725 Park Ave. (70th St.), 212-288-6400; asiasociety.org Bronx Museum of the Arts – Intersections: The Grand Concourse at 100 (through 7/20). Closed Mon.-Wed. $5; students/seniors, $3; 12 & under, free; free on Fri. 1040 Grand Concourse (165th St.), 718-681-6000; bronxmuseum.org Brooklyn Museum – Small Wonders from the American Collections (through 6/28); Gustave Caillebotte: Impressionist Paintings from Paris to the Sea (through 7/5); Sun K. Kwak: Enfolding 280 Hours (through 7/5); Light of the Sufis: The Mystical Arts of Islam (6/5-9/6); Yinka Shonibare MBE (6/26-9/20); Magic in Ancient Egypt: Image, Word, and Reality (through 10/18); Reflections on the Electric Mirror: New Feminist Video (through 1/10); Patricia Cronin: “Harriet Hosmer, Lost and Found” (6/5-1/24)From the Village to Vogue: The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith (through 2/21). Closed Mon. & Tues. $8; seniors/students, $4; under 12, free. 200 Eastern Parkway (Washington Ave.), 718-638-5000; brooklynmuseum.org Center for Architecture – New Practices San Francisco (6/4-9/19). Closed Sun. 536 LaGuardia Pl. (Bleecker-W. 3rd Sts.), 212-683-0023; www.aiany.org Chelsea Art Museum – modern modern (through 6/13). Closed Sun. & Mon. $8; students/seniors, $4; under 16, free. 556 W. 22nd St., 212-255-0719; chelseaartmuseum.org China Institute – Noble Tombs at Mawangdui: Art and Life in the Changsha Kingdom, First Century BC-Third Century AD (through 6/7). Open daily. $7; students/seniors, $4; under 12, free. 125 E. 65th St., 212-744-8181; chinainstitute.org The Cloisters – A branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Cloisters are devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. Closed Mon. $20; seniors, $15; students, $10; under 12, free; admission includes Met Museum

Ellis Island Immigration Museum – Open daily. Ellis Island; ferry at Battery Park, 212-363-6307; nps.gov/elis/ Fraunces Tavern Museum – George Washington Portrait Gallery (ongoing). Closed Sun. $4; seniors/children, $3; under 6, free. 54 Pearl St. (Broad St.), 212-425-1778; frauncestavernmuseum.org The Frick Collection – Portraits, Pastels, Prints: Whistler in The Frick Collection (6/2-6/23). Closed Mon. $15; seniors, $10; students, $5; pay-what-you-wish Sun., 11am-1pm. 1 E. 70th St., 212-288-0700; frick.org Grey Art Gallery at NYU – John Wood: On the Edge of Clear Meaning (through 7/18). Closed Sun. & Mon. $3. 100 Washington Square East, 212-998-6780; nyu.edu/greyart The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum – A Year With Children 2009: Selected Works from Learning Through Art (through 8/9); Frank Lloyd Wright: From Within Outward (through 8/23); Learning by Doing (through 8/23); The Sweeney Decade: Acquisitions at the 1959 Inaugural (6/59/2). Closed Thurs. $18; seniors/students, $15; under 12, free. 1071 Fifth Ave. (89th St.), 212-423-3500; guggenheim.org Hispanic Society of America – Arts and cultures of Spain, Portugal, and Latin America. Closed Mon. Free. Audubon Terrace (Broadway btw. 155th & 156th Sts.), 212-926-2234; hispanicsociety.org International Center of Photography – Avedon Fashion: Photographs, 1944–2000 (through 9/6); David Seidner: Paris Fashion, 1945 (through 9/6); John Wood: Quiet Protest (through 9/6). Closed Mon. $12; students/seniors, $8; under 12, free. 1133 Sixth Ave. (43rd St.), 212-857-0000; icp.org Japan Society – KRAZY! The Delirious World of Anime + Manga + Video Games (through 6/14); Buriki: Japanese Tin Toys from the Golden Age of the American Automobile, The Yoku Tanaka Collection (7/9-8/16). Closed Mon. $10; students/seniors, $8; under 16, free. 333 E. 47th St., 212-832-1155; japansociety.org Merchant’s House Museum – This museum is housed in New York City’s only 19th-century family home that is preserved intact. It’s considered one of the finest surviving examples of the

time period. Thurs.-Mon, noon-5pm. 29 E. 4th St. (Lafayette St.-The Bowery), 212-777-1089; merchantshouse.org The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Art of the Korean Renaissance, 1400-1600 (through 6/21); The Pictures Generation, 1974-1984 (through 8/2); Royal Porcelain from the Twinight Collection, 18001850 (through 8/9); The Model as Muse: Embodying Fashion (through 8/9); Francis Bacon: A Centenary Retrospective (through 8/16); Pen and Parchment: Drawing in the Middle Ages (6/2-8/23); Living Line: Selected Indian Drawings from the Subhash Kapoor Gift (through 9/7); Napoleon III and Paris (6/9-9/7); Arts of the Ming Dynasty: China’s Age of Brilliance (through 9/13); Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul (6/23-9/20); African and Oceanic Art from the Barbier-Mueller Museum, Geneva: A Legacy of Collecting (6/2-9/27); Roxy Paine on the Roof: Maelstrom (through 10/25); Augustus SaintGaudens in The Metropolitan Museum of Art (6/3011/15); Japanese Mandalas (6/18-11/29); Raphael to Renoir: Drawings from the Collection of Jean Bonna (through 4/26). Closed Mon. $20; seniors, $15; students, $10; under 12, free. Fifth Ave. & 82nd St., 212-535-7710; metmuseum.org The Morgan Library & Museum – Creating the Modern Stage: Designs for Theater and Opera (through 8/16); Studying Nature: Oil Sketches From the Thaw Collection (through 8/30); Pages of Gold: Medieval Illuminations from the Morgan (6/19-9/23); New at the Morgan: Acquisitions Since 2004 (through 10/18). Closed Mon. $12; seniors/students/children 13-15, $8; 12 and under, free. 225 Madison Ave. (36th St.), 212-685-0008; themorgan.org Museum of American Finance – Four permanent galleries and special-focus temporary exhibitions help visitors understand the potential rewards of low-risk and high-risk investments and explore the history and future of Wall Street. Closed Sun. & Mon. 48 Wall St. (William St.), 212-908-4110; moaf.org Museum of Arts & Design – Elegant Armor: The Art of Jewelry (through 7/5); Gord Peteran: Furniture Meets Its Maker (through 7/26); Object Factory, The Art of Industrial Ceramics (through 9/13); Klaus Moje: Painting With Glass (through 9/20); GlassWear (7/15-9/20). Open daily. $15; students/seniors, $12; under 12, free; Thurs., 6–9pm, pay-what-you-wish. 2 Columbus Cir. (near Eighth Ave. & W. 58th St.), 212-956-3535; madmuseum.org The Museum of Biblical Art – Scripture for the Eyes: Bible Illustration in Netherlandish Prints of the Sixteenth Century (6/5-9/27). Closed Mon. $7; seniors/students, $4; under 12, free. 1865 Broadway (61st St.), 212-408-1500; mobia.org Museum of the City of New York – Amsterdam/New Amsterdam (through 9/27); Dutch Seen (6/10-9/13); Mannahatta/Manhattan (through 10/13). Closed Mon. $9 (free Sun., 10am-noon); seniors/students, $5; under 12, free. Fifth Ave. & 103rd St., 212-534-1672; mcny.org

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The Museum of Modern Art. Gift of the designer

MUSEUMSNEWYORK

DESIGNS FOR THE GREATER GOOD In the middle of the 20th century, our own Museum of Modern Art took a leading role in the definition and dissemination of so-called Good Design, a concept that took shape in the 1930s and emerged with new relevance in the decades following World War II. The new exhibition What Was Good Design? MoMA’s Message 1944–56 (on view through Nov. 30th) features selections from MoMA’s design collection that highlight the movement’s primary values. Iconic pieces include Charles and Ray Eames’ 1948 full-scale model of a chaise longue, pictured here.

Museum of Comic & Cartoon Art – This museum shows a whole array of comic and cartoon art. The works here show the artistic, cultural, and historical impact of what is the world’s most popular art form. Tues-Sun., noon-5pm. $5; 12 & under, free. 594 Broadway (Prince-Houston Sts.), Ste. 401, 212-254-3511; moccany.org Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust – Woman of Letters: Irène Némirovsky and Suite Française (through 8/30). Closed Sat. $10 (free Wed. 4-8pm); seniors, $7; students, $5; 12 & under, free. 36 Battery Pl., 646-437-4200; mjhnyc.org

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Museum of Modern Art – Projects 89: Klara Liden (through 6/8); Into the Sunset: Photography’s Image of the American West (through 6/8); Tangled Alphabets: León Ferrari and Mira Schendel (through 6/15); How to Make a Modern Art Library: Selections from the Éluard-Dausse Collection (through 6/22); The Printed Picture (through 7/13); Compass in Hand: Selections from

The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection (through 7/27); Aernout Mik (through 7/27); Stage Pictures: Drawing for Performance (through 8/24); In Situ: Architecture and Landscape (through 9/14); The Erotic Object: Surrealist Sculpture from the Collection (6/24-1/4); What Was Good Design? MoMA’s Message 1944-56 (through 1/11); Polish Posters 1945-1989 (through 1/11). Closed Tues. $20; seniors, $16; students, $12; 16 & under, free. 11 W. 53rd St., 212-708-9400; moma.org

National Academy of Design Museum and School of Fine Arts – The 184th Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Art (through 6/10); Eleventh Annual Year-End Juried Student Exhibition (6/18-28); Reconfiguring the Body in American Art, 1820–2009 (7/8-11/15). Closed Mon. $10; seniors/students, $5. 1083 Fifth Ave. (89th St.), 212-369-4880; nationalacademy.org

Museum of the Moving Image – Pays homage to the art, history, and technology of film and television, educating the public on its influence in our culture and society. Tues.-Sat., 10am-3pm. $7. 35th Ave. & 36th St., Astoria, Queens, 718-784-0077; movingimage.us

National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution – Identity by Design: Tradition, Change, and Celebration in Native Women’s Dresses (through 9/13); Beauty Surrounds Us (through 3/31). Open daily. Free. U.S. Custom House, 1 Bowling Green (Broadway), 212-514-3700; americanindian.si.edu

Museum of Sex – Sex Life of Robots (ongoing); Action: Sex and the Moving Image (ongoing). Open daily. $14.50; students/seniors, $13.50. 233 Fifth Ave. (27th St.), 212-689-6337; museumofsex.com

Neue Galerie – Brücke: The Birth of Expressionism in Dresden and Berlin, 1905-1913 (through 6/29); Selections from the Permanent Collection: Focus: Oskar Kokoschka (7/16-10/5). Closed Tues. & Wed. $15; students/seniors, $10.


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New Museum of Contemporary Art – The Generational: Younger Than Jesus (through 7/5); Jeffrey Inaba (through 7/19); Ugo Rondinone: Hell Yes! (through 7/19). Closed Mon. & Tues. $12; seniors, $10; students, $8; 18 & under, free. 235 Bowery (Prince St.), 212-219-1222; newmuseum.org New York City Fire Museum – One of the nation’s most important collections of fire-related art and artifacts from the late 18th century to the present. Closed Mon. $5; seniors/students, $2; under 12, $1. 278 Spring St. (Varick-Hudson Sts.), 212-691-1303; nycfiremuseum.org New York City Police Museum – Dedicated to preserving the history of the world’s largest and most famous police force. Closed Sun. $7; seniors/students, $5; under 6, free. 100 Old Slip (Water-South Sts.), 212-480-3100; nycpolicemuseum.org The New-York Historical Society – Landmarks of New York (through 7/9); Abraham Lincoln in His Own Words: An Intimate View of Our Greatest President (through 7/12); Harlem: Photographs of Camilo José Vergara, 1970-2009 (through 7/12); New York Painting Begins: Eighteenth-Century Portraits (through 1/1); Nature and the American Vision: The Hudson River School at the New-York Historical Society (through 3/21). Closed Mon. $10 (free Fri. 6-8pm); seniors, $7; students, $6; under 12, free. 170 Central Park West (77th St.), 212-873-3400; nyhistory.org New York Public Library (Humanities and Social Sciences Library) – Call 212-869-8089 for a recorded announcement of all current exhibitions. Open daily. 42nd St. & Fifth Ave., 212-340-0830; nypl.org New York Public Library for the Performing Arts – Katharine Hepburn: In Her Own Files (6/10-10/10); Diaghilev’s Theater of Marvels:

The Ballets Russes and Its Aftermath (6/26-9/12). 40 Lincoln Center Plaza (Columbus Ave. btw. 63rd & 64th Sts.), 212-870-1630; nypl.org/research/lpa/lpa.html New York Transit Museum – The Future Beneath Us: Eight Great Projects Under New York (through 7/5); The Route of the Dashing Commuter: The Long Island Railroad at 175 (through 9/13); The Triborough Bridge: Robert Moses and the Automobile Age (through 2009). Closed Mon. $5; seniors/children 3-17, $3. The New York Transit Museum Gallery Annex in Grand Central Terminal presents changing exhibitions. Boerum Pl. & Schermerhorn St., Brooklyn, 718-694-1600; mta.info/museum The Noguchi Museum – From Plaster to Stone (through 8/30); Noguchi ReINstalled (6/1710/24). Closed Mon. & Tues. $10 (pay-whatyou-wish first Fri. of the month); students/seniors, $5; under 12, free. A shuttle operates Sat.-Sun. from the Asia Society (70th St. & Park Ave.). 9-01 33rd Rd. (Vernon Blvd.), Long Island City, Queens, 718-204-7088; noguchi.org The Paley Center for Media – A center for the cultural, creative, and social significance of television, radio, and emerging platforms. Closed Mon. $10; seniors/students, $8; under 14, $5. 25 W. 52nd St., 212-621-6600; paleycenter.org

The Rubin Museum of Art – Stable as a Mountain: Gurus of Himalayan Art (through 7/13); Patron and Painter: Situ Panchen and the Revival of the Encampment Style (through 8/17); Nagas: Hidden Hill People of India, Photographs by Pablo Bartholomew (through 9/21); A Collector’s Passion (6/12-11/9). Closed Tues. $10; seniors/students/artists with ID, $7; under 12, free. 150 W. 17th St., 212-620-5000; rmanyc.org Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America – Headquarters of The AmericanScandinavian Foundation. Closed Sun. & Mon. Free. 58 Park Ave. (37th-38th Sts.), 212-879-9779; scandinaviahouse.org The Skyscraper Museum – Closed Mon. & Tues. $5; seniors/students, $2.50. 39 Battery Pl., 212-968-1961; skyscraper.org The Studio Museum in Harlem – Collected. Propositions on the Permanent Collection (through 6/28); Kalup Linzy: If it Don’t Fit (through 6/28); Shinique Smith: Like it Like that (through 6/28); Harlem Postcards (through 6/28); Hurvin Anderson (7/16-10/25); Artists-in-Residence (7/1610/25); Expanding the Walls 2009 (7/16-10/25). Closed Mon. & Tues. $7; seniors/students, $3; under 12, free. 144 W. 125th St. (Lenox Ave.Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd.), 212-864-4500; studiomuseum.org

The Queens Museum of Art – Tarjama/ Translation (through 9/27); Launch Pad Artist Project: Johanna Unzueta (through 9/27); Red Lines Housing Crisis Learning Center (through 9/27). Closed Mon. & Tues. $5; seniors/children, $2.50; under five, free. NYC Bldg. in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Queens, 718-592-9700; queensmuseum.org

The Ukrainian Museum – A Generous Vision: A Major Gift of Works by Mychajlo Moroz (through 9/6); In Full Bloom: The Pysanky of Folk Artist Iryna Bilianska (through 11/29). Closed Mon. & Tues. $8; seniors/students, $6; under 12, free. 222 E. 6th St., 212-228-0110; ukrainianmuseum.org

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Annex - NYC – Galleries featuring personal mementos, New York Rocks, special exhibitions. Closed Mon. $24.50; seniors/military, $22.50; students, $19.50; 4-12, $16.50. 76 Mercer St. (Spring-Broome Sts.), 866-976-2569; rockannex.com

Whitney Museum of American Art – Sadie Benning: Play Pause (through 9/20); Dan Graham: Beyond (opening 6/25). Closed Mon. & Tues. $15 (pay-what-you-wish Fri., 6-9pm); seniors/students, $10. 945 Madison Ave. (75th St.), 800-WHITNEY; whitney.org

RELATIVE STRANGENESS

© AMNH/R. Mickens

1048 Fifth Ave. (86th St.), 212-628-6200; neuegalerie.org

The latest major exhibition to hit the American Museum of Natural History is Extreme Mammals: The Biggest, Smallest, and Most Amazing Mammals of All Time, now on view through Jan. 3rd, 2010. Exploring the sometimes bizarre world of extinct and living mammals, the exhibition features awesome fossils and animals with oversized claws, fangs, snouts, and horns and examines the ancestry and evolution of many different species. Highlights include specimens—from the egg-laying platypus to the recently extinct Tasmanian wolf—and fleshed-out models of extinct forms. Pictured here is the skull fossil of a Cynognathus (“dog jaw”), a cynodont (mammal-like reptile) that lived during the early to middle Triassic period, roughly 230–245 million years ago.

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Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

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STOCK IN TRADE One of the city’s top galleries for fine-art photography, Howard Greenberg Gallery is featuring three stunning exhibits through July 11th: Rebecca Lepkoff: Signs of Life, Hank O’Neal: The Ghosts of Harlem, and Dennis Stock: Altered States (pictured above). A renowned photojournalist, Stock is best known for his photographs of James Dean, and jazz greats like Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday. See listing for hours and location.

NEW YORK

ART GALLERIES All exhibits subject to change Acquavella Galleries, Inc. - 19th-, 20th- & 21st-century master paintings, drawings, and sculptures. Mon.-Fri., 10am-5pm. 18 E. 79th St., 212-734-6300; acquavellagalleries.com Allen Gallery - Emerging and mid-career artists. By apppointment only during summer. 547 W. 27th St., 5th Floor, 917-202-3206; allengallerychelsea.com

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Amsterdam Whitney Gallery - A “vanguard gallery” featuring cutting-edge contemporary artists. Magical Moonlight Meditations - Amy Cohen Banker,

Nathan Rice, Lisa Strassheim; Dreamscapes of Fantasia - Elaine “Angel” Gomer, David Labella, Ralph Vogler; Beyond Moondust & Stardust - J.B. Dule, Sonja Olson, Guy Wilkins; Gateway to Enchanted Reveries - Philip Cantania. Frans Frengen, Ignacio Montano (6/5-7/7); Dioramas of Fluidity - Hugo Aasjord, Rodney Jones, Rafal Wieczorek; Cataclystic Paradigms - Richard Bailey, Marc Cavello, Josef Kursky; Transluminescent Metaphors - Amy Barker-Wilson, Slavko Dujix, Sam Fadhli; Evanescent N-Visions - Ruth Poniarski, Susan Obermeyer Strauss, Giorgio Tuscani (7/10-8/4). Tues.-Sat., 11am-5:30pm. 511 W. 25th St., 212-255-9050; amsterdamwhitneygallery.com Artists Space - One of the first alternative spaces in New York, founded in 1972 to support contemporary artists working in the visual arts. Tues.-Sat., noon-6pm. 38 Greene St., 3rd Floor, 212-226-3970; artistsspace.org


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Bespoke Gallery - Solo exhibitions from emerging artists. Christy Bush - Jackson (through 6/15). Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm. 547 W. 27th St., 6th Floor, 212-695-8201; bespokegallery.net Peter Blum Gallery - Contemporary American and European artists. SoHo: Ruben Ochoa - Collapsed (through 7/24). Chelsea: Chris Marker - “Quelle heure est-elle?”(through 7/21). 99 Wooster St., 212-343-0441; 526 W. 29th St., 212-244-6055; peterblumgallery.com Mary Boone Gallery - Prominent contemporary artists. Fifth Ave.: Patty Chang (through 6/27). 24th St.: Jacob Hashimoto (through 6/27). 745 Fifth Ave. (58th St.); 541 W. 24th St., 212-752-2929; maryboonegallery.com Campton Gallery - Contemporary international and American art. Manel Anoro: Recent Paintings (June); Tracy Sylvester-Harris: Recent Paintings (July); Group exhibition (August). 451 West Broadway, 212-387-0208; camptongallery.com Leo Castelli Gallery - Pop art, conceptual art, and more in the gallery started by the man who first sold Warhol’s soup-can paintings. Other gallery artists have included Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Richard Serra, and many others. Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 18 E. 77th St., 212-249-4470; castelligallery.com CFM Gallery - Figurative fine art paintings, sculptures and original graphics. Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm; Sun., noon-6pm. 112 Greene St. (Spring-Prince Sts.), 212-966-3864; cfmgallery.com Cheim & Read - International contemporary artists. Chantal Joffe (through 6/20); The Female Gaze: Women Look At Women (6/25-9/12). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 547 W. 25th St., 212-242-7727; cheimread.com

SUMPTUOUS SCULPTURE: THE WORK OF RAY KLAUSEN Ray Klausen, a three-time Emmy Award-winning set designer (the Kennedy Center Honors, seven Academy Awards shows), is perhaps best known for some of his Broadway work (including the hits Brooklyn and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof), but he has always been an artist, working in various media. He recently completed two successful one-man shows in Tokyo and has now begun to sell his stylish work here in Gotham. Creating his œuvres in sweeping, graceful planes of stainless steel—polished and sometimes in highgloss colors—Klausen has produced a new series, “Eternity,” that features flowing, organic, and elegant lines and curves. The pieces range in size from a compact foot-and-under to much larger works that are custom-crafted on commission; although his pieces are suited to pedestal and tabletop, many are also ideal for hanging on the wall. His work is priced from $2,000 to $3,500 and can be viewed at sculptor.rayklausen.com, or by private appointment with dealer Massoud Nader, at 212-752-7176. –– RJK

Charles Cowles Gallery - Contemporary art. Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 537 W. 24th St., 212-741-8999; cowlesgallery.com Heidi Cho Gallery - Contemporary fine art from mid-career and emerging artists. Tues.-Fri., 11am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm. 522 W. 23rd St., 212-255-6783; heidichogallery.com CRG Gallery - Well-established and emerging contemporary American and European artists. Angela Dufresne: Modern Times 2 (through 7/2). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 535 W. 22nd St., 212-229-2766; crggallery.com Aaron Faber Gallery - Jewel and watch design of the 20th & 21st centuries. Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-6pm. 666 Fifth Ave. (53rd St.), 212-586-8411; aaronfaber.com David Findlay Jr. Inc. - American 19th- and 20th-century paintings and sculpture. Houghton Cranford Smith (through 6/27). Mon.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm. 41 E. 57th St., 212-486-7660; davidfindlayjr.com Foley Gallery - Contemporary photography, painting, sculpture, and works on paper. Sarah Wilson - Blind Prom (through 7/31); Colby Katz - Beauty Pageants (through 7/31).Tues.- Sat., 11am-6pm. 547 W. 27th St., 5th Floor, 212-244-9081; foleygallery.com Forum Gallery - Modern and contemporary figurative art. Michael Leonard: New Paintings & Drawings (through 6/12). Tues.- Sat., 10am-5:30pm. 745 Fifth Ave. (57th St.), 5th Floor, 212-355-4545; forumgallery.com Gagosian Gallery - Modern and contemporary art, including works by de Kooning, Hirst, Picasso, Ruscha, Serra, Twombly, and Warhol. Madison Ave.: Go Figure (through 6/13). 21st St.: Pablo Picasso - Mosqueteros (through 6/6). 24th St.: Yayoi Kusama (through 6/27). Tues.- Sat., 10am-6pm. 980 Madison Ave. (76th-77th Sts.), 212-744-2313; 555 W. 24th St., 212-741-1111; 522 W. 21st St., 212-741-1717; gagosian.com GINA (Gallery of International Naïve Art) Gallery - Exclusive US location dedicated to the exhibition and sale of international Naïve Art.

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The 2,000-square-foot gallery is the authority and definitive resource of Naïve art and aims to introduce the public to this approachable and accessible genre. The gallery represents more than 275 artists in 25-plus countries from Portugal to Russia. Wed.-Sun., noon-9pm. 454 Columbus Ave. (82nd St.), 212-877-0097; ginagallerynyc.com Gladstone Gallery - Contemporary art. 24th St.: Victor Man (through 6/13). 21st St.: Huang Yong Ping (through 7/31). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 515 W. 24th St., 212-206-9300; 530 W. 21st St.; gladstonegallery.com Howard Greenberg Gallery - Fine art photgraphy. Dennis Stock: Altered States (through 7/11); Hank O’Neal: The Ghosts of Harlem (through 7/11); Rebecca Lepkoff: Signs of Life (through 7/11). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. The Fuller Building, 41 E. 57th St., 212-334-0010; howardgreenberg.com Stephen Haller Gallery - Contemporary paintings. Landscape as Grid - Lloyd Martin, Johnnie Winona Ross (through 6/20). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 542 W. 26th St., 212-741-7777; stephenhallergallery.com Hammer Galleries - 19th- and 20th-century European and American paintings. Mon.-Fri., 9:30am-5:30pm; Sat., 10am-5pm. 33 W. 57th St., 212-644-4400; hammergalleries.com

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Hirschl & Adler Galleries - 18th-, 19th- & 20thcentury American and European paintings, drawings, watercolors, and sculpture. Barbara

Sarah Wilson, Patsy, 2008, 19.5 x 13 inch Pigment print, Edition of 10

Claude Lalanne, Mirror with 15 leaves, 4 candle-rings, 2009. Bronze. 59 x 61 x 7 inches; 150 x 155 x 18 cm

GALLERIESNEWYORK

SURREALISTIC FURNISHINGS Through July 3rd, the work of Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne is on view at the Paul Kasmin Gallery, offering an opportunity to examine the inventive, poetic, and surrealist sculpture the duo have been known for individually and collectively since the 1960s. The exhibition includes Claude’s Choupatte (Très Grande), a fantastical major work combining an oversized cast of a cabbage with the legs of a chicken, and Mirror With 15 Leaves (left), and the late FrançoisXavier’s last planned works, including Singe Avisé (Très Grand). See listing for hours and location.

Kassel: Paintings (through 7/3); Susan Van Campen: Watercolors (through 7/3). Tues.-Fri., 9:30am5:15pm.; Sat., 9:30am-4:45pm. 21 E. 70th St., 212-535-8810; hirschlandadler.com Susan Inglett Gallery - Emerging artists and historical exhibitions. Sarah Charlesworth (through 6/13). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 522 W. 24th St., 212-647-9111; inglettgallery.com Jacobson Howard Gallery - Post-war American and British painting and sculpture. Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 33 E. 68th St., 212-570-2362; jacobsonhoward.com Paul Kasmin Gallery - Contemporary and modern art. Les Lalanne (through 7/3). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 293 Tenth Ave. (27th St.); 511 27th St., 212-563-4474; paulkasmingallery.com Jim Kempner Fine Art - Contemporary and modern master works on paper. Greg Parker: New Paintings (through 6/20). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 501 W. 23rd St., 212-206-6872; jimkempnerfineart.com Alan Klotz Gallery- Fine-art vintage, modern, and contemporary photography. By appointment. 511 W. 25th St., 212-741-4764; klotzgallery.com Knoedler & Company - Accomplished contemporary and sculpture works. Mimmo Rotella: American Icons and Early Work (through 7/31). Tues.-Fri., 9:30am-5:30pm., Sat., 10am-5:30pm. 19 E. 70th St., 212-794-0550; knoedlergallery.com

Kouros Gallery - Modern and contemporary sculpture, painting, photography, and works on paper. Joe Mooney - Monad (6/17-7/17); Despo Magoni - Sky Watch (6/17-7/17). Mon.-Fri., 11am-6pm. 23 E. 73rd St., 212-288-5888; kourosgallery.com L & M Arts - Paintings, drawings, and sculptures by first-generation Abstract Expressionists. John Chamberlain: Early Years (through 6/27). Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm. 45 E. 78th St., 212-861-0020; lmgallery.com Lehmann Maupin Gallery - International contemporary painting, sculpture, photography, video, and new media. 26th St.: Adrianna Varejão Two Paintings and Ten Drawings (through 7/10). Chrystie St.: Hernan Bas - The Dance of the Machine Gun & Other Forms of Unpopular Expression (through 7/10). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 540 W. 26th St., 212-255-2923; 201 Chrystie St., 212-254-0054; lehmannmaupin.com Littlejohn Contemporary - Contemporary modern art and emerging artists. Wed.-Sat., 11am-6pm. 249 E. 32nd St., 212-988-4890; littlejohncontemporary.com Marlborough Gallery - Important contemporary masters. Mon.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm. 40 W. 57th St., 212-541-4900; 545 W. 25th St., 212-463-8634; marlboroughgallery.com Barbara Mathes Gallery - 20th-century, and contemporary American and European masters.


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The GINA (Gallery of International Naïve Art) Gallery is the exclusive exhibitor and seller of the highest-quality naïve art in the U.S. Through June 28th, they will be hosting a general exhibition featuring over 60 different artists from more than 20 countries, including Luis Alvarado (Nicaragua), Ana Maria Guevara (Peru), Nira Lev (Israel), Marisa Norniella (Spain), and Valeriy Parachod (Russia). Pictured here is Belgium’s MarieLouise Batardy’s Tenderness on Cat Street (2009). GINA is open Wed.-Sat., 10am-8pm and Sun., noon-6pm. 454 Columbus Ave. (82nd St.), 212-877-0097; ginagallerynyc.com

Since opening in 2004, Foley Gallery has championed a number of up-and-coming, lesser-known, and under-recognized artists working in the field of contemporary photography, painting, sculpture and works on paper. This summer they host stirring photography exhibitions by Sarah Wilson (whose Patsy (2008) is pictured at left) and Colby Katz, both running through July 31st. A fine-art and documentary photographer, the Floridabased Katz’s work includes her behind-the-scenes shots at child beauty pageants, while the Austinbased Wilson’s rich and colorful portraits were taken at a prom held at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Both exhibits are sure to surprise and leave an indelible impression. Foley Gallery is open Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm. 547 W. 27th St., 5th Floor, 212-244-9081.

The Minimalist Site (through 6/19). Tues.-Fri., 9:30am-6pm.; Sat. 10am-5pm. 22 E. 80th St., 212-570-4190; barbaramathesgallery.com McKenzie Fine Art - Contemporary art. Group exhibtion (6/18-8/8). Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm.; Sat. 11am-6pm. 511 W. 25th St., 212-989-5467; mckenziefineart.com Robert Miller Gallery - Contemporary art. Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 524 W. 26th St., 212-366-4774; robertmillergallery.com Yossi Milo Gallery- Contemporary photography. Andrew Bush: Vector Portraits (through 6/27). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 525 W. 25th St., 212-414-0370; yossimilo.com Pace/MacGill Gallery - 19th-, 20th-century, and contemporary photography. Tod Papageorge: American Sports, 1970 (6/11-8/28). Tues.-Fri., 9:30am-5:30pm; Sat., 10am-6pm. 32 E. 57th St., 9th Floor, 212-759-7999; pacemacgill.com PaceWildenstein - 20th-century art, including works by Calder, Close, LeWitt, Nevelson, Noguchi, Picasso, Rauschenberg, Rothko, Tuttle, and many others. 22nd St.: Alex Katz (through 6/13); Summer show (6/19-7/31). 25th St.: Chuck Close: Selected Paintings and Tapestries (through 6/20); Summer show (6/26-7/31). 57th St.: Tim Hawkinson (through 7/25). 32 E. 57th St., 212-421-3292; 534 W. 25th St., 212-929-7000; 545 W. 22nd St., 212-989-4258; pacewildenstein.com

Max Protetch - Contemporary paintings, drawings, prints, architectural drawings, and sculptures. Oliver Herring: Teens With Masks (through 6/13); Chen Qiulin (June-July). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 511 W. 22nd St., 212-633-6999; maxprotetch.com Ross Art Group - Over 3000 original vintage posters. Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 532 Madison Ave. (54th St.), 4th Floor, 212-223-1525; rossvintageposters.com Perry Rubenstein Gallery - Solo exhibitions by international artists. Summer show (JulyAugust). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 527 W. 23rd St., 212-627-8000; perryrubenstein.com Spanierman Modern - Modern and contemporary paintings, watercolors, works on paper, drawings, and sculpture. Frank Wimberley (through 6/27). Mon.-Sat., 9:30am-5:30pm. 53 E. 58th St., 212-832-1400; spaniermanmodern.com Alan Stone Gallery - Contemporary, mid-career, and emerging artists, plus an expertise in the New York School of Abstract Expressionism (Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Arshile Gorky, John Graham). Peter Anton - Sculptures (through 6/19); Gina Minichino - Paintings (through 6/19). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 113 E. 90th St., 212-987-4997; allanstonegallery.com Frederieke Taylor Gallery - Highly contemporary, conceptual art. Xun Dao, Seeking the Way:

Spiritual Themes in Contemporary China (through 6/27). Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm. 535 W. 22nd St., 646-230-0992; frederieketaylorgallery.com 303 Gallery - Contemporary photography, video projections, film, paintings, and sculpture. 21st St.: Ceal Floyer (through July). 22nd St.: Stephen Shore (through July). Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. 547 W. 21st St.; 525 W. 22nd St., 212-255-1121; 303gallery.com UBS Art Gallery - Contemporary art. A Parallel Presence: National Association of Women Artists, 1889-2009 (through 7/31); Jack Tworkov Against Extremes: Five Decades of Painting (8/13-11/13). Mon.-Fri., 8am-6pm. 1285 Sixth Ave. (52nd St.), 212-713-2885; ubs.com Viridian Artists - Works in the abstract mode, including oils, pastels on paper, prints, and sculptures. Stephen Garmey - Recent Works Wood Sculptures (6/2-6/27); 20th Annual Juried Exhibition (6/30-7/17). Tues.-Sat., 10:30am-6pm. 530 W. 25th St., 4th Floor, 212-414-4040; viridianartists.com Zabriskie Gallery - Group and solo exhibitions with an emphasis on American Modernism, Surrealism and Dada, and French and American photography. Pat Lasch - If You Make a Mistake, Put a Rose on It (through 7/2). Tues.-Sat.,10am-5:30pm. The Fuller Building, 41 E. 57th St., 4th Floor, 212-752-1223; zabriskiegallery.com

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REAL ESTATENEW YORK

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living near Lincoln Center... ...where world-class performing artists and the people who love them are neighbors By Diane Mehta

anhattan's cultural heart pulses throughout the 60s on the West Side, an area once made famous by the gang rivalry depicted in West Side Story, the Leonard Bernstein-scored musical set in 1950s New York. A massive urban renewal project in the 1960s tore down those tenements to make way for the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, home to many of the world’s top performing arts companies and now celebrating its 50th anniversary with its own architectural transformation. Buy here and you're buying into a cultural scene, not just a neighborhood. Dan Danielli, a senior vice president at Halstead Property, says there's a higher

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density of artists and performing artists here than anywhere else in the city, citing Spanish tenor PlĂĄcido Domingo, the Metropolitan Opera's general manager Peter Gelb and music director James Levine, pianist Yevgeny Kissin and violinist Itzhak Perlman as residents. Many Europeans, performing artists, conductors, and opera singers who appear at Lincoln Center all claim a pied-Ă -terre here. Lincoln Center high-rises tend to be condo developments, built in the last few decades. Visually, that means sleek glass-box apartments. That's exactly what you get at The Element, a sparkling new condo at 555 W. 59th Street with floor-to-ceiling views. Residents in the 186 plush units on 35 floors will find stellar amenities: a glass-enclosed atrium-

[ Left: The Element on West 59th Street; Above: living and dining at The Element ]

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style pool, whirlpool and kids' pool, saunas, massage treatment rooms and yoga studios, and 12,000 square feet of landscaped outdoor space. Prices start at $1.26 million for a one-bedroom to a penthouse for $5.2 million. For sale at $3.25 million is a 3bedroom corner unit on the 32nd floor, facing northwest to a view of the George Washington Bridge from the balcony. The curvy interior spans 1,790 square feet, and sports 9 ½ foot ceilings, a kitchen outfitted in Italian cabinetry, a Sub Zero refrigerator and Bosch oven. A similar glass-centric design graces a $3.595 million penthouse at The Copley, a 1985 white-glove tower at 2000 Broadway and 68th Street. The 3-bedroom, 3-bath unit spans 2000 square feet, with dramatic Manhattan views. It too has a pool, gym, and garden. One owner, says Danielli, says it's seven minutes from her apartment to her seat at the Metropolitan Opera. The area has always been posh, but it once felt more artsy than moneyed. When 15 Central Park West and the monolithic Time Warner Center went up, they raised the profile of the neighborhood considerably – giving it a 21st-century edge. Fifteen Central Park West – one of the most prestigious new addresses in Manhattan – was designed by Robert A. M. Stern, Dean of the Yale School of Architecture. Its 200 units are spread across two towers rising 23 and 44 floors, and it comes loaded with a 14,000-square-foot fitness center, a 75-foot pool illuminated by a skylight, a plush private screening room, a tasteful wood-paneled private library, and 30 private climate-controlled wine rooms and a tasting area. An active group of buyers are Asian and Russian investors, who tend to buy second or third homes here, says Mitchell Speer, a senior vice president at Corcoran. These days, unit prices have softened by 15%. But for sale at $4.6 million is a 1-bedroom with two full granite baths outfitted with Italian-imported Calcutta marble. The apartment overlooks the building's leafy motor court and pool. It spans 1,292 square feet, with 10-foot ceilings throughout, crown molding, and individually controlled thermostats for air-conditioning and heating in each room. A convertible guest area off the kitchen includes a custom-built Murphy bed.

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Both buildings have become a magnet for celebrities, notes Vera Jones, vice president at Prudential Douglas Elliman, who says Forbes 400 billionaires, rock stars, some of the surviving hedge fund tycoons, Hollywood directors and producers, and celebrities like Ricky Martin, Denzel Washington, and Sting populate the buildings. They don't have to go far to eat. The Time Warner Center is packed with celebrity chef-driven restaurants, including Marc Murphy’s Landmarc, Masa Takayama's Masa, and Thomas Keller's FrenchAmerican phenomenon Per Se, considered by many to be one of the best restaurants in the world. Nearby is Picholine, famous for its cheese and game; Jean-Georges, haute, Asian-inspired and French; and Daniel Boulud's Bar Boulud, a bistro across from Lincoln Center. Artsier types congregate at the Italian Café Fiorello's and Café Des Artistes, bedecked with its famed murals of nymphlike women frolicking in the woods. Living here means it’s just minutes from your door to any of the world’s finest arts venues. The New York Philharmonic, led by the inimitable Lorin Maazel and soon his successor Alan Gilbert, makes its home at Avery Fisher Hall, and at the Metropolitan Opera you'll hear the greatest voices of the world and see some of the most theatrical and cutting-edge productions. The American Ballet Theatre is in residence at the Met in June and July. At the David H. Koch Theater, the New York City Opera performs, as well as the New York City Ballet. The newest addition is "Jazz at Lincoln Center" – located in the Time Warner Center – run by jazz impresario Wynton Marsalis. The Vivian Beaumont Theater stages plays and musicals – right now the critically acclaimed revival of South Pacific is playing, and the Mitzi Newhouse Theater offers lively seasons of off-Broadway style productions. The Walter Reade Theater screens indie, foreign, and classic films by the Film Society of Lincoln Center. And of course, the summer standards: the Lincoln Center Festival and Mostly Mozart. What a world to wake up to. Diane Mehta writes about real estate, travel, and other topics for The New York Times, Worth, Fast Company, Elle Decor, and other national publications. Her last piece in Promenade was on the Upper East Side.

[ The Copley at 2000 Broadway and 68th Street ]

[ The nighttime view from The Copley ]

[ A living room at 15 Central Park West ]

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on the QUEEN MARY 2:

history, luxury, culture, and advanced computer courses By Ruth J. Katz

[The Queen Mary 2, steaming out of NewYork harbor ]

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This fabulous ship harkens back to a bygone era… but is ever so updated for the 21st-century traveler would be delighted!" So gushed—at least apocryphally—Queen Mary, wife of England’s King George V, in 1934 or thereabouts, when the good King was told that the Cunard Line would like to name its newest ocean liner “after England’s greatest Queen.” Legend has it that the delegation that visited the royal was seeking his blessing to christen her the Queen Victoria, but Mary assumed that the description referred to her—and graciously accepted what she misconstrued as an offer for an eponymous ship! Whether factual, it initiated a series of new queenly appellations for Cunard’s glorious ocean-going vessels, which had always borne majestic-sounding names, ending in “ia,” like Carpathia, Lusitania, and Mauretania. That original Queen Mary was retired in 1967 and is currently a hotel and museum in Long Beach, California. But her successor and namesake, the $800-million-dollar Queen Mary 2, or QM2, is the first liner built in over 40 years, and carries on the regal tradition of transatlantic crossings (her maiden voyage was in 2004). She is without question the world’s most imposing ocean liner. Put the Chrysler Building (1,046 feet tall) on its side next to the QM2 (1,132 feet, stem to stern) and the liner outflanks the landlubber skyscraper by 86 feet; she sports 17 decks, 14 of which are for passengers. A jigsaw puzzle of over 300,000 pieces of steel, she is home to the world’s largest floating library (over 8,000 volumes) and its only maritime planetarium; she has 5 swimming pools, a driving range, a putting green, a jogging track (and, O.K., the clichéd shuffleboard and table tennis), a kennel, and even a Harrod’s outpost. Call her a cruise ship within earshot of any of her more than 1,200 crew, and you’re likely to get your wrist kindly rapped by a white-gloved hand. She is a liner, an imposing liner, capable of slicing through tranquil or treacherous seas like a sleek cigarette boat or agile dolphin. She can chug along at 30 knots (a not-so-speedy 34 miles an hour, but on board, it seems swift), and despite

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[ The entrance to the library ]

a gross tonnage of over 150,000 tons, she’s delicate, even when her deep A note bellows from her signature red-and-black whistle-funnel. (That horn is a vestige of the original Mary, and its basso profundo can be heard for ten miles.) Last fall, the QM2 logged her 100th voyage across the pond, during which I had the opportunity to “road test” a westbound (Southampton/New York) crossing, in a gracious Princess Grill stateroom, an experience I would repeat in a heartbeat. Yes, it’s true sailing might not be for everyone, but if you like to: • Read in a singularly unique atmosphere—like how about on-deck, in a classic chaise, with a smart tartan blanket wrapped around your feet, basking in glorious sunshine, with a mild breeze caressing your cheek; • Eat in any of ten top-flight restaurants, one of which is under the artful culinary whisk of renowned chef Todd English (his famed Truffled Potato Loveletters should not be missed); • Swirl your own frozen, dairy-delight treat in a cone, out of one of those nifty machines with the dispensing levers, anytime, 24/7 (I particularly liked doing this!); • Take enrichment courses and classes (I brushed up on Advanced Excel), or an acting workshop with students from London’s Royal Academy of Dramatic Art; • Seek out another kind of “enrichment” course in the casino; • Attend interesting auctions, lively discussion groups, or drink in fun lectures, like "Forensics for Everyone: Let's Bump Off Granny”; • Check out the exhibit (take the audio tour) throughout the ship, called “Maritime Quest,” highlighting fascinating bits of Cunard (and world) history, punctuated by captivating old-time photos; • Luxuriate in a state-of-the-art, 20,000-square-foot Canyon Ranch spa (Yes, I dragged myself there a few times);

[ The Winter Garden, a popular public space ]

[ One of the five pools Top: The QM2 has shuttled over 500 pets across the ocean ]

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[ Top: A Queens Grill suite ] [ From bottom left: The Royal Court Theater A typical computer classroom The Todd English dining room ]

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• Watch movies, stage shows, and assorted live entertainment in the ship’s theaters, lounges, and nightclub; • Sip elegant afternoon tea, accompanied by finger sandwiches, scones, and other tantalizing delices. (There are eight bakers on board who sure know their way around puff pastry; keeping about 2,600 passengers in scrumptious carbs requires nearly 8,000 industrial-size bags of flour, that, if stacked up, would be taller than five Eiffel Towers!) So, if you like to do any of those things, you could assuredly get accustomed to ocean-going travel and being treated like a celeb…speaking of which, the QM2’s literature boasts that it has hosted more boldface names than any ship, from Elton John to Nelson Mandela, including Gotham’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, to name but a few. My voyage was filled with little vestiges that reminded me that it wasn’t that long ago that steam travel was the norm: popping corks from bubbly and streamers and confetti soared skyward…royalty and commoners alike dressed to the nines for nightly black-tie dinners, after which the smart set would boogie to the big bands…café society arrived with their steamer trunks and lap dogs. Today, there are touches that are pitch-perfect, evoking that bygone era: I loved the captain’s daily noontime speakerbroadcasts, always sending me to a map, announcing things like, “We’re 625 miles astern of the Azores,”


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the latest from london In the celebrated 1944 musical, On the Town, we learn that “The Bronx is up and the Battery's down.” Well, we could say the same about the exchange rate between the pound sterling and the American dollar: Their relative values scoot around a monetary graph skittishly, but for Yanks, there’s not been a more favorable time to swap greenbacks for quid than the past few months. So before your crossing, carve out a few days’ time to first visit London before heading to Southampton. We stayed at the charming Stafford Hotel (thestaffordhotel.co.uk), tucked away discreetly, with its picture-postcard-perfect 17th-century courtyard in genteel St. James’s. It’s just a stone’s throw from Clarence House, home to Harry and Wills, so don’t be surprised if you spot them at the hotel’s renowned American Bar—an institution, decorated in all manner of memorabilia from obliging, imbibing guests. If you’re a hotel regular you’ll get a posh velour robe with your name embroidered on it, kept on premises for you. But, even if you’re not, you’ll find countless welcoming touches—like the personalized stationery and business cards, announcing to the world that the Stafford is “My residence whilst in London.” Do not miss dining in the hotel’s 350-yearold wine cellar, stocked with nearly 20,000 bottles. [ White-glove service at afternoon tea ]

or that we were “crossing the Grand Banks and the water depth is a mere 200 feet,” or that we were “41 degrees, 21minutes north, 65 degrees, 45 minutes west of” some nautical landmark I’d never heard of. I enjoyed the Daily Programme (yes, so English) that arrived nightly with turn-down service, to keep me apprised of the next day’s “big doings.” And the notice on my TV screen five out of my six nights on board, which politely instructed: “Please remember to retard your clocks & watches by one hour before retiring.” (Yes, so English.) This is perhaps the best perk of a westward crossing—with six nights on board and a five-hour time difference, you literally get five 25-hour days! Assuredly something to make you smile. And speaking of smiling, you’ll find yourself grinning cheerfully during your entire journey. I realized I hadn’t stopped feeling heady and happy from the moment I got my sea legs. I spotted a sign when I toured the galley of the Britannia restaurant: Just to the right of the egress leading into the dining room, a blue-paper placard with yellow lettering was posted as a gentle reminder to the wait staff, which stated: “This is a Happy Area. Let’s SMILE.” The entire ship is a happy area and you’d be hard-pressed to feel anything but buoyant to take a wondrous and worldly voyage like this one…and bittersweet to see it end. On the last night, nearly everyone woke up to experience a (perhaps) once-in-a-lifetime event at 4:30 a.m.—sailing under the VerrazanoNarrows Bridge, with a mere ten-foot clearance. By 8 a.m., it was time to disembark, and I had to then encourage myself to consider that terra firma might also be a “happy area,” but not as evocative as the one I was leaving.

Nearby, on Piccadilly is the Campo Marzio (campomarziodesign.it) boutique, with fun and funky Italian writing papers and adorable pens—the Bijoux Collection is “discreetly” studded with rhinestones. Check out: Artisanal items, from around the world at Few and Far (fewandfar.net); very cool fashion at Matches (matchesfashion.com); for interesting home furnishings, visit Gordon Watson, Ltd. (gordonwatson.co.uk); and for sure-to-please gifts (from mugs to make-up kits), go to the eclectic Lisa Stickley shop (lisastickleylondon.com). A five-minute walk away is the superbly renovated Albemarle dining room—with its stunning wooden paneling and serene atmosphere— in the celebrated Brown’s Hotel (brownshotel.com), where the fare might include roasted fillet of cod with braised Savoy cabbage, wild boar bacon, flavored with native beer, Innis & Gunn. We’re mad, too, for the sweets and confections from the petite, jewel-box-like chocolatier, Cocomaya (cocomaya.com). For sybarites: We love the fragrance shop Les Senteurs (lessenteurs.com) that has hard-to-find scents from around the world; the Dorchester Hotel’s (thedorchester.com) extraordinarily beautiful and just-perfect spa is opening as we speak; and if you simply want a facial to take your jet lag away, visit Amanda Lacey (amandalacey.com) on elegant Walton Street. No stay in London is complete without tea, so cozy up to the chic Metropolitan Hotel (metropolitan.como.bz) for a slightly-more-healthy version, where flour substitutes, low-fat crème fraîche, fresh fruit purées, and olive oil are used to create tasty delicacies. –RJK For more info, visitlondon.com

[ thinking of sailing?] This year, the QM2 will make 25 regular transatlantic crossings, in addition to other exotic trips (including some maiden ports of call) around the Mediterranean, the North Sea, and the Caribbean. Crossings began in mid-April and will continue to mid-November, starting from as little as $945 (for an inside cabin) to about $4,300 for Princess Grill accommodations, and range up to $25,000 for the ship’s Grand Deluxe Apartment. (All prices are per person.) For additional information: 1-800-7-CUNARD and cunard.com.

[ The cozy courtyard of the Stafford Hotel, with the Carriage House on the left ]

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SNAP, CRACKLE & THE POPS On the 4th of July, light and thunder will roar over Manhattan as the 33rd annual Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks burst into the night sky. As always, the New York Pops will provide the score, and the best places to view them are in Manhattan along the Hudson River from 24th Street to 50th Street (access at 23rd, 38th, and 42nd Streets), and downtown from the ferry terminal to Pearl Street. For more info, call 212-494-4495.

SIGHTSEEING Apollo Theater – Harlem’s world-famous showplace offers tours seven days a week, as well as the Apollo Amateur Night every Wednesday at 7:30pm. 253 W. 125th St. btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves., 212-531-5337; apollotheater.org Battery Park – The row of cannons that once defended New York from invasion and gave this park its name are long gone now, but what remains is a pleasant open space on the water, a popular lunch spot for office workers from the nearby Financial District. The view of the harbor, and of a group of monuments recalling New York’s maritime and commercial history, is unparalleled. Battery Place & State St. (foot of Broadway); batteryparkcity.org

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Bike and Roll NYC – Bike the Hudson River Greenway and return by ferry; see the Statue of Liberty, Brooklyn Bridge, South Street Seaport and more. Huge variety of bikes and accessories; guided tours. Pier 84, Hudson River Park, W. 44th St. &

the Hudson River, 866-736-8224, 212-260-0400; bikeandroll.com BODIES...The Exhibition – Housed in the recently refurbished Exhibition Centre at the South Street Seaport, this striking exhibit showcases real human bodies, giving visitors the opportunity to see themselves in a fascinating way like never before. Both captivating and edifying, it unveils the many complex systems of organs and tissues that drive every aspect of our daily lives and unite us all as humans. Exhibition Centre at the South Street Seaport, 11 Fulton St., 888-9BODIES; bodiestheexhibition.com Brooklyn Botanic Garden – 52 carefully tended, intensively planted acres of flora and exotica, including a carefully reproduced Japanese garden and one of the largest public rose collections in America. Upcoming events include: Spring Gala (6/9); Gallery Exhibition: Wicked Plants: Prints by Briony Morrow-Cribbs (through 9/6).

Tues.-Fri., 8am-6pm; Sat.-Sun., 10am-6pm. $8 (free all day Tues. & Sat. 10am-noon); $4 (seniors/students); free (under 12). 1000 Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718-623-7200; bbg.org Brooklyn Bridge – At 125 years old, it remains one of the world’s most spectacular monuments to progress and human industry. Its broad pedestrian walkways afford an unsurpassed view of lower Manhattan. But no sight is more impressive than the bridge itself—nearly 6000 feet long, 272 feet high, and reinforced by four steel cables, each composed of 5700 wires. East side of City Hall Park Carnegie Hall – Learn about the story of Andrew and Louise Carnegie, hear how the Hall was saved from demolition in 1960, and experience a century-long performance tradition that has showcased the world’s finest artists from Tchaikovsky to Mahler, from Horowitz to Callas to Bernstein—even Judy Garland and the Beatles.


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Tours are offered seven days a week, as schedule permits; call ahead for details. 881 Seventh Ave. at 57th St., 212-903-9765; carnegiehall.org The Cathedral of St. John the Divine – Set on a 13-acre site along with five surrounding buildings, the world’s largest Gothic cathedral and seat of the Episcopal Diocese of New York––begun in 1892 by architects Heins and LaFarge, and still considered a work-in-progress––is an awesome structure. Some 12 stories high and, at 603 feet, longer than two football fields, it can seat 6,000, plus another 2,000 standing, and attracts some 500,000 yearly visitors. A magnificent blend of Romanesque and Gothic architecture, the Cathedral’s structure is made entirely out of Maine granite and Indiana limestone, carved and set on site. Be sure to enjoy the park and garden areas. Tours can be arranged by calling 212-932-7347. 1047 Amsterdam Ave. (112th St.), 212-316-7540; stjohndivine.org Central Park (centralparknyc.org) – Belvedere Castle (79th St. south of the Great Lawn, 212-772-0210) - This famed, whimsical landmark is within sight of the Delacorte Theatre (summer home of the Public Theater/New York Shakespeare Festival.) The Henry Luce Nature Observatory at Belvedere Castle is a permanent interactive exhibit focusing on how to observe, record, and identify the plants and wildlife that exist in Central Park’s rich and diverse natural habitats. Bethesda Terrace (mid-Park at 72nd St.) - Reconstruction has restored the Victorian stonework and steps to the acre-sized esplanade. Carousel (mid-Park at 64th St., 212-879-0244) - Nostalgic turn-of-the-century merry-go-round open daily, weather permitting. Central Park Walks and Talks (212-794-6564) Subjects ranging from geology to bird-watching to astronomy, ecology, and park history make for lively free weekend walking tours of the Park. Central Park Conservancy staff and volunteers, as well as Urban Park Rangers of the City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation lead the tours. Central Park Zoo (Fifth Ave. btw. 63rd & 66th Sts., 212-439-6500; centralparkzoo.com) From a steamy rain forest to an icy Antarctic penguin habitat, the zoo features natural tropical, temperate, and polar environments with dozens of fascinating animals, from leafcutter ants to polar bears, plus monkeys, sea lions, and cute penguins. Open daily; call for hours. The Charles A. Dana Discovery Center in Central Park (110th St. & Lenox Ave., 212-860-1370) provides year-round environmental education and visitors’ programs. Free workshops, performances, and events highlight the beauty of Central Park and the vitality of its surrounding neighborhoods. Birdwatching, fishing, ecology, and horticulture explorations are just a few of the family and youth activities available. The Conservatory Garden (Fifth Ave. near 105th St.) - A lush and dazzling six-acre garden. The Dairy (mid-Park at 65th St., 212794-6564) - The main visitor information center, set in a vintage Victorian Chalet. Pick up a map or a calendar, and enjoy the gift shop. Horse-andCarriage Rides (212-736-0680) wait on the Central Park So./59th St. side of the Park. Sheep Meadow (66th to 69th Sts. on the west side of the park) is a lush, 15-acre quiet zone open for passive play and skyline admiring. Strawberry Fields (71st

to 74th St. near Central Park West) - A 2.5-acre International Garden of Peace dedicated to the memory of John Lennon. Swedish Cottage Marionette Theatre (enter at Central Park West & 81st St., 212-988-9093) - Shows for the general public, including groups of 10 or more. Call for current schedule. Tisch Children’s Zoo (Fifth Ave. btw. 64th & 65th Sts., 212-439-6500) - This wildlife center echoes and reinforces the pastoral landscape of Central Park by creating a rustic Enchanted Forest with soft paths and native plantings. Youngsters will love the bewitching area, which suddenly unfolds into a magical place filled with birds flying freely overhead, contained in a virtually invisible net suspended in the trees, and a petting zoo. Victorian Gardens (212-982-2229; victoriangardensnyc.com), a family-entertainment center with handcrafted rides for children 2-12, interactive games and activities, clowns, balloon sculptors and face painters, and other amusement park classics, takes over Wollman Rink through 9/13. Central Park Bike Tours and Rentals – Discover Central Park by bike on the original Central Park Bike Tour. This 2-hour leisurely tour is a sure fire way to see all the sights and secrets. A nice combination of exercise and sightseeing. SBR Multisports Shop, 203 W. 58th St., 212-541-8759; centralparkbiketours.com

Chrysler Building – Architect William Van Alen’s magnificent Art Deco skyscraper (1930), lavished with stainless steel frills, ornate stonework, and figures and thematic motifs, topped by the distinctive illumination of 480 lights that can be seen from all over the city and are an integral part of the city’s famous skyline. While not open to the public, the Chrysler Building remains one of the world’s finest examples of 1930s Art Deco architecture and the second-tallest building in the city. 405 Lexington Ave. at 42nd St. Circle Line Sightseeing Cruises – Take in the grandeur of New York and see spectacular views of Manhattan as knowledgeable guides point out the famous landmarks. There are many cruises to choose from, for every type of traveler: the classic 3-hour Full-Island Cruise; the 2-hour SemiCircle Cruise; the 75-minute Liberty Cruise (May-Oct.); the romantic 2-hour Harbor Lights Cruise; plus special holiday cruises. The 4th of July Cruise features a close-up view of Lady Liberty as the fireworks light up the night sky with a live DJ and food and drink. The Beast’s 30-minute thrill ride starts up again in May and runs 9/30. Pier 83, W. 42nd St. & 12th Ave., 212-563-3200; circleline42.com CityPass – With CityPass you have access to landmarks such as the Empire State Building Observatory; the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA); the American Museum of Natural History; Circle Line Sightseeing Cruise for views of the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, bridges; and much more. All at one low price. Tips, location and transportation information, as well as discount offers at restaurants. 888-330-5008; citypass.com/city/ny CitySights NY – See New York from top-seatingonly double-decker buses with unobstructed views of NYC attractions, neighborhoods, and places of interest. Buses are furnished with state-of-the-art sound systems and entertaining urban-storytellers who offer interesting facts and tales about all of the city’s famous faces and places. They also feature combination tickets, day trips, and more. They offer tours in four languages (Italian, French, German, and Spanish) by way of an audio headset that plugs into a player at each seat. 212-812-2700; citysightsny.com

SONGS OF SUMMERSTAGE A popular summertime tradition is Central Park’s SummerStage, which hosts free concerts by some of the biggest names in music, dance, and the arts. Highlights this year include TV on the Radio, Béla Fleck, Mingus Dynasty Quintet, and Morphoses/The Wheeldon Company with Martha Wainwright. See our Performing Arts listings for more information.

Empire State Building – From the Observatory on the 86th floor, reached by express elevator in less than a minute, Manhattan is an unforgettable spectacle day or night. You’ll enjoy the panoramic view, which, on a clear day, reaches 80 miles in each direction. Visitors may also enjoy the free changing exhibits in the lobby. Tickets to the 102nd floor observatory sold only upon arrival. Daily, 8am-2am; last elevator at 1:15. $20; $18 (seniors, 12-17); $14 (6-11). 350 Fifth Ave. (34th St.), 212-736-3100; esbnyc.com Grand Central Terminal – This international landmark masterpiece—built in the Beaux Arts style, between 1903–13, by Warren & Wetmore— boasts a huge, dramatic sunken central room, lit by huge windows and ornamented by a whimsically designed ceiling depicting the constellations of the

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zodiac and a nostalgic information kiosk topped by an old clock set in the center of the main floor. Join the one-hour walking tours, Wed. at 12:30 pm, sponsored by the Municipal Art Society; call 212-935-3960. 42nd St & Park Ave., 212-532-4900; grandcentralterminal.com Gray Line Sightseeing Tours – Daily tours by open-top deluxe double-decker buses & luxury coaches. Classic New York Tour includes a roundtrip ferry ticket to the Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island, a ticket to the South Street Seaport Museum, a ticket to the Empire State Building Observatory & the ALL LOOPS TOUR, a 2-day ticket hop-on & off w/ 50+ stops from Times Square & Broadway to Harlem to Brooklyn, & Night Tours. $25-$112. 777 Eighth Ave. btw. 47th & 48th Sts.; PABT, 42nd St. & Eighth Ave.; Times Square, Broadway btw. 46th & 47th Sts., 800-669-0051; newyorksightseeing.com Harlem Spirituals/New York Visions – Explore Harlem with Gospel tours on Sun. and Wed. & the evening soul food & jazz tours Mon., Thurs., and Sat.; New York Visions uncovers the hidden treasures of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Brooklyn. 690 Eighth Ave. (43rd-44th Sts.), 212-391-0900; harlemspirituals.com Helicopter Flight Services Tours – See NYC from above the turmoil of its streets. They offer 2 long helicopter tours that include the Statue of Liberty, NY Harbor, the Chrysler Building, Central Park, Columbia University, the George Washington Bridge, Yankee Stadium & the Financial Center. They also offer customized tours of the city & hourly rates. Weekdays: Downtown Heliport (Pier 6 & the East River); Sundays: VIP Heliport (W. 30th St. & Twelfth Ave.)., 212-355-0801; heliny.com Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum – The renovated museum complex includes the 900-footlong aircraft carrier with seven full decks and four theme halls; the guided missile submarine Growler; and an extensive aircraft collection including the A-12 Blackbird, the fastest plane in the world, and the British Airways Concorde, the fastest commercial aircraft in the world. Experience newly opened areas of the ship, new multimedia presentations and exhibit collections, interactive educational stations, recently restored historic aircraft collection and a brand new state-of-the-art public pier. Pier 86, W. 46th St. & 12th Ave., 212-245-0072; intrepidmuseum.org Liberty Helicopter Tours – Six different tours in modern jet helicopters. Reservations required for 6 or more passengers. Downtown Manhattan Heliport (Mon.-Sat.), Pier 6 & the East River; VIP Heliport (open daily), W. 30th St. & Twelfth Ave., 212-967-6464; libertyhelicopters.com

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Madame Tussauds New York – A chance for an up-close-and-personal look at nearly 200 famous faces, from the Dalai Lama to Madonna, Albert Einstein to Joe DiMaggio. The famed Madame Tussauds wax museum of London has a spectacular NYC version in Times Square that’s become one of the city’s must-see sights. New York and world

notables from film, television, music, politics, history and sports are represented in themed displays. Open 365 days a year from 10am. $35; $32 (seniors); $28 (4-12). 234 W. 42nd St. (Seventh-Eighth Aves.), 800-246-8872; nycwax.com Madison Square Garden All-Access Tour – The one-hour guided tour features backstage and onstage at the Garden, the locker rooms, dressing rooms, and more. Group discounts are available. Tours operate daily, approximately every half-hour: Mon.-Sat., 10am-3pm; Sun., 11am-3pm. $17; under 12, $12. Group and student rates also available. 4 Pennsylvania Plaza (Seventh Ave. & 32nd St.), info: 212-465-5800; groups: 212-465-6080; thegarden.com/about/all-access-tour.html Manhattan by Sail – Hop aboard the Clipper City, NYC’s largest tall ship, as it unfurls its massive sails for a tour through NY Harbor. The best and closest views you can get of the Statue of Liberty, the Brooklyn Bridge, Ellis Island and the NYC skyline. Daily departures at 10am, 12:30, 3 & 7pm. $39/adult; $17/child. Pier 17, South Street Seaport, 212-619-0907; 800-544-1224; manhattanbysail.com Manhattan Helicopter Sightseeing Tours – A one-of-a-kind sightseeing tour experience. The 15-minute sightseeing tour flies along the Hudson and East Rivers as well as directly over Manhattan. Tours feature aerial views of the Empire State Building, Times Square, Central Park, the Statue of Liberty, and more. Reservations required. Wall Street/Downtown Manhattan Heliport, Pier 6 at the East River, 212-845-9822; flymh.com My Kind of Town New York – Private and personalized tours of New York City in Mercedes Benz SUVs (1 to 6 guests). Larger groups accommodated. 866-NY1-TOUR; 212-754-4500; mykindoftown.com NBC Universal Store / Studio Tour – Stroll through the halls of NBC, the NBC History Theatre, and the studios of some of NBC’s most popular shows, including “Saturday Night Live,” “The Today Show,” and others. Tours run every 15-30 minutes, seven days a week. Reservations recommended. The NBC Universal Store is open Mon.-Sat., 8am-7pm; Sun., 9am-6pm. 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 49th St. btw. Fifth & Sixth Aves., 212-664-3700; nbcuniversalstore.com The New York Botanical Garden – A museum of plants offering a variety of gardens and collections and events, courses and exhibitions, year-round. Upcoming events include: Wine and Roses (6/5, 12, 19); Farmers Market (6/17-11/14); The Edible Garden (6/27-9/13). Bronx River Parkway (Exit 7W at Fordham Rd.), The Bronx, or by Metro-North Railroad to Botanical Garden Station, 718-817-8700; nybg.org OnBoard Tours – NYC’s most comprehensive 51/2-hour tour combines driving and short walks with a ferry cruise past the Statue of Liberty. Stops include the World Trade Center site, Rockefeller Center, and the Empire State Building. The threehour Discover Uptown: Harlem and More tour

visits 125th Street, Harlem’s commercial center and home to the Apollo Theater and Bill Clinton’s office. 212-277-8019; onboardnewyorktours.com NYC Ducks – NYC’s first land-and-water visitor experience. Splash Tours’ amphibious AquaBus fleet, designed to evoke the memory of Henry Hudson’s famous ship, are helmed by the captain and first mate, who dress in period costumes. The 1-hour route starts in Times Square with an exhilarating multi-media experience; then the AquaBus splashes into the Hudson River for an explorer’seye view of the New York skyline. Reservations required. 877-527-4691 newyorksplashtours.com NY SKYRIDE – A combination of movie-motion and sights rolled up into NY’s only aerial virtual tour simulator. Guide Kevin Bacon takes you on an adventure above, through, and underneath New York. A remarkable IMAX®-style digital presentation combining HD technology, custom-designed seats, and a 6-meter/18-foot screen. Open daily at 8am. Enter on the 33rd Street side of building. Empire State Building, 350 Fifth Ave. (33rd St.), 2nd floor, 212-279-9777; skyride.com On Location Tours – Visit the sites of your favorite movies and TV shows on several bus tours: New York TV and Movie sites (more than 60 locations from Friends, Seinfeld, Ugly Betty, SpiderMan 2, Manhattan, and many others), Sex and the City Hotspots, Sopranos Sites, or take a walk through Central Park on the walking tour of Central Park Movie Sites (When Harry Met Sally, Ghostbusters, and more). Advance purchase required. 212-209-3370; screentours.com Radio City Music Hall – Get an exclusive look at the legendary hall. And as a bonus, you’ll meet one of the world-famous Rockettes. Daily, 11am-3pm. $17; seniors, $14; under 12, $10. Tickets sold at the Radio City Avenue Store on the day of the tour. Advance tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster and the Box Office only. Group rates also available. 1260 Sixth Ave. (50 St.), 212-307-7171; radiocity.com Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Times Square – Ripley’s showcases the oddities in life and delivers the ultimate in shockingly strange, true stories. Discover the embodiment of one man’s belief that fact is stranger than fiction. Open daily, 9am-1am. 234 W. 42nd St. (Seventh-Eighth Aves.), 212-398-3133; ripleysnewyork.com Riverside Church – This beautiful Gothic building was inspired by the Cathedral of Chartres in France. The church houses four canvases by Heinrich Hofmann, the most famous of which is Christ in Gethsemane, and Sir Jacob Epstein’s Madonna and Child and his 20-foot Christ in Majesty. The Riverside Church tower, which rises 392 feet, contains one of the world’s largest carillons and one of the city’s most magnificent views. 490 Riverside Drive (north of 120th St.), 212-870-6700; theriversidechurchny.org Rockefeller Center - Considered one of the outstanding architectural achievements in the world, the internationally famous landmark is


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renowned for its exquisitely maintained Art Deco ornamentation. The 70–story masterpiece is the GE Building (“30 Rock”), decorated inside and out with murals and reliefs celebrating Wisdom and the advances in electronic communication. NBC Studio Tours are offered from here, and Top of the Rock, the observation deck on the 70th floor, boasts unparalleled views of New York. The Lower Plaza offers summer dining in a garden setting, below street level in the shadow of one of New York’s great landmarks. Overlooking it all is Paul Manship’s famous 18-foot, eight-ton gilded bronze statue of Prometheus, who brought the secret of fire to the world. Fifth to Sixth Ave. btw. 48th & 51th Sts., 212-632-3975; rockefellercenter.com Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex - A 25,000-square-foot space aimed toward everyone from the casual music fan to the seasoned rock enthusiast. This experiential, technologically advanced exhibition space focuses on the greatest moments in rock history with exciting permanent and rotating exhibits. 76 Mercer St. (Spring-Broome Sts.), 866-9-ROCKNY; rockannex.com St. Patrick’s Cathedral – The largest Gothic-style Catholic cathedral in the U.S. is the city’s most famous house of worship, visited by more than 3 million people each year. Call for tour schedule. Fifth Ave. btw. 50th & 51st Sts., 212-753-2261; saintpatrickscathedral.org South Street Seaport – Located in lower Manhattan, along the East River and adjacent to the Brooklyn Bridge, the refurbished, 200-plus-year-old designated historic landmark is a thriving waterfront community encompassing 12 cobblestone blocks of restored 19th-century buildings, shops, and restaurants. Pier 17 (Water-Fulton Sts.), 212-SEA-PORT; southstreetseaport.com Staten Island Ferry - Free for pedestrians, leaving from South Ferry at the Battery, any day, any time. siferry.com Statue Cruises – The only provider of ferry transportation to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island from Battery Park, as well as from Liberty State Park in New Jersey. Tickets: $12 adults/$10 seniors/$5 kids (with Audio Tour: $18/$16/$11). 877-523-9849; statuecruises.com

Located in downtown Montréal, Quebec, 333 Sherbrooke is an exceptional, lifestyle-oriented residential building featuring luxury condos and penthouses that offer an oasis in the heart of a city rich in history and teeming with cultural vitality. Located near the Latin Quarter—the Montréal equivalent to SoHo and Greenwich Village—333 Sherbrooke is comprised of two tenstory towers offering beautiful views of the city and two fourstory condominium complexes highlighted by a beautiful, tranquil courtyard. The interiors are stylish and airy, with openplan layouts, extensive windows, and panoramic views—not to mention amenities like the fitness rooms, rooftop sundeck, the swimming pool “floating” between the two towers, wine cellar, and more! A wonderful suggestion for world-class travelers and guests. For more information, visit 333sherbrooke.com/en.

David Behl/©Yoko Ono

Statue of Liberty – Experience a special insider’s view of the engineering marvel that is the Statue of Liberty. Visitors have a choice of two tours: the Observatory Tour and the Promenade Tour. Both include a guided tour through the Statue of Liberty Museum, which features the original torch. Liberty Island, 212-363-3200; nps.gov/stli Top of the Rock – 30 Rockefeller Plaza’s dazzling, 360-degree indoor and outdoor views are not exactly new –– in fact, it was open from 1933 to 1986. The brainchild of John D. Rockefeller, the original deck was designed to evoke the upper decks of a 1930s grand ocean liner. They’ve preserved the historic integrity of Rockefeller’s creation while incorporating innovative features, and three decks featuring outdoor terraces and indoor space. Daily, 8am-midnight. $18; $13 (under 12). Reserved-time tickets available. 30 Rockefeller Center (W. 50th St. btw. Fifth & Sixth Aves.), 877-692-7625; topoftherocknyc.com Trinity Church – The history of this important city parish is depicted in the Trinity Museum, which features a permanent exhibit: The Parish of Trinity Church in the City of New York: The Evolution of an Urban Institution. On view at St. Paul’s Chapel, at Broadway and Fulton, is George Washington’s pew, in honor of Washington’s worshipping at St. Paul’s when New York City was the capital of the United States. Completed in 1766, it is the oldest public building in continuous use on the island of Manhattan. Both Trinity and St. Paul’s have attractive church grounds. Take a stroll around Trinity’s famous churchyard, where Robert Fulton and Alexander Hamilton are buried. 74 Trinity Pl. (Broadway at Wall St.), 212-602-0800; trinitywallstreet.org Uncle Sam’s New York – Historical walking tours, pub crawls, nightlife tours, and custom New York City nightlife limousine tours. 917-655-0906; unclesamsnewyork.com United Nations – Multilingual guided tours normally leave every half hour Mon.-Fri., 9:30am-4:45pm. Call 212-963-7539 for a schedule of tours in other languages. $12.50; seniors & students, $8; children 5-14, $6.50. Children under five not admitted. First Ave. & 46th St., 212-963-8687; un.org/tours

LENNON’S NEW YORK One of the biggest recent additions to the downtown scene is the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex, which opened in SoHo to great fanfare last fall. Currently featured is John Lennon: The New York City Years, which explores the Beatle’s passion for music, art, politics and film, with New York City as his backdrop. Highlights include handwritten notes for his LP Double Fantasy (above left) and his green card, which he won after a four-year battle with the FBI. 76 Mercer St. (Spring-Broome Sts.), 866-9-ROCKNY; rockannex.com

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LatinNEWsizzle YORK DINING By Kristopher Carpenter

Islero CUISINE: Modern Spanish

On Aug. 28, 1947, in the town of Linares in Andalusia, Spain, the most famous bullfighter of his time, Manuel Laureano Rodríguez Sánchez, better known as Manolete, entered his second fight of the day against the Miura bull, Islero. It would be the last fight of his career as he died later that day following a goring. But Manolete returned the favor before his wound could take hold, stabbing and killing Islero in one of the most notorious bullfights of all time.

El Parador Café

Islero, named after the infamous bull that slew Manolete, is one of the most comfortable and chic locales for upscale Spanish cuisine around. Islero’s gourmet tapas menu brings the passion and heat of Spain to east midtown amidst a sexy atmosphere and downtown vibe. Beyond great tapas are great entrees, including a heavenly slice of pan-seared codfish, where the bold flavors of tomato and chorizo are in harmony with the fish, underscored by a chickpea hash and cooled with cucumber salad. Executive Chef Candido Rosales brings 11 years of experience in several of Jean-George Vongerichten’s restaurants to Islero for a diverse but fairly compact menu, with specialty cocktails to accent his culinary creations. Islero also serves up great live music on Saturday nights by ex-Gypsy Kings and an entertaining bar scene full of beautiful people. As was the bull that proved its namesake, Islero is not to be taken lightly. Chef’s Recommendations:

CUISINE: Mexican

Arroz Cremoso Negro Forbidden black rice, white truffle oil, drunken goat cheese Pan Roasted Chatham Cod (pictured) Chorizo-braised chickpea hash, tomato vinaigrette Galician Cheese Cake Galician ultra crema, mango puree, macada NYC

El Parador Café was founded in 1959, making it the oldest and one of the most authentic Mexican restaurants in New York City. Carlos Jacott launched the original establishment, first located on Second Avenue and 31st Street, and later sold his enterprise to Manuel Alejandro in 1990. In 1994, the torch was passed to Manny's son, Alex, (pictured) a graduate of The French Culinary Institute who continues to cater to their regulars, dubbed “El Paradorians,” many of whom have been eating there for decades. El Parador has been lauded for having the best Margaritas by The New York Press, best ceviche by The New York Times, and was recently named the #1 Mexican restaurant in NYC by Open Table diners.

LOCATIONS Islero 247 East 50th Street • 212-752-1414 • isleronyc.com

The world-class menu features appetizers, such as guacamole classico, a lobster salpicon salad, with a half chilled lobster, and varieties of “personal” nachos, including the delectable Nachos Royale. Some dishes put wonderfully off-key notes on Mexican standbys like the Jalapeños Rellenos – pickled jalapeños, stuffed with anejo cheese or chunky peanut butter. To cool down after a peanut butter infused jalapeño, try their signature frozen cocktail, the Tamarind Margarita. El Parador, a staple for midtown lunch, offers a lighter, abbreviated version of its classic dinner menu, “para almuerzo,” seven days a week. Chef’s Recommendations: Chicken in Mole Poblano (pictured) Cocoa and eight dry-chiles seasoning Bouillabaisse Veracruzana Lobster, shrimp, scallops, clams and mussels in a charred tomato, jalapeño and garlic broth

NYC

Baja style Mahi- Mahi Tacos Chunky avocado and tomatillo salsa

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LOCATIONS El Parador Café

325 East 34th Street • 212-679-6812 • elparadorcafe.com

[ Candido Rosales and Abraham Carlos ]


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Rosa Mexicano CUISINE: Mexican

As Time Out New York wrote in their April 2009 Eat Out Awards, “New York has a sorry reputation when it comes to Mexican eats [ask any West Coaster]. But it isn’t entirely deserved.” One of the Manhattan purveyors of that West Coast dietary staple, Rosa Mexicano, has been lending credence to the second sentence in that quote since 1984. The menu at Rosa is straightforward and Mexican-inspired but incorporates tastes, colors and presentation from all disciplines. One of the big guns in their arsenal of authentic Mexican flavors is their guacamole, made in a traditional lava-rock mortar. Along with their specialty cuisine, comes a host of specialty cocktails; among the best of them, the Pomegranate Margarita, which is the balanced blend of pomegranate juice, tequila blanco and lime juice, frozen to perfection.

Crema

When Rosa’s 2nd installment opened near Lincoln Center in 2000, Rosa Mexicano turned the corner in a new incarnation of upscale Mexican cuisine. The David Rockwell-designed interior includes a staircase of “floating” orange and red terrazzo stone slabs and a 30-foot water wall made of blue glass tiles with legions of white cliff- diving figurines. Their third NYC eatery opened in 2005, just east of Fifth Avenue and a few blocks north of Union Square. Chief Operating Officer of Rosa Mexicano restaurants, Howard Greenstone, (pictured) has directed the eight restaurants of the rapidly expanding chain since 2001, and has been a key leader in charting the restaurant group’s ambitious and strategic plans for national growth. He has also founded a proprietary series of on-site cooking classes.

CUISINE: Mexican

Chef’s Recommendations:

Crema has enjoyed a lot of praise. About one of the featured cocktails, Agua Loca, Jonathan Miles wrote in the New York Times, “The Mexican alternative to sangria, [which is Spanish in origin] Agua Loca, is as Mexico is to Spain: fresher, bolder, and a poquito bit tougher. It has all the familiar wine and fruit of sangria without the diluting sodas; it’s also packed with a double-fisted wallop of rum and vodka.” Zagat diners have also weighed in to consistently name Ballesteros NYC’s top Mexican chef.

Guacamole en Molcajete Freshly made guacamole with avocado, jalapeño, tomato, onion and cilantro, prepared tableside Zarape de Pato (pictured) Roasted pulled duck layered between soft corn tortillas and topped with yellow pepper-habanero cream sauce Alambre a la Mexicana Grilled cubes of beef tenderloin, chorizo sausage, onions, tomatoes and serrano peppers with tomatillo and tomato-chipotle sauces NYC

Chef/owner, Julieta Ballesteros has melded the traditional cuisine of her upbringing in Monterrey, Mexico with her training at the French Culinary Institute to bring diners a unique experience in Latin cuisine – New York City style. Crema Restaurante opened in March, 2006, on West 17th just north of Union Square, southwest of Madison Square Park and the newly red-hot Flatiron district. Crema’s designer transformed the interior space, playing with traditional Mexican colors and textures in an upscale and entertaining way with a few surprises, like the gorgeous cactus garden in the entrance that gives the space a festive but comfortable feel. The original paintings on display were custom created for the space by the celebrated artist and mother of the chef, Julieta del Bosque.

LOCATIONS Rosa Mexicano Rosa Mexicano Rosa Mexicano

1063 First Avenue • 212-753-7407 61 Columbus Avenue • 212-977-7700 9 East 18th Street • 212-533-3350 • rosamexicano.com

Chef’s Recommendations: Tostadas de Avestruz Seared fillet of ostrich tostadas with black beans, goat cheese and guava chile glaze Alambres de Filete a los Cinco Chiles (pictured) Grilled filet mignon skewer with red bell peppers, mushrooms, scallions, bacon, drizzled with a five-chile paste and topped with crispy onion rounds

NYC

Magret de Pato en Mole Poblano Glazed Peking duck breast served with roasted plantains, pomegranate honey, crema and potato cheese enchilada over mole poblano LOCATIONS Crema 111 West 17th Street • 212-691-4477 • cremarestaurante.com

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Pamplona CUISINE: Spanish

Pamplona is the capital city of Navarre, Spain, home to the most famous “running of the bulls” ceremony during the festival of San Fermín. Located in the northeastern part of Spain, near the French border – Pamplona is a place where Spanish tradition and French flair intersect; making it a befitting name for Chef Alex Ureña’s Flatiron outpost of approachable, Spanish bistro-style cuisine.

CUISINE: South American/Japanese Fusion

At the turn of the century, thousands of Japanese émigrés traveled to South America’s fertile soil to cultivate coffee plantations and find their fortune. In bustling cities like Callao and Lima in Peru, and São Paulo in Brazil, the integration of Japanese and South American cultures flourished and blended to create the inspiration for today’s SushiSamba restaurants. The décor plays a large part in the experience, with bubble-shaped lights hanging over a room of mango, red, lime and gold to recreate the look of a Brazilian carnival. The focal point of each restaurant is the sushi bar, made of glass and mahogany featuring the innovative and popular Samba Rolls such as the Rainbow Dragon, which brings together eel, red bell pepper, cucumber, mango and avocado. SushiSamba 7 in the West Village has a particularly impressive rooftop garden to seat its guests. It’s open year-round and filled with lush flora, evoking a tropical feel.

Chef’s Recommendations: Gazpacho (pictured) Cucumber, avocado, yogurt sorbet Cochinillo Confit suckling pig, apple puree, green leaf lettuce, shiitake mushrooms Buñuelos de Chocolate Chocolate fritters, yogurt sorbet NYC

SUSHISAMBA

From his observations of wholesome ingredients harvested on his grandfather’s farm in the Dominican Republic to his time spent studying the intricacies of French culinary technique alongside David Bouley, Ureña has earned a hands-on mastery of the kitchen in several of Manhattan’s most notable restaurants, including Jo Jo, La Cote Basque, and La Caravelle. Ureña even spent time at Spain’s culinary Mecca and holy land of gastronomy, elBulli. With Pamplona, he brings an accessible upscale Spanish cuisine to New York City with a straightforward menu consisting of small plates, medium plates, and entrees and also offers four- and six-course tasting menus priced at $45 and $60 respectively. Since its debut in 2007, Pamplona has received a great many accolades from patrons and press. It was lovingly two-starred by New York Times food critic Frank Bruni in November of 2007, who raved about the chickpea fries, noting in his review that “Mr. Ureña can really cook.”

LOCATIONS Pamplona

37 East 28th Street • 212-213-2328 • pamplonanyc.com

With the opening of SushiSamba Park in 1999, Shimon Bokovza began bringing his dreams to New York, which he calls the “world’s Mecca of the cultural mix.” The lines of traditional cuisines are integrated by Corporate Chef Michael Cressotti (pictured) for a phenomenon that exploded onto the scene as one of the premier NYC fusion hot-spots. The menu also features traditional Brazilian and Peruvian drinks. In the end, the blend of these very different cultures results in an innovative menu and a unique dining experience. Chef’s Recommendations:

Sea Bass Anticuchos Skewered and served with Peruvian corn

NYC

Moqueca Mista (a Brazilian Seafood Stew) (pictured) Shrimp, squid, sea bass, mussel, clam and crayfish with coconut milk, toasted cashew, dendê oil and white rice

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LOCATIONS SUSHISAMBA Park 245 Park Avenue South • 212-475-9377 SUSHISAMBA 7 87 Seventh Avenue South • 212-691-7885 • sushisamba.com

Photo:Francesco Tonelli

Kobe Beef Tataki Heart of palm, avocado, tatsoi, citrus soy


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Toloache CUISINE: Mexican

Deriving its name from a flowering plant, famed in Mexico for being used in love potions – Toloache, (pronounced toh-lo-ah-tchay) is the brainchild of Chef Julian Medina (pictured) who studied under the legendary Latin cuisine chef/restaurateur Richard Sandoval. A 1999 graduate of NYC’s French Culinary Institute, Medina worked his way through the best Latin kitchens in the city including Pampano (owned by Sandoval and Placido Domingo), SushiSamba and Zocalo – and as a corporate chef for all of Sandoval’s restaurants before opening Toloache in August of 2007. [ Sazon ]

His colorful two-story restaurant in the heart of the theatre district is hard to miss. Features of the space include a ceviche bar available by reservation for up to five people, which allows diners to watch as the citric acidity used in Latin America to “cook” fish is added to their dish as well as the rest of the entertaining show that happens in the open kitchen at Toloache. Their cocktail list, pulled from a repertoire of fine spirits including about 100 tequilas ranging from Blancos at $9-10 to the extra anejos like the Herradura Selecion Suprema at $45. For a refreshing summer cocktail, try the Moras Margarita, which combines blackberry, lime, and combier orange flavors.

Sofrito | Sazon CUISINE: Puerto Rican

Owner Genaro “JR” Morales has just opened a sister restaurant to his landmark, Sofrito, purveyor of top-notch Puerto Rican cuisine. Besides the high praise from the media, Sofrito has also become a hangout for Mets players Carlos Delgado, Carlos Beltran and Pedro Martinez. The East Side hot spot also receives regular visits from music icons Jennifer Lopez, Marc Anthony, and Fat Joe, who has left his mark on the menu in the form of a signature drink, the “Lean Back,” combining vodka, gin, rum, tequila, orange liquor and cranberry juice for a cocktail that will have you leaning in one direction or another. With this reputation, Morales is expecting his new place, Sazon, to be a beacon to the downtown Latin community. The décor at both restaurants is superb – Sofrito uses cool tones of neon blue and orange for accents to their bar and a dining room that is plush and luxurious but comfortable. Sazon is nothing short of breathtaking with a free-form bar made of exotic wood, green leather banquettes, and two stories of colorful Puerto Rican flair.

Chef’s Recommendations: Huitlacoche Black truffle quesadilla Langosta Spicy lobster tacos, morita salsa, avocado Carnitas de Lechon (pictured) Shredded suckling pig, habanero-sour orange salsa, cactus avocado, chicharron salad NYC

[ Owner JR Morales and actor Matt Dillon ]

LOCATIONS Toloache 251 West 50th Street • 212-581-1818 • toloachenyc.com

The menu at Sazon mirrors some of the dishes available at Sofrito, such as the Sazon paella, but Sazon is also its own restaurant, with dishes like mar y tierra (churrasco and shrimp scampi with fried green plantains and a red wine mushroom sauce) and pollito (roast cornish hen stuffed with sweet plantain and guava sauce). Both restaurants are also open for Sunday brunch. Chef’s Recommendations: served at both restaurants Pernil Roast pork, pigeon pea rice, sweet plantains Sazon/Sofrito Paella (pictured) Lobster, chicken, chorizo, clams, shrimps, in saffron rice

NYC

Whole Red Snapper Baked or fried crispy, stuffed with seafood, with coconut rice LOCATIONS Sofrito 400 East 57th Street • 212-754-5999 • sofritony.com Sazon 105 Reade Street • 212-406-1900 • sazonnyc.com

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AMERICAN

with French and Italian overtones in a dining room that recalls a country estate. 42 E. 20th St., 212-477-0777; gramercytavern.com

Allen & Delancey - Richard H. Friedberg and chef Neil Ferguson offer a casual, modern American menu. The atmosphere is very romantic, with exposed natural and painted brick, dark walnut paneling accented with beveled mirrors, and an art collection that reflects its Lower East Side location. 115 Allen St. (Delancey St.), 212-253-5400; allenanddelancey.net

The Harrison - This Tribeca favorite—with a new menu by chef Amanda Freitag, who arrived in January—exudes the aura of a long-time neighborhood haunt, serving comfort food with a downtown twist. 355 Greenwich St. (Harrison St.), 212-274-9310; theharrison.com

Beacon - Feasting on cuisine cooked over a wood fire is an incomparably delicious experience, and at Beacon, it’s all about the flame. Waldy Malouf, chef and co-owner, wields flame as a culinary tool to enhance the bold flavors of his ingredients, employing a wood-burning oven, a rotisserie, and a grill to perfect his earthy, flavorful and inventive American fare. 25 W. 56th St., 212-332-0500; beaconnyc.com

Hundred Acres - Fresh and seasonal cuisine in a fun atmosphere that pairs rustic warmth with a lively downtown vibe. The menu balances classic favorites—like one of the city’s best burgers—with simple preparations of fresh fish and vegetables. With a table decorated with fresh fruits and wines, the middle room evokes a farm kitchen, and garden dining is also available. 38 MacDougal St. (Prince-Houston Sts.), 212-475-7500; hundredacresnyc.com

Bryant Park Grill - Overlooking the magnificent Bryant Park and set behind the landmarked New York Public Library, this American-style grill, with seasonal outdoor patio and roof-top dining, features an elegant and sophisticated dining room ideal for a romantic dinner or a festive party. Whether you’re in the mood for light fare or a full-course meal, the restaurant’s high-end, traditional fare is sure to delight. 25 W. 40th St., 212-840-6500; arkrestaurants.com

Inside Park at St. Bart’s - A brand-new space has been built across the famous Terrace at St. Bartholomew’s Church, with intricate, Byzantine-like decorative stenciling, true to the immense room’s original colors, motifs, and craftsmanship, painstakingly replicated on the 30-foot ceiling, as well as on the walls and overhanging balcony. Executive Chef Matthew Weingarten oversees the everchanging contemporary American menu. 109 E. 50th St., 212-593-3333; insideparknyc.com

Char No. 4 - This new addition to Brooklyn’s Carroll Gardens neighborhood offers Southern comfort food complemented by a 300+ bourbon menu put together by former Primehouse sommelier Sean Josephs and whiskey enthusiast Michael Tsoumpas. Matt Greco oversees a menu that includes cornflakecrusted fried oysters with bacon remoulade and Dr. Pepper-glazed short rib. 196 Smith St. (Baltic St.), Brooklyn, 718-643-2106 Eleven Madison Park - Relive the glamorous era of Cole Porter and New York’s café society in the sleek, high-ceilinged elegance of what was once the cavernous Art Deco assembly hall of the old Met Life Building. The restaurant has that wonderful streamlined look of the Roaring ’20s and the menu features American fare with an emphasis on sophisticated French classics. 11 Madison Ave. (24th St.), 212-889-0905; elevenmadisonpark.com Gilt - Award-winning, Michelin-starred Chef Christopher Lee helms the New York Palace’s elegant and refined yet striking and futuristic Gilt, where contemporary, honey-colored leather accented with white man-made materials provide harmonious contrast to the 19th-century details. The New American menu offers transcendent twists on the classics. 455 Madison Ave. (50th St.), 212-891-8100; giltnewyork.com Gotham Bar and Grill - The highly acclaimed haute cuisine of this dynamic, trendy downtown restaurant reflects the Post-Modernist, converted warehouse setting. Chef Alfred Portale creates dazzling visual and provocative culinary effects with his superb, contemporary meals, piled whimsically skyscraper-like onto plates, including one of the city’s best seafood salads. 12 E. 12th St., 212-620-4020; gothambarandgrill.com Gramercy Tavern - This classic American tavern offers extraordinary cuisine and hospitality in a historic landmark, featuring contemporary American fare

Irving Mill - Family-owned by Mario, Sergio, and Suzanne Letulle Riva, Irving Mill is a seasonal American restaurant, green-market-driven with French and Italian influences. The wine list features approximately 180 bottles, selected to have more of a European focus, particularly French, Italian, and Spanish. 116 E. 16th St., 212-254-1600; irvingmill.com Istana - Inventive, creatively presented bistro-style cuisine, including an array of á la carte appetizers, entrées, and desserts complemented by seasonal specialties, in a relaxed atmosphere. New York Palace Hotel, 455 Madison Ave. (51st St.), 212-303-6032; newyorkpalace.com The Libertine - Celebrity chef Todd English’s latest NYC venture is a clubby restaurant and bar with a small dining room and a rustic pub fare menu. A popular stop for the neighborhood’s Financial District workers. Gild Hall, 15 Gold St. (Platt St.), 212-785-5950 Métrazur - A progressive American brasserie with Mediterranean flavors, located in Grand Central Terminal, with views of the sky ceiling. The menu features the famous Caesar salad, a bounty of fresh seafood, and a popular oyster tasting. Grand Central Terminal, 42nd St. & Lexington Ave., 212-687-4600; charliepalmer.com/metrazur Murals on 54 - A unique take on contemporary American cuisine with global influences in a dining room decorated with dramatic classically inspired murals painted by Dean Cornwell in 1937 and restored in 2004. The Warwick New York Hotel, 63 W. 54th St., 212-314-7700; murals54.com The Oak Room - This legendary landmark, which reopened in November 2008 after major renovations, now features the work of chef Eric Hara, who

The romance and elegance of Venetian design meets the rich tradition of Northern Italian cuisine at Remi. Dining here is a bit like embarking on a luxury cruise through Venice, with a stunning mural of a grand canal, flying buttress archways, Brazilian cherry-striped floors, and glass chandeliers. The endless menu features a wide variety of antipasti and salads, homemade pastas, and classic signature dishes like the Spaghetti Remi, prepared al dente with oven-dried tomatoes, garlic and hot peppers and Venetian-style calf liver sauteed with onions and served on polenta. 145 W. 53rd St., 212-581-4242 (212-757-7610 for private parties); remi-ny.com

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brings his special touch to the classic American menu. 10 Central Park So. (Fifth Ave.), 212-758-7777; oakroomny.com The Odeon - This famous 1930s-style brasserie, complete with original Art Deco fixtures, was a Tribeca pioneer, opening in 1980 as a gathering place for a colorful uptown-meets-downtown crowd. Now its near-legend status grows with each bite of the casual blend of American and European favorites. 145 West Broadway (Thomas St.), 212-233-0507; theodeonrestaurant.com

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arresting and vividly (yet mostly mildly) flavored. 149 E. 57th St., 212-752-0808; lecolonialnyc.com Mr. K’s - Scrumptious Chinese fare in a spectacular Art Deco food palace. Fresh from Washington D.C., where he wowed the culinary tastes of the Capitol set for 15 years, proprietor Johnny Kao has transformed an old bank into a splendid serene oasis with a bar that dazzles with green Avonite tops and etched glass panels, complementing the rich, mauve interior, two-tone wood décor and quietly elegant ambiance. 570 Lexington Ave. (51st St.), 212-583-1668; mrksny.com

Pranna - Chef Chai Trivedi adds his own special touch to the flavors of modern Southeast Asian cuisine in a wide-open, opulent space. The satays are especially popular, while the menu also includes dishes from Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and India. 79 Madison Ave. (28th St.), 212-696-5700; prannarestaurant.com Spice Market - The two-level room features teak floors from a 200-year-old Bombay palace and colonial-style furniture. Jean-Georges Vongerichten draws inspiration from the best of the region’s street food and gives it a New York spin. 403 W. 13th St., 212-675-2223; jean-georges.com

Per Se - This four-star sensation features New American creations that are nothing short of divine. Luxurious in its stunning views of Central Park from each table, its décor of dark woods and glittering metal surfaces and its incomparable menu featuring caviar, lobster, foie gras, and Kobe beef. Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Circle (60th St.), 4th Floor, 212-823-9335; perseny.com Tavern on the Green - Overlooking Central Park, one of the city’s most popular landmarks began as a sheepfold in 1870. Evocative of a European country lodge, its baroque rustic charm has made it the spot for celebrations and a magnificent garden in season. Central Park West at 67th St., 212-873-3200; tavernonthegreen.com Triomphe - Two dining rooms, with only 20 tables between them, offer a warm and comfortable atmosphere, both stylish and subtle, and a diverse menu of French American cuisine with an international flair. Iroquois Hotel, 49 W. 44th St., 212-453-4233; triomphe-newyork.com 21 Club - This legend has intrigued and inspired since it first opened during Prohibition in an historic 19th-century brownstone. Upscale yet comfortable, the 21 Club is the place to “close a deal” over a global and classic American meal. 21 W. 52nd St., 212-582-7200; 21club.com Union Square Cafe - By day, this is one of the most red-hot business-lunch spots in the city; by night, it’s a casual, popular bistro. Owner Danny Meyer, chef Michael Romano, and executive chef Carmen Quagliata oversee this smash hit, serving American cuisine with an Italian soul. 21 E. 16th St. (Union Sq. West-Fifth Ave.), 212-243-4020; unionsquarecafe.com The View - Spectacular, panoramic views of the city from the 47th floor and inviting décor of leather, velvet and lacquered woods are a splendid backdrop for the contemporary American, New York-centric menu and wine list. Times Square Marriott Marquis, 1535 Broadway (45th-46th Sts.), 212-704-8900; nymarriottmarquis.com

ASIAN Le Colonial - Authentic French-Vietnamese cuisine in an atmosphere reminiscent of early20th-century Southeast Asia. The menu emphasizes vegetables, fresh seafood, and meats, and the dishes are light, low in fat, visually

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Sugiyama - Even the most ardent Japanese-cuisine aficionados are astonished by the authenticity of chef-owner Nao Sugiyama’s creations, his own interpretation of the traditional Kaiseki meals—multi-course, prix-fixe dinners that range from the mini-Kaiseki to a majestic 14-course extravaganza—prepared behind an open counter. 251 W. 55th St., 212-956-0670; sugiyama-nyc.com Tse Yang Restaurant - Like the original in Paris, the serenely elegant Tse Yang lives up to its name, an exclusive epicurean “Center of the Sun” boasting authentic, Northern Chinese seasonal dishes created from fresh local and imported ingredients and served European-style. 34 E. 51st St., 212-688-5447 Woo Lae Oak - Featuring upscale, radically innovative Korean fare in a sleek, cool interior in the heart of SoHo. The dishes, which fuse traditional elements with a modern flair, have garnered praise and popularity in equal measure. 148 Mercer St. (Prince St.), 212-925-8200; woolaeoaksoho.com

FRENCH/FRENCH BISTRO Adour Alain Ducasse - The famed French chef combines traditional French cooking with local flavors, resulting in elegant dishes with rich textures and new aromas. Oenophiles will be delighted by the interactive wine bar, where they can discover a wine’s origin, producer, variety—and of course, its best matching dish. St. Regis Hotel, 2 E. 55th St., 212-710-2277; adour-stregis.com Bistro Bagatelle - A southern French bistro in the Meatpacking District. “Sophisticated comfort foods” include bouillabaisse, boeuf Bourguignon, and classics like steak au poivre with pomme frites. 409 W. 13th St., 212-675-2400 Bouley - Legendary French chef David Bouley’s landmark in fine dining, offering a legendary and world-renowned experience. 120 West Broadway (Duane St.), 212-964-2525; bouley.net Brasserie 8 1/2 - A delicate fusion of creativity and comfort, featuring a worldclass art collection, haute French cuisine, and a plush atmosphere, complemented by Latin- and Asian-influenced dishes, a raw bar, and desserts. 9 W. 57th St., 212-829-0812; rapatina.com/brasserie8/ Café Boulud - In an atmosphere reminiscent of cosmopolitan 1930s Paris, enjoy master restaurateur/chef Daniel Boulud’s serious American-influenced French food, inspired by four muses—traditional, seasonal, vegetarian, and world cuisine. 20 E. 76th St., 212-772-2600; danielnyc.com Chanterelle - Located in the 19th-century Mercantile Exchange Building, Chanterelle offers an innovative monthly menu based on French classics and laced with flavors of the Far East—showcasing the freshest seafood, produce, game, and wild mushrooms from small sources all over the country. 2 Harrison St. (Hudson St.), 212-966-6960; chanterellenyc.com Felix - Some of the SoHo’s finest French food, lovingly prepared and served in a relaxed yet elegant atmosphere, where prewar photos from France adorn the walls. 340 West Broadway (Grand St.), 212-431-0021; felixnyc.com Gascogne - Reflecting the hospitality, joie de vivre, and hearty regional fare of Gascony is this Gallic jewel. The décor is a blend of rustic French and candlelit romance. It is almost de rigueur to end the evening with a glass of fine Armagnac, the region’s most famous spirit. 158 Eighth Ave. (17th-18th Sts.), 212-675-6564; gascognenyc.com La Goulue - This modern, intimate Parisian bistro is great for people-watching and celebrity sightings while sampling Chef Antoine Camin’s signature creations. 746 Madison Ave. (64th-65th Sts.), 212-988-8169; lagouluerestaurant.com La Grenouille - Classic Gallic cuisine that guests have appreciated since the restaurant opened in 1962. The menu—and floral decorations—are seasonally inspired. Jacket required. 3 E. 52nd St., 212-752-1495; la-grenouille.com

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Le Périgord - Long regarded as one of New York’s superb old-school French dining rooms, this refined, luxurious gem is one of the longest-running four-

star operations under the same management. The menu blends classical French technique with a lighter contemporary touch, natural flavors, sauces and spices, and high-quality produce. Jacket and tie required. 405 E. 52nd St., 212-755-6244; leperigord.com The Modern at MoMA - As sleek, elegant, and contemporary as the MoMA that houses it, The Modern features original French-American cuisine by chef Gabriel Kreuther. Enjoy fine dining in the main room—overlooking the sculpture garden and visible from the street through a long glass wall—or a more casual menu at the curved marble bar in the Bar Room. Operated by Danny Meyer. 11 W. 53rd St., 212-333-1220; themodernnyc.com Nice Matin - With warm colors, chic light fixtures, and plush chairs, this gorgeous space is lively, yet still conducive to easy conversation. The wine list and the cocktails are imaginative. 201 W. 79th St., 212-873-6423; nicematinnyc.com Orsay - This Upper East Side brasserie features a classic Art Nouveau interior, using rich woods, traditional moldings, and mirrors. The menu marries modern French and classic fare with an award-winning wine list dominated by French and American varietals. 1057 Lexington Ave. (75th St.), 212-517-6400; orsayrestaurant.com

INDIAN Tabla - Walk up the impressive staircase to Danny Meyer’s Tabla, which combines classic American dishes with pungent Indian spices. For a downscale version, head downstairs to its less expensive sister restaurant, Bread Bar at Tabla. 11 Madison Ave. (25th St.), 212-889-0667; tablany.com

INTERNATIONAL & ECLECTIC Blue Ribbon - A cozy and casual SoHo establishment filled with wood, mirrors, comfortable banquettes, candlelight, and music. It boasts an eclectic menu featuring some of the best sushi and sake in town. 97 Sullivan St. (Spring-Prince Sts.), 212-274-0404; blueribbonrestaurants.com Cru - Wine in all its forms was restaurateur Roy Welland’s inspiration when he opened Cru. With a wine list hovering around 3,300 and a cellar with 65,000 bottles, they will help you make the consummate wine choice to accompany modern European fusion meals. 24 Fifth Ave. (9th St.), 212-529-1700; cru-nyc.com Double Crown - The stunning atmosphere here evokes the colonial British East of the 19th century, while the eclectic menu features dishes such as pork rillette, venison Wellington, and wild boar. The brunch, offered Sat. and Sun. 10am-3:30pm, is also very popular among the Village denizens. 316 Bowery (Bleecker St.), 212-254-0350; doublecrown-nyc.com The Spotted Pig - Chef and co-owner April Bloomfield presides over this West Village favorite’s eclectic menu of seasonal British and Italian fare, which uses local ingredients whenever possible. Entreés as of press time include grilled beef tongue, marinated octopus and celery salad, and lamb crepinette with sautéed kidney. 314 W. 11th St., 212-620-0393; thespottedpig.com Wallsé - Austrian cuisine and wild game is the order of the day here, at chef Kurt Gutenbrunner’s elegant restaurant that has quickly become a favorite among NYC foodies and West Villagers. Menu favorites include the veal goulash, and other Austrian favorites such as tafelspitz and Wiener schnitzel. 344 W. 11th St., 212-352-2300; wallserestaurant.com

ITALIAN Bar Milano - The team behind ‘ino & ‘inoteca present their most ambitious project yet, inspired by their mutual love of Northern Italian food and wine. From early breakfast to a late night, they offer modern interpretations of classic


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dishes with understated elegance and a lively vibe. Hotel Marcel, 323 Third Ave. (24th St.), 212-683-3035; barmilano.com Bice Ristorante - Combining traditional and new trends in Northern Italian cuisine in an elegant-casual atmosphere, Bice Ristorante caters to a knowledgeable clientele seeking out superior versions of beloved Italian fare utilizing topof-the-line ingredients, refined dishes, light-touch cooking, seamless service, and, most of all, consistency. Top dishes include tagliolini lobster, ravioli massala, osso buco, and papardelle al telefono, just to name a few. And don’t miss out on dessert—the tiramisu della Bice is one of the best in the city. 7 E. 54th St. (Madison-Fifth Aves.), 212-688-1999; bicenewyork.com Del Posto - Joe Bastianich, Lidia Bastianich and Mario Batali present a “trans-generational” expression of the evolution of cuisines with what is considered one of the greatest indoor spaces in the city with an ambiance filled with warmth buoyancy and lightheartedness of the Italian spirit. 85 Tenth Ave. (15th-16th Sts.), 212-497-8090; delposto.com Downtown Cipriani - This SoHo restaurant is part of New York’s extended Cipriani family, which includes Harry’s on Fifth, Rainbow by Cipriani at Rockefeller Plaza, and Cipriani 42nd Street. With its downtown spin, this eatery has a more casual menu and relaxed ambiance than its uptown cousins, offering sandwiches and ciabette alongside main courses. 376 West Broadway (Spring-Broome Sts.), 212-343-0999; cipriani.com Insieme - This Italian newcomer from Marco Canora, the man behind Hearth, has earned its Michelin star with perfectly prepared, uncomplicated dishes and sincere hospitality. The old and new worlds meet here in all areas, from the menu and wine, to the service and design. The Michelangelo Hotel, 777 Seventh Ave. (51st St.), 212-582-1310; restaurantinsieme.com Montenapo - Located in the New York Times building, this new Italian restaurant features pastas, breads, and desserts, homemade on premises with the very best ingredients: grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, and wild-caught fish. 620 Eight Ave. (41st St.), 212-764-7663; montenaporestaurant.com Patsy’s - Considered one of the greatest attractions in the Theatre District, renowned for its celebrity clientele (it was Frank Sinatra’s favorite), this landmark has been family-run since 1944. The Neapolitan cuisine is heavenly, including succulent veal chops Siciliano, spicy lobster fra diavolo, savory calamari stuffed with seafood, and much more. A “must go” New York favorite. 236 W. 56th St., 212-247-3491; patsys.com Sfoglia - Famous for their location on Nantucket, Sfoglia has opened an outpost on the Upper East Side. The Renaissance-influenced menu features samplings of antipasto, plates of their renowned pasta, naturally raised meats, a contorno made with ingredients from area farms, and a wonderful dessert menu. 1402 Lexington Ave. (92nd St.), 212-831-1402; sfogliarestaurant.com

JAPANESE & SUSHI Cho Cho San - The opera-inspired Cho Cho San (the misspelling of Cio Cio San, Puccini’s heroine of Madama Butterfly, was purposeful) is a cozy neighborhood restaurant with a modern twist on traditional Japanese fare. For example, the Puccini roll is chockablock with olives as its stuffing; the niko niko, which are pan-friend oysters, are wrapped in bacon. There are also daily pastas and curries, and classic sushi prepared by the former chef of Taste of Tokyo, Yoshi Azegami. 15 W. 8th St., 212-473-3333; chochosanrestaurant.com Hakubai - The only branch of Japan’s renowned ancient Nadaman restaurant, and one of the very few in the U.S. serving Kaiseki,which has its roots in Zen Buddhism and the traditional Japanese tea ceremony. Both the dishes and food change with the seasons. The elegant, comfortable Tatami rooms feature perfect presentation and flawless service. Kitano Hotel, 66 Park Ave. (38th St.), 212-885-7111; kitano.com/hakubai.html Masa - This four-star restaurant is making waves among sushi aficionados. Evoking the quiet aura of a rare temple, the décor is every bit as simple and

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elegant as the fish, prepared with painstaking care by the staff. Sit at the 27-foot-long sushi bar, where you can watch owner Masa Takayama at work. Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Circle (60th St.), 4th Floor, 212-823-9800; masanyc.com Nobu - Chef Nobu Matsuhisa dazzles with his daring cuisine that fuses influences from Tokyo to Peru in partnership with restaurateur Drew Nieporent and Robert De Niro. David Rockwell’s lovely Japanese countryside setting enhances the experience. 105 Hudson St. (Franklin St.), 212-334-4445; myriadrestaurantgroup.com Nobu Next Door - Superstar chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s famous fusion menu of Asian and South American delicacies is now available at this spin-off restaurant. Featuring a simpler menu than its famed neighbor Nobu and David Rockwell designed décor. 105 Hudson St. (Franklin St.), 212-334-4445; myriadrestaurantgroup.com Ono - Celebrity restaurateur Jeffrey Chodorow’s contemporary Japanese restaurant and bar. The multilevel space—decorated with paper lanterns and featuring a glass-bottomed sushi bar and semi-private tatami booths—provides the ideal setting for exotic fare, an array of sushi and the popular Robatayaki bar, where diners select their meat or seafood and watch it grilled over an open flame. Hotel Gansevoort, 18 Ninth Ave. (13th St.), 212-660-6766; chinagrillmgt.com

STIRRING UP HISTORY The splendid cuisine and beauty of the ultra-modern décor at Rouge Tomate is apparent as soon as its guests brush by the plush red curtains and approach the host to begin their gastronomic journey. However, what Rouge Tomate patrons may not know about 10 East 60th Street is that from 1940 to 1992, it housed one of the most famous nightclubs of all time – The Copacabana. If you missed the name in the 1978 Barry Manilow song, (Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl…) and didn’t see Goodfellas, Raging Bull, Tootsie, Carlito's Way or Beyond the Sea, it might not seem familiar. A few fairly notable occurrences took place at 10 East 60th including Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis getting their start as a tandem (Martin & Lewis), the Supremes making their debut in 1965, and possibly the most notorious fight in New York City history before Ali and Frazier met in the Garden: In May of 1957, Billy Martin and Mickey Mantle, along with their Yankee teammates were at The Copa for Martin’s birthday and began punching out drunken hecklers in an all out brawl while Sammy Davis Jr. was on stage. On these same few historically-charged square feet, Rouge Tomate has opened its chic, lower level lounge, StirRED, putting its delectably health conscious spin on the small plates and specialty cocktail revolution. StirRED’s drink menu, crafted by director of beverages, Rain Lampariello, offers libations spanning the gamut from the hearty whiskey, bitters, and absinthe found in the Sazerac to the prim tastes of cucumber, mint and lemon in the Queen’s Cup. The fairly large, small plates including tuna poke with sugar snap peas, honshimeji mushrooms, jicama and sesame, match the light and airy décor for a filling but guiltless dining experience. Slake your thirst for history with a great cocktail, enjoy a Dark and Stormy, and ponder the New York lore that happened right where you’re sitting. –– Kristopher Carpenter

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MEDITERRANEAN Isabella’s - This Upper West Side mainstay, across from the American Museum of Natural History, serves Mediterranean-style fare. The ambiance is sunny and casual, with its split-level dining room, rattan chairs, and popular outdoor patio. 359 Columbus Ave. (77th St.), 212-724-2100; brguestrestaurants.com Picholine - Acclaimed chef/restaurateur Terrance Brennan takes a modern approach to Mediterranean cooking, expertly layered with French, Italian, and Spanish influences. Enjoy the casually elegant succession of dining rooms, with soaring boysenberry velvet curtains, purple leather and grey mohair banquettes, contemporary artwork, and the restaurant’s customary fine linen, crystal, silver, and china. 35 W. 64th St., 212-724-8585; picholinenyc.com

MEXICAN/TEX-MEX Maya - Mexico City-born chef/owner Richard Sandoval serves up his family’s Acapulco heritage with style; Mexican food and ambiance are elevated to a high level in a festive yet sophisticated atmosphere. 1191 First Ave. (64th-65th Sts.), 212-585-1818; modernmexican.com/mayany Rosa Mexicano - Upscale, authentic Mexican cuisine in a stylish and festive atmosphere. The David Rockwell-designed Lincoln Center space features a 30-foot cascading waterwall that spans both levels, complete with 200 miniature cliff divers. The First Avenue location has been a Midtown/Upper East Side institution for 25 years. Three locations: 61 Columbus Ave. (62nd St.), 212-977-7700; 1063 First Ave. (58th St.), 212-753-7407; 9 E. 18th St., 212-533-3350; rosamexicano.com

SCANDINAVIAN Aquavit - This modern Scandinavian establishment reflects the best of minimalist Scandinavian design with pale wood tones, soft lighting, and unique tableware. A large selection of aquavits (potato vodka infused with fruits or spices) is available, along with cocktails inspired by the region and an extensive wine list. 65 E. 55th St., 212-307-7311; aquavit.org

SEAFOOD Blue Fin - This 400-seat, two-level seafood emporium, established by restaurateur Stephen Hanson is not your run-of-the-mill theater eatery. Blue Fin offers


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the finest and freshest raw bar, colorful and innovative sashimi and sushi rolls, contemporary seafood and other entrées in a setting marked by giant faux tortoiseshell walls. W Times Square Hotel, 1567 Broadway (47th St.), 212-918-1400; brguestrestaurants.com Blue Water Grill - This majestic bank redux is just the thing for those seeking fresh raw-bar delicacies and entrées. 31 Union Square West (16th St.), 212-675-9500; brguestrestaurants.com Le Bernardin - Exquisite, ultra-fresh seafood served with impeccable service in an elegant venue has earned Le Bernardin a four-star rating since it opened in 1986. Veteran chef Eric Ripert surprises diners with Asian accents throughout his menus, featuring fish that is “almost raw” or “lightly cooked.” The Equitable Building, 155 W. 51st St., 212-554-1515; le-bernardin.com

SOUTHWESTERN Mesa Grill - Chef Bobby Flay serves Southwestern cuisine in a whimsical setting accented in shades of Sutter’s gold, adobe terra cotta, and sage green, and boasting a view of the kitchen. Dining room people-watching is just as much fun, and the mood is relaxed and friendly. 102 Fifth Ave. (15th-16th Sts.), 212-807-7400; mesagrill.com

STEAKHOUSES Bull and Bear - Atmospherically a swank Regency-style club, the Bull and Bear serves hearty fare in the form of succulent steaks (the only certified Angus Beef Prime in the city), and seafood. The elaborate and celebrated mahogany bar is one of the city’s most popular watering holes. The Waldorf=Astoria, 570 Lexington Ave. (50th St.), 212-355-3000; bullandbearsteakhouse.com

The ever innovative chef and entrepreneur David Burke is still, as he says “throwing fastballs.” The December ’08 opening of his tantalizing new restaurant Fishtail had Upper East Side diners lining up for his signature spin on upscale seafood. In addition, Burke has recently revitalized his other Upper East Side eatery, David Burke Townhouse, and been ushered into the culinary equivalent of the Hall of Fame as a 2009 inductee to the James Beard Foundation’s Who’s Who of Food & Beverage in America. Whether starting with the Angry Lobster Cocktail or finishing with his signature Cheesecake Lollipops, Burke’s creations will keep you enthralled and elated from start to finish. Fishtail, 135 E. 62nd St., 212-754-1300; davidburke.com

Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House - This expansive steak house’s soaring, two-story-high windows offer a spectacular view of Radio City Music Hall and Rockefeller Center. The menu features fresh, not frozen, USDA aged prime beef shipped to Del Frisco’s from the Midwest twice a week. Lobster, fish, lamb, osso buco, and veal chops receive equal billing with steaks that are boldly seasoned with salt and pepper and sport a perfectly charred, crusty surface. 49th St. & Sixth Ave., 212-575-5129; delfriscos.com The Post House - This old-time New York steakhouse is known for a superb menu and impeccable service. The dining room—with parquet floors, majestic floral arrangements, cushy leather armchairs and wooden wainscoting— features everything from 18th-century American folk portraits to the works of Jean Dubuffet. Specializing in juicy steaks, chops and seafood, the eatery also offers daily blackboard specials and a menu that goes back to the basics. 28 E. 63rd St., 212-935-2888; theposthouse.com Quality Meats - Chef Craig Koketsu distinguishes his rustic New American menu and concept by creating modern interpretations of familiar dishes and flavor combinations, resulting in unique tastes, innovative presentations, and a distinctive style. All of the steaks are sourced from two legendary family butchers: Milton Abeles and Strassburger Meats. 57 W. 58th St., 212-371-7777; qualitymeatsnyc.com Smith & Wollensky - This celebrated steakhouse is recognized for its healthy portions, seasoned service staff and elegant interior with turn-of-the-century design elements. Steaks take center stage, including juicy double sirloin, chateaubriand for two, filet mignon, filet au poivre, and sliced steak Wollensky, all of which have been dry-aged in-house for 28 days. 797 Third Ave. (49th St.), 212-753-1530; smithandwollensky.com Uncle Jack’s Steakhouse - Pleasing the most discerning of steak lovers, the USDA prime steaks here—all aged for at least 21 days—include New York strip, filet mignon and a special Kobe beef, hand-massaged with sake and hard to find anywhere else. For the seafood lover, there are succulent crab cakes, Australian lobster tails, a seafood platter, and more. 440 Ninth Ave. (34th-35th Sts.), 212-244-0005; 44 W. 56th St., 212-245-1550; 39-40 Bell Blvd., Bayside, Queens, 718-229-1100; unclejacks.com

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THEINTERVIEW

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Porter House New York: 10 Columbus Circle, 4th Floor • 212-823-9500 • porterhousenewyork.com

Michael Lomonaco ––

a steakhouse, american-grill style

By Kristopher Carpenter

everal successful restaurateurs have likened the restaurant business to show-biz. But in few restaurants is the connection between the two industries more apparent than in Porter House. Says chef/owner Michael Lomonaco, “I’m a born and raised New Yorker, and in my mid-20s I was pursing an acting career – tending bar and driving a cab when I wasn’t playing bit parts in movies, and doing off-off Broadway plays. But I really, really had a passion for food and wine, and that’s what drove me into cooking.” The affably upbeat chef found himself back at school and then in the kitchen, where he’s undeniably hit the big time. His demeanor is a perfect two notches below hyper-activity, giving him an air of constant bustle that exudes happiness without being overpowering. After our morning interview, he invited me back to the kitchen of Porter House “Do you want an espresso?,” he asked. “People have wept openly in joy over my espresso. Follow me, back here, I’ll show you the steaks.” His attitude might not be what one would expect from someone who was the chef at Windows on the World in September, 2001. Among the victims of the tragedy were Lomonaco’s friends and co-workers. In response, he co-founded the Windows of Hope Family Relief Fund to provide aid to the families. You wouldn’t know what he’s been through from the endearing smile he wore while he talked about his love of food.

S

Q: Your career seems like it’s been anything but dull. What’s the rundown? I went through the two-year hospitality and restaurant management program at New York City Technical College and graduated in 1984. Then, I really started to make my bones as a cook, first as a line cook at a private club, then at Le Cirque, then as a headline cook at the 21 Club. I left there to do other things, but came back eight months later, accepting a promotion to executive chef in 1989. I was the executive chef there for seven years before I left to do a show on the Food Network called “Michael’s Place.” In 1997, I joined Windows on the World.

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Q: What prompted you to make that move and how has it affected you? [In 1996] Windows had just re-opened after being closed in 1993, and a year later they asked me if I would take over the role of executive chef. Actually, the manager, Joe Baum, made up a title for me. He said, “I hate executive chef; it sounds like you should be a banker!” So the title he gave me was “Chef Director;” I thought it was great. At Windows, we had 90,000 square feet, three restaurants, and a huge banquet operation. I took over the restaurant Windows on the World, and I also opened a smaller boutique restaurant up there called Wild Blue, which was a chophouse with organic vegetables and locally sourced wild

seafood. Windows was an unbelievable experience; I spent four years there and as a chef, that’s a lot of time. I had a lot of love and pride in what we were doing there and the people I worked with. In the tragedy, we lost some unbelievable people; I lost very close friends. What I’ve tried to do is dedicate my life, to continuing the legacy of what we were all doing together on September 11th, 2001: serving great food and wine, providing an escape from everyday life with great cuisine, and taking care of the public. That’s what I’ve done to dedicate myself back to the work, and to my friends. Q: How was Le Cirque in the mid-80s? It was my first big job. I was hired in ‘85-’86, which was probably when Le Cirque was really at the pinnacle of its success. It was the hottest restaurant in New York, and it was a great way for me to learn the ropes because we were constantly performing under pressure. Not only did we have to produce quality cuisine, with a packed house six days a week, we had to produce it quickly and in volume for a very discerning clientele. Q: What makes Porter House different? For starters, we have a much more extensive menu program than an old-world steakhouse, and we’re in that new world of steakhouse that is owned and operated by a chef. Sides like

mustard and dill roasted beets, and creamy polenta with porcini mushrooms set us apart; and the fresh leaf spinach that we use for the creamed spinach is very lightly creamed and accented with nutmeg. I try to let the flavors of the produce come through, not overpower them. We also have a number of different steaks that are dry aged prime beef and we butcher them straight off of the rack. It’s the pinnacle of our steak program; but we also have items on our menu that you don’t see in old-school steakhouses, different cuts of beef like skirt steak and hanger steak. We opened with those on our menu in 2006—a pretty unique feature—and they’re even more popular now. We also carry natural veal and American lamb, not to mention our seafood program. We have seasonal fish, local swordfish, and responsibly raised salmon that we import from Scotland. Of course, we do a lobster, but it’s a lobster dish—lobster poached in butter, out of the shell. The seafood part of our menu is actually very popular—it accounts for about 20% of our sales. The focus of this restaurant for me has always been an American Grill, not an oldworld steakhouse. The clean American style at Porter House is something I’ve been doing for over 20 years and I try to take the best from the sea and the land, with pristine ingredients, cooked well with flavors harvested to their full potential.


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