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Issue: Oct. 2014

FOUNDATION NEWS

HEALTHY EATING

The case of CT lung scans 5k Walk/Run Prevention on the Hill

Beyond bake sales

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IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

For the next generation

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PREVENTIVE MEASURES & GENERAL WELLNESS

New year, new Congress

Doctor’s orders

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6 MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Rallying for research


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FOUNDATION NEWS

President’s Corner Dear Readers, Fall, to me, has always been a season of newness. The kids go back to school, the slightly slower pace of summer picks up and we settle into a fresh routine. Here at the Prevent Cancer are heading into this new season refreshed and rejuvenated, and ready to make progress in leaps and bounds to achieve our vision: Stop Cancer Before It Starts! Along with the new season, we gave our newsletter a fresh look better reading experience. Inside help you stay active, healthy and also learn more about what we’ve been up to at the Prevent Cancer Foundation and what role you can play in cancer prevention and early detection. Thank you for reading.

With CT scans

20%

Without CT scans

Lung Cancer Mortality Rate per year

Carolyn Aldigé President and Founder

160,000

128,000

Prevention policy: The case for CT scans of the lung Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women, taking the lives of nearly 160,000 Americans each year and accounting for 27 percent of all cancer deaths. It is also the second most common cancer diagnosis with over 224,000 new cases each year—and over 400,000 people living with the disease. These numbers are distressing because they represent real people whose lives are changed and often ended prematurely. In response to these troubling numbers, the Prevent Cancer Foundation has been a longtime advocate for high-quality, lowdose spiral computed tomography (LDCT) lung scans for people at risk of lung cancer. These scans can detect lung cancer in its early stages and, if implemented broadly, are expected to drop lung cancer mortality rates by more than 20 percent. CT scans are much more likely to detect lung tumors than are routine chest x-rays. They are also more precise in terms of the size, shape and position of lung tumors because these scans produce detailed cross-sectional images. At the end of 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT scans in adults ages 55 to 80 who have a pack per day for 30 years smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. This decision carried with it a “B” recommendation, which means that under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), all private insurers must cover this preventive service without copay requirements. The cancer advocacy community was gratified by this recommendation and looks forward to its broader impact, not only on patients with private insurance, but on patients who are covered by government programs such as Medicare.

Prevention o

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he Prevent Cancer Foundation’s Congressional Families Cancer Prevention Program held its twenty-second annual Action for Cancer Awareness Awards Luncheon to recognize outstanding contributions in cancer prevention. This year’s luncheon included three honorees representing the Congressional, journalism and corporate communities. Luncheon guests included a bipartisan, bicameral group of members and spouses; ambassadors and diplomatic spouses; and leaders in cancer prevention, research, education and advocacy.

Carolyn “Bo” Aldigé

Dr. Andrew Sussman

Paula Zahn


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PreventCancer.org

Prevention at the park: 2014 5k Walk/Run

on the Hill

Corporate leadership (Excellence in Cancer Awareness ): CVS Health In February of this year, CVS Health demonstrated bold leadership by announcing it would selling cigarettes and other tobacco products at its nearly 7,700 CVS/ pharmacy stores by October 1, 2014 and met its goal early on September 3, 2014. CVS is the first nationwide pharmacy chain to take tobacco products offthe shelves. “The work the Foundation does in bringing the public’s attention to cancer prevention and early detection mirrors our vision in removing tobacco products from our stores,” said Dr. Andrew Sussman, Senior Vice President/Associate Chief Medical Officer of CVS Health, who accepted the award.

Linda Bachus

Leadership in media (Distinguished Service in Journalism): Dr. Nancy Snyderman, NBC News Chief Medical Editor Dr. Snyderman, an award-winning journalist also on staff at the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania, is one of the most respected voices on television, educating a broad audience about critical public health issues, including cancer and cancer prevention. In accepting her award, Dr. Snyderman said, “It is so important to me that my audience understands their individual roles in cancer prevention, and I am honored to be recognized by the Foundation.” Leadership in the Congressional community (Congressional Families Leadership): Linda Bachus As the inaugural executive director of the Congressional Families Cancer Prevention Program, Linda grew this unique bipartisan, bicameral initiative to raise awareness about cancer prevention and early detection. During her four years as executive director (1997-2001), she expanded the reach of the program and took it to the next level of effectiveness. “As Congressional spouses, we have a unique opportunity to raise awareness about cancer prevention and early detection in our home communities. Together, we help educate the public and make an impact on health nationwide,” said Linda Bachus, spouse of retiring Representative Spencer Bachus of Alabama.

he Prevent Cancer Foundation welcomed more than 1,200 people to Nationals Park on Sunday, September 21 for the 6th Annual Prevent Cancer 5k Walk/ Run. There was excitement and anticipation in the air as team members found each other and prepared for a morning focused on health, fitness and fun. After the completion of the walk/run, participants returned to Nationals Park for healthy food to refuel and a health fair which included free screenings, community resources for preventive care, BMI and blood pressure testing, nutrition counseling, the Prevent Cancer Super Colon™ and more. A highlight for many families was the opportunity to try out their swing in the Nationals batting cages and take photos on the field. Whether there to support a loved one affected by cancer or to simply exercise and have fun for a good cause, it was clear that those in attendance were serious about raising awareness of the importance of cancer prevention and making healthy lifestyle choices. “The purpose of the Prevent Cancer Foundation is close to my heart,” said participant Tusa Rebecca Schap. I really appreciate the effort they made to provide an educational experience after the run. I hope to go back next year and get involved in other ways, too.” The 6th Annual Prevent Cancer 5k Walk/ Run raised nearly $240,000 for cancer research, thanks to the leadership of event co-chairs Jeremy H. FitzGerald and Helen Moreau, along with the 5k teams that worked so hard to raise funds through their own networks of friends and family. We are grateful for the generosity of all of our event sponsors, including our presenting sponsor, Amgen’s Breakaway from Cancer, and our in-kind sponsors, who made the event possible.


4 FEATURED EXERCISE:

The chair squat As the weather gets colder, it’s tempting to stay glued to the cozy couch 24/7. Indoor and easy exercises like the squat will keep you active and energetic. The squat replicates everyday movements, like sitting and picking things up. Targeting several thighs, hips, buttocks, quads and hamstrings, it doesn’t get much better than the squat.

HEALTHY EATING

Beyond bake sales

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hildhood is an essential time for learning healthy habits. From encouraging exercise of any kind, to eating healthy snacks instead of candy bars, to staying away from all tobacco products, teaching children to take care of their health at an early age is a lesson they will take into adulthood. Many school fundraisers focus on selling sweets. Although bake sales may seem like minor affairs, they can encourage limitless sugar and calorie consumption. Fundraising doesn’t have to come with a sugar rush!

The va insti lues yo child ll in yo u cont ren at h ur inue o at sc me hool .

1. Stand in front of a chair.

2. Make sure your back is completely straight. Extend your arms and keep your feet spread shoulder width apart. 3. Contract and tighten your abs, and move downward so your butt is touching the chair. Your knees should be in line with your toes.

4. Move back up to your original standing position.

Congratulations, you just did a squat! Repeat 10-15 times. Once you’re a pro, you can start doing multiple sets.

Try these ideas for fun, healthy fundraising events for your community. HEALTHY FOOD SALES Fruit baskets, trail mix, seasonal smoothies and even cookies (with alternative ingredients like oats and quinoa) are much healthier than typical food sale items like candy bars, pizza kits, cupcakes and brownies. WALK-A-THONS Raise funds and promote fitness at the same time. OBSTACLE COURSES Students can have fun forming teams and competing to win. Teamwork, fitness, creativity and problem-solving are better than cookies.

HAUNTED HOUSES Embrace the healthier side of Halloween. Ditch the treats and opt for creative costumes and spooky scenes instead. BOOK FAIRS Encourage students to explore the great wide world of literature and exercise their brains as well as their bodies. Reading more means less screen time. Choosing a healthy fundraising event over a traditional bake sale is a refreshing change. Mix it up, embrace healthy living and help make the next generation more conscious of their eating and living choices. They’ll thank you someday.


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PreventCancer.org

IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

For the next generation “Why?” isn’t a question I have often asked over the past 22 months. When I was first diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer I asked my doctors why, but was told there wasn’t an answer as to why an active, seemingly healthy, 31-year old, happily married father was inflicted with a disease that could kill him within one to two years. And frankly, once you have cancer, the “why” doesn’t really much matter anymore. You focus on the “how.” How do I beat the grim prognosis that comes with a lung cancer diagnosis? How do I buy more time to spend with my amazing wife (preferably outside the

By: Chip Kennett

confines of a hospital)? How do I live long enough so my children have lasting memories of their father? But the more I think about my children, the more I realize I need to start asking more questions. As a father battling cancer, I struggle daily with the thought of leaving my kids when they are still so young, at the ages of 4 and 21 months. It is a concept one can never willingly accept or be at peace with. That being said, leaving my kids early isn’t my biggest fear. My biggest fear is they might one day have to wage the same battle their father is currently fighting.

So, why does lung cancer remain the leading cause of cancer-related deaths? Why are there not better methods of early lung

cancer detection? What can my kids do to protect themselves from ever being diagnosed with cancer? Why isn’t there more of a focus by the medical community on cancer prevention? Why isn’t more known about prevention of all forms of cancer? We must remain committed and relentless in our pursuit of finding those answers.

FITNESS

Fall into daily exercise Finally, it’s fall! There is nothing better than curling up with a book and something pumpkin flavored, celebrating Thanksgiving and walking through autumn foliage and scattered red, brown and gold leaves. Fall is also a season for spending time with family members and loved ones, so it’s easy to get sidetracked and stop making an effort to stay fit. Don’t let the season drag down your health. A great way to continue on the path toward prevention year-round is by turning your leisurely walks into your daily exercise. Read the tips below and keep active this fall. 5 TIPS FOR WALKING IN THE FALL:

GO AHEAD AND JUMP IN THAT PILE OF LEAVES. Do it. This classic fall activity is great exercise and a lot of fun. FIND YOUR PARADISE. Don’t live in a walkable area? It’s worth with sidewalks if it means your walks are more likely to happen.

ENLIST FRIENDS AND FAMILY. They’ll keep you motivated. Conversations and funny stories will make your walks go by quicker.

COUNT YOUR STEPS. Pedometers can track how many steps you’re getting out of your walks. comes to walking, slow and steady wins the race.

DITCH THE UGGS. Boots and other fashionable fall footwear won’t serve you well when you’re burning calories.

Walking is a fantastic and accessible form of exercise that can fit into most everyone’s daily life. Enjoy the fall season and use its festivities to your advantage. P.S. Don’t forget to stay hydrated!


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PREVENTIVE MEASURES & GENERAL WELLNESS

Doctor’s orders

Fall means new pencils, new teachers… and visits to the doctor. Back-to-school is an important time for your family’s health care. The children need vaccines and annual checkups to make sure they stay healthy— but many parents are so busy getting the kids ready for school that they forget about themselves. If you missed your “back-to-school” checkup, it’s not too late. It is important that you find time to see a doctor, even if you are feeling well. Annual visits are an integral part of cancer prevention and early detection. Your doctor can pick up on early signs of cancer or risk factors and discuss lifestyle changes to improve your health. The annual visit is also your opportunity to ask any nagging questions you have been putting off, even if they seem minor. Depending on your age, family history, risk factors and other indicators, annual

PAP SMEAR Every 3 years for women ages 21-29, every 5 years with HPV test for women ages 30-65 COLONOSCOPY Every 10 years starting at age 50. Other screenings such as stool-based tests and virtual colonoscopies, should be done more frequently LOW-DOSE SPIRAL CT SCAN Discuss with your doctor if you are a smoker or former smoker PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN BLOOD TEST Discuss with your doctor starting at age 50 or 40, or if you are African-American, at age 40 screenings might also be a necessary part of your yearly routine. Screening for breast cancer, for instance, can reduce breast cancer death by 25 percent simply by catching it early. Here is a brief highlight of some screenings you should discuss with your doctor: MAMMOGRAM Annually starting at age 40

ADVOCACY

New year, new Congress Prevent Cancer Foundation advocates have worked hard this year to make sure that cancer prevention and early detection are in the news and on the minds of elected officials. As we prepare for Election Day on November 4, we have a renewed focus on what needs to be accomplished to ensure that prevention continues to be a major policy priority at both federal and state levels. The 113th Congress will end on January 3, 2015 and the 114th Congress will be sworn in. All pieces of legislation that have

SKIN EXAM Annually starting at age 20 The fall is a notoriously busy time of year, but it’s important to keep your family’s health—and your own—at the top of your to-do list. Don’t put it off any longer. The kids are back to school and it’s time for you to head back to the doctor. prevention and early detection policies. In order to prepare for Election Day, visit our advocacy website at www.preventcancer. org/advocacy to do your research and easily figure out who is running for office. You can also sign up for action alerts, read our Power. Progress. Prevention. newsletter when it launches later this year and stay tuned for our new advocacy toolkit. We look forward to continuing our work with passionate advocates from across the country and having an even greater impact in the 114th Congress.

not been enacted into law during the 113th Congress will expire and will have to be reintroduced. It will be the last legislative session of President Obama’s tenure. At the federal level, one third of the U.S. Senate is up for election and all 435 Representatives are running for their seats. Further, dozens of members in both chambers have announced that they will be departing Congress at the end of the year. The new Congress will bring with it significant changes that have the potential to affect the health and well-being of all Americans. Therefore, it’s critical that you vote for elected officials who support strong cancer


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PreventCancer.org

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Rallying for research

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is a vital force in the fight to prevent and treat cancer. A part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the NIH is the nation’s medical research agency and consists of 27 institutes and centers, (AFTER ADJUSTING FOR INFLATION) including the National Cancer Institute 2003 (NCI). Biomedical research funded through the NIH has resulted in medical breakthroughs, The NIH currently: scientific discoveries, -Receives $29.9 billion in federal funding and, most important, extended lifespans and -Awards over 50,000 competitive grants enhanced health and -Awards grants to over 300,000 researchers well-being for millions -Awards grants to over 2,500 institutions of Americans. Congress finances the NIH each year through the federal appropriations process and currently funds it at $29.9 billion. This amount is significant as it fuels the entire federal medical research enterprise. As our society ages and our health needs increase, an adequately funded NIH is an absolute necessity for a nation that prides itself on innovation and progress. Yet, the funding levels for the NIH have been stagnant since 2003, and after adjusting

FUNDING LEVELS FOR NIH 2014

HEALTHY EATING

percent. What’s more, cancer funding as an overall share of the NIH budget has declined. In response to these worrying developments, the Prevent Cancer Foundation joined the American Association for Cancer Research and dozens of national organizations on September 18 for the Rally for Medical Research. Over 300 advocates joined forces to raise public awareness and pressure Congress regarding the vital importance of adequate funding for medical research. We have to promote and protect this funding, working together as a unified voice for a strong and stable federal research enterprise that is continually enhanced through adequate investments. Learn more about the Rally and how you can become involved by visiting www.preventcancer.org/advocacy.

Featured Recipe: Dr. Ann’s pumpkin granola

Makes about 4 cups INSTRUCTIONS Preheat oven to 325° F. Spread oats and quinoa out on parchment lined baking pan. Toast in the oven for 10 minutes, stirring once. While oats toast, combine maple syrup, pumpkin puree, oil, spices, salt and vanilla in a small bowl. Remove the oats from the oven and reduce heat to 300°. Pour the toasted oats into a medium bowl and add the Chia seeds, pepitas, pecans and dried fruit. Pour over syrup and pumpkin mixture and stir until oats and seeds are evenly coated. Spread back onto a baking sheet and bake 20-30 minutes, or until golden. Granola will crisp as it cools.

INGREDIENTS: 1/4 cup uncooked quinoa, rinsed well and pat dry with paper towel 2 cups rolled oats 1/4 cup maple syrup 1/3 cup pumpkin puree 1 tsp canola oil 1/4 tsp nutmeg 1/8 tsp cloves 1 tsp cinnamon Pinch of salt 1/2 tsp vanilla extract 1/4 cup Chia seeds 1/4 cup pepitas 1/4 cup chopped pecans 1/2 cup dried cranberries


Open Me! Tips & Tricks for a Healthy Fall

TO SUBSCRIBE, CONTACT: Prevent Cancer Foundation 1600 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, VA 22314 Toll-Free: (800) 227-2732 Main: (703) 836-4412 Email: Info@PreventCancer.org Visit: PreventCancer.org Cancer PreventionWorks is published by the Prevent dedicated to the prevention and early detection of cancer. All contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. The Prevent Cancer Foundation is a member of the Combined Federal Campaign (#11074).

1600 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, VA 22314

Beyond bake sales 6


2014 October Newsletter